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Full text of "Annual catalogue"

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University of Cincinnati 
Record 



Skriks I 



JANUARY, 1914 



Vol. X, No. 1 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

1913-1914 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 
CINCINNATI. OHIO 



ENTERED AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER MAY 19 1913. AT THE POST OFFICE 
AT CINCINNATI. OHIO, UNDER THE ACT OF AUGUST 24, 1912 



i 




University of Cincinnati 
Record 

ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

1913-1914 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Entered as Second-Class Matter May 19. 1913, at the Post office 
at Cincinnati, Ohio. Under the Act of August 24. 1912 



C ¥?* H 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PART I 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Calendar, 10 

Departments of the University, 12 

Board of Directors, 13 

Administrative Officers 14 

University Senate, 15 

Committees of the General Faculty . 16 

Committees of the Medical College Faculty, 17 

Officers of Instruction and Administration : 

Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering, and Commerce, 
College for Teachers, and the Graduate School, . . . 18-23 

Assistants in the Observatory, 23 

University Library Staff, 24 

University Museum Staff, 24 

Municipal Reference Bureau Staff, 24 

College of Medicine, 25 

Addresses and Lectures, 1912-13, 33-36 

General Information : 

Foundation, 37 

Buildings and Site, 40 

Benefactors of the University, 40 

Endowment Fund Association, Benefactions, 41 

University Library, 42 

Municipal Reference Bureau 44 

Publications, 44 

Museums, . . ., 45 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes, 46-48 

Alliance Francaise 48 

Athletics, 48 

Carson Field, 49 

Physical Training for Women, 49 

Student Organizations, 49 

Admission : 

Special Students, . 50 

Students Entering from Other Colleges and Universities, 50 

Admission to Advanced Standing, 50 

Registration, 50 

General Regulations, 52 

Fees: 

Tuition, 53 

Special and Irregular Students, 54 

External Courses, 54 

Special Courses for Teachers 55 

Laboratory Fees, 55 

Graduation Fees, 55 

Breakage Deposits, 56 

Course for Teachers of Art, '. 56 

Miscellaneous Fees, 56 

Expenses, 57 



4 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PART II 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Faculty, 58 

Admission, 59 

Instruction, 60 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts, .... 60 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, . . 60 

Admission to Advanced Standing, 62 

Special Arrangement for Graduate Students in Lane Semi- 
nary and in the Hebrew Union College 62 

Fellowships and Scholarships, 62 

Courses of Instruction : 

Anatomy, 63 

Astronomy, 63 

Biology 63 

Chemistry, 64 

Economics, 65 

Education, 65 

English, 65 

Geology and Geography, 65 

German, 66 

Greek, 66 

History, 66 

Latin, 67 

Mathematics, 67 

Mathematics (Applied), 67 

Pathology and Bacteriology, 67 

Philosophy, 68 

Physics, 68 

Physiology, 68 

Political and Social Science 68 

Psychology, 69 

Romance Languages 69 



PART III 



McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Faculty, 70 

Requirements for Admission 72 

Entrance Conditions, 73 

Entrance Examinations, 73 

Schedule of Entrance Examinations 74 

Definitions of Units in Subjects Required for Entrance: 

English, 75 

Latin, Greek, 77 

French, 78 

German, 79 

Spanish, Mathematics, 81 

Physics, Chemistry, 83 

Zoology, Botany, 85 

Botany and Zoology, Physical Geography S6 



TABLE OF CONTENTS * 

Astronomy, History, . 87 

Civics, Drawing, Manual Training, 88 

Domestic Science, 89 

Admission on Certificate from Accredited Schools, ... 89 

List of Accredited Schools, 89 

List of Recognized Schools, 91 

Accredited Schools of the North Central Association, . . 91 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree, .... 91 

Election of Studies, 93 

Special Arrangements : 

Credit for Work Done in the College of Law, .... 93 

Six- Year Combined Collegiate and Medical Course, ... 94 
Credit for Hebrew Taken in the Hebrew Union College 

and in Lane Theological Seminary, 94 

Credit for Work Done in the Art Academy of Cincinnati, 94 

Credit for Work Done in the College for Teachers, ... 94 

Courses of Instruction : 

Astronomy, Biblical Literature, 95 

Biology, 96 

Chemistry, 101 

Economics, 106 

Education, 108 

English, . 109 

Geology and Geography, 114 

German, 116 

Greek, 118 

History, 120 

Latin, 123 

Mathematics, 125 

Philosophy, 127 

Physical Education, 129 

Physics, 130 

Political and Social Science 133-136 

Psychology, 136 

Romance Languages: 

French, 137 

Spanish, 139 

Italian, 140 

Drawing, Modeling, and Carving, 140 

External Courses. 141 



PART IV 

COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Committee in Charge, 143 

Faculty and Instructors, 143 

General Statement, 144 

General Regulations : 

Program I, 144 

Program II, 146 

Program III, 147 



6 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Program IV, 148 

Program V, 149 

Program VI, 149 

Special Courses for Teachers, 149 

Requirements of the Cincinnati Board of Education, . . . 149 

Appointment Committee, 150 

Courses of Instruction : 

Education 150 

Biology, Geology and Geography, 153 

History, 154 

Philosophy, Psychology, 155 

Courses in Kindergarten Training, 15G 

Courses for Teachers of Art, 158 



PART V 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Faculty, 161 

Requirements for Admission 162 

Entrance Conditions and Admission to Advanced Standing, 163 

Degrees, 165 

Co-operative Engineering System : 
Plan of Instruction : 

General Description, 165 

Length of Course, 166 

Conditions and Time of Entrance, 166 

Date to File Applications for Positions 166 

Board and Lodging, 166 

Wages of Co-operative Students, 166 

Expenses, 167 

Shop Work, 167 

Courses Offered, 168 

The Summer Term 168 

Courses of Instruction : 
Chemical Engineering: 

General Description, 168 

Four-Year Course, 169 

Co-operative Course, 169 

Regular Plan: 

Schedule of Studies 169 

Courses in Detail, 172 

Co-operative Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 171 

Courses in Detail, 172 

Civil Engineering: 

General Description, 177 

Co-operative Plan, 177 

Regular Plan: 

Schedule of Studies, 178 

Courses in Detail, 180 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 7 

Co-operative Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 179 

Courses in Detail, 180 

Electrical Engineering : 

General Description, 181 

Co-operative Plan, 182 

Regular Plan : 

Schedule of Studies 183 

Courses in Detail, 186 

Co-operative Plan: 

Schedule of Studies, 184 

Courses in Detail, 186 

Mechanical Engineering: 

General Description, 187 

Co-operative Plan, 188 

Regular Plan: 

Schedule of Studies, , 189 

Courses in Detail, 191 

Co-operative Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 190 

Courses in Detail, 191 

Metallurgical Engineering: 

General Description, 194 

Co-operative Plan: 

Schedule of Studies 195 

Courses in Detail, 197 

Co-ordination, 198 

Special Courses in Engineering 199 

General Courses : 

Applied Mathematics, 199 

Astronomy, Biology, 200 

Economics, English, 201 

Geology and Geography, German, French, or Spanish, 202 

Mathematics, 203 

Physical Education, Physics, 204 



PART VI 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

Faculty, 205 

The College Dispensary 212 

Equipment : 

Buildings, 214 

Museums, . 214 

Medical Libraries, 215 

Current Literature in the University Library, 215 

Current Literature in the Cincinnati Hospital Library, . . 216 

Current Literature in the Medical College Library, . . . 217 

Laboratories, 217 

Requirements for Admission, 217 

Advanced Standing, Graduation, and Other Information : 

Credit for Courses in Colleges of Liberal Arts, .... 218 

Credit for Work in Medical Colleges, 219 

Graduates in Medicine, 220 

Special Students, 220 

Requirements for Completion of a Course, 221 



8 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Promotions, 221 

Requirements for Graduation, 221 

Ohio State Medical Board Examinations, 222 

Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons of England, . 222 

Six- Year Combined Collegiate and Medical Course, . . 223 

Athletics, 224 

Courses of Instruction : 

Anatomy, 225 

Physiology, 227 

Chemistry, 228 

Pathology and Bacteriology, 229 

Materia Medica, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics, . . . 231 

Medicine, 232 

Paediatrics 234 

Psychiatry and Neurology, 236 

Dermatology and Syphilology, 236 

Surgery, 237 

Orthopedic Surgery, Obstetrics 239 

Gynecology 240 

Ophthalmology, 241 

Otology, 242 

Hygiene, Co-operative Course with the Board of Health, 243 

Medical Jurisprudence and Economics 244 

Clinical Instruction, 244 

The Cincinnati Hospital : 

General Description, 245 

Medical Staff, Consulting Staff, Visiting Staff, .... 246 

Junior Visiting Staff, 247 

Clinical and Pathological School, 248 

The Good Samaritan Hospital, 249 

Cincinnati Tuberculosis Hospital, 249 

Other Hospitals of Cincinnati, 249 

Longview Hospital for the Insane, 250 

College Dispensary : 

General Description, 250 

Children's Clinic, 251 

Orthopedic and Obstetric Clinics, 251 

PART VII 

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

Faculty, 252 

General Information 253 

Admission, 254 

Registration, Fees, Plan of Instruction, 256 

Graduation, 258 

Certified Public Accountant 258 

Evening Academic Courses 258 

Schedule of Courses, 259 

Courses of Instruction : 

Administration and Accountancy, Commerce 260 

Commercial Law, 262 

Finance, 263 

Insurance, German, French, Spanish, 264 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 9 

PART VIII 
FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, LIST OF STUDENTS, ETC. 
Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes, 1913-14 : 

Graduate School, 265 

McMicken College of Liberal Arts, 265 

College of Medicine 267 

Holders of Fellowships Since 1900, 268 

Degrees Conferred in June, 1913: 

Graduate School, 270 

McMicken College of Liberal Arts, 270 

College for Teachers, 272 

College of Engineering, 273 

College of Medicine, 274 

Summary of Graduates, June, 1913, 274 

Registration of Students, 1913-14: 

Graduate School, 275 

McMicken College of Liberal Arts: 

Seniors, 281 

Juniors, 283 

Sophomores 284 

Freshmen, 287 

Irregular Students, 291 

Special Students, 291 

Unclassified Students, 292 

Evening Students, 293 

College for Teachers : 

Graduates, 302 

Seniors, 303 

Juniors, 304 

Specials, 304 

Art Students, 304 

Kindergartners, 304 

Home Economics, 305 

Teachers, 305 

College of Engineering : 

Seniors, 307 

Sophomores 307 

Freshmen, 307 

Fifth Year Co-operative Students, 308 

Fourth Year Co-operative Students, 308 

Third Year Co-operative Students, 309 

Second Year Co-operative Students, 310 

First Year Co-operative Students, 311 

Special Co-operative Engineers, 314 

College of Medicine : 

Seniors, - 315 

Irregular Students, 315 

Juniors, . 315 

Sophomores, 315 

Freshmen, 315 

College of Commerce, 316 

Summary of Students at End of Academic Year, 1912-13, . 319 
Registration of Students at Beginning of Academic Year, 

1913-14, 321 

Alumnal Associations, University of Cincinnati 323 

Schedule of Hours, 324 

General Index, 326 



10 



UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1913 

f Examinations for entrance to the Colleges 
Sept. 15, Monday. ) of Liberal Arts, Medicine, Engineering, and 

(^ Commerce began. 

f Registration days for the Colleges of 
-> Liberal Arts, Engineering, Commerce, and 
(^ the College for Teachers. 



Sept. 18, Thursday. 
Sept. 19, Friday. 
Sept. 20, Saturday. 

Sept. 20, Saturday. 
Sept. 22, Monday. 

Sept. 22, Monday. 

Sept. 25, Thursday. 
Sept. 26, Friday. 
Sept. 27, Saturday. 

Sept. 27, Saturday. 
Sept. 30, Tuesday. 
Oct. 6, Monday. 
Oct. 18, Saturday. 
Nov. 27, Thursday. 



Entrance examinations end. 

First semester began for the Colleges of 
Liberal Arts, Engineering, Commerce, and 



5- 

( the College for Teachei 

( First registration day for the Graduate 
| School. 



Registration days for the College of 
Medicine. 

j Last registration day for the Graduate 
I School. 

{First semester began for the College of 
Medicine. 

( First registration day for the External 
| Courses. 

( Last registration day for the External 
i Courses. 



Thanksgiving Day : a holiday. Recess of 



) three days. 
Recess from Dec. 22, 1913, to Jan. 3, 1914, Inclusive. 



CALENDAR 



11 



Jan. 5, Monday. 

Jan. 10, Saturday. 
Jan. 12, Monday. 
Jan. 26, Monday. 

Jan. 31, Saturday. 

Feb. 2, Monday. 
Feb. 5, Thursday. 

Feb. 6, Friday. 

Feb. 7, Saturday. 

Feb. 9, Monday. 
Feb. 10, Tuesday. 
Feb. 11, Wednesday. 

Feb. 9, Monday. 



1914 

Classes resumed in all departments of the 
University, except the College of Commerce. 
Entrance examinations begin. 

Entrance examinations end. 

Classes resumed in the College of Commerce. 

First semester examinations begin. 

First semester ends for the College of 
Medicine. 

Second semester begins for the College of 
Medicine. 

First semester examinations end. 

Registration day for the second semester 
of the Colleges of Liberal Arts and 
Engineering, and the College for Teachers. 

No classes. 

Registration days for the second semester 
of the Graduate School. 

Second semester of the Colleges of Liberal 
Arts, Engineering, Commerce, and the 
College for Teachers begins. 



Easter Recess for the College of Medicine from April 6 



May 1, Friday. 
May 30, Saturday. 
June 1, Monday. 
June 12, Friday. 
June 13, Saturday. 
June 15, Monday. 
June 20, Saturday. 



to April 11, Inclusive. 

Oratorical contest for Jones Prizes. 
Memorial Day: a holiday. 
Second semester examinations begin. 
Second semester ends. 
University Commencement Day. 
Entrance examinations begin. 
Entrance examinations end. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The University comprises the following departments : 

GRADUATE SCHOOL, 

McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS, 

COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING: Departments of Chem- 
ical, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, and Metallurgical 
Engineering, 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE (The Ohio-Miami Medical 
College and the Clinical and Pathological School of the 
Cincinnati Hospital), 

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE. 

For special announcements of the various departments, except 
the Medical College, and for further information, address : 

The Secretary of the University 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

For special announcement of the Medical College, address : 
The Dean of the College of Medicine 

Clifton Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 18 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Appointed by the Mayor of Cincinnati 

Arch I. Carson, M. D January, 1914 

Robert William Hochstetter " 1914 

Robert W. Stewart. M. D., " 1914 

William Harvey Anderson " 1916 

Smith Hickenlooper, " 1916 

Emil Pollak, " 1916 

Alfred K. Nippert " 1918 

Rufus B. Smith, " 1918 

David T. Wolfstein. M. D., " 1918 

OFFICERS 

For the Fiscal Year 1913 

Robert W. Stewart, M. D. Chairman 

Daniel Laurence, Clerk 

Christie Wilke, Assistant Clerk 

COMMITTEES 

Committee on Finance: Messrs. Anderson, Pollak, and Nippert. 
Committee on Real Estate: Messrs. Hickenlooper, Nippert, and 

Wolfstein. 
Committee on University Buildings and Grounds: Messrs. Pollak, 

Wolfstein, Carson, and Hochstetter. \ 

Committee on Law : Messrs. Smith, Nippert, and Anderson. 
Committee on Academic Affairs: Messrs. Carson, Hickenlooper, 

and Smith. 
Committee on Observatory : Messrs. Nippert, Hochstetter, and 

Stewart. 
Committee on Professional Schools : Messrs. Wolfstein, Stewart, 

and Hickenlooper. 

Committee on Engineering College: Messrs. Hochstetter, Carson, 
and Pollak. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Charles William DABNEY,Ph.D.,LL. D., President of the University. 
Office, 10 McMicken Hall. 

Frank W. Chandler, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. 
Office, 8 McMicken Hall. 

Joseph E. Harry, Ph. D., . . . . Dean of the Graduate School. 
Office, 4 McMicken Hall. 

Herman Schneider, Sc. D., . Dean of the College of Engineering. 

College of Engineering Building. 

William P. Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Dean of the College for Teachers. 

Office, 2 McMicken Hall. 
Christian R. Holmes, M. D., . Dean of the College of Medicine. 

Medical College Building, Clifton Ave. 

Frederick C. Hicks, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Commerce and 
Supervisor of the Evening Academic Courses. 
Office, 32 McMicken Hall. 

Emilie Watts McVea, A. M„ Dean of Women. 

Office, 12 McMicken Hall. 
Frank B. Cross, M. D., Secretary of the Faculty, College of Medicine. 

Medical College Building, Clifton Ave. 

Jermain G. Porter, Ph. D., .... Director of the Observatory. 

The Observatory, Mt. Lookout. 

Henry S. West, Ph. D., Director of School Affiliation. 

Office, 2 McMicken Hall. 

Alfred Brodbeck, Director of Physical Education. 

Gymnasium Building. 
Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., Director of the Municipal Reference 
City Hall. Bureau. 

Daniel Laurence, B. S., Secretary of the University. 

Office, 5 McMicken Hall. 

Charles Albert Read, A. B., Librarian of the University Library. 

Van Wormer Library Building. 

Lelia Garvin Hartmann, B. L., Registrar. 

Office, 7 McMicken Hall. 



UNIVERSITY SENATE \h 



UNIVERSITY SENATE, 1913-14 

Charles William DABNEY,Ph.D.,LL. D., President of the University. 
Christian R. Holmes, M. D., . Dean of the College of Medicine. 
Joseph E. Harry, Ph. D., . . . . Dean of the Graduate School. 
Frank W. Chandler, Ph. D., Dean of the McMicken College of 

Liberal Arts. 

William P. Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Dean of the College for Teachers. 

Herman Schneider, Sc. D., . Dean of the College of Engineering. 

Frederick C. Hicks, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Commerce and 

Supervisor of the Evening Academic Courses. 

Emilie Watts McVea, A. M., Dean of Women. 

Jermain G. Porter, Ph. D., . . . . Director of the Observatory. 
B. K. Rachford, M. D., Representative of the Faculty of the College 

of Medicine. 
Guy A. Tawney, Ph. D., Representative of the Faculty of the 

McMicken College of Liberal Arts. 
John W. Hall, A. M., Representative of the Faculty of the College 

for Teachers. 
Alexander Massey Wilson, M. E., Representative of the Faculty 

of the College of Engineering. 



COMMITTEES 

Committee on Athletics: A. M. Wilson, John W. Hall, Guy A. 

Tawney. 
Committee on Correlation of Courses: Frank W. Chandler, A. M. 

Wilson, Christian R. Holmes. 
Committee on Rules: Herman Schneider, Frederick C. Hicks, 

B. K. Rachford, M. D. 
Committee on Intercollegiate Debate: Joseph E. Harry, William 

P. Burris, Frank W. Chandler. 
Committee on Public Lectures: William P. Burris, Joseph E. 

Harry. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

COMMITTEES OF THE GENERAL FACULTY 

OF 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL, THE COLLEGES OF LIBERAL 

ARTS AND ENGINEERING, AND THE 

COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

1913—14 



Committee on Admission — 

For Liberal Arts: Frederick C. Hicks, Max Poll, Louis T. 

More, William P. Burris, Frank W. Chandler, Guy A. Tawney. 

For Engineering: Herman Schneider, Stephen E. Slocum, John 

T. Faig. Dr. West, Secretary. 

Committee on Discipline: Frank W. Chandler, Herman Schneider. 

William P. Burris, Emilie W. McVea, Frederick C. Hicks. 
Committee on Library: Max Poll, Louis T. More, Selden G. 

Lowrie, A. M. Wilson, Henry S. West. 
Committee on Museums and Collections: Nevin M. Fenneman. 

Robert Chambers, Jr., Charles A. Read. 
Committee on Schedule of Hours: Harry S. Fry, John T. Faig, 

John W. Hall, Claude E. Lotspeich, Isaac J. Cox. 
Committee on Social Functions: Emilie W. McVea, Phillip Ogden, 

Frank W. Chandler, John T. Faig, Lelia G. Hartmann. 
Committee on Convocation : Guy A. Tawney, Claude E. Lotspeich, 

William H. Parker, Emilie W. McVea, A. M. Wilson, Cyrus 

D. Mead. 
Committee on Public Exercises: Phillip Ogden. 

COMMITTEES OF THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL 

ARTS 

Committee on Advanced Standing: Bur.is B. Breese. John M. 

Burnam, Lauder W. Jones. 
Committee on External Courses: Guy A. Tawney, Frank W. 

Chandler, Nevin M. Fenneman. 
Committee on Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes: Joseph E. 

Harry, Harris Hancock, Phillip Ogden. 
Freshman Advisory Committee: S. J. M. Allen, Harry Wieman. 

Ralph E. Bassett, William T. Semple. Florence Lawler, Henry 

G. Hartmann, Bertha K. Young. 
Committee on Rules: Louis T. More. P'milie W. McVea. Burtis B. 

Breese. 



MEDICAL COLLEGE COMMITTEES 17 



♦FACULTY COMMITTEES 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

1913—14 



Committee on Admission : Drs. Knower, Jones, Wherry. 

Committee on Advanced Standing: Drs. Greiwe, Thompson, 
Freiberg. 

Committee on Buildings: Drs. Knower, Fischer, Hoppe. 

Committee on Course of Study : Drs. Oliver, Withrow, Fried- 
lander. 

Committee on Clinics: Drs. Rachford, Bonifield, Eichberg, Oliver. 

Committee on Publicity : Drs. Reed, Carothers, Brown. 



The Dean is a member ex officio of all Committees 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINIS- 
TRATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 
OF CINCINNATI 

Charles William Dabney, Ph.D.,LL.D., President of the University. 
The Romaine, Clifton. 

COLLEGES OF LIBERAL ARTS, ENGINEERING, AND 

COMMERCE, COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, AND 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Wayland Richardson Benedict, A. B., Professor of Philosophy, 

Cincinnati. Emeritus. 

Jermain Gildersleeve Porter, Ph. D., Director of the Observatory 

3314 Avery Lane, Mt. Lookout. and Professor of Astronomy. 

Frederick Charles Hicks, Ph. D., Sinton Professor of Economics 

and Commerce, Dean of the College of Commerce, and 

Supervisor of the Evening Academic Courses. 

The Alexandra, Walnut Hills. 

Harris Hancock, Ph. D., D. Sc, . . Professor of Mathematics. 

2415 Auburn Ave. 

John Miller Burnam, Ph. D., Professor of Latin. 

Sterling Hotel. 

Max Poll, Ph. D., . . . Professor of the Germanic Languages. 

The Romaine, Clifton. 

Joseph Edward Harry, Ph. D., Professor of Greek and Dean of the 
840 Lincoln Ave., Walnut Hills. Graduate School. 

* Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., Professor of History. 

3411 Clifton Ave., Clifton. 

Louis Trenchard More, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

317 Pike St. 

Herman Schneider, Sc. D., William Thorns Professor of Civil 
Engineering and Dean of the College of Engineering. 

3343 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. 

Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Psychology. 

560 Evanswood PI., Clifton. 

William Paxton Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Professor of the History 
and Principles of Education and Dean of the College for 
Teachers. 
3523 Biddle St., Clifton. 

John William Hall, A. M., Professor of Elementary Education. 

The Romaine, Clifton. 

* Absent on leave, 1913-14. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 19 

Stephen Elmer Slocum, B. E., Ph. D., Professor of Applied 

565 Evanswood PL, Clifton. Mathematics. 

John Theodore, Faig, M. E'., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

3342 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. 

Nevin M. Fenneman, Ph .D., Professor of Geology and Geography. 

348 Shiloh St., Clifton. 

Lauder William Jones, Ph. D Professor of Chemistry. 

3457 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. 

Guy Allan Tavvney, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Philosophy. 

345 Thrall Ave., Clifton. 

Frank Wadleigh Chandler, Ph. D., Professor of English, Ropes 
Professor of Comparative Literature, and Dean of the 
College of Liberal Arts. 
222 Hosea Ave., Clifton. 

Phillip Ogden, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Romance Languages. 

257 Senator PL, Clifton. 

Curtis Clark Myers, M. M. E., Professor in Charge of Co- 

3432 Lyleburn PL, Clifton. ordination. 

x\lexander Massey Wilson, M. E., Professor of Electrical En- 

The Roanoke, Clifton. gineering. 

* Harris Miller Benedict, A. M., .... Professor of Botany. 

554 Evanswood PL, Clifton. 

Henry S. West, Ph. D., Professor of Secondary Education and 

3458 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. Director of School Affiliation. 
Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., Professor of Political Science and 

Director of the Municipal Reference Bureau. 
3411 Clifton Ave., Clifton. 

John C. Duncan, M. S., Ph. D., Professor of Administration and 
4ii Ludlow Ave., Clifton. Accounting. 

1 Professor of Zoology. 

Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

2269 Washington Ave., Norwood. 

Alexander Lewis Jenkins, M. E., Associate Professor of Mechan- 

369 Terrace Ave., Clifton. ical Engineering. 

** Fred Eugene Ayer, C. E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
3019 Stanton Ave., Clifton. 

Samuel James McIntosh Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

274 McGregor Ave., Mt. Auburn. Physics. 

Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., . . . Associate Professor of History. 

553 Evanswood PL, Clifton. 

Claude M. Lotspeich, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of German. 

416 Resor Ave., Clifton. 
Emilie Watts McVea, A. M., Assistant Professor of English and 
3 Hedgerow Lane, Clifton. Dean of Women. 



* Absent on leave, first semester, 1913-14. 
** Absent on leave, 1913-14. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Charles Napoleon Moore, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 

1123 E. Third St. matics. 

Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

145 W. University Ave. Chemistry. 

Benjamin Carlton Van Wye, A. M., Assistant Professor of Public 

2117 Auburn Ave. Speaking and English. 

Harry Lewis Wieman, Ph. D., . Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

4540 Glenway Ave., Price Hill. 

William Tunstall Semple, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Latin. 

3411 Clifton Ave., Clifton. 

Clarence Raymond Wylie, M. E., Assistant Professor of Electrical 

219 Woolper Ave., Clifton. Engineering. 

J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., Assistant Professor of Geology. 

2346 Ohio Ave. 

Louis Brand, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

14 W. Charlton St. 

Ralph Emerson Bassett, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance 

3649 Michigan Ave., Hyde Park. Languages. 

Robert Chambers, Jr.. Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology 

345 Thrall Ave. and Comparative Anatomy. 

Bertha K. Young, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of English. 

343 Bryant. Ave., Clifton. 

Clyde William Park, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 

2817 Eden Ave. 

William Hammond Parker, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Eco- 

2 Glen Armand Ave. nomics and Social Science. 

James Aston, Ch. E., . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 

2522 Ritchie Ave., Hyde Park. 

Cyrus DeWitt Mead, A. M., Assistant Professor of Elementary 

The Maplewood, Clifton. Education. 

Gustave Maurice Braune, C E., Assistant Professor of Civil 

367 Terrace Ave., Clifton. Engineering. 

Henry G. Hartmann, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

1200 Cypress St., Walnut Hills. 

Clarence Oran Gardner, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political 

340 Howell Ave., Clifton. Science. 

Clarence D. Stevens, A. M.. . . Assistant Professor of English. 

1332 Duncan Ave., Hyde Park. 

Alfred Brodbeck, Director of Physical Education. 

Robinson Rd., Pleasant Ridge. 
Florence Cameron Lawler, B. S., . . Instructor in Mathematics. 

2516 Woodburn Ave. 

Arthur James Kinsella, A. M Instructor in Greek. 

2613 Ashland Ave. 

Joseph Henry Kindle, A. M., . . . Instructor in Mathematics. 

2706 Eden Ave. 
James Francis Dilworth, A. M.. . Instructor in English History. 

254 Greendale Ave., Clifton. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 21 

Platt Bishop Evens, Mechanician and Instructor in Laboratory Arts. 

203 W. Fifth St., Covington, Ky. 

Cora May Box, A. M., Instructor in Zoology. 

275 McGregor Ave. 

Marguerite Gray, A. B Instructor in Physical Education. 

956 Lincoln Ave. 

Harold W. T. Collins, M. E m Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

2388 Mound Ave., Norwood. 

Vernon Lantis, A. M Instructor in Botany. 

238 McCormick PI. 

Leroy James Cook, A. M., Instructor in French. 

3411 Clifton Ave. 

Eleanor Katherine Nippert, A. B., . . . Instructor in German. 

The Laurel, Middleton Ave., Clifton. 
Martin Ludwich, M. E., . . Instructor in French and German. 

262 Albion PI., Mt. Auburn. 

Robert E. Clyde Gowdy, Ph. D Instructor in Physics. 

2115 Auburn Ave., Mt. Auburn. 

Max B. Robinson, M. E., . . , . . Instructor in Co-ordination. 

2650 Bellevue Ave., Mt. Auburn. 

Ellery K. Files, A. M., Chemist of the Bureau of City Tests, College 

3411 Clifton Ave., Clifton. of Engineering. 

Charles Watkins Brown, Mechanician and Instructor in Labora- 

228 Piedmont Ave. tory Arts. 

Abbie Louise Day, B. S., B. Di.. Instructor in Elementary Education. 

315 Bryant Ave., Clifton. 

Thomas Lansing Porter, Ph. D Instructor in Physics. 

2614 Eden Ave. 

Annette Frances Braun, Ph. D Instructor in Botany. 

2702 May St. 

Clarence A. Nash, A. M., . . Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 

429 Resor Ave. 

George R. Moore, C. E., .... Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

429 Riddle Rd., Clifton. 
Edwin W. Esslinger, A. M., . Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 

2331 Wheeler St. 
Walter H. Bucher, Ph. D., Instructor in Geology. 

2624 Eden Ave. 

Philip Walter MacDonald, A. M Instructor in History. 

3411 Clifton Ave. 

Edward S. Smith, M. E., M. S Instructor in Mathematics. 

3826 Forest Ave., S. Norwood. 

James Dysart Magee, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Economics. 

126 E. Auburn Ave. 

Charles Albert Joerger, M. E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

3541 y 2 Edwards Rd., Hyde Park. 
Russell Bennett Witte, B. C. E., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

2627 Moormann Ave., E. Walnut Hills. 

Charles Oscar Chambers, Ph. D Instructor in Zoology. 

267 Oilman Ave. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

LECTURERS FOR 1913—14 
Nathan Isaacs, Ph. D., LL. B., . . Lecturer on Commercial Law. 

No. 2, The Aragon, Avondale. 

Charles W. Dupuis, Lecturer on Investments. 

S. E. Cor. Ninth and Main Sts. 

Harvey M. Manss, A. B., Lecturer on Advertising. 

1408-10 First National Bank Bldg. 

Henry M. Brouse, .... Lecturer on Business Administration. 

Third and Front Sts. 
Ernest A. Roden, .... Lecturer on Principles of Accounting. 
612 Mercantile Library Bldg. 

Edward A. Sisson, A. B., Lecturer on Banking. 

115 E. Fourth St. 

George R. Lamb, C. P. A., Lecturer on Accounting. 

First National Bank Bldg. 
Edward Mack, D. D Lecturer on Biblical Literature. 



Other Appointments for 1913-14 

Schachne Isaacs, A. M Assistant in Psychology. 

3552 Bogart Ave. 

Raphael Isaacs, A. M., . Assistant in Embryology and Zoology. 

3552 Bogart Ave. 

Lesley Henshaw, A. M., Assistant in History. 

1928 Bigelow St. 

Edward Joseph Lorenz, A. M., . . . Hanna Fellow in Physics. 

633 W. McMicken Ave. 

Margaret B. Plimpton, A. B., D. A. R. Fellow in American History. 

731 Grand Ave., Price Hill. 
Emma Andriessen, A. M., . . . Graduate Assistant in German. 
116 Parker St. 

Ralph Edward Oesper, A. M., . Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

2559 Fair view Ave. 

Leonora Neuffer, A. B., . . . Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Lockland, O. 

Mary Louise Nute, A. B., . . . Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

No. 5, Marguerite Building, Norwood, O. 

James P. Andrews, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

3600 Shaw Ave. 

Archibald Bernstein, A. M., . . Student Assistant in Spanish. 

2S63 Stanton Ave. 

Ralph E. Belsinger, Student Assistant in Physics. 

804 Grand Ave., Price Hill. 
William H. Dresch, .... Student Assistant in Philosophy. 

Lynchburg, O. 
John D. Ellis, A. B., LL. B., . . Student Assistant in English. 

1114 Union Trust Building. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 23 

John Gerstle, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

20, The Crescent, Reading Rd., Avondale. 

Estelle Hunt, Student Assistant in English. 

3344 Whitfield Ave. 

Elise Loebman, A. M Student Assistant in English. 

524 Hickman Ave. 

Walter A. McIntire. Student Assistant in Physics: 

2318 Williams Ave.. Norwood, O. 

Henry Albert Marks, .... Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

113 Garfield Pi. 

Harold F. Richards, Student Assistant in Physics. 

413 Fifth Ave., Dayton, Ky. 

Clifford J. Rolle, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

3803 Glenway Ave. 

Benedict Salkover, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

256 Ehrman Ave. 

Oscar See, Student Assistant in Economics. 

Blue Ash, O. 
Benjamin E. Sive, . . . . . . Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

1722 Fairfax Ave. 

Helen Stanley, A. B., Student Assistant in English. 

3576 Zumstein Ave. 

Paul Raymond Stevenson, A. B., Student Assistant in Psychology. 

3228 Wold Ave. 

Werner John Suer, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

314 W. McMillan St. 

Agnes Van Slyck, A. M., .... Student Assistant in English. 

328 Rockdale Ave. 

Helen Judith Vickers, A. B., Student Assistant in Romance 

3885 Reading Rd., Avondale. Languages. 

Mary Whitfield, A. B., .... Student Assistant in English. 

6028 Oakwood Ave., College Hill. 

Mattie Winston, Student Assistant in English. 

959 Hatch St. 

Neil Wright, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

221 Kinsey Ave. 

Clinton Wunder, .... Student Assistant in Social Science. 
1640 Pullan Ave. 

ASSISTANTS IN THE OBSERVATORY 

Everett Irving Yowell, Ph. D., First Astronomer and Instructor in 
Corbett and Griest Sts. the Observatory. 

Elliott Smith, Ph. D., Second Astronomer and Instructor in the 
3441 Observatory Pi. Observatory. 

Fannie R. Gaston, Assistant in the Observatory. 

S441 Observatory PI. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY STAFF 
Charles Albert Read, A. B Librarian. 

The Metamora, Clifton. 

Marguerite Burnet Resor, A. B„ Cataloguer. 

254 Greendale Ave., Clifton. 

Florence Stimson, In Charge of Circulation. 

190 E. McMillan St. 

Walter C. Scheland, Assistant in the Library. 

1017 N. Wells St. 

UNIVERSITY MUSEUM STAFF 
Annette Frances Braun, Ph. D., . Museum Assistant in Biology. 

2702 May St. 

Josiah Bridge, A. B Museum Assistant in Geology. 

1325 Yarmouth Ave, 

Henry G. Bieler. Student Assistant in Museum and Taxidermist. 
Milford, O. 

MUNICIPAL REFERENCE BUREAU STAFF 
Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D Director. 

3411 Clifton Ave., Clifton. 

Jessie P. Boswell, A. B., Librarian. 

The Somerset, Avondale. 

OTHER OFFICERS 
Daniel Laurence, B. S.. Secretary of the University. 

6 McMicken Hall. 

Lelia Garvin Hartmann, B. L Registrar. 

1200 Cypress St., Walnut Hills. 

Martha Gillespie Fain, Secretary to the President. 

The Roanoke, Clifton. 

Christie Wilke, Assistant Clerk, Board of Directors. 

6 McMicken Hali. 

George W. Burns, Secretary to the Faculty of the College of 
2482 Wheeler St. Engineering. 

Edith Wagoner, A. B., Secretary to the Dean of the College of 
The Roanoke, Clifton. Liberal Arts and Editorial Clerk. 

Helen H. Hissem, Secretary to the Dean of the College for 

The Madrid, Avondale. Teachers. 

Thomas L. McJovnt Secretary. College of Commerce. 

2700 Park Ave. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 25 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 
Charles William Dabney, Ph.D.,LL.D., President of the University. 

Christian R. Holmes, M. D. f Professor of Otology and Dean of the 
8 E. Eighth St. College of Medicine. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 
mology and Secretary of the Faculty of the College of Medicine. 
4 W. Seventh St. 

J. C. Mackenzie, M. D., Clinical Professor of Medicine, Emeritus. 

624 W. Eighth St. 

Chauncey D. Palmer, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
Reading Rd. and Forest Ave., Avondale. cology, Emeritus. 

Byron Stanton, M. D., Professor of Diseases of Women and 
Savannah Ave., College Hill. Children, Emeritus. 

Alexander Greer Drury, A. M., M. D., Professor of Hygiene, 
836 Lincoln Ave. Emeritus. 

Stephen Cooper Ayres, A. M., M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology, 
4 W. Seventh St. Emeritus. 

Philip Zenner, A. M., M. D., . Professor of Neurology, Emeritus. 

14 Glenn Building. 

E. W. Walker, M. D., . Professor of Clinical Surgery, Emeritus. 

30 W. Eighth St. 

The names of the teaching staff are arranged by departments : 
Henry McElderry Knower, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Anatomy. 

3436 Middleton Ave., Clifton. 

Edward F. Malone, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
The Maplewood, Clifton. 

Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 
345 Thrall Ave.. Clifton. Comparative Anatomy. 

, Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 



Martin H. Fischer, M. D., Joseph Eichberg Professor of Physiology. 

The Maplewood, Clifton. 

Edmund M. Baehr, M. D., . Assistant Professor of Physiology 

Fourth and Sycamore Sts. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Lauder W. Jones, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

3457 Whitfield Ave.. Clifton. 

Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

2269 Washington Ave.. Norwood. 

Edward B. Reemelin, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
3471 Cheviot Ave.. Westwood. and of Physiological Chemistry. 



Paul Gerhardt Woolley, B. S., M. D., Professor of Pathology. 

343 Bryant Ave.. Clifton. 

William Buchanan Wherry, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor 

The Cumberland. Avondale. of Bacteriology. 

Charles Goosmann. M. D., Instructor in Pathology. 

1203 Walnut St. 
Gilbert Mombach, M. D., Instructor in Pathology. 

22 W. Seventh St. 



Julius H. Eichberg, Ph. G., Ph. D., M. D., Professor of Materia 
55 Groton Building. Medica, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics. 

, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

C. C. Fihe, M. D., Lecturer in Dietetics and Instructor in Thera- 

19 W. Seventh St. (32) peutics. 

Rufus Southworth, A. M., M. D., Assistant Professor of Thera- 
Fountain Ave., Glendale. peutics. 

William C. Herman, Ph. G., M. D., Instructor in Pharmacology. 
19 W. Seventh St. 

Sidney Lange, A. B., M. D., Lecturer and Demonstrator of Radiology. 

5 Garfield PI. 

H. Kennon Dunham, M. D., Lecturer and Demonstrator of Elec- 

McMillan St. and Auburn Ave., Mt. Auburn. trotherapeutics. 

Louis G. Schrickel, Ph. G., M. D., Instructor in Pharmacy and 
1635 Walnut St. Pharmacist to Dispensary. 



Edwin W. Mitchell, A. B., M. D Professor of Medicine. 

4 W. Seventh St. 
George A. Fackler, M. D., . . . Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Oliver P. Holt, M. D Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

134 W. Ninth St. 
John Ernest Greiwe, A. M., M. D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

32 Garfield PI. 
Mark A. Brown, M. D., . . . Associate Professor of Medicine. 

828 Elm St. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 27 

Henry VVald Bettmann, B. L m M. D., Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 
4 W. Seventh St. 

Allan Ramsey, B. S., M. D., . Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 
Oscar Berghausen, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

19 VV. Seventh St. 
Charles Sumner Rockhill, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

705 Livingston Building. 

C. C. Fihe, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Louis G. Heyn, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

22 W. Seventh St. 

Otto J. Seibert, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

913 Dayton St. 

Charles P. Kennedy, M, D., . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 
3329 Gilbert Ave., Walnut Hills. 

John S. Grisard, M. D., .... Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

3870 Ivanhoe Ave, Norwood, O. 

J. D. Spelman, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

1828 Freeman Ave. 

Julius G. Stammel, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

3477 Montgomery Ave.. Evanston. 

Marcus E. Wilson, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

248 Pike St. 

Henry Lynde Woodward, M. D., Demonstrator of Clinical 

Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. Microscopy in Medicine. 



B. K. Rachford, M. D Professor of Paediatrics. 

323 Broadway. 

Alfred Friedlander, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor of Paediatrics. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

Frank H. Lamb, A. M., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 

940 E. McMillan St. Paediatrics. 

Max Dreyfoos, M. D Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

19 W, Seventh St. 

Edward A. Wagner, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

3104 Jefferson Ave., Clifton. 

Edward D. Allgaier, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
8001 Epworth Ave., Westwood. 

John T. Batte, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Charles K. Ervin, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

2 Klinckhamer Building. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

E. I. Fogel, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

723 W. Eighth St. 

William J. Graf, M. D Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. 

Georges Rasetti, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

16 Garfield PI. 

Ida M. Westlake, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
Y. W. C. A., 20 E. Eighth St. 

James M. Bentley, M. D., . . .Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

705 Livingston Building. 

Frank W. Case, M. D Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

2807 Erie Ave. 

Eric R. Twachtman, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

Seventh and Race Sts. 

Charles A. Stammel, Jr., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
1202 Vine St. 

Frank Warren Langdon, M. D Professor of Psychiatry. 

4003 Rose Hill Ave. 

Herman Henry Hoppe, A. M., M. D., . Professor of Neurology. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

David I. Wolfstein, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Nervous 

22 w. Seventh St. Diseases. 

Edmund M. Baehr, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Nervous 

Fourth and Sycamore Sts. Diseases. 

Robert Ingram, M. D Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry. 

510 Clark St. 
Charles E. Kiely, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 

City Hospital. 

Meyer L. Heidingsfeld, Ph. B., M. D., Professor of Dermatology 

19 W. Seventh St. and Syphilology. 

Augustus Ravogli, A. M., M. D.. Clinical Professor of Dermatology 

5 Garfield Pi. and Syphilology. 

Elmore B. Tauber, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

19 W. Seventh St. Syphilology. 

James W. Miller, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

Seventh and Race Sts. Syphilology. 

Moses Scholtz, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 
22 W. Seventh St. Syphilology. 

Joseph Ransohoff, M. D., F. R. C. S. (Eng.), Professor of Surgery. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

John Chadwick Oliver, M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Berkshire Building. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 29 

Charles Edward Caldwell, A. M., M. D., Associate Professor of 
Surgical Anatomy and Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

E. Otis Smith, M. D., Adjunct Professor of Genito-Urinary Dis- 

19 W. Seventh St. eases. 

Frank Fee, M. D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

22 W. Seventh St. 

Carl Hiller, M. D., . . Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Harry Hayes Hines, M. D. f Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

34 W. Eighth St. 

Goodrich Barbour Rhodes, A. B., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor 

4 W. Seventh St. of Surgery. 

Dudley White Palmer, B. S., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor 

4 W. Seventh St. of Surgery. 
Charles A. Langdale, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

5 Garfield PI. 

Casper F. Hegner, M. D M . . . Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
Berkshire Building. 

John A. Caldwell, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

350 Ludlow Ave., Clifton. 

Dudley Webb, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
409 Broadway. 

William A. Lucas, M. D v ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

351 Bryant Ave., Clifton. 

J. Edward Pirrung, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

1218 Walnut St. 

Carleton G. Crisler, M. D., . Assistant Demonstrator in Surgery. 
Groton Building. 

Ralph Staley, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

421 Clark St. 

Charles T. Souther, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

Berkshire Building. 

Guy Giffen, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

5 Garfield PI. 



Simon Pendleton Kramer, M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

22 W. Seventh St. 



Albert Henry Freiberg, M. D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Robert Carothers, M. D„ Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

409 Broadway. 

Robert Daniel Maddox, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Orthopedic 
4 W. Seventh St. Surgery. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

R. B. Cofield, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Orthopedic 

19 W. Seventh St. Surgery. 

E. Gustav Zinke, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

William D. Porter, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 

Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. 

George M. Allen, M. D., ... Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 

2404 Auburn Ave. 

James William Rowe, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 

20 W. Ninth St. 

Henry Lynde Woodward, M. D., . . . Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. 



Charles Lybrand Bonifield, M. D., . Professor of Gynecology. 
409 Broadway. 

Charles Alfred Lee Reed, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical 
60 Groton Building. Gynecology. 

John M. Withrow, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

22 W. Seventh St. 
Rufus Bartlett Hall, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical 

19 Berkshire Building. Gynecology. 

Sigmar Stark, M. D., . . . . Professor of Clinical Gynecology 
11 y 2 E. Eighth St. 

John D. Miller, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology 

Cor. Eighth and Elm Sts. 

Joseph A. Hall, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology 

19 Berkshire Building. 

Benjamin W. Gaines, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Gynecology 

409 Broadway. 

John E. Stemler, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology 

103 W. McMillan St. 
Joseph S. Podesta, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology 

428 Broadway. 

Philip Dorger, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology 

Berkshire Building. 

Walter R. Griess, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology 

21 Garfield PI. 



Robert Sattler, M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

30 Groton Building. 

Derrick T. Vail, M. D., . Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

24 E. Eighth St. 

Walter Forchheimer, A. B., M. D., Clinical Professor of Ophthal- 

Fourth and Sycamore Sts. mology. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 33 

Charles W. Tangeman, M. D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

20 VV. Ninth St. 
Victor Ray, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

30 Groton Building. 

Wylie McLean Ayres, A. B., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 

4 W. Seventh St. Ophthalmology. 

John Ranly, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

936 Clark St. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 
mology, and Secretary of the Faculty of the College of Medicine. 
4 W. Seventh St. 

Clarence J. King, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 

Groton Building. mology. 

K. L. Stoll, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Horace F. Tangeman, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in 

20 W. Ninth St. Ophthalmolog)\ 
Frank U. Swing, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 

705-06 Livingston Building. mology. 



Christian R. Holmes, M. D., Professor of Otology and Dean of the 

8 E. Eighth St. College of Medicine. 

John Albert Thompson, B. S., A. M., M. D., Professor of Laryn- 

Berkshire Building, 628 Elm St. gology. 

John Wesley Murphy, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Laryn- 

4 W. Seventh St. gology and Otology. 

Samuel Iglauer, B. S., M. D., . Associate Professor of Otology. 

22 W. Seventh St. 

Walter E. Murphy. M. D.. Associate Professor of Laryngology and 
Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, Laryngology, and Otology. 

Berkshire Building. 

William Mithoefer, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 
19 W. Seventh St. Laryngology, and Otology. 

W. J. Thomasson, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 
942 York St., Newport, Ky. Laryngology, and Otology. 

Robert W. Bledsoe, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and 
1005 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. Otology. 

S. Bertha Dauch, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 

2924 Vaughn St., Mt. Auburn. Laryngology, and Otology. 

Charles Jones, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 

19 W. Seventh St. Laryngology, and Otology. 



^ UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

George L. Krieger, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Laryngology 
4804 Central Ave., Madisonville. and Otology. 

Robert Stevenson, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Laryngology 
22 w. Seventh St. and Otology. 



John Howard Landis, M. D Professor of Hygiene. 

City Hall. 



LECTURER ON SPECIAL TOPICS 
Hon. James B. Swing, Medical Jurisprudence. 

Union Trust Building. 



OTHER OFFICERS 
J. DeWitt Schonwald, M. D., .... Director of Dispensary. 

5654 Hamilton Ave., College Hill. 

L. M. Prince, Optician. 

108 VV. Fourth St. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D Secretary of the Medical Faculty. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

Daniel Laurence, B. S Secretary of the University. 

Office, 6 McMicken Hall, Burnet Woods. 

Frances Currie, . Secretary and Librarian of the Medical College. 

Ill E. Auburn Ave. 

Anna L. Hook, . . Secretary to the Dean of the Medical College. 

2123 Sinton Ave. 



TECHNICAL ASSISTANTS 
Henry Louhier, Anatomy. 

McMicken Cottage. 

Daisy Clark, Pathology. 

40 E. McMillan St. 

Joseph Kupka, Physiology. 

221 Victor St. 



ADDRESSES AND LECTURES, 1912-13 

The speakers at Convocation during the year 1912-13 were as 
follows : Dr. Charles W. Dabney, president of the University ; 
Alfred K. Nippert, member of the Board of Directors; Robert 
Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., assistant professor of Histology and Com- 
parative Anatomy; Josephine Simrall, A. B., instructor in the Cin- 
cinnati Kindergarten Training School ; Charles R. Towson, execu- 
tive secretary of the Industrial Committee of the International 
Department of the Y. M. C. A. ; Emilie W. McVea, A. M., assistant 
professor of English and dean of women; Benjamin C. Van Wye, 
A. M., assistant professor of Public Speaking and English; Rev. 
W. M. Hayes, Tsingchowfu, Shantung, China; Charles Sawyer, 
member of the City Council; Robert Marx; John D. Ellis, of the 
Class of '07; Mrs. Anna Gilchrist Strong, head of the Department 
of Home Economics in the Cincinnati Kindergarten Training 
School; Mr. Charles Hampden, stage manager of The Blue Bird; 
Miss Rachel Butler, reader, accompanied by Mr. Paul Bliss, com- 
poser ; Miss Zona Gale, the authoress ; Mr. L. H. Meakin, curator 
of the Art Museum and member of the American Academy of 
Design ; Mr. Fred H. Rindge, member of the International Com- 
mittee of the Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. Frederick Hoffman, of the College of Music, gave a piano 
recital. 

A series of public lectures was given at the University during 
the year 1912-13, and the speakers were as follows : 

Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., professor of History, a public 
course of lectures during the first semester on "Select Topics in 
Medieval and Renaissance History." 

Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., associate professor of History, four 
illustrated lectures on "The Cities of Old and New Spain:" (1) 
"Moorish Spain in a Modern Setting;" (2) "The Capitals of Old 
and New Castile;" (3) "Spain and the Great Discoverer;" (4) 
"Modern Mexico, Its People and Problems." December 9, 12, 16, 
19, 1912. 

Dr. Woods Hutchinson, of New York City: "Foods." Decem- 
ber 6, 1912. 

Benjamin Carlton Van Wye, A. M., assistant professor of 
Public Speaking and English, a reading of Dickens' "A Christmas 
Carol." December 21, 1912. 

Prof. John A. Lomax, president of the American Folk-lore 
Society: "Cowboy Songs." January 13, 1913. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Dr. Paul G. Woolley, professor of Pathology: "The Life and 
Work of Dr. Jesse Lazear." (Blue Hydra Commemorative Tree 
Planting and Open House.) April 11, 1913. 

Prof. Hugo Miinsterberg, of Harvard University: "Mind 
Reading." April 14, 1913. 

Rev. F. L. Flinchbaugh, rector of Calvary Church: "The Art 
of Life." (Under the auspices of the Delta Chapter of Ohio Phi 
Beta Kappa.) May 29, 1913. 

Other public addresses were given as follows : 

Dr. Charles Hughes Johnston, dean of the School of Education, 
University of Kansas : "The Dirigible High School." (Delivered 
at the Ninth Annual Conference of the Secondary School Principals 
and Teachers of the Accredited Schools Affiliated with the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati.) March 1, 1913. 

Dr. Charles W. Dabney, president of the University : "The 
Scholar's Commission." (Baccalaureate address, June 8, 1913.) 

Dr. Albert Shaw, editor of The Review of Reviews: "Knowl- 
edge in its Relation to the Community." (Commencement address, 
June 14, 1913.) 

The following speakers, under the auspices of the Student 
Branch of the A. I. E. E., addressed the students in the College of 
Engineering: 

Mr. F. R. Fishback, sales manager of the Electric Controller 
and Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, Ohio, an illustrated lecture 
on "Motors, Controllers, and Starters." (Before a joint session of 
the Student Branches of the A. I. E. E. and the A. S. M. E.) 
November 1, 1912. 

Mr. Bourman, of the Carborundum Company, Niagara, N. Y. : 
"The Manufacture and Uses of Carborundum." (Before a joint 
session of the Student Branches of the A. I. E. E. and the A. S. 
M. E.) February 4, 1913. 

Mr. James S. Bishop, of the Cincinnati and Suburban Bell 
Telephone Company : "Telephony." February 25, 1913. 

Mr. Willey, of the Triumph Electric Company : "Some Features 
of Direct Current Machinery." May 6, 1913. 

The following lectures were delivered under the auspices of 
the Student Branch of the A. S. M. E. : 

Mr. Rosenzweig, of the Erie City Iron Works, an illustrated 
lecture on "Superheated Steam and Poppet Valve Engines." 
December 3, 1912. 



ADDRESSES AND LECTURES, 1912-13 35 

Mr. A. J. Baker, of the Cincinnati Milling Machine Company: 
"The Engineer's Relation to the Sales Department in a Modern 
Industry." February 19, 1913. 

Dr. William Kent, of New York, author and lecturer: "The 
Engineer in His Relation to Society." March 20, 1913. 

Mr. H. M. Prentis, Jr., of the Armstrong Cork Company, an 
illustrated lecture on "The Cork Industry." March 21, 1913. 

Besides the above, a series of lectures on the comparative study 
of literature, which were open to the public, was given on the 
Ropes Foundation by the following eminent scholars : 

Kuno Francke, Ph. D., LL. D., professor of German Culture 
and curator of the Germanic Museum, Harvard University, three 
lectures on "German Literature and Art at the Beginning of the 
Sixteenth Century:" (1) "German Humanism and Erasmus of 
Rotterdam;" (2) "The Erasmians. The Letters of the Obscure 
Men. Ulrich von Hutten;" (3) "Diirer's Biblical Illustrations and 
Holbein's Dance of Death." January 22, 23, 24, 1913. 

Christian Gauss, M. A., professor of Modern Languages, Prince- 
ton University, four lectures on "French Literary Ideals:" (1) 
"The Renaissance in France;" (2) "The Development of the 
French Classical Ideal;" (3) "The Spirit of the Eighteenth Cen- 
tury;" (4) "Romanticism and Realism." April 1, 2, 3, 4, 1913. 

Frank Wadleigh Chandler, Ph. D., professor of English and 
Ropes professor of Comparative Literature, seven lectures on 
"Aspects of the Recent Drama:" (1) "Irish Plays of Mysticism 
and History;" (2) "Irish Plays of the Peasantry;" (3) "Scenes 
from Married Life;" (4) "The Problem of Divorce;" (5) "Family 
Studies;" (6) "Plays of Social Criticism;" (7) "The Poetic Drama." 
May 1, 6, 8, 13, 15, 20, 22, 1913. 

The following lecturers appeared at the University under the 
auspices of the Alliance Franchise : 

M. Louis Hourticq, inspecteur des beaux arts de la ville de 
Paris : "La sculpture romane ; l'art des pelerinages et des monas- 
teres." November 11, 1912. 

M. Firmin Roz, ecrivain, laureat de FAcademie Franchise : 
"La crise de la sensibilite francaise au 18me siecle; Jean Jacques 
Rousseau et les origines du Romantisme." February 17, 1913. 

The following addresses were delivered before the students in 
the different departments : 

"David Lloyd George and Social Legislation in England." Prof. 
Israel Abrahams, Cambridge University, England. (Delivered be- 



36 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

fore the students in the Departments of Economics and History.) 
November 6, 1912. 

"School Luncheons." Miss Alice C. Boughton, chairman of the 
Committee on Luncheons in the Elementary Schools of the American 
Home Economics Association. (Delivered before the students in 
the Department of Education.) December 2, 1912. 

"The Drama as a Communal Art." Miss Isabel Colbron, 
lecturer. (Delivered before the students in the Department of 
English.) April 21, 1913. 

Lectures on "Social Hygiene" were delivered before the women 
students of the University by Dr. Frances Hollingshead. 

The following lectures were delivered before the men of the 
University: 

Three lectures on "Sex Hygiene." Dr. M. L. Heidingsfeld. 

One lecture on "Narcotics." Dr. Martin Fischer. 

One lecture on "Hygiene of the Brain and Nervous System." 
Prof. B. B. Breese. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

FOUNDATION 

On his death, in 1858, Charles McMicken gave to the city of 
Cincinnati by will almost the whole of his estate, valued at about 
$1,000,000, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining "two 
colleges for the education of white boys and girls." 

He had "long cherished the desire to found an institution where 
white boys and girls might be taught not only a knowledge of their 
duties to their Creator and their fellow men, but also receive the 
benefit of a sound, thorough and practical English education, and 
such as might fit them for the active duties of life, as well as instruc- 
tion in the higher branches of knowledge, except denominational 
theology, to the extent that the same are now or may hereafter be 
taught in any of the secular colleges or universities of the highest 
grade in the country." 

Nearly half of the property devised by Mr. McMicken was sit- 
uated in the state of Louisiana. This was entirely lost, in 1860, by a 
decision of the Supreme Court of that state, annulling that part of 
the devise. The court refused to recognize the validity of bequests 
of real estate to institutions controlled by non-resident trustees upon 
perpetual trusts. The remainder of the property, lying in Cincinnati 
and its vicinity, did not yield a sufficient income to warrant the estab- 
lishment of the proposed colleges. For ten years, therefore, the 
revenue derived from the estate was applied to its improvement. 

In 1869, the trustees provided for a School of Design, which they 
maintained, with aid from Joseph Longworth, until 1884, when they 
transferred it to the Cincinnati Museum Association. Meanwhile, an 
attempt was made to unite the various educational trusts in Cincin- 
nati. To this end, in 1870, the General Assembly of Ohio passed an 
act "to aid and promote education," under which, almost a year later, 
the University of Cincinnati was established. Bonds were soon issued 
by the city to provide funds for the erection of a suitable building, 
which was ready for use in the fall of 1875. But students were re- 
ceived in 1873, and instruction was given temporarily by the teachers 
of Woodward High School. In 1874, the Academic Department, now- 
known as the McMicken College of Liberal Arts, was organized by 
the appointment of three professors and two instructors, who met 
classes during that year in a school building on Franklin street. 

The effort to unite other trust funds with those given by Charles 
McMicken having failed, the income remained long inadequate to 
the needs of such an institution as he had intended to found. At 



38 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

length the city undertook to support the University in part by public 
taxation, the tax for this purpose being limited at first to three-tenths 
of one mill. In 1906 the General Assembly of Ohio authorized the 
levying of an increased municipal tax for the University— five- 
tenths of a mill, instead of three-tenths as heretofore. 

In 1913 a law was passed providing that the levy for 
University and Observatory purposes shall not be "subject to any 
limitations of rates of taxation or maximum rates provided by law" 
except the maximum of five-tenths of a mill for the University and 
three-tenths of a mill for the Observatory, and the "further excep- 
tion that the combined maximum rate for all taxes levied in a year 
in any city or taxing district shall not exceed fifteen mills." This 
law further provides that the levy shall include the amount neces- 
sary to pay interest on and sinking fund for all bonds issued for 
the University subsequent to June 1, 1910. The situation produced 
by the Smith one per cent tax law, under the provisions of which 
the income of the University was limited to the amount received in 
the year 1910, made this law necessary. 

In the course of time additional funds for the maintenance 
of the institution were provided by individual citizens, the most 
important being the bequest of property, valued at $130,000, by 
Matthew Thorns in 1890, the gift of $100,000 by David Sinton in 
1899, and the recent bequest of Mary P. and Eliza O. Ropes, of 
Salem, Massachusetts, amounting to $100,000, for the endowment of 
a chair of Comparative Literature, as a memorial to their father, 
Nathaniel Ropes, for many years a citizen of Cincinnati. Then, in 
1910, the friends of Dr. Joseph Eichberg, for many years an eminent 
Professor of Physiology in the Miami Medical College, who lost his 
life through a lamentable accident in the summer of 1908, presented 
the University with the sum of $45,000, to establish in the University 
the Joseph Eichberg Chair of Physiology. In 1911, Dr. Francis Brun- 
ning bequeathed his entire estate, with the exception of a few minor 
bequests, to the Endowment Fund Association of the University of 
Cincinnati, for the College of Medicine. This estate has yielded 
about $80,000. In 1912, Mrs. Floris A. Sackett and Mrs. Frances 
W. Gibson made bequests to the University, the exact value of which 
has not yet been determined. 

In 1912, Mr. Harry Levy presented to the Board of Directors of 
the University of Cincinnati for the Endowment Fund of the College 
of Medicine, the sum of $50,000, to be known as "The Julie Fries 
Levy Endowment." Mr. Levy made this gift in honor of his mother 
and wishes the income used in furthering and disseminating medical 
knowledge. 

In 1913, Mrs. Mary M. Emery presented to the Endowment 
Fund Association of the University of Cincinnati, the sum of 



FOUNDATION 89 

$125,000, to be used to endow the Chair of Pathology in the College 
of Medicine. 

In 1913, Mrs. Henrietta Moos bequeathed $25,000 to the Endow- 
ment Fund of the University of Cincinnati for the College of 
Medicine, as a memorial to her husband, Herman M. Moos. 

New departments were also added. In 1872, the Cincinnati Astro- 
nomical Society (founded in 1842) transferred its property on Mt. 
Adams to the city, which agreed, as a condition of the gift, to sustain, 
in connection with the University, on a new site provided by John 
Kilgour, an Observatory,* to be built with funds given by him. In 
1896, the Medical College of Ohio (founded in 1819) became the 
College of Medicine of the University, though still retaining its origi- 
nal title conjointly with its new one. In 1908, an invitation was 
extended to the Miami Medical College to become a department of 
the University. In accordance with this invitation the Miami Medical 
College and the Medical College of Ohio (the College of Medicine, 
of the University) have recently been united into a single medical 
department, known as "The Ohio-Miami Medical College of the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati." 

Out of a professorship of Civil Engineering in the College of 
Liberal Arts has developed the College of Engineering. It was 
organized under that name in 1900, and became a distinct department 
in 1904. 

Since its organization, in 1887, the Clinical and Pathological 
School of the Cincinnati Hospital has been affiliated with the Uni- 
versity, being designated as the Medical Department, until 1896, and 
afterwards as the Department of Clinical Medicine. 

The College for Teachers was organized in 1905, in co-operation 
with the Board of Education of the City of Cincinnati. 

In 1906 the Graduate School was separated from the McMicken 
College of Liberal Arts and a distinct organization with a dean at 
its head effected. 

In 1912 the College of Commerce was organized for the purpose 
of providing opportunity for higher commercial education. 

Evening Classes in the College of Liberal Arts were opened in 
1912 in order that those persons whose occupations prevented them 
attending the day classes might have an opportunity to take college 
courses at night. 

In 1912 a Bureau of City Tests was established in the Engineer- 
ing College in connection with the Engineer's office of the Depart- 
ment of Public Service of the City. It will make all the tests of 
materials and supplies required by this and other city departments. 
A technical chemist has been employed to take direction of this 



* For this purpose the city levies annually a special tax of one-twentieth 
oi one mill. 



40 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

work, and, as far as possible, it will be utilized to train students 
in the methods of such tests. It is hoped in this way to develop a 
course in municipal engineering. 

BUILDINGS AND SITE 

From 1875 to 1895, the Academic Department occupied the 
building erected on the grounds of the McMicken homestead, as 
required by the will of the founder. This site proving altogether 
unsatisfactory, application was made to the courts for permission to 
remove to a more suitable location in Burnet Woods Park. The 
desired permission having been granted by the court of last resort in 
March, 1893, steps were immediately taken for the construction of a 
main building, called McMicken Hall, which was completed in two 
years. This building stands on high ground at the southern end of 
the park, forty-three acres having been set apart as a site for the 
University. During 1895-96, the north wing, known as Hanna Hall, 
was built for the Departments of Chemistry and Engineering, with 
funds amounting to about $70,000, provided by Henry Hanna. The 
south wing, called Cunningham Hall, was built in 1898-99 by Briggs 
S. Cunningham, at a cost of $60,000. This wing is occupied by the 
Departments of Physics and Biology. The Van Wormer Library, 
costing about $60,000, the gift of Asa Van Wormer, was built during 
1898-1900. The Observatory, built in 1873 with $10,000 given by John 
Kilgour, stands on Mt. Lookout, at a distance of several miles from 
the other University buildings. A smaller structure, the O. M. 
Mitchel Building, was added in 1904 to house the old telescope. 
In 1912 this building was enlarged by the addition of a lecture room, 
a library, and another small dome. Since 1896, the building on the 
McMicken homestead site has been used by the College of Medicine. 
A Dispensary, erected in that year, is situated on the lower part of the 
grounds. A gymnasium, power plant, and engineering building, pro- 
vided by the city, at a cost of $550,000, were completed in Decem- 
ber, 1911. 

A bond issue of $550,000 has been authorized to provide for 
the construction of a chemical laboratory, a woman's building, a 
stadium, and for making extensive repairs in McMicken Hall. Of 
this issue, $100,000 of bonds has already been sold and the proceeds 
partly used in improving McMicken Hall. 

BENEFACTORS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Besides those whose names have already been mentioned, the 
following persons have contributed to the endowment or to the 
equipment of the University: William A. Proctor, Samuel J. 
Browne, William J. Odell, Julius Dexter, Frank J. Jones, Moses F. 



EN DO WMEN T FUND ASSOC I A TION 41 

Wilson, Eugene F. Bliss, James T. Whittaker, Mrs. William E. 
Merrill, Theodore A. Bruehl, Andrew Hickenlooper, Christian 
Moerlein, Laura Seasongood, Lewis Seasongood, S. Lilienthal, Mrs. 
Nannie Fechheimer, A. G. Wetherby, Charles F. Windisch, C. T. 
Webber, P. Robertson, the Lane & Bodley Company, James E. 
Mooney, John Kilgour, Chas. Kilgour, C. H. Krippendorf, Julius 
Fleischmann, Lucien Wulsin, Samuel Pogue, Edward Miles Brown, 
Nathaniel Pendleton Dandridge, Mrs. Lloward Breen, Robert 
William Hochstetter, Mrs. R. N. Hollingshed, Davis L. James, 
Catherine M. James, Ellen W. James, Annie A. James, Mr. and Mrs. 
O. J. Renner, Mrs. Antonia Wendte, Mary E. Dandridge, Mrs. Joseph 
Eichberg, the alumni of the University, Harry M. Levy, J. G. 
Schmidlapp, the Class of 1907, the estate of John B. Peaslee, and 
Alice L. Kuhn. 

ENDOWMENT FUND ASSOCIATION 

The Endowment Fund Association of the University of Cincin- 
nati was incorporated on April 21, 1905, by a number of prominent 
citizens of the municipality. The purpose of the corporation, as 
stated in its Code of Regulations, is "to secure property, including 
money, or the income from the same, for the use of the University 
of Cincinnati, and for that purpose to solicit, collect, accept, hold, 
manage, invest, or pay over such property, money, or income, whether 
such property, money, or income arises by way of gift, devise, or pur- 
chase, for the benefit of said University." Its affairs are managed 
by a Board of Trustees consisting of nine members. The officers of 
the Endowment Fund Association are: 

Rufus B. Smith, President. 

Jacob G. Schmidlapp, Vice-President. 

Charles F. Windisch, Treasurer. 

Howard C. Hollister, Secretary. 

BENEFACTIONS 

For the guidance of those who may wish, during life or by bequest, 
to make benefactions to the University, the following information 
is given: 

Form of Bequest to the University of Cincinnati : — 

I bequeath and devise to the City of Cincinnati as Trustee for 
the University of Cincinnati, to hold in trust forever for said Uni- 
versity, the following property : 



42 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Form of Bequest to the Endowment Fund Association : — 

I bequeath and devise to the Endowment Fund Association of the 
University of Cincinnati, for the use of the University of Cincinnati, 
the following property : 

The sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars would erect 
a section of a Natural History Museum. 

The sum of one hundred thousand dollars is the amount necessary 
to found a full professorship in any one of the departments. The 
donor has the privilege of naming the professorship. 

Fifty thousand dollars would be required for a dormitory, and 
the contributor of such a sum would be privileged to name the build- 
ing. There is nothing which the University needs more than a dormi- 
tory system. 

Twenty thousand dollars endows an instructorship in a depart- 
ment. The donor has the right to name it. 

Ten thousand dollars is the principal required to establish a 
fellowship in any one of the departments; the income being paid to 
the Fellow, who devotes his time to original research combined with 
a little teaching. 

Three thousand dollars endows a free scholarship, the income 
from this sum remitting all fees and giving the donor the right during 
life to nominate to the scholarship, subject to the rules of the Uni- 
versity. 

The President of the University would be glad to give full infor- 
mation upon any question relating to foundation to any person or 
persons who may desire more detailed knowledge. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

The Van Wormer Library Building is of stone, fire-proof through- 
out, and is built in accordance with the most approved modern plans 
of library construction. The library is open from 8 A. M. to 
9:30 P. M., on Monday and Friday; Saturday, 8 A. M. to 5 P. M. 

The University Library, in this building, contains about 69,000 
volumes and 10,000 pamphlets. In the Reference Room about 2,000 
volumes are arranged on open shelves, to which the students have 
free access. The Periodical Room contains the current numbers of 
300 periodicals. The library is provided with a card catalogue of its 
own books, and also with card catalogues of the books (non-fiction) 
received since 1905, by the Public Library of Cincinnati. 

The Library contains some valuable special collections : 

The Robert Clarke Library, comprising 6,761 volumes, was given 
by William A. Procter. This collection is especially rich in Ameri- 
cana, and contains some rare first editions. 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 43 

The Enoch T. Carson Shakespeare Library, 1,420 volumes, was 
also given by William A. Procter. 

The Bruehl Library, of about 2,000 volumes, contains many rare 
and valuable works on the history, archaeology, and ethnology of 
Mexico and Central America. This collection was made by Dr. 
Gustav Bruehl, and presented to the Library by his son, Mr. 
Theodore A. Bruehl. 

The Wilson Library, consisting of works of English, French, and 
Italian literature, 810 volumes, was given by Judge Moses F. Wilson. 

The Merrill Library of engineering works, 876 volumes, 478 
pamphlets, and 185 maps, charts, and photo-lithographs, was given by 
Mrs. William E. Merrill. 

The Whittaker Medical Library, the bequest of Dr. James T. 
Whittaker to the Medical College of Ohio, comprises 1,547 volumes 
and 538 pamphlets. 

The Thorns Library, miscellaneous works, was part of the bequest 
of the late Matthew Thorns. 

The Brown Philological Library, containing the English philo- 
logical library of the late Professor Edward Miles Brown, was pre- 
sented to the University by Mrs. Edward Miles Brown. It consists 
of 318 bound volumes, 51 unbound volumes, and 83 pamphlets. 

The Charlotte Hillebrand Memorial Library consists of French 
and German books, at present about 1,000 volumes, purchased from 
the proceeds of an endowment recently established in memory of the 
late Charlotte Hillebrand. 

The library has many volumes on history and economics, pur- 
chased from the proceeds of an endowment provided in 1894 by the 
will of Laura Seasongood. 

The Library of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science has been placed under the charge of the University of 
Cincinnati, by the terms of an agreement with the Association, 
entered into on September 14, 1895. This collection consists at present 
of 5,600 volumes, for the most part periodical publications of foreign 
scientific societies. 

The Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio has rooms for 
its valuable collections of books, pamphlets, and other articles in the 
Van Wormer Library. This collection comprises over 25,000 volumes 
and 69,000 pamphlets, pertaining chiefly to the history of the Ohio 
Valley, and contains valuable collections of original letters and other 
manuscripts. Students of the University have access to this library 
and may withdraw books from it under certain conditions. 

The total number of books, including duplicates, in the Van 
Wormer Library Building is about 99,600 volumes and 79,000 pam- 
phlets. 



44 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

To these collections must be added the libraries of departments 
of the University, situated in other parts of the city. These are: 

The Library of the Observatory 4,000 volumes 

The Library of the College of Medicine 3,000 volumes 

The Library of the Municipal Reference Bureau 70 volumes 

Total 7,070 volumes 

The libraries of the University, excluding those of the Historical 
and Philosophical Society of Ohio and the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, contain 75,500 volumes and 10,000 
pamphlets. 

The Public Library, 443,146' volumes; the Mercantile Library, 
containing about 83,453 books ; and the Lloyd Library and Museum, 
consisting chiefly of scientific works, as well as those of the Lane 
Theological Seminar}', the Llebrew Union College, the Art Museum 
and the College of Music, are open to University students. 

MUNICIPAL REFERENCE BUREAU 

The Municipal Reference Bureau was organized in 1913 under 
the Department of Political .Science of the College of Liberal Arts. 
Its quarters in the City Hall are adjacent to the Council Chamber 
and the rooms of the Charter Commission. The library of this 
Bureau contains material relating to all phases of city government 
and municipal activities. This Bureau is primarily for the use of 
Council and the administrative officers of the city, but is available 
to the general public and students as well. Through this agency, 
students in political and social science are enabled to familiarize 
themselves more intimately with the actual operation of both the 
city government and the organizations and institutions working for 
political and social betterment. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The official publications of the University are as follows : 
The University Record. This publication is issued at intervals 
during the year and comprises the President's Annual Report, the 
Annual Catalogue, and Announcements of the Graduate School, 
College of Liberal Arts, College for Teachers, College of Engineer- 
ing, College of Medicine, and College of Commerce. 

The University Studies. This publication is issued in parts 
and contains the results of research by members of the faculty or 
by other persons connected with the University of Cincinnati. A 
price list of the different numbers of this publication may be 
obtained by addressing the office of the Press. 



MUSEUMS 45 

Student publications of the University are as follows : 

The Cincinnatian. The Cincinnatian is the University Annual, 
and is edited and published by the members of the Junior Class. 

The University Weekly News. This paper is the official 
student bulletin, and is issued every week during the University year 
by a student board of editors. 

MUSEUMS 

The Museum of Natural History consists of a number of 
geological and biological collections. Among others are specimens 
donated from the Zoological Garden from time to time, the Balke 
natural history collections, chiefly of mammals, birds and insects, 
the Huntington collection of shells, the Fillmore and Schneider 
collection of Philippine relics ; the Fechheimer collection of igneous 
rocks ; the Wetherby collection of rocks and minerals ; and lastly, a 
series of specimens illustrating the chemical industries. The De- 
partment of Geology and Geography has also on exhibition a part 
of its working collections of maps, models, minerals, rocks, and 
fossils. Among recent valuable additions are the U. P. James col- 
lection of fossils and minerals, the Carl Holmes collection of Green- 
land birds, permanently loaned by Dr. and Mrs. C. R. Holmes ; 
donations by Mr. E. Meyer and Dr. Arch I. Carson; and several 
group mounts of large animals by the custodian of the Museum. 

In 1912 the heirs of the late Samuel A. Miller loaned to the 
University his large collection of fossils (more than 8,000 labels), 
gathered from various parts of America and Europe. In return for 
the use of this collection for educational purposes, the University has 
provided for its exhibition in specially adapted show-cases in a large 
well-lighted room devoted especially to that purpose. The collection 
is for sale and is open at all times for inspection by prospective 
buyers. It is earnestly hoped that some friend may purchase it 
for this institution. The University has also on loan and similarly 
exhibited the H. M. Norris collection of Indian implements. 

The Greek Room contains reproductions of the most noted 
works of Greek art. There were added to this collection recently a 
cast of the "Winged Victory," "Aphrodite of Melos," "Faun Playing 
the Flute," "Esquiline Venus," "Capitoline Venus," and a pediment 
of the temple of Zeus at Olympia. Two additional statues (Minerva 
Giustiniani and the Lateran Sophocles) have been installed in the 
main corridor of McMicken Hall. These, together with the large 
carbon pictures of the Parthenon, Erechtheum. Acropolis, Corinth, 
and Paestum in the same hall, form a valuable adjunct to the collec- 
tion of casts in the Art room. 



46 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The D. A. R. Fellowship in American History. This fellow- 
ship was established in 1900 by the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, and yields an income of $100 per year. 

The Hanna Fellowship in Physics. This fellowship was 
established by Mrs. Henry Hanna and Miss Mary Hanna in 1906. 
Its value is $500 a year. 

The Alliance Francaise Scholarship, of $300, was estab- 
lished in 1904 by the Alliance Franchise of the City of Cincinnati. 
It is awarded to the student in the Department of Romance Lan- 
guages showing the greatest proficiency in French. The successful 
candidate is required to attend the summer course of instruction 
given by the Alliance Franchise in Paris. 

The Armstrong-Hunter Memorial Fund, valued at $1,000, was 
established in 1910 in memory of Miss Sarah J. Armstrong and Miss 
Clara Hunter, by eighty of their former pupils. This fund will be 
used to found a scholarship in the Department of English Literature 
in the Graduate School, for a woman who is a graduate of the 
University. 

In addition to the above, the University offers ten scholarships in 
several departments which exempt their holders from the payment of 
tuition fees. 

THE McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The Cornelius George Comegys Scholarship, with an income 
of fifty dollars, was founded in 1899 by the Old Endowment Fund 
Association, which was composed of the alumni of the University. 
This scholarship is awarded annually to a meritorious under- 
graduate. 

The McMicken Honorary Scholarships are awarded annually 
to the five Juniors who have the best scholastic standing, according 
to the records in the Registrar's office. 

The Thoms Honorary Scholarships are awarded annually to 
the six Sophomores and the six Freshmen who have the best 
scholastic records. 

The Julius Fleischmann Scholarships. Thirteen scholarships 
of $75 each, offered for the years 1909-10, 1910-11, 1911-12, 1912-13, 
1913-14, by ex-Mayor Julius Fleischmann. They cover the first 
year's tuition, in the College of Liberal Arts, of thirteen non- 
residents, who are members of the graduating classes of the accred- 
ited schools outside of Cincinnati. 

The Optimist Club Scholarships. Two scholarships of $75 
each, offered in 1910, for four succeeding years, by a resident of 



FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 47 

Cincinnati who wished his identity to remain unknown. According 
to the wishes of the donor, these scholarships will be awarded in 
the College of Liberal Arts to non-resident students who have 
attended the University for at least one year and need assistance. 

The Jones Prizes. The first Jones Prize of forty dollars was 
founded in 1892 by the Honorable Frank J. Jones, and is awarded 
annually to that member of the Senior class in the College of Liberal 
Arts who writes and pronounces the best English oration. The sub- 
jects are chosen by the Dean and the Chairman of the Board of Direc- 
tors. A committee consisting of three citizens of Cincinnati is ap- 
pointed by the Chairman of the Board of Directors to judge the con- 
test. The second Jones Prize of twenty dollars was founded by Mr. 
Jones in 1901. It is awarded to that member of the Senior class whose 
oration is judged by the committee to be second in merit. These 
prizes are permanently endowed. 

The Edward Miles Brown Prize for Excellence in English. 
This prize of fifty dollars was established in 1908, by a provision of 
the will of the late Professor Edward Miles Brown. It is awarded 
annually to that member of the Senior class who has attained the high- 
est excellence in English during his four years' undergraduate course. 

The Henry Hochstetter Prize in Chemistry. This prize was 
established in 1909 by Mr. Robert Hochstetter, of the Class of 
1895, in memory of his brother, Henry Hochstetter. It is to be 
awarded annually for the best graduating thesis in Chemistry, and 
is open to both students of Liberal Arts and Engineering. The suc- 
cessful candidate is nominated by a committee consisting of the head 
of the Department of Chemistry and two members of the Cincinnati 
Section of the American Chemical Society. 

The Robert Patterson McKibbin Memorial Prize, a gold 
medal of the value of twenty-five dollars, was established in 1911 by 
the Reverend William McKibbin and family, in memory of their son 
Robert Patterson McKibbin, who died in 1910, while a member of 
the Junior class of this University. This prize aims to hold up 
before the male students of the University the ideals of manhood. 
It will be awarded to that young man of the Senior class who, in 
the judgment of the faculty, is the best embodiment of these ideals. 

The Union Bethel Scholarships in Social Science. Four 
scholarships of $75 each, offered for the year 1913-14, by Mr. J. O. 
White, resident director of the Union Bethel Settlement. These 
scholarships are awarded to four advanced students in the Depart- 
ment of Social Science who will carry on sociological investigations 
at the Union Bethel. 

For the fellowships, scholarships, and prizes of the various col- 
leges, consult their several announcements. 



48 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

In the year 1906, the Lodge and Shipley Machine Tool Company 
donated two loan scholarships of the amount of one hundred dollars 
each to two students of the Co-operative Course in Engineering for 
the payment of their University fees. 

THE ALLIANCE FRANQAISE 

The Alliance Franchise, a national association, officially recog- 
nized by a decree of the President of the French Republic, October 
23, 1886, aims to promote the study of the French language and litera- 
ture in foreign lands. 

The Cincinnati branch of the Alliance Franchise, in co-operation 
with the University of Cincinnati, has arranged for a number of 
lectures to be given during the year by some of the most eminent 
French writers of the day. To these lectures students of the 
University of Cincinnati are admitted by season tickets free of 
charge. 

In 1904 the Alliance Franchise of Cincinnati established a Schol- 
arship of three hundred dollars in the University, to be awarded to 
the student showing the greatest proficiency in French. The suc- 
cessful candidate is required to attend the summer course of instruc- 
tion given by the Alliance Franchise in Paris. 

ATHLETICS 

Athletics are so controlled in the University that they play an 
important part in the college life of the student without seriously 
interfering with his interest in class-room work. 

All students are required to take five hours per week in the 
Department of Physical Education. It is expected that these hours 
will be distributed as follows : three hours per week for all members 
of the Freshman class, and two hours per week for all members of 
the Sophomore class. Departures from this rule will be allowed only 
under exceptional conditions, for which special permission must be 
secured from the Dean in advance. 

A large part of the work is done out of doors during good 
weather, and such games as football, baseball, basket ball, tennis and 
track athletics are a part of the students' training. Lessons in box- 
ing, wrestling, and fencing are also given to students interested in this 
form of exercise. 

All athletics and gymnastics are in charge of the Director of 
Physical Education and his assistants. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 49 

CARSON FIELD 

An Athletic Field has recently been provided, which is one of the 
best college athletic fields in the country. It contains a baseball 
diamond, a football gridiron, and a quarter-mile cinder track, with 
a one hundred and twenty-four straight-away extending in front of 
the new grand stand. The proximity of this field to the gymnasium 
makes it a particularly valuable addition to the athletic equipment of 
the University. Its location between three hilltops, which form a 
natural amphitheater, affords opportunity for thousands of people to 
view the games. 

The new gymnasium with its modern equipment — cork-covered 
running track, white-tiled swimming pool, and spacious locker 
rooms — is the most complete institution of its kind in the West. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR WOMEN 
A special instructor has charge of the work in Physical Training 
for young women, which is required during the Freshman and 
Sophomore years. The work in the gymnasium is supplemented 
during the fall and spring with outdoors games. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The following student organizations met regularly throughout 
the academic year, 1913-14. 

The Academic Club, composed of the men of the College of 
Liberal Arts ; Blue Hydra, a permanent organization devoted to the 
study of Biology ; The Chemical Journal Club ; The Chemist's Club ; 
The Co-op Club; The Debating Council; The French Club; The 
German dub; The History Club; The Literary Society; Men's 
Glee and Mandolin Clubs; The Speaker's Club, an oratorical and 
debating society composed entirely of young men; The Student 
Section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers; The 
Student Section of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers; 
The University Club, composed of representatives from the student 
clubs, the fraternities, and the four classes; Women's Glee Club; A 
chapter of the Y. W. C. A. 

The Woman Student's League is an organization open to all 
women students of the University and to the women of the faculty. 
Regular meetings are held, at which lecturers of note address the 
members on subjects connected with the general and economic 
interests of women. 

A Student Tribunal for Self-Government exists in the College 
of Engineering. It consists of five members — three Seniors and 
two Juniors. 

Membership in the Three Arts Club of Cincinnati is open to 
women students in the College of Liberal Arts. 



50 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

ADMISSION 

Special Students. — Persons at least twenty years of age and 
qualified to do University work may be admitted as special students 
to lectures and laboratory courses in the College of Liberal Arts 
and in the College for Teachers. They will be required to 
furnish documentary evidence to the Director of School Affiliation 
and Dean of the College of Engineering, respectively, and to satisfy 
the heads of the departments concerned, of their ability to carry 
on successfully the courses which they desire to enter. 

Before any special student may become a candidate for a degree 
he must satisfy the entrance requirements. All special students are 
amenable to the same regulations as apply to regular students in mat- 
ters of examination, probation, discipline, etc. 

Students Entering from Other Colleges and Universities.— 
An undergraduate of a college or university desiring to enter the 
McMicken College of Liberal Arts, the College for Teachers, or the 
College of Engineering, must present to the Director of School 
Affiliation, or the Chairman of the Board of Admission of the 
College of Engineering, satisfactory evidence that he has done a 
sufficient amount of preparatory work to meet the regular entrance 
requirements, together with a certificate of honorable dismissal from 
the college or university last attended. He will be given credit for 
work of university grade in accordance with the provision for 
"Admission to Advanced Standing." 

Admission to Advanced Standing. — Students may be admitted 
to advanced standing upon presentation of a certificate from a col- 
lege of approved standing. All applications for advanced standing 
must be made within three weeks after matriculation to the Director 
of School Affiliation, and must be accompanied by a statement of 
the work done, signed by the proper officials of the college from 
which the applicant comes, and by a marked copy of the catalogue 
or by a written description in detail of the courses for which ad- 
vanced credits are desired. In courses where note books or drawings 
or both are required, these also must be presented. The students 
applying for advanced standing must first have satisfied the entrance 
requirements the same as regular students. 

REGISTRATION 

New students registered in 1913 on Thursday and Friday, 
September 18 and 19; upper classmen on Saturday, September 20. 
In 1914 they should register on Friday, February 6. Students regis- 
tering on any other days than those designated above will be 
required to pay a registration fee of one dollar. 



REGISTRATION 51 

No person will be admitted to any course after the beginning 
of the semester, unless a good and sufficient excuse for not entering 
at the opening of the semester be presented to the Dean; and in no 
event will any person be permitted to enter the work of any semester 
after the close of the third week of that semester. In accordance 
with this regulation no person was admitted to the work of the 
first semester of 1913-14 after October 11, 1913; for the second 
semester, the last day of admission will be February 28, 1914. 

New Students. — A student shall (1) take to the Advisory Com- 
mittee for Freshmen the Certificate of Admission received from the 
Director of School Affiliation and, after consultation, fill out the 
Course Card received from the Committee; (2) take the Certificate 
of Admission and the Course Card to the Registrar; (3) pay the 
library fee (also tuition and laboratory fees when such are required) 
to the Clerk of the Board; (4) get a receipt for matriculation from 
the Clerk of the Board ; (5) file the Course Card received from the 
Advisory Committee in a box prepared for that purpose in the Reg- 
istrar's office. 

Upper Classmen should fill out the registration blank and pre- 
sent it to the Registrar, who will give in exchange a Card of Matricu- 
lation Fees, which must in turn be presented to the Clerk. After 
paying the library fee (also tuition and laboratory fees, when such 
are necessary), upper classmen should take the clerk's receipts to 
their respective Deans, and receive their Course and Schedule Cards. 
The young men will obtain these cards from the Dean of the 
College of Liberal Arts, and the young women from the Dean 
of Women. 

On the Course Card each course must be designated by the 
department and the number of the course, especial title, and the num- 
ber of hours' credit, e. g. : 

English 1: Rhetoric and Composition 3 

Mathematics 1 : Algebra, Trigonometry, and 
Analytical Geometry 4 

In filling out election blanks especial care should be taken to 
note the advertised hours of courses, in order that conflicts may be 
avoided. 

All students who expect to become teachers should confer with 
the Dean of the College for Teachers before filling out their 
Course Cards. 

No change will be permitted on the Course Card after the 
expiration of three days from the last day of registration. 

All Course and Schedule Cards must be filled out and deposited 
in the boxes provided for that purpose before four o'clock on the 
last registration day. 



52 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Each student shall, at the beginning of the year, leave his local 
address at the office of the Registrar and shall promptly report all 
subsequent changes of address. 

Unit of Instruction. — The unit of instruction is one hour per 
week for one semester. Two and one-half hours of actual work in 
the laboratory, shop, or drafting-room, are considered equivalent to 
one recitation hour and the preparation therefor. Credit will be given 
for the number of hours officially published with the course, and for 
no more. University work not regularly registered is forbidden. 

Absences in the College of Liberal Arts. — All absences of 
students, from any cause whatsoever, are recorded in the Registrars 
office. If thirty or more absences are recorded against a student, two 
extra credits must be made in order to obtain the A. B. degree. No 
absences are excusable except those incurred by students representing 
the University in some public exercise outside of the city. Applica- 
tion for these excuses must be made to the Dean in advance. 

Absences in the College of Engineering. — All absences of 
regular students from class work must be accounted for to the head 
of the department concerned. A student who has been absent must 
report it within a week after returning to the University, or his 
absence shall rank as unexcused. 

Probation. — A student in the College of Liberal Arts or 
Engineering who receives a grade below D in one-half of his work 
at the mid-term, or at the end of any semester, shall be put upon 
probation for the next half semester of college work. Such a 
student, if similarly delinquent at the end of his probation, shall 
cease to be a member of the University. 

If it shall be necessary to place a student upon probation a 
second time, after an interval has elapsed since the first time, it shall 
be within the power of the Dean to dismiss the student the moment 
his grades fall below D in one-half of his work. 

Readmittance After Suspension. — Students suspended for in- 
efficient work during the Freshman year may not return to the 
University as Freshmen until they have passed the entrance examin- 
ations of that year. 

Grades. — The scale of marks for recording grades is as follows : 
A, 90-100; B, 80-89; C, 70-79; D, 60-69, passed; E, 50-59, condi- 
tioned; F, 0-49, failed. 

A student in the College of Engineering who has failed in any 
subject must register for that subject the next time it is given in the 
course, and may not register for any advanced subject whose hours 
conflict with the subject in which he has failed. 

In case a student withdraws from the University during any 



FEES 53 

semester, credit will not be given for any of the work elected for that 
semester. 

Honorable Dismissal. — It is required as a condition of honor- 
able dismissal, that every student who wishes to withdraw from the 
University shall submit to the Registrar a written request to that effect. 

A copy of the "Rules for the Guidance of Students" may be 
obtained at the Registrar's office. 

FEES 

Tuition in the Graduate School, the College of Liberal Arts, and 
the College for Teachers is free to regular students who are residents 
of Cincinnati. 

All fees must be paid in advance to the Clerk of the Board of 
Directors during the days of registration. If fees are not paid 
promptly, the Deans are authorized to exclude students from 
attendance upon their classes. No University fees are refunded. 

Tuition Fees 

All regular non-resident students in the Colleges of Liberal Arts 
and Engineering, and in the College for Teachers, are charged a 
tuition fee of $75.00 per year, payable in installments of $37.50 per 
semester. If not paid during registration days, but if paid within 
the two weeks succeeding the last registration day, the fee is $45.00 
per semester. If not paid as above, but if paid within the following 
two weeks, the fee is $50.00 per semester. If not paid within four 
weeks after the last registration day, further attendance upon classes 
will be refused. 

Students in the College of Liberal Arts who are residents of the 
city of Cincinnati, and elect any work whatsoever in the College of 
Engineering, are charged the full tuition fee of $37.50 per semester. 

All regular five-year co-operative students in the College of 
Engineering are charged a tuition fee of $50.00 per year, payable 
in installments of $25.00 per semester. If not paid during regis- 
tration days, but if paid within the two weeks succeeding the last 
registration day, the fee is $32.50 per semester. If not paid as above, 
but if paid within the following two weeks, the fee is $37.50 per 
semester. If not paid within four weeks after the last registration 
day, further attendance upon classes will be refused. 

All regular students in the College of Medicine (except those 
who entered the College previous to September, 1913) are charged a 
tuition fee of $150.00 per year, payable in installments of $75.00 per 
semester. If not paid during registration days, but if paid within two 
weeks succeeding the last registration day, the fee is $82.50 per 
semester. If not paid as above, but if paid within the following two 
weeks, the fee is $87.50 per semester, and if not paid within four 



54 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

weeks after the last registration day, further attendance upon classes 
will be refused. This fee entitles students in the College of Medicine 
to attend all didactic and clinical lectures and recitations, except the 
clinics of the City Hospital, which the members of the advanced 
classes are required to attend, and for which they pay an additional 
fee of $10.00 to the Hospital. 

Students in the College of Commerce are charged a tuition fee 
of $50.00 for a full year's work of five courses. Those taking less 
than a full year's work are charged $6.00 per recitation hour per 
year. Thus the tuition for one two-hour course is $12.00 a year. 

Tuition in the University Evening Courses is free (a) to all 
residents of Cincinnati ; (b) to all teachers* who, although non- 
residents, are engaged in teaching in the public schools of the city. 
All other teachers are charged tuition at the rate of $3.00 per course, 
per year. Non-residents, other than teachers, are charged tuition at 
the rate of $3.00 per credit hour per semester. A credit hour is one 
hour's work a week carried through a semester or half year. Labora- 
tory fees will be charged for courses in the laboratory sciences. 

Fees for Special and Irregular Students 
All special students, and irregular students (i. e., students who 
have satisfied the entrance requirements, but take less than twelve 
hours a week by special permission), in the Colleges of Liberal Arts 
and Engineering, and in the College for Teachers, and all non-resident 
students in the Graduate School, are charged tuition at the rate of 
$3.00 per credit hour, per semester, in advance. A credit hour is one 
hour's work a week carried through a semester or half year. 
For instance, tuition for a three-hour course would amount to 
$9.00 a semester, or $18.00 a year. If not paid within one week 
after the last registration day, an additional fee of $1.00 will be 
charged. If not paid within four weeks after the last registration 
day, attendance upon classes will be refused. 

All special and irregular students in the College of Medicine are 
charged tuition at the rate of $5.00 per credit hour, per semester, 
in advance. A credit hour is one hour's work a week carried through 
a semester or half year. Three laboratory hours are the equivalent 
of one credit hour. If this tuition is not paid within one week after 
the last registration day, an additional fee of $1.00 will be charged, 
and if not paid within four weeks after registration, further attend- 
ance upon classes will be refused. 

External Courses 
A fee of five dollars will be charged for admission to each 
External Course. 



* Librarians or assistants in the Public Library are given the same rates as 
teachers in the public schools. 



FEES 55 

Special Courses for Teachers* 

Teachers enrolled in Special Courses for Teachers in the Univer- 
sity, pay the regular library fee of $5.00 per year. Tuition in these 
courses is free (a) to all teachers in public schools who are residents 
of the city; (b) to all teachers who, although non-residents, are en- 
gaged in teaching in the public schools of the city. All other teachers 
are charged tuition at the rate of $3.00 per course, per year, payable 
in advance. 

The laboratory fee in a teacher's course is $5.00 per year. 

Laboratory Fees 

All laboratory fees are payable strictly in advance. 

A student shall not be permitted to enter a laboratory course 
until he presents to the instructor in charge a receipt for the pay- 
ment of his laboratory fee. 

Biology, $10.00 per semester. 

Cement, $5.00 per semester. 

Chemistry, $15.00 per semester ; breakage deposit, $10.00. 

Drawing, $1.00 per semester. 

Geology, $5.00 per semester; $2.50 per semester for a course hav- 
ing but one laboratory period per week. 

Metallurgy, $7.50 per semester. 

Physics, $10.00 per semester ; $5.00 per semester for a course hav- 
ing but one laboratory period per week. 

Psychology, $5.00 per semester. 

Engineering Laboratory. — Regular students in the College of 
Engineering pay $5.00 per period per week per semester in advance. 
Co-operative students pay $2.50 per period per alternate week per 
semester in advance. 

College of Medicine Laboratories. — A student who entered 
the College of Medicine before September, 1913, will be charged a 
fee of $5.00 for each laboratory course. 

Graduation Fees 

All graduation fees must be paid at least two weeks before the 
day appointed for conferring the degree. 

A graduation fee of $5.00 is charged every candidate for the 
degree of bachelor of arts, for the degree of bachelor of arts in 
education, and for an engineering degree. A graduation fee of $10.00 
is charged a candidate for the degree of master of arts, and a fee 
of $20.00 is charged for the degree of doctor of philosophy, and for 
the degree of doctor of medicine. 



* Librarians or assistants in the Public Library are given the same rates a; 
teachers in the public schools. 



56 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Breakage Deposits 

At the beginning of the year, a breakage deposit of $10.00 will 
be required of each student who takes chemistry. Five dollars of 
this amount must be kept permanently upon deposit until all accounts 
with the Department of Chemistry have been settled. For the re- 
maining $5.00 a coupon ticket will be issued, with which supplies and 
apparatus may be obtained at the store-room. Should this coupon- 
ticket become exhausted, the student must purchase a new ticket 
($5.00) before supplies will be issued to him at the store-room. 

A deposit of $5.00 will be required of all engineering students 
except those taking chemistry. 

A deposit of $10.00 will be required of each student in the 
College of Medicine at the opening of each session as a guarantee 
against breakage of apparatus, instruments, furniture, etc., to be 
renewed by each student whenever the breakage or damage amounts 
to $10.00. This deposit will be returned at the end of the year after 
deductions for such damage have been made. 



Course for Teachers of Art 

The fees in the Special Course for Teachers of Art are as fol- 
lows: matriculation fee, $5.00; tuition fee for non-residents, $18.00 
(for one year's instruction in psychology and the history of educa- 
tion) ; laboratory fee, $25.00 per year; tuition fee, payable at the Art 
Academy, $25.00 per year. 

Miscellaneous Fees 

Gymnasium Fee. — A gymnasium fee of $5.00 per annum ($2.50 
per semester) will be charged all men in the College of Liberal 
Arts, in the College for Teachers, and in the College of Engineering, 
taking six or more hours of work per week. The same fee will be 
charged all men in the Graduate School who elect twelve hours of 
work per week. 

A fee of $5.00 per annum ($2.50 per semester) will be charged 
all other men in the University who desire to avail themselves of 
the privileges of the gymnasium. 

During the temporary use of the men's gymnasium by the 
classes for women, a gymnasium fee of $1.00 per semester will be 
charged the women students. 

Library Fee. — All students in the Graduate School, in the 
Colleges of Liberal Arts and Engineering, except fifth year 
co-operative students, in the College for Teachers, in the College of 
Commerce, and in the Evening Academic Courses, must pay a 
library fee of $5.00 per year at the opening of the session. 



FEES 57 

Late Registration. — Students who apply for registration or sub- 
mit schedules of study on days other than those designated will be 
required to pay a fee of $1.00. 

Matriculation and Library Fee. — All students who entered the 
Medical College previous to September, 1913, must pay a University 
Matriculation and Library fee of $5.00 per year. This fee entitles 
the student to matriculation in any College of the University, and 
also to the use of all of the libraries of the University. 

Microscope Fee. — Each student in the College of Medicine must 
own a microscope approved by the professor of the department, or 
rent one from the College, at a cost of $2.50 per session. 

Special Examinations. — A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each 
supplemental examination for the removal of conditions, and this 
fee must be paid even though the condition is removed without a 
supplemental examination. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for en- 
trance examinations on days other than those specified in the 
calendar. Every candidate who applies for the removal of a condition 
must present to the head of the department in which the condition 
occurred a receipt showing that the candidate has paid the fee of 
$1.00, before the said head of department may report the removal of 
a condition to the Registrar. 

Slimmer Course. — A fee of $10.00 will be charged for the use of 
instruments in the summer courses in the College of Engineering. 

EXPENSES 

Graduate School 
Liberal Arts, _. . . .. . 

or College Engineering Medicine 

for Teachers 

Tuition Fees $75 00 $75 00 $150 00 

Library Fees 5 00 5 00 

Library and Matriculation 

Fee, payable each year $$5 00 

Gymnasium Fee 5 00 5 00 

Laboratory Fees * $35 to $45 

Books $20 to $25 $25 to $30 $45 to $60 

Board and Room, per week.. $5 to $8 $5 to $8 $5 to $8 

Total Expense per year $325 to $450 $350 to $450 $375 to $500 

The Secretary of the University will furnish informa- 
tion regarding suitable boarding places in the vicinity of 
the University. 



% To be paid by students who entered the Medical College previous to 
September, 1913. 

* Laboratory fees vary according to the courses taken. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Charles William Dabney, Ph.D.,LL.D., President of the University. 
Jermain Gildersleeve Porter, Ph. D., Director of the Observatory 

and Professor of Astronomy. 
Frederick Charles Hicks, Ph. D., Sinton Professor of Economics 

and Commerce. 
Harris Hancock, Ph. D., D. Sc, . . . Professor of Mathematics. 

John Miller Burnam, Ph. D., Professor of Latin. 

Max Poll, Ph. D., ... Professor of the Germanic Languages. 
Joseph Edward Harry, Ph. D., Professor of Greek and Dean of the 

Graduate School. 

* Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., Professor of History. 

Louis Trenchard More, Ph. D. Professor of Physics. 

Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D., Professor of Psychology. 

William Paxton Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Professor of the History 

and Principles of Education. 
John William Hall. A. M., Professor of Elementary Education. 
Stephen Elmer Slocum, B. E., Ph. D., Professor of Applied 

Mathematics. 
Nevin M. Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Geography. 
Lauder William Jones, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Chemistry. 
Guy Allan Tawney, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Philosophy. 
Frank W^adleigh Chandler, Ph. D., Professor of English and Ropes 

Professor of Comparative Literature. 
Phillip Ogden, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Romance Languages. 
Paul Gerhardt Woolley, B. S., M. D., . Professor of Pathology. 
Martin H. Fischer, M. D., Joseph Eichberg Professor of Physiology. 
Henry McElderry Knower, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Anatomy. 
** Harris Miller Benedict, A. M., .... Professor of Botany. 
Henry S. West, Ph. D., . . Professor of Secondary Education. 
Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., . . Professor of Political Science. 

, Professor of Zoology. 

Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
William Buchanan Wherry, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor of 

Bacteriology. 

* Absent on leave, 1918-14. 

** Absent on leave, first semester. 1913-14. 



ADMISSION 59 

Samuel James McIntosh Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

Physics. 
Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., . . . Associate Professor of History. 
Claude M. Lotspeich, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of German. 
Emilie Watts McVea, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 
Charles Napoleon Moore, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 
Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Chemistry. 
Harry Lewis Wieman, Ph. D., . Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
Edward F. Malone, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., Assistant Professor of Geology. 
Ralph Emerson Bassett, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance 

Languages. 
Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 

Comparative Anatomy. 
Bertha K. Young, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of English. 
Clyde William Park, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 
William Hammond Parker, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Social Science. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 
Henry G. Hartmann, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
Clarence Oran Gardner, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political 

Science. 
Clarence D. Stevens, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 
James Francis Dilworth, A. M., . Instructor in English History. 

Leroy James Cook, A. M„ Instructor in French. 

Clarence A. Nash. A. M., . . Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 
James Dysart Magee, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Economics. 
Philip Walter MacDonald, A. M., . . . Instructor in History. 



INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS 

ADMISSION 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts conferred by the University of 
Cincinnati entitles its holder to admission to the Graduate School. 
The University also offers its degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy to graduates of other institutions of high standing 
who shall complete their work in conformity with the regulations of 
the Graduate School. Students will not be admitted to the Graduate 
School after the third week of the semester. 



60 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

INSTRUCTION 

The work of each candidate for a graduate degree shall be under 
the direction of an Advisory Committee, composed of the Dean of 
the Graduate School and the heads of the departments in which the 
work is taken. 

The unit of instruction in the Graduate School is one hour a 
week for one semester. 

The nature of the graduate student's work will vary with the 
subjects pursued, but it is intended that the student's work shall re- 
quire a regular attendance at class meetings or in the laboratory, and 
shall not be in any respect of that character of work known as "in 
absentia." No credit will be given toward a graduate degree for work 
done prior to the conferring of the degree of Bachelor of Arts or its 
equivalent. No course in which a student obtains a grade below "B" 
will count for credit in the Graduate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS 

In order to receive the Master's degree the candidate must have 
completed satisfactorily such courses as shall be prescribed by his 
Advisory Committee, representing not less than twenty-four units 
of graduate instruction, at least twelve units of which shall be elected 
in one department. In case the candidate has previously elected the 
work in the department as a major for the completion of the under- 
graduate degree, he shall, under the direction of the head of the 
department concerned, elect sufficient work in some allied department 
to complete the required twelve units. The requirement of a thesis 
is optional with the head of the department in which the major sub- 
ject is taken. Wherever a thesis for the Master's degree is required, 
it must be filed with the Registrar, not less than six weeks before 
the close of the final semester of graduate study. The work for the 
Master's degree shall occupy the attention of the student for at least 
one full year in residence in the Graduate School. Students taking 
work in courses open to graduates and undergraduates shall be 
required to complete an additional amount of work estimated to be 
fifty per cent of the regular undergraduate requirements. Candi- 
dates for the degree of Master of Arts must pass an oral examina- 
tion in their major subjects before a committee of the faculty. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF 
PHILOSOPHY 

For the Doctor's degree, three years of graduate study will 
ordinarily be required. Where the student's college training has been 
defective or he cannot devote his whole time to the work, the 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR'S DEGREE. 61 

period of study will be longer than three years. At least the last 
year of study must be spent in residence at the University of Cincin- 
nati. Students may be permitted to count for the Doctor's degree 
work done for the Master's degree, provided that such work is of a 
satisfactory character. 

A candidate for the Doctor's degree shall designate at the time 
of his admission to the Graduate School three subjects which he 
desires to pursue. These shall be known as a major and two minor 
subjects, not more than two of which shall be selected in one depart- 
ment, and the candidate shall satisfy the Dean of the Graduate 
School that his selection has received the approval of the heads 
of the departments in which the courses have been selected. These 
heads of departments, together with the Dean of the Graduate 
School, shall constitute an Advisory Committee, under whose direc- 
tion the candidate shall pursue his graduate course. 

A candidate for the Doctor's degree is expected to be able to read 
French and German. In order to receive the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy, the candidate must have completed satisfactorily such 
courses as shall be prescribed by his Advisory Committee, represent- 
ing not less than forty-eight units of instruction embodied in a 
major and two minor subjects, thirty units of which must be given 
to the major subject, and to pass such written examinations on his 
major and minor subjects as the Advisory Committee may indicate. 
The statement of the number of units required for the Doctor's 
degree is to be taken as a minimum requirement. The degree is 
given, not as a result of the completion of a certain number of units 
of study, but on the basis of long study and scientific accomplishment. 

The candidate shall furthermore be required to present, in such 
form as the Advisory Committee may determine, a thesis which will 
give evidence of high attainment and power of independent research, 
and he shall pass satisfactorily an oral examination before the faculty. 

All theses offered for the Doctor's degree must be filed with the 
Registrar not later than six weeks before the close of the final semes- 
ter of graduate study, Moreover, each student upon whom the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy is conferred, is required to deposit in the 
University Library one hundred printed copies of his thesis. The 
candidate may receive his diploma before the thesis i9 printed, pro- 
vided a type-written copy is deposited with the Librarian and the 
sum of fifty dollars with the Registrar of the University. This sum 
will be returned upon presentation to the Library of the required 
number of printed copies of the thesis. 



62 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Work done at other universities may be accepted as an equivalent 
for part of the work required for a graduate degree. All claims for 
such credit, together with all claims for advanced standing, must 
be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School within three weeks 
after the student enters upon his work at the University or resumes 
his work after a leave of absence for the purpose of carrying on 
work at another university. 

At least twelve credits of the twenty-four required for the Master 
of Arts degree must be obtained through work done in residence at 
the University of Cincinnati. 

SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

IN LANE SEMINARY AND IN THE HEBREW 

UNION COLLEGE 

Courses in Hebrew taken in Lane Seminary and in the Hebrew 
Union College by graduates of recognized colleges and universities 
may count to the extent of twelve hours for the Master of Arts 
degree. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

There are at present three fellowships, a traveling scholarship, 
and ten University scholarships open to students of the Graduate 
School. The fellowships and traveling scholarship carry a stipend 
of from one hundred to five hundred dollars. (For particulars see 
page 46). The emolument of the University scholarships is sufficient 
for the payment of tuition fees. Applications should be addressed 
to the Dean of the Graduate School. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 63 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For detailed description of the courses given in the Graduate 
School, see the Announcements of the College of Liberal Arts and 
the College for Teachers. 



ANATOMY 

7. Those interested in post-graduate work in anatomy, histology, 
or gross human anatomy, are requested to apply to the head of the 
department. 

Professor Knower, Assistant Professor Malone. 



ASTRONOMY 
For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 95. 



BIOLOGY 

To pursue advanced courses in botany or zoology the student 
should have some training in physics and chemistry, and should be 
able to read French and German. Special facilities are afforded 
students pursuing courses of research. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 
To enter upon work for the degree of Master of Arts in zoology 
students must have completed Courses la, 2a, 3b, 4b, 15, 17b, 18b, 
19a, 13b, 14b, 20a, or their equivalents, while in botany the required 
preliminary courses are 5a, 6a, 7b, 8b, 35, 24a, 25a, 26b, 27b, or their 
equivalents. (See Biology, College of Liberal Arts.) Courses for 
"Undergraduates and Graduates" may be counted as graduate sub- 
jects toward the degree of Master of Arts by students who have 
elected majors in other departments. When botany or zoology is 
chosen as a minor for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the work 
required approximates that of the full course for the degree of Master 
of Arts in zoology or botany. The requirements for a higher degree, 
when botany or zoology is chosen as a major subject, are adequately 
stated under the general requirements for degrees (page CO). 

Primarily for Graduates 

30. Current Problems in Zoology. 

Assistant Professor Wieman. 

31. Research. Hours to be arranged. 

Professor Benedict, Assistant Professor Wieman, 

and Assistant Professor Chambers. 
For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 98. 



64 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

CHEMISTRY 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGHER DEGREES 
The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

A. Chemistry as the Major Subject. — All candidates who 
make chemistry their major subject must offer the following courses 
or their equivalents (see Chemistry, Liberal Arts) : la, 2a, 3b, 4b, 5a, 
6, 7b, 8a, 9a, 12a, 13a. In addition to these requirements, students 
who specialize in a certain branch of chemistry must complete the 
advanced courses required in connection with the choice made. The 
completion of these courses, however, does not satisfy the require- 
ments made of the candidate for a higher degree; he must show a 
maturity acquired by personal intimacy with the literature and method 
of chemistry. 

B. Chemistry as the Minor Subject. — It is not possible to 
state precisely those courses which may be required in each particular 
case. The choice will be made after consultation with the heads of 
the departments in which the major work falls. The usual require- 
ments will be Courses la, 2a, 3b, 4b, 5a, 6, 7b. If the candidate has 
chosen one of the physical sciences as his major subject, Courses 12a 
and 13a (one semester) will be required; if one of the biological 
sciences has been made the major subject, Courses 8a and 9a will be 
taken. 

The Master's Degree 

A candidate for the Master's degree must present a thesis 
embodying the results of some experimental work, or a written 
account in some detail of a subject suggested by the instructor under 
whose direction the student has been placed. 

Primarily for Graduates 

30. Research. 

Professor Jones, Associate Professor Fry, 

Assistant Professor Goettsch, 

Assistant Professor Aston. 

35b. Some Special Problems and Theories of Organic Chem- 
istry. Professor Jones. 

40. Journal Club Meetings. Papers by instructors and advanced 

students. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 103. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

ECONOMICS 

(The Sinton Professorship) 
For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 107. 



EDUCATION 



Education 3. Secondary Education. — S., 9:30-11:30. 

Professor West. 

Open to graduates and teachers who contemplate appointment to 
high school positions. For the conditions under which graduate 
students may enter the course see Program II, page 146. 

Education 7. Seminar. — Investigations and reports on special 
problems, chiefly in educational administration. W., 4 :00-6 :00. 
Professor Burris and Professor West. 
Education 12. Seminar. — Investigations and reports on problems 
in the theory and practice of teaching. T., 4 :00-6 :00. 

Professor Hall and Assistant Professor Mead. 

Education 1, 2 and 6. — These courses (for description of which 
see Announcement of the College for Teachers), when pursued by 
graduate students, may be counted for credit towards a graduate 
degree, provided such students do satisfactory pieces of independent 
work and embody the results of same in acceptable written theses. 
The number of credits allowed, respectively, for these courses, will 
be six, six, and two. 



ENGLISH 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

(The Nathaniel Ropes Foundation for the Comparative Study of 

Literature) 

For Graduates Only 

20. Seminary.— Studies in Literary Theory. T., 3:30-5:30. 

Professor Chandler. 

For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 111. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 114. 



m THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

GERMAN 
Primarily for Graduates 

12. Interpretation of both parts of Faust and Study of the 
Legend.— T., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Poll. 

Course 12 is open to students who have passed in Course 5. 

[lib. German Literature from the Reformation to the Classic 
Period of the Eighteenth Century.] Second semester, T., 4:00-6:00. 

Professor Poll. 
Course lib is open to students who have passed in Course 5 or 6. 
Omitted in 1913-14. 

[7. Middle High German.] M., 4:00-6:00. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

8. Old High German.— M., 4:00-6:00. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

[13. Gothic] W., 4 :00-6 :00. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 
Omitted in 1913-14. 

26. Old Norse.— M., 4 :00-6 :00. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich. 
[9b. German Seminary.] Second semester, T., 4:00-6:00. 
Omitted in 1913-14. Professor Poll. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 117. 



GREEK 

Primarily for Graduates 

5. Rapid Reading.— W., 3:00-4:00. Professor Horry. 

6. Practical Exercises in Greek. — F., 3:00-5:00. 

Professor Harry. 

7. Greek Seminary.— The Drama (1913-14) ; The Historians 
(1914-15). M., 3 :00-5 :00. Professor Harry. 

Open to graduates and to those who have completed the under- 
graduate courses in Greek. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 120. 



HISTORY 

For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 121. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 

LATIN 
Primarily for Graduates 

(Hours in all cases to be arranged) 

9. Latin and Romance Palaeography. — Professor Burnam. 
Prerequisite : Four years of undergraduate work and ability to 

read French and German. 

10. Latin Seminary. — Cicero. Professor Burnam. 

12. Graduate Study. — Credit according to the work elected and 
completed under the direction of the teaching staff of the Depart- 
ment. Professor Burnam. 



MATHEMATICS 

Primarily for Graduates 

34.— Advanced Algebra, Part II.— M., Th., 4:00-6:00. 

Professor Hancock. 
29. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable.— S., 9:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Moore. 
For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 125. 



MATHEMATICS (APPLIED) 

Primarily for Graduates 

lib. Fourier's Series and Spherical Harmonics. — Second semes- 
ter, Th., 4:00-6:00; S., 9:30-10:30. Professor Slocum. 

10a. Theory of Errors and Method of Least Squares. — First 
semester, M., 4:00-5:00; W., 4:00-6:00. Professor Slocum. 

For Graduates Only 

40. Seminary. — Theoretical and experimental research in some 
special topic of the mechanics of rigid, elastic, fluid or gaseous bodies. 

Professor Slocum. 
For Other Courses in Mathematics See Page 125. 



PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

8. Research. — Open to any qualified person after consultation 
with the head of the department. 

Professor Woolley, Associate Professor Wherry. 



68 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

PHILOSOPHY 

Primarily for Graduates 

19. The Philosophy of Immanuel Kant with special reference 
to its historical development. — T., 12 :30-2 :30. 

Assistant Professor Hartmann. 
21. The Philosophy of Religious Experience. — Th., 1:00-3:00. 

Professor Tawney. 
14. Types of Philosophy.— Th., 3 :00-5 :00. 

Professor Tawney. 
For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 127. 



PHYSICS 

For Graduates Only 

7. Lectures on Theoretical Physics. Professor More. 

25a. Theoretical Mechanics. — See under Applied Mathematics 16a. 

Professor Slocum. 
9. Research. — Those electing this course are supplied with all 
the apparatus needed, and with the assistance of the Mechanician. 
Professor More and Associate Professor Allen. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 131. 



PHYSIOLOGY 

(The Joseph Eichberg Professorship) 

7. Research.— Open to any qualified person after consultation 
with the head of the department. Professor Fischer. 



POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

For Courses in Political and Social Science Open to 
Graduates See Pages 133. 135. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Primarily for Graduates 

3. Research. — Special investigation in the psychological labora- 
tory. Professor Breese. 

[4. Seminar.] A critical study of the most important problems 
in psychology. Th., 3 :00-5 :00. Professor Breese. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

[6a. Educational Psychology.] First Semester. Hours to be 
arranged. Professor Breese. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 130. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

For Courses Open to Graduates See Pages 138. 139. 



McMICKEN COLLEGE OF 
LIBERAL ARTS. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Charles William Dabney, Ph.D.,LL. D., President of the University. 
Jermain Gildersleeve Porter, Ph. D., Director of the Observatory 

and Professor of Astronomy. 

Frederick Charles Hicks, Ph. D., Sinton Professor of Economics 

and Commerce and Supervisor of the Evening Academic Courses. 

Harris Hancock, Ph. D., D. Sc, . . . Professor of Mathematics. 

John Miller Burnam, Ph. D., Professor of Latin. 

Max Poll, Ph. D., . . . Professor of the Germanic Languages. 

Joseph Edward Harry, Ph. D., Professor of Greek. 

* Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., Professor of History. 

Louis Trenchard More, Ph. D., .... Professor of Physics. 

Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D., Professor of Psychology. 

Stephen Elmer Slocum, B. E., Ph. D., Professor of Applied 

Mathematics. 
Nevin M. Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Geography. 
Lauder William Jones, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Chemistry. 

Guy Allan Tavvney, Ph. D., Professor of Philosophy. 

Frank Wadleigh Chandler, Ph. D., Professor of English, Ropes 
Professor of Comparative Literature, and Dean of the 
College of Liberal Arts. 
Phillip Ogden, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Romance Languages. 
** Harris Miller Benedict, A. M., .... Professor of Botany. 
Henry S. West, Ph. D., . . . . Director of School Affiliation. 
Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., . . Professor of Political Science. 

f Professor of Zoology. 

Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Samuel James McIntosh Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

Physics. 

Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D Associate Professor of History. 

Claude M. Lotspeich, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of German. 
Emiue Watts McVea, A. M., Assistant Professor of English and 

Dean of Women. 
Charles Napoleon Moore, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 

* Absent on leave, 1913-14. 

** Absent on leave, first semester, 1918-14. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 71 

Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Chemistry. 
Benjamin Carlton Van Wye, A. M., Assistant Professor of Public 

Speaking and English. 
Harry Lewis Wieman, Ph. D., . Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
William Tunstall Semple, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Latin. 
J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., Assistant Professor of Geology. 
Ralph Emerson Bassett, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance 

Languages. 
Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 

Comparative Anatomy. 
Bertha K. Young, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of English. 
Clyde William Park, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 
William Hammond Parker, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of 

Economics and Social Science. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 
Henry G. Hartmann, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
Clarence Oran Gardner, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political 

Science. 
Clarence D. Stevens, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 

Alfred Brodbeck, Director of Physical Education. 

Florence Cameron Lavvler, B. S., . . Instructor in Mathematics. 

Arthur James Kinsella, A. M., Instructor in Greek. 

Joseph Henry Kindle, A. M., . . . . Instructor in Mathematics. 
James Francis Dilworth, A. M., . Instructor in English History. 
Platt Bishop Evens, Mechanician and Instructor in Laboratory Arts. 

Cora May Box, A. M., Instructor in Zoology. 

Marguerite Gray, A. B., . . . Instructor in Physical Education. 

Vernon Lantis, A. M., Instructor in Botany. 

Leroy James Cook, A. M., Instructor in French. 

Eleanor Katherine Nippert, A. B., . . . Instructor in German. 
Robert E. Clyde Gowdy, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Physics. 
Thomas Lansing Porter, Ph. D., .... Instructor in Physics. 
Clarence A. Nash, A. M., . . Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 
Edwin W. Esslinger, A. M., . Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 

Walter H. Bucher, Ph. D., Instructor in Geology. 

Philip Walter MacDonald, A. M., . . . Instructor in History. 
James Dysart Magee, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Economics. 
Charles Oscar Chambers, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Botany. 
Edward Mack, A. M., D. D., . . Lecturer on Biblical Literature. 

Other Appointments for 1913-14 

Schachne Isaacs, A. M., Assistant in Psychology. 

Raphael Isaacs, A. M., . Assistant in Embryology and Zoology. 
Lesley Henshaw, A. M., Assistant in History. 



72 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Edward Joseph Lorenz, A. M., . . . Hanna Fellow in Physics. 
Margaret B. Plimpton, A. B., D. A. R. Fellow in American History. 
Emma Andriessen, A. M., . . . Graduate Assistant in German. 
Ralph Edward Oesper, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 
Leonora Neuffer, A. B., . . . Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 
Mary Louise Nute, A. B., . . . Graduate Assistant in Botany. 
Archibald Bernstein, A. M., . . . Student Assistant in Spanish. 

Ralph E. Belsinger Student Assistant in Physics. 

William H. Dresch, A. B., B. D., Student Assistant in Philosophy. 
John D. Ellis, A. B., LL. B., . . . Student Assistant in English. 

Estelle Hunt, Student Assistant in English. 

Elise Loebman, A. M., Student Assistant in English. 

Walter A. McIntire, Student Assistant in Physics. 

Henry Albert Marks, .... Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

Harold F. Richards, Student Assistant in Physics. 

Clifford J. Rolle, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

Oscar See, Student Assistant in Economics. 

Helen Stanley, A. B., Student Assistant in English. 

Paul Raymond Stevenson, A. B., Student Assistant in Psychology. 
Agnes Van Slyck, A. M., .... Student Assistant in English. 
Helen Judith Vickers, A. B., Student Assistant in Romance 

Languages. 

Mary Whitfield, A. B., Student Assistant in English. 

Mattie Winston, Student Assistant in English. 

Neil Wright, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

Clinton Wunder, Student Assistant in Social Science. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE McMICKEN 
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Candidates for admission as undergraduates must be at least 
sixteen years of age. They must give evidence of having completed 
satisfactorily an amount of preparatory study represented by sixteen 
units, a unit being the quantity of work represented by a full year's 
study, of five periods per week, of one of the subjects listed below, 
and the completion of the assignment specified for that subject in 
the section headed "Definition of Units." Of these sixteen 
units every candidate for admission to the McMicken College of 
Liberal Arts must present the following : 

English — Three units, in which there can be no '"condition." 

Mathematics — One unit in Algebra and one unit in Plane Geometry. 

History — One unit. 

Language— Three units, from the five languages: Latin, Greek, 
French, German, Spanish; two units must be in the same language. 
Candidates who intend to pursue the study of Latin in the University 
must present four units in Latin. 



ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 73 

In addition to these fixed requirements the candidate must offer 
a number of units selected from the list of subjects below, sufficient, 
with the units specified above, to amount to a total of sixteen. The 
number of units that may be offered in any subject is shown in the 
lOlJowing table : Number of Units Accepted for Admissio n 

Minimum Maximum 

English 3 required or 4 

Latin 1 ] f ..or 2 or 3 or 4 

Greek 1 | Three units | .. or 2 or 3 

F«nch 1 !• JE&TSSl i ••or2or3or4 

German 1 j one language . .or 2 or 3 or 4 

Spanish 1 J [ ..or 2 

General or Medieval and "] 

Modern History 1 | ..or 1 

Ancient y 2 1 One unit 1 

English }/ 2 f required . . or 1 

American y 2 | ..or 1 

American and Civics 1J 1 

Algebra 1 required or...l^or2 

Geometry, Plane 1 required or 1 

Geometry, Solid y 2 or l / 2 

Trigonometry y 2 or 1 

Civics y 2 y 2 

Physics 1 1 

Chemistry 1 1 

♦Zoology 1 1 

*Botany 1 1 

Physical Geography y 2 or 1 

Astronomy y 2 y 2 

Drawing 1 1 

Manual Training 1 or 2 or 3 or 4 

Domestic Science 1 or 2 or 3 or i 

ENTRANCE CONDITIONS 
Students who are deficient in not more than two units of the 
sixteen required for admission, provided their credit includes three 
units of English, may be admitted conditionally to the College of 
Liberal Arts. All such entrance conditions must be removed before 
the student is allowed to register as a regular student for a second 
year of residence at the University. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations for admission were held on September 15, 16, 
17, 18, 19, 20, 1913. In 1914 they will be held on January 5, 6, 7, 8, 
9, 10, and on June 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20. 

Students who desire to take these examinations must obtain 
permission beforehand from the Director of School Affiliation. All 
applications for permission to take the entrance examinations should 
be made at least two days before the first day of the examination 

* One-half unit will be allowed in Zoology and one-half unit in Botany 
when these two subjects are presented together as one unit in the same year. 



74 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

period. Some of the examinations may be taken in the spring and 
the remainder in the fall if so desired. Students who apply for 
entrance examinations at times other than the days specified will be 
charged a fee of five dollars. 

Examinations for candidates without graduation certificates. — 
A candidate for admission to the University, coming from one 
of the accredited schools, who is not a graduate of such school, will 
not be admitted to the entrance examinations within one year after 
leaving such preparatory school, unless recommended for examination 
by the principal of the school from which he comes. 

Students intending to take the entrance examinations should 
consult the statement of the entrance requirements, as printed on a 
preceding page, and arrange to take their examinations 

(a) in the fixed requirements, and 

(b) in enough additional subjects to make a total of sixteen 
units. 

The work covered by each unit or group of units in the various 
subjects may be found on the following pages. Specimen entrance 
examination questions will be furnished free of charge on application 
to the Director of School Affiliation. 

SCHEDULE OF ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

September 15, 1913; January 5, and June 15, 1914: 

8 :30-ll :00. . . .English 3 units 

11 :00-12 :0O. . . .English 1 unit additional 

1:00- 3:00.... Physics 1 unit 

3:00- 4:00.... Solid Geometry y 2 unit 

4:00- 5 :00 Physical Geography y 2 or 1 unit 

September 16, 1913; January 6, and June 16, 1914: 

8 :30-10 :30. . . .Latin 1 or 2 units 

10:30-12:00 Latin 1 or 2 units additional 

1 :00- 3 :00. . . .Chemistry 1 unit 

8:00- 4:00 Astronomy y 2 unit 

4:00- 5:00.... Civics y 2 unit 

September 17, 1913 ; January 7, and June 17, 1914 : 

8 :30-10 :30. . . .French 1 or 2 units 

10 :30-12 :00 French 1 or 2 units additional 

1 :00- 2 :30. . . .Plane Geometry 1 unit 

2:30- 4:00. ...Algebra 1 unit 

4:00- 5 :00 Advanced Algebra y 2 or 1 unit additional 

September 18, 1913 ; January 8, and June 18, 1914 : 

8 :30- 9 :30 Ancient History V 2 or 1 unit 

9:30-10:30 American History y 2 or 1 unit 

1ft-3A_19-on i General or Medieval and ) 1 « f 

10.dO-12.UO.... f Modern History j l un,t 

1:00- 2:00 English History y 2 or 1 unit 

2 :00- 3 :00 American History and Civics 1 unit 

3:00- 5:00 Spanish 2 units 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 75 

September 19, 1913; January 9, and June 19, 1914: 

8 :30-10 :30. . . .German 1 or 2 units 

10 :30-12 :00 German 1 or 2 units additional 

1:00- 3:00.... Zoology *4 or 1 unit 

3:00- 5:00.... Botany */ 2 or 1 unit 

September 20, 1913 ; January 10, and June 20, 1914 : 

8:30-10:30.... Greek 1 or 2 units 

10:30-11 :30. . . .Greek 1 unit additional 

11 :30-12 :00. . . . Drawing 1 unit 

1 :00- 2 :00 Trigonometry y 2 or 1 unit 

4 :00- 5 :00 Manual Training 4 units 

4:00- 5 :00. . . .Domestic Science 4 units 

DEFINITION OF UNITS 

Detailed statements showing the exact amount of work required 
for each unit or group of units in the various subjects are here 
presented : 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 

I. Three Units. — The preparation should include the following 
subjects : 

Composition. — There should be practice in writing at regular and 
frequent intervals throughout all the years of the preparatory course. 
Special attention should be given to the proper structure of sen- 
tences and paragraphs, and the method of planning or outlining an 
essay. 

Grammar. — It is expected that the applicant will be familiar with 
the essentials of English grammar, and will be able to explain the 
construction of sentences that occur in the classics he has read. 

English Classics. — The following books are recommended for 
reading and study: 

For Reading in 1914 and 1915 

I (two to be selected) : The Old Testament, comprising at least 
the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and 
Esther; the Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, 
III, IV, V, XV, XVI, XVII ; the Iliad, with the omission, if desired, 
of Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; Virgil's Aeneid. The 
Odyssey, Iliad, and Aeneid should be read in English translations of 
recognized literary excellence. 

For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may 
be substituted. 

II (two to be selected) : Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice ; 



76 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Midsummer Night's Dream; As You Like It; Twelfth Night; Henry 
the Fifth; Julius Caesar. 

III (two to be selected): Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Part I; 
Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Scott's Ivanhoe or Quentin Dur- 
zvard; Hawthorne's Flouse of the Seven Gables; Dickens' David 
Coppertield or Tale of Two Cities; Thackeray's Henry Esmond; 
Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; George Eliot's Silas Marner; Stevenson's 
Treasure Island. 

IV (two <to be selected) : Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Part I ; 
the Sir Roger de Coverley papers in The Spectator; Franklin's 
Autobiography (condensed) ; Irving's Sketch Book; Macaulay's 
Essays on Lord Clive and Warren Flastings; Thackeray's English 
Humorists ; Selections from Lincoln, including at least the two 
Inaugurals, the Speeches in Independence Hall and at Gettysburg, 
the Last Public Address, and the Letter to Horace Greeley, along 
with a brief memoir or estimate; Parkman's Oregon Trail; either 
Thoreau's Walden, or Huxley's Autobiography and selections from 
Lay Sermons, including the addresses on Improving Natural Knowl- 
edge, A Liberal Education, and A Piece of Chalk; Stevenson's 
Inland Voyage and Travels with a Donkey. 

V (two to be selected) : Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First 
Series), Books II and III, with especial attention to Dryden, Collins, 
Gray, Cowper, and Burns ; Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard and 
Goldsmith's Deserted Village; Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and 
Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; Scott's Lady of the Lake; Byron's 
Childe Harold, Canto IV, and Prisoner of Chillon; Palgrave's Golden 
Treasury (First Series), Book IV, with especial attention to Words- 
worth, Keats, and Shelley; Poe's Raven, Longfellow's Courtship of 
Miles Standish, and Whittier's Snow-Bound; Alacaulay's Lays of 
Ancient Rome and Arnold's Sohrab and Rustuin; Tennyson's Gareth 
and Lynetie, Lancelot and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; 
Browning's Cavalier Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They Brought the 
Good News from Ghent to Aix, tlome Thoughts from Abroad, 
Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident of the French Camp, Herve 
Riel, Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up at a Villa — Down in the City. 

For Intensive Study in 1914 and 1915 

Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's L'Allegro, II Penseroso, and 
Comus; either Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, or both 
Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's First Bunker Hill 
Oration; either Macaulay's Life of Johnson or Carlyle's Essay on 
Burns. 

All the books should be read with care and appreciation, but 
particular attention should be given, with regard to form, structure, 
and style, to those intended for intensive study. In addition, the 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 77 

student should have some definite knowledge of the lives of the 
authors read and of the history of their times. 

II. Four Units. — For four units in English composition and 
literature the preparation should extend throughout the four years 
of the high school course. Besides the subjects mentioned above, the 
applicant should have studied the outlines of English literary history. 
His study should be based upon one of the recent manuals of English 
literature, the study of the text being accompanied by as much reading 
as possible of representative authors. 

LATIN 

I. First Unit. — The student should have digested some Begin- 
ner's Book like that of Coy, or Collar and Daniel. 

II. Second Unit. — Caesar's Gallic War, Books I- IV, or an equiv- 
alent amount selected from the remaining portions of that work. It 
is expected that in the first year's preparation the student has mastered 
the declensions, comparisons, and verbal inflections, knows the leading 
rules of syntax, and possesses some vocabulary. Along with Caesar 
there should be some exercise in Latin Composition, a wider and 
deeper acquaintance with grammatical principles of the language, and 
a good vocabulary. Sallust's Catiline or an equivalent amount of the 
Jugurtha may be substituted for two books of Caesar. It is further- 
more suggested that the teacher, if possible, vary the Caesar lessons 
by selections from Books V-VII. The Department of Latin is also 
willing to accept Miller and Beeson's second year Latin Book as a 
substitute for Caesar. 

III. Third Unit.— Cicero, In Catilinam, I-IV, and Pro Archia, 
with more practice in composition. It is also preferred that the 
student should study an additional oration or short treatise, e. g., 
de Amicitia, or selections from the Letters. He should also begin 
the practice of writing continuous prose. 

IV. Fourth Unit.— Vergil's Aeneid, I-VI, with scanning and 
prosody. An equivalent amount of verse from Aeneid, VII-XII, or 
Ovid will be accepted in place of Aeneid, III and V. If circumstances 
permit, it i9 very advantageous to let Ovid precede Vergil. It is 
preferable that the composition done during this year be based on 
Cicero. 

GREEK 

I. First Unit. — White's Beginner's Book or an equivalent. 
Grammar and composition work. 

II. Second Unit. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I and II. 
Grammar and composition work. 



78 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

III. Third Unit. — In addition to the work outlined in para- 
graphs I and II. the following: 

Xenophon, Anabasis, Books III and IV. 

Homer, Iliad, Books I-III. 

Composition. 

Grammar : Babbitt, Goodell, Goodwin, or Hadley-Allen 

FRENCH 

I. One Unit. — 

(a) The translation at sight of very simple French prose. 

(b) The translation into French of easy sentences to test the 
candidate's familiarity with elementary grammar. 

(c) One full year of five periods a week is necessary to meet 
the requirements in one unit. The first one hundred and fifty pages 
in Fraser and Squair's French Grammar may be taken as a standard 
of the amount of grammar which should be covered during that 
period. 

II. Two Units.— 

(a) The translation at sight of ordinary prose. The passages 
.set for translation must be rendered into clear and idiomatic English. 

(b) A test of the candidate's knowledge of the regular verbs; 
the auxiliaries etre, avoir; the more frequent irregular verbs. 

(c) The translation into French of sentences to test the candi- 
date's familiarity with elementary grammar. 

Two full years of five periods a week are necessary to meet the 
requirements in two units. Fraser and Squair's French Grammar, 
complete, may be taken as a standard of the amount of grammar 
which should be covered during that period. Not less than three 
hundred duodecimo pages should be read from the works of at least 
three different authors. Suitable texts for these two units are : Le 
Siege de Berlin and La Derniere Classe, Daudet; La Mere Sauvage, 
Maupassant ; Le Tour de la France, Bruno ; Le Petit Chose, Daudet ; 
Sans Famille, Malot; La Tache du Petit Pierre, Mairet; La Poudre 
aux Yeux, Labiche et Martin ; Le Voyage de M. Perrichon, Labiche 
et Martin; La Cigale ches les Fourmis, Legouve et Labiche. 

III. Three Units. — A continuation for one year of work just 
outlined. The candidate should be able to read at sight ordinary 
French prose or poetry, to translate into French easy English prose, 
to answer questions involving a more thorough knowledge of the 
essentials of French syntax, especially the ordinary uses of tenses 
and modes. It is expected that the candidate for three units will 
have worked through a grammar and will have read five or six 
hundred pages of French during three years of five periods a week. 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 79 

Suitable texts for these three units are : The plays of Labiche, Scribe, 
etc. ; Gil Bias, Lesage ; Le Tour de la France, Bruno ; La Belle Niver- 
naise, Daudet; Les Fourb cries de Scapin, Le Medicin Malgre Lui, 
Moliere; Voltaire's historical writings; Le Cid, Corneille; Coppee's 
poems, etc. 

IV. Four Units.— 

(a) The translation at sight of standard French. The passages 
set for translation must be rendered into clear and idiomatic English. 

(b) A test of the candidate's knowledge of the irregular verbs 
and the essentials of French syntax, especially the uses of tenses, 
modes, prepositions, and conjunctions. 

(c) The translation into French of a connected passage of Eng- 
lish prose. 

(d) The writing of a theme in French on a given topic. 

Four full years in a good preparatory school are necessary to 
meet the requirements for four units. Not less than six hundred 
pages should be read from the works of at least five different authors. 
Suitable texts besides those given above are Colombo, Merimee ; La 
Mare au Diable, Sand ; Peckear d' Islande, Loti ; La Canne de J one, 
Vigny ; Horace, Corneille ; L' Avare and Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, 
Moliere; Athalie, Racine; Le Gendre de M. Poirier, Sandeau; 
Re cits des Temps Mercvingiens, Thierry; L' Expedition de Bonaparte 
en Egypte, Thiers. 

The student should have constant practice in giving paraphrases 
and abstracts. He should be trained to write French from dictation 
in order to enable him to understand lectures delivered in that lan- 
guage. 

GERMAN 
I. One Unit. — 

(a) The translation at sight of very simple German prose. 

(b) The. translation into German of easy sentences, to test the 
candidate's familiarity with elementary grammar. 

The candidate ougbt to have read not less than one hundred 
pages of easy German, such as is found in Hewitt's or Harris' 
German Reader. 

If. Two Units. — 

(a) The translation at sight of simple German prose. 

(b) The translation into German of easy connected prose, to 
test the candidate's familiarity with elementary grammar. The 
requirement in elementary grammar includes the conjugation of the 
weak and strong verbs; the declination of articles, adjectives, pro- 



80 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

nouns, and such nouns as are readily classified ; the prepositions ; the 
simpler uses of the modal auxiliaries ; the elements of syntax, espe- 
cially the rules governing the order of words. 

The candidate ought to have read not less than two hundred 
pages of easy German, such as is found in Hewett's or Harris's 
German Reader. 

In general, to obtain two units in German, two years' work in a 
good preparatory school is required. 

III. Three Units — 

(a) The translation at sight of ordinary German. 

(b) The translation into German of a connected passage of 
English prose, to test the candidate's familiarity with grammar. 

The candidate ought to have read not less than four hundred 
pages of classical and contemporary prose and verse. It is recom- 
mended that the reading be selected from such works as Schiller's 
Wilhelm Tell; Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm; Goethe's Hermann unci 
Dorothea; Wildenbruch's Das edle Blut; Fontane's Vor dem Sturm; 
Moser's Kopnickerstrasse. 

Generally speaking, three years' work in a good preparatory 
school will be necessary in order to meet the requirements for three 
units. 

IV. Four Units. — 

(a) The translation at sight of ordinary German. 

(b) The translation into German of a connected passage of 
English prose, to test the candidate's familiarity with grammar. 
The candidate will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of 
accidence, the principal uses of prepositions and conjunctions, and 
the essentials of syntax, especially the uses of the modal auxiliaries 
and of the subjunctive and infinitive modes. 

The candidate ought to have read not less than six hundred pages 
of classical and contemporary prose and verse. It is recommended 
that the reading be selected from such works as Schiller's Jungfrau 
von Orleans; Goethe's Iphigenie; Freytag's Die Journalisten, Soil 
nnd Haben, Bilder aus dcr deutschen Vergangenheit; Riehl's Cultur- 
geschichtliche Novellcn. 

In general, to obtain four units in German, four years' work in a 
good preparatory school is required. 



DEFINITION OP REQUIREMENTS 81 

SPANISH 

I. One Unit. — 

(a) The translation at sight of simple Spanish prose. 

(b) The essentials 1 of grammar, including the conjugations of 
the regular and the most frequently used irregular verbs. The trans- 
lation into Spanish of short sentences, intended to test the candidate's 
knowledge of the essential points in grammar. Conversation and 
dictation. 

In general, one year's work in a preparatory school, or its equiva- 
lent, is necessary to meet the requirements for one unit. The candi- 
date will be expected to have worked through a short Spanish gram- 
mar, or the principal parts of a more complete one, and to have read 
at least one hundred pages of simple Spanish. Suitable texts for 
one unit are: Spanish Reader, Bronsby; Victoria y Otros Cuentos, 
Asensi ; Gil Bias, Padre Isla ; El Pdjaro Verde, Valera ; O Locura o 
Santiddd, Echegaray; Zaragueta, Carrion y Vital Aza; El Clavo, 
Alarcon, etc. 

II. Two Units.— 

In general, two years' work in a preparatory school, or its equiva- 
lent, will be needed to meet the requirements for two units. In 
addition to the work outlined in Paragraph I, the candidate will be 
expected to have worked through an elementary composition book 
and to have read from two to three hundred pages of modern 
Spanish. Suitable texts for the second unit are : El Capitdn Veneno, 
Alarcon; El Si de las Ninas, Moratin; Dona Perfecta, Galdos ; 
Guzman el Bueno, Gil y Zarate; Cuentos Alegres, Taboada; Legends, 
Tales, and Poems, Becquer ; El Haz de Lena, Nunez de Arce ; Jose, 
Valdes, etc. 

MATHEMATICS 

I. Algebra. One Unit. Definitions. — Integral numbers. Ra- 
tional numbers. Irrational numbers. The six fundamental operations 
of algebra. Algebraic expressions. Rational Algebraic expressions. 
Application of the four fundamental operations to Rational Algebraic 
expressions. The use of parentheses. Especial emphasis given to 
working within the parentheses. Factoring, determination of highest 
common factor and lowest common multiple by factoring. Fractions, 
simple and complex. Simple equations, both numerical and literal, 
containing one or more unknown quantities. Systems of equations. 
Problems depending on linear equations. Involution and evolution 
of monomials and polynomials. Radicals, including rationalization. 



82 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Exponents, including the fractional and negative. Imaginary quanti- 
ties. Elementary treatment of quadratic equations. The solution of 
simple problems in quadratic equations* 

II. Algebra. One and one-half units. — In addition to Para- 
graph I, the following: The completion of quadratic equations, both 
numerical and literal. A standard form for the solutions of these 
equations. The discriminant condition for equal roots, real and 
imaginary roots. Relations among the roots and the co-efficients of 
the equation. The nature of the roots when the different co-efficients 
approach zero. Simultaneous quadratic equations. Systems of equa- 
tions, simple and quadratic. Property of quadratic surds and solution 
of equations containing radicals. Problems leading to quadratic equa- 
tions. Ratio and proportion. The binomial theorem for positive 
integral exponents. 

III. Alcebka. Two units. — In addition to the work outlined in 
Paragraphs I and II, the following: Convergence of infinite series. 
Binomial theorem with fractional negative exponents. Exponential 
and logarithmic series. Formation of logarithms to base e, to base 10. 
Properties and application of logarithms. The progressions. Con- 
tinued fractions. 

IV. Plane Geometry. One unit. — The work required in Plane 
Geometry is practically the equivalent of the first five books in Wells', 
Sanders', or Wentworth's Geometry. Emphasis should be given to 
the demonstration of original problems and the solution of original 
exercises, including loci problems. Application to the mensuration 
of lines and plane surfaces. 

V. Solid Geometry. One-half unit. — The usual theorems and 
constructions of good text-books. Emphasis should be given to the 
demonstration of original problems and the solution of original exer- 
cises, including loci problems. Application to the mensuration of 
surfaces and solids. 

VI. Plane Trigonometry. One-half unit. — Definitions and 
relations of the six trigonometric functions as ratios, not as lines. 
Circular measurement of angles. Proofs of principal formulas, in 



* It is assumed that the pupils will be required throughout the course to 
solve numerous problems which involve putting questions into equations. 
Familiarity with the metric system is pre-supposed. Some of these problems 
should be chosen from mensuration, from physics and from commercial life. 
The use of graphic methods and illustrations, particularly in connection with 
the solution of equations, is also expected. On the other hand, the student 
must be guarded against the tendency to become mechanical in his algebraic 
work. Algebra is not to be used as a T-square. Above all, the student should be 
thoroughly grounded in the fundamental principles, operations and definitions. 
It is recommended that Wells's Academic Algebra, Wentworth's Algebra, or 
an equivalent be used. 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 83 

particular those for the sine, cosine and tangent of the sum and the 
difference of two angles, of the double angle and the half angle, the 
product expression for the sum or the difference of two sines or of 
two cosines, etc.; the transformation of trigonometric expressions by 
means of these formulas. 

VII. Trigonometry. One unit.— In addition to Paragraph VI, 
the following : Solutions of triangles, right-angled and oblique, requir- 
ing a knowledge of logarithms. Application to heights and distances. 
Demoivre's Theorem. Properties of spherical triangles. Formulas 
connecting the sides and angles of spherical triangles. Napier's 
Analogies, Gauss' Theorem. Solution of spherical triangles. 

PHYSICS 

One unit. — The candidate must be well prepared in the elemen- 
tary theory of the subject and must present a note-book showing the 
quantitative work done by him in the laboratory. One full year of 
four to five periods a week is necessary to meet the requirements 
for one unit. 

The instruction in the class-room should include qualitative 
lecture-room experiments, the solution of numerous problems, and 
the study of some one standard text-book, such as Hall and Bergen. 

Every candidate for admission on examination is required to 
present a laboratory note-book, signed by the teacher, containing the 
results of quantitative experiments performed by him in the labora- 
tory. At least thirty quantitative experiments must have been per- 
formed, of which ten must be in mechanics, and which must also 
include three of the subjects, light, heat, electricity, and sound. The 
thirty experiments are to be selected from some standard list such as 
the list adopted by the National Education Association, which 
may be found in The Teaching of Chemistry and Physics, Smith and 
Hall, Chapter X. 

Laboratory note-books will be examined for neatness, language, 
accuracy, and proficiency in physics. They should be called for within 
one month after presentation. 

CHEMISTRY 

One unit. — The student's preparation should consist of an ele- 
mentary course in chemistry (one year)* of the character taught in 
the better class of high schools. It should include: 



* The course should cover from thirty-five to forty weeks, with four to 
five periods per week. Two hours of laboratory work count as one period of 
recitation. 



84 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

(a) Individual laboratory work, to the extent of at least one- 
third of the time; 

(b) Instruction by lecture table demonstration, to be used when 
expensive apparatus or superior skill in manipulation is indispensable; 

(c) The study of at least one standard text-book, to the end 
that the pupil may gain a connected view of the subject. 

Either in the class-room or by experimental treatment in the 
laboratory, the course should take up for consideration the important 
modes of occurrence, the principal methods of preparation, the essen- 
tial physical and chemical properties, and the recognition of the ele- 
mentary substances and their chief compounds, commonly considered 
in the standard text-books. More detailed study should be given to 
those of frequent occurrence, or of especial scientific importance. 

The candidate should be able to state the significance of such 
commonly used terms as homogeneous body, solution, element, com- 
pound. By the use of definite examples, he should be able to show 
what kinds of facts have led to the formulation of such essential 
laws as the laws of definite and of multiple proportions, the law of 
combining weights, the laws of the expansion of gases, and the law 
of volumes of reacting gases. 

He should be qualified to give a statement of the nature of the 
processes by the aid of which chemists determine equivalent weights, 
choose molecular weights, and select atomic weights; furthermore, 
to explain the significance of chemical symbols, and the manner of 
arriving at chemical formulae (not graphic) after the necessary quan- 
titative data are obtained in the laboratory. 

Such terms as valence, acid, base, salt, neutralization, hydrolysis, 
oxidation, reduction, decomposition, dissociation, electrolysis, ioniza- 
tion, should have a meaning to the student, and he should be prepared 
to define them correctly, at least by well-chosen illustrations, if they 
cannot be defined precisely by words. 

At the time of and as part of the examination in chemistry, every 
student must present a note-book, containing a description of at least 
forty experiments. The note-book must include drawings of essential 
pieces of apparatus used, and an index of the experiments. The 
laboratory note-book should be called for within one month after 
presentation. 

Text-books recommended: McPherson and Henderson, Hessler 
and Smith, Newell, Bradbury, Remsen (Briefer Course), Torrey, and 
Story and Lindsay. Other texts than the one prescribed should be 
available to the student for reference. Ostwald's Conversations on 
Chemistry will be found stimulating and suggestive for collateral 
reading. 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 85 

ZOOLOGY 

One unit. — The candidate will be required to present his original 
note-book of practical laboratory study, together with the dates and 
the endorsement of his teacher, certifjang that the book is a true 
record of the pupil's own work. The note-book should contain care- 
fully labeled outline drawings of the chief structures studied in at 
least fifteen different animals, together with notes on the same. The 
note-book will be graded as one-third of the examination. The stu- 
dent will be expected to know the classification of animals into phyla 
and classes, and he must be able to state the chief characteristics and 
to compare the general life activities of examples of each of the 
principal classes. He must know the general plan of internal structure 
of one vertebrate (frog or fish) in general comparison with the human 
body; an arthropod (crustacean or insect) ; an annelid (earth-worm 
or Nereis) ; a coelenterate (hydroid, hydra or sea-anemone) ; a 
protozoan (a ciliate and amoeba when possible,). A mollusk (clam 
or mussel), an echinoderm or a second vertebrate may be substituted 
for any of the above types. A knowledge of the very general features 
of cell division, of the cellular nature of germ-cells, and the essentials 
of embryological development will be expected, as well as some under- 
standing of the main facts involved in the struggle for existence, 
adaptation to environment and variation of individuals. 

One full year of at least five periods a week is necessary to 
meet the requirements for one unit. 

Such books as Benedict's Animal Adaptations, Colton's Descrip- 
tive and Practical Zoology, Harvey's Introduction to the Study of 
Zoology, or Kingsley's Comparative Zoology cover this ground ade- 
quately. At least half of the student's work must have been labora- 
tory work, guided by definite directions. 

BOTANY 

One unit. — A laboratory note-book containing drawings of the 
parts of two kinds of flowering plants, of a fern, moss, liverwort, 
toadstool, lichen, and mould, must be presented with the certificate of 
his teacher that it is the student's own work. The note-book will 
count for one-third of the work. 

A knowledge of the names and distinguishing characteristics of 
the different phyla and the classes will be required, and the kind of 
alternation of generations found in the three highest phyla must be 
known. A general knowledge of the principal plant societies and the 
relation between their structures and environments, as well as an 
understanding of the adaptations by which the flowering plant does 
its necessary work are important requirements. 



83 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Bergen, Bessey, Atkinson, Caldwell, Coulter, and Leavitt are 
representatives of the type of elementary texts accorded recognition. 
At least half of the student's work must have been laboratory work, 
guided by definite directions. 



BOTANY AND ZOOLOGY 

One unit. — A unit will be accepted only when Botany and Zoology 
have each been studied for half a year in one continuous course 
which extends throughout the year. Such a course will be reckoned 
as a one-unit course in Biology. A half year of one, independent of 
the other, will not be accepted. It is strongly recommended that the 
student devote an entire year to Botany or to Zoology for one unit, 
instead of combining Botany and Zoology for a single unit. 

At least half of the work must have been laboratory work guided 
by definite directions. A laboratory note-book containing drawings 
and observations upon at least ten kinds of animals (both vertebrate 
and invertebrate) and ten kinds of plants (both flowering and non- 
flowering) must be presented with the certificate of the teacher that 
it is the student's own work. The student will be required to answer 
in writing general questions upon familiar animals, such as the frog, 
fish, earth-worm, paramoecium, crayfish, etc., and upon common 
plants, such as the fern, moss, mushroom, and simple flowering plants. 
In both Botany and Zoology a knowledge of the names and distin- 
guishing characteristics of the different phyla and their classes will be 
required. The note-book will count for one-third of the work. 



PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

One-half unit. — The scope of the work required for one-half 
unit in Physical Geography is represented by the standard modern 
text-books, some of which are named below. This includes the earth 
as a whole, atmosphere, ocean and land, with special emphasis on the 
work of water on the land in making topographic features. Entrance 
examinations may include simple interpretations of topographic maps, 
weather maps, and such charts as are given in text-books, the pointing 
out of features of scientific importance in such pictures as are used 
in text-books, and simple demonstrations with globes. 

Dryer, Lessons in Physical Geography; Tarr, New Physical 
Geography; Gilbert and Brigham, Introduction to Physical Geog- 
raphy; Davis, Physical Geography; Ward, Practical Exercises in Ele- 
mentary Meteorology; and Physiography of the United States (10 
National Geographic Monographs), are recommended as suitable texts. 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 87 

One unit. — For a sufficiently thorough and extended knowledge 
of the subject, and at the option of the examiner, a credit of one unit 
may be given. Examinations for one unit's credit assumes a knowl- 
edge of the larger text-books, a greater familiarity with laboratory 
exercises, and such a knowledge of the United States as will enable 
the candidate readily to cite illustrations of all topographic forms. 
One full year of four to five periods a week is necessary to meet 
the requirements for one unit. 



ASTRONOMY 

One-half unit.— The student should be familiar with: 

(a) Such fundamental notions and definitions as are necessary 
to locate celestial bodies. 

(b) The names and positions of the most conspicuous stars and 
constellations, and be able to trace the positions of the ecliptic across 
the sky at certain times during the year. 

(c) The most important facts concerning the form, dimensions, 
mass, density, rotation and orbital motion of the earth, including 
seasons, tides, eclipses, and other dependent phenomena ; also methods 
for determining the mass of the earth. 

(d) The essentials concerning the sun, moon, and planets, includ- 
ing methods for determining their respective distances, motions, etc. 

(e) The various hypotheses of the stellar universe and cos- 
mogony. 

Every student should visit a well-equipped observatory at least 
twice, once during the day to examine the apparatus, and once at 
night to view the heavens. 

HISTORY 

I. General History, or Medieval and Modern History. One 
Unit. — General History: Myers, Barnes, or G. B. Adams (complete) ; 
Medieval and Modern History: Munro and Whitcomb, Myers, 
Thatcher and Schwill, Harding's Essentials, or Robinson's History of 
Western Europe (complete). 

II. English History. One unit. — English History : Montgom- 
ery, Walker, Andrews, Cheyney, Larned or Wrong (complete). 
(Where half time is given to this subject a half unit may be offered.) 

III. Ancient History. One unit. — Ancient History: Myers, 
Seignobos, West, or Wolf son (complete). (Where half time is given 
to the subject a half unit may be offered.) 



88 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

IV. American History. One unit. — American History : Adams 
and Trent, Channing, Larned, McLaughlin, Montgomery (student's), 
McMaster, or Hart's Essentials (complete). 

V. American History and Civics. One unit. — See list in IV 
for American History. For Civics, James and Sanford : Government 
in State and Nation, or an equivalent text. 



CIVICS 

One-half unit. — James and Sanford : Government in State and 
Nation, or an equivalent text. (See V under History above.) 

DRAWING 

One unit. — One unit for entrance will be allowed for Freehand 
Drawing or Mechanical Drawing, or both. The student must have 
done the equivalent of at least two years' work of not less than four 
periods a week of forty-five minutes each. 

The work in Freehand Drawing should include outline drawing 
from models, principles of light and shade, application of conventional 
forms, ornaments, design, etc. 

The course in Mechanical Drawing should cover lettering, simple 
geometric problems, projections, solution of problems of helix, cycloid, 
parabola, etc. 

The candidate for admission on examination must present at the 
time of, and as a part of, his examination a full set of drawings, with 
the teacher's certificate that they are the candidate's work. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Manual Training Including Shop Work and Mechanical Draw- 
ing. — Credit will be allowed in this subject to the extent of from one 
to four units according as one, two, three, or four years are devoted 
to the work ; but it must be clone in accordance with the regulations 
governing laboratory work ; that is, twice the time must be given to 
the subject each week as is given to a regular academic subject. 

The course must include carpentry, wood turning, pattern 
making, foundry work, forging, and machine work, and the proper 
courses in drawing must accompany such work. 

The candidate for admission on examination must present at 
the time of, and as part of his examination, a certified list of courses 
completed by him, the drawings for the same, and such statements 
of his work as will give an adequate idea of the efficiency of the course. 



ADMISSION FROM ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 89 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

One to four units of credit is allowed in this subject according 
as one, two, three, or four years are given to the work; but it 
must be done in accordance with the regulations governing 
laboratory work ; that is, twice the time should be given to this work 
each week as is given to the academic studies which it displaces. The 
course should include the drawing and art work which usually accom- 
pany a first-class course in this subject. The first two years should 
include a study of textiles, drafting of patterns, and the making of 
dresses, and the designing and construction of hats. The last two 
years of work should consist of the study of cooking, chemistry of 
foods, home construction and sanitation, dietetics, food adulteration, 
bacteriology, laundering, decorating, and home economics. 



ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE FROM ACCREDITED 
SCHOOLS 

Work of satisfactory grade (not lower than 70 per cent) will 
be accepted from graduates of the University's accredited schools 
in lieu of the entrance examinations upon the presentation of the 
proper certificate, signed by the principal of the school, certifying to 
the work of the candidate. All certificates presented for admission 
must specify the work actually done, the time devoted to each 
subject, and the grade received in each course. Blank forms will 
be furnished upon application to the Director of School Affiliation. 

These certificates, properly made out, should be sent to the Direc- 
tor of School Affiliation, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
as soon as possible after graduation, and at least five days before the 
first day of registration. Upon receipt of the certificate, the Director 
of School Affiliation will pass upon the application, and if it is satis- 
factory, will send a card of admission, which should be presented to 
the Registrar at the opening of the session. If the certificate is not 
satisfactory, the candidate will be informed, so that he may prepare 
himself for the entrance examinations. 

A candidate from an accredited school who is not a graduate 
of such school will not be admitted upon certificate at all, but must 
enter by examination in accordance with the rule given above under 
the heading "Entrance Examinations." 

*LIST OF ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 
The following preparatory schools and high schools are on the 
accredited list of the University of Cincinnati. This list is subject 
to change from year to year, and each school is visited from time to 
time by a representative of the University : 

* Superintendents or principals who may desire to have their schools 
accredited by the University, should address the Director of School Affiliation. 



90 



McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



CITY 



Bellevue, Ky. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 

Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 



NAME OF SCHOOL 



PRINCIPAL 



High School 

Oakhurst Collegiate School 

The Bartholomew Clifton School . . 

Fianklin School 

The College Preparatory School for 
Girls 



Cincinnati, O 

Cincinnati, O 

Cincinnati, O 

Cincinnati, O 

Covington, Ky 

Danville, Ky 

Dayton, O 

Delhi, O ■ 

Glendale, O 

Glendale, O 

Hamilton, O 

Jefferson ville, Ind. . . 
Lawrenceburg, Ind. . 

Lebanon, O. 

Lockland, O 

Ludlow, Ky 

Maysville, Ky 

Middletown, O 

Milford, O 

Newport, Ky 

Norwood, O 

Oldenburg, Ind 

St. Bernard, O 

Wyoming, O 



The H. Thane Miller School . 

Hughes High School 

Walnut Hills High School. . 
Woodward High School .... 
University School 



Ohio Military Institute 

Hartwell High School 

Madisonville High School 

Pleasant Ridge High School 

High School 

Kentucky College for Women 

Steele High School 

Mt. St. Joseph on the Ohio Academy 

High School 

Glendale College 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 



Academy of the Immaculate Con- 
ception 

High School 



High School. 



*W. P. King 

MissH.F.Kendrick 

\ Miss E. A. Ely 

! Mary F. Smith 

J. E. White 



' G. S. Sykes 
Mary Doherty 

J Mrs. H. Miller 
) Emma L. Parry 

E. D. Lyon 
J J A. T. Henshaw 
Pliny A. Johnston 
Wm. E. Stilwell 

( *A. M. Henshaw 
•{ S. P. C. Roberts 
( §C. B. Wood 

Arthur Powell 
C. M. Merry 

T. L. Simmermon 

j H. S. Cox 
I *H. O. Sluss 

fjohn C. Acheson 
j C. L. Loos, Jr. 
I *E. J. Brown 
Sister Eveline 

*J. C. Chapin 

tjane R. DeVore 

j C. H. Lake 
I *Darrel Joyce 
j Emmett Taylor 
1 *C. M. Marble 
j Lydia A. Sembacb 
1 *J. W. Riddle 
I C. H. Burner 
I *C. H. Young 

*C. F. Sharp 
j *W. D. Reynolds 
I C. O. Morgan 
j Earl F. Chase 
/ »T. W. Bradner 
\ Elsor Heater 
I »N. D. O. Wilson 
) T. F. Hardin 
I *F. P. Timmons 
J *T. A. Sharon 
1 Wm. A. Evans 
J W. W. Mclntirc 
< *W. S. Cadman 

Sister M. Clarissa 
Mr. Trisler 

t *C. S. Fay 

\ Evelyn M. Prichard 



Superintendent S Commandant t President ±+ Acting Principal. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE A. B. DEGREE 
LIST OF RECOGNIZED SCHOOLS 



91 



The work of the following schools is recognized by the University. 
Graduates of these schools will be given entrance credit without 
examination for such work as they have completed in a satisfactory 
manner : 



CITY 


NAME OF SCHOOL 


PRINCIPAL 




East Night High School 






West Night High School 


E. W. Wilkinson 


Dayton, Ky 


High School 


J T. M. McVey 

\ L. N. Taylor, Supt. 


Highlands, Ky 


High School 


Loveland, O 

Terrace Park, O 


High School 


John Morris, Supt. 
E. H. Foster 


Williamsburg, O 




R. C. Franz 









ACCREDITED SCHOOLS OF THE NORTH CENTRAL 
ASSOCIATION 

Graduates of the secondary schools approved by the North Cen- 
tral Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools will be admitted 
to the University of Cincinnati in accordance with the provision for 
"Admission on certificate from accredited schools." 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS 
DEGREE 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is the only degree conferred 
upon graduates of the College of Liberal Arts. 

The unit for reckoning credit in the University is a subject pur- 
sued for one hour per week for one semester. This hour is one credit. 
One hundred and twenty-four credits are required for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, of which the required subjects as outlined below 
must be a part. In addition, moreover, one-half of the recorded 
grades must be C or higher. 

All students who are candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree 
must fulfill the following requirements : 



92 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

1. English 1, three hours per week, to be taken in the Freshman 
year. 

2. One of the sciences,* Biology, Chemistry, Geology, or Physics, 
with laboratory work, five hours per week for one year. Those 
students who elect Mathematics in their Freshman year are permitted 
to postpone their work in Science until the Sophomore year. 

3. A three-hour course for one year in either Psychology or 
Philosophy, not to be taken in the Freshman year. 

4. A reading knowledge of two languages out of five (Greek, 
Latin, French, German, or Spanish). It is advised that this knowl- 
edge be acquired before the Junior year. 

Students who have had four years' preparation in either German, 
French, or Spanish in the High School, will not be required to do 
further work in these languages in the University, provided they 
satisfy the head of the department in regard to their reading knowl- 
edge of the language. Students who have had two years' prepara- 
tion in Greek must take at least Greek 15 in addition in fulfillment of 
the requirement. Students who wish to fulfill the requirement in 
Latin must have completed Course 1 or its equivalent. 

5. A three-hour or two-hour course for one year in History, 
Political and Social Science, or Economics. 

6. Five hours per week in the Department of Physical Educa- 
tion. — It is expected that these hours will be distributed as follows : 
three hours per week for all members of the Freshman class, and 
two hours per week for all members of the Sophomore class. De- 
partures from this rule will be allowed only under exceptional condi- 
tions, for which special permission must be secured from the Dean 
in advance. 

On or before the first week of the Senior year students who have 
not been certified by the heads of the Departments of Greek, Latin, 
French, German, or Spanish, as having fulfilled the requirements with 
respect to language, must pass an examination to determine that they 
have fulfilled these requirements. 

At or before the beginning of the Junior year each student is 
required to select work in two departments, in each of which he shall 
have obtained at least sixteen credits before graduation. 

The last year of work required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts must be done in residence at the University of Cincinnati. 



* Science may be elected in the Sophomore year by students who take botb 
Greek and Latin in the Freshman year. 



SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS 93 

ELECTION OF STUDIES 

The following courses are prescribed for all Freshman students 
in the College of Liberal Arts : 

English 1 3 credit hours 

Language 3 credit hours 

♦Science or Mathematics 5 credit hours 

Physical Education 1 credit hour 

Total 12 credit hours 

The selection of the remainder of the work for the Freshman 
year is left to each student in conjunction with the Advisory Com- 
mittee. 

Subject to the restrictions noted under "Requirements for the 
Bachelor of Arts Degree," the department statements, and "Election 
of Studies," all studies are open to election. 

In all laboratory courses two and one-half hours in the labora- 
tory are considered as equivalent to one recitation hour and the 
preparation therefor. Without permission from the Dean, no student 
shall elect courses amounting to more than eighteen hours per week 
of University work, exclusive of the work in Physical Education. 

Students who have satisfied the requirements for admission, but 
take less than twelve hours per week, are called "irregular students," 
and a tuition fee is charged in every instance. (See "Fees.") No 
student is permitted to elect courses in more than five departments 
in any one semester. 

SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS ' 

Credit for Work Done in the College of Law.— A student who 
has received credit for the work of the first two years in the College 
of Liberal Arts may, in the third year, elect from four to six hours 
per semester of the lectures of the first year of the law course, as a 
substitute for studies in the College of Liberal Arts, and in the fol- 
lowing year he may, in the same way, take the remainder of the 
thirteen hours of the first year's course in the College of Law. Or, if 
he so desires, he may elect, in his Senior year, the entire thirteen 
hours of the first year law course (equivalent to twenty-six credit 
hours in the College of Liberal Arts), provided he has fulfilled all the 
requirements for obtaining his B. A. degree. Thus a student may 
obtain both the academic and legal degrees in six years. In either of 

* Freshmen who elect Mathematics or both Greek and Latin will be per- 
mitted to postpone their science to the Sophomore year. Mathematics does not 
fulfill the science requirement. 



94 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

the above cases, the student will be classified as an irregular student 
in the College of Liberal Arts, and will be required to pay tuition at 
the regular rate of three dollars per credit hour per semester. 

Six-Year Combined Collegiate and Medical Course. — In this 
combined course the student takes the first two years of work in the 
College of Liberal Arts, and the last four in the College of Medicine. 
At the end of six years he is granted the degrees of B. S. and M. D. 

Credit for Hebrew Taken in the Hebrew Union College and 
in Lane Theological Seminary. — Arrangements have been made 
with the Hebrew Union College and with Lane Theological Seminary, 
whereby students of these institutions who are pursuing a course in 
the University of Cincinnati may be allowed to count work in Hebrew 
taken in these institutions for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, to the 
amount of two hours a week throughout the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years, and three hours a week throughout the Junior and Senior 
years, for the Hebrew Union College, and three hours per week for 
three years in Lane Theological Seminar}', provided such work is 
regularly entered upon the election schedules of the University. 

Credit for Work Done in the Art Academy of Cincinnati. — 
By an arrangement with the Art Academy of Cincinnati, students from 
the University may elect from the courses stated in the catalogue in 
drawing, modeling and carving, not more than six hours' work in any 
one semester, and receive credit therefor on the books of the Uni- 
versity, provided these courses have been duly entered on the 
election blank and the proper certificate from the Director of the 
School is presented on their satisfactory completion. Not more than 
twelve hours of work in the Art Academy will be credited for the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Credit for Work Done in the College for Teachers. — Certain 
courses in Education, to the number of twenty-four credits, may be 
elected by undergraduates during the Senior year and be counted 
toward fulfilling requirements for the A. B. degree. 



ASTRONOMY, BIBLICAL LITERATURE 95 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ASTRONOMY 

Jermain Gildersleeve Porter, Ph. D m Director of the Observatory 
and Professor of Astronomy 

For Undergraduates 

lb. Descriptive Astronomy. — Lectures and class work. No 
mathematical training is required beyond a geometrical conception of 
the sphere and its circles. The object of the course is to give a com- 
prehensive view of astronomy in its historic and practical relations. 
as well as a general resume of our knowledge concerning the heavenly 
bodies. Reference books : Popular Astronomy, Newcomb ; Manual of 
Astronomy, Young; The Stars in Song and Legend, Porter. M., F., 
10 :30 — 11 :30, second semester. Professor Porter. 

2a. General Astronomy. — Text-book : Young's Manual of Astron- 
omy. W., 2 :00-3 :00, first semester. Professor Porter. 

For Course 2a Trigonometry, Analytical Geomct^, and Calculus 
will be required. 

3b. General Astronomy. — Text-book : Young's Manual of Astron- 
omy. W., 2:00-3:00, second semester. Professor Porter. 

Course 3b is open only to those who have taken Course 2a. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

4a. Celestial Mechanics. — Investigation of the fundamental equa- 
tions of motion and of the formulae for determining the positions of 
bodies revolving about the sun. Text-book: Watson's Theoretical 
Astronomy. First semester; hours to be arranged. 

Professor Porter. 

5b. Computation of a parabolic orbit from three observations, 
and of an elliptic orbit with perturbations. Text-book: Watson's 
Theoretical Astronomy. Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

Professor Porter. 

Courses 4a and 5b are given at the Observatory. 



BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

Edward Mack, A. M., D. D., . . Lecturer on Biblical Literature. 
For Undergraduates and Graduates 

8a. The Political and Social Institutions of the Ancient 
Hebrews in Relation to Modern Civilization. — A study of the life 
and literature of the Old Testament, particularly in their social 
aspects. First semester, T., Th., 2:00-3:00. Dr. Mack. 



96 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

8b. The Social Teachings of Jesus and the Apostles. — Their 
teachings with regard to the nature of man, his individuality and 
responsibility; the family, rights of children, divorce; society, the 
method of its improvement ; the state and our relations to it ; wealth, 
the rich and the poor, "the social question ;" crime, criminals, and 
their treatment ; non-resistance, peace and war, etc. Second 
semester, T., Th., 11 :30-12 :30. Dr. Mack. 

Other hours will be arranged if there is sufficient demand. 



BIOLOGY 

* Harris Miller Benedict, A. M., .... Professor of Botany. 
Harry Lewis Wieman, Ph. D., . Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 

Comparative Anatomy. 

Cora May Box, A. M., Instructor in Zoology. 

Vernon Lantis, A. M., Instructor in Botany. 

C O. Chambers, Ph. D., Instructor in Botany. 

Raphael Isaacs, A. M., Assistant in Embryology 

Robert T. Hance, A. B., Assistant in Zoology. 

Mary Louise Nute, A. B., . . . . Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

When a biological science is chosen as one major for the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts, the sixteen credits regarded as a minimum 
must be in zoology or in botany. 

In the advanced courses training in physics and chemistry, as 
well a9 ability to read French and German, is expected. Special 
facilities are afforded students pursuing courses of research. 

Students who expect to do advanced work in botany or zoology 
are advised to take general inorganic chemistry during their first 
year and organic chemistry during their second year, together with 
the courses in botany or zoology. 

Students who desire to be recommended as teachers of botany 
or zoology in secondary schools must complete as a minimum, 
Courses la to 8b inclusive and Courses 15 and 35. It is very 
desirable that they also do at least one year of graduate work. 
For Undergraduates 

la. Animal Biology. — Lectures dealing with topics of a general 
biological nature, such as animal activities and adaptations, protoplasm, 
the cell, sex, development, etc. The course is intended to provide a 
thorough foundation for further work in zoology. This course must 
be accompanied by Course 2a. First semester, M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. 

Assistant Professor Wieman. 

* Absent on leave, first semester, 1913-14. 



BIOLOGY 97 

2a. Animal Biology, Laboratory. — This course consists of the 
practical laboratory and field work which must accompany Course la. 
Certain animals, selected as types to illustrate general principles, are 
dissected and compared- Careful notes and drawings of all dissec- 
tions are required. First semester. 

Sec. 1, M., W., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. II, T., Th, 1 :00-4 :00. 

Sec. III. T., Th., 9 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor Wieman and Miss Box. 

3b. General Zoology.— Lectures dealing in a comparative way 
with the various groups of animals, including life-histories, evolu- 
tion, heredity, and classification. This course must be accompanied 
by Course 4b. Second semester, M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Assistant Professor Wieman. 

Course 3b is open to students who have passed in Course la. 

4b. General Zoology, Laboratory.— This course consists of the 
practical work which must accompany Course 3b. Careful dissections, 
drawings, and comparisons are required. Second semester. 

Sec. I. M., W.. 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. II, T.. Th., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. Ill, T., Th.. 9 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor Wieman and Miss Box. 

5a. Plant Biology. — Lectures dealing with the physiology, ecol- 
ogy, and evolution of plants. The course is designed to provide 
the proper foundation for the study of systematic botany. This 
course must be taken in conjunction with Course 6a. First semester, 
M., W., F., 10 :30-ll :30. Dr. C. O. Chambers. 

6a. Experimental Plant Biology. — This course consists of labora- 
tory and field investigations of the physiology and ecology of selected 
plants. Each student is required to keep a careful record in a note- 
book of the results of experiments and observations, illustrating 
them with exact drawings. This course must be taken in connection 
with Course 5a. T., Th., 1 :00-4 :00. Mr. Lantis. 

7b. General Botany. — Lectures on the structure, reproduction, 
and adaptation to environment of the plants of the various phyla of 
the plant kingdom, including short series of special lectures on "Bac- 
teria and Disease" and "History and Value of Cultivated Plants." 
It must be taken in connection with Course 8b. Second semester, 
M., W., F., 10 :30-ll :30. Professor Benedict. 

8b. General Botany, Laboratory. — Thorough laboratory study 
of the structure of selected plants as examples of the different phyla 
of the plant kingdom, as well as carefully organized field trips for 
the purpose of learning to identify the commoner plants in their own 
habitats. This course must be taken in connection with Course 7b. 
T., Th., 1 :00-4 :00. Professor Benedict and Mr. Lantis. 



98 McMICKEN COLLEGE OE LIBERAL ARTS 

[9. Sanitary Biology.] Lectures on the biological principles in- 
volved in sanitary engineering, designed to enable the engineer to 
solve local problems in sanitation and to appreciate the significance of 
specialists' reports. M., 2:00-3:00, throughout the year. 

Course 9 is open to all students. Professor Benedict. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

12b. Field Ornithology.— A field study of the identification, 
classification, songs, and habits of our native birds. One laboratory 
period per week during the second semester. Hours to be arranged. 

Professor Benedict. 

35. Systematic Botany. — A course designed to give a working 
knowledge of the flora of this vicinity, comprising field trips followed 
by laboratory work in classification and in the preservation of plants, 
discussions on plant relationships and the preparation of "keys." 
T., Th., 9 :30-12 :30. Professor Benedict and Mr. Lantis. 

Course 35 is open to students who have taken Courses 5 and 7, 
and under certain conditions to all Seniors. It is required of all who 
desire to be recommended as teachers of Biology or Nature-Study in 
secondary schools. 

[15. Invertebrate Zoology.] An advanced laboratory course 
dealing with selected forms of Invertebrates. Credit according to 
number of hours elected. Miss Box. 

Prerequisite : Courses la, 2a, 3b, and 4b. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

19a. Embryology of Vertebrates. — The work consists of lectures 
and demonstrations dealing with the history of the germ cells, cleav- 
age of the ovum, embryo formation, and the development of the 
principal organs of the body. This course must be accompanied by 
Course 20. T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00. Assistant Professor Chambers. 

Prerequisite: Courses la, 2a, 3b, and 4b. 

20a. Embryology of Vertebrates, Laboratory. — Laboratory work 
to accompany Course 19a. The work is based largely on the chick and 
pig. T., Th., 2 :00-5 :00. 

Assistant Professor Chambers and Mr. Isaacs. 

[17b. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates] Lectures on the 
anatomy, classification, habits, and distribution of vertebrates. The 
anatomy is studied in a comparative way, with special reference to the 
evolution of the various organs. This course must be accompanied 
by Course 18b. Second semester, T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professor Chambers. 

Prerequisite: Courses 19a and 20a. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 



BIOLOGY 99 

[18b. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates, Laboratory.] The 
work consists in the careful dissection and study of selected forms 
to accompany Course 17b. Second semester, T., Th., 2 :00-5 :00. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Assistant Professor Chambers. 

13b. Animal Physiology. — Lectures dealing with fundamental 
physiological phenomena of animal life. This course must be accom- 
panied by Course 14b. Second semester, T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professor Chambers. 

Prerequisite: Courses la, 2a, 3b, and 4b. 

14b. Animal Physiology Laboratory. — Experiments on different 
organisms selected for the study of physiological activities, such as 
irritability, conductivity, reproduction, tropisms, etc., to accompany 
Course 13b. Second semester, T., Th., 2 :00-5 :00. 

Assistant Professor Chambers. 

Courses 13b and 14b alternate with Courses 17b and 18b. 
Courses 13b and 14b are given in 1913-14. 

10a. Microscopical Technique. — The course includes the prepa- 
ration and use of standard fixing and staining agents, and drill in 
the manipulative processes incident to general microscopy and 
cytology. First semester, M., W., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Assistant Professor Wieman. 

Prerequisite : Courses 19a and 20a. 

10b. Cytology. — A laboratory course intended to serve as an 
introduction to cytology and the general field of cellular biology. 
Second semester, M., W., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Prerequisite: Course 10a. Assistant Professor Wieman. 

21. Histology and Organology. — This course belongs to the 
Department of Anatomy of the Medical College. It is numbered 2 in 
the catalogue of the Medical College, and is open to academic 
students who are taking or have taken Courses 19a and 20a. See 
catalogue of Medical College for full description of this course and 
others open to academic students. M., W., 8:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Chambers. 

23. Field Work. — Practical directions for collecting, identifying, 
and preserving specimens will form a minor part of the work. Each 
student is assigned a special problem. The work may be taken as a 
two or a three-hour course. Hours to be arranged. 

Professor Benedict. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, ,6a, 7b, and 8b. 



100 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

[24a. Plant Histology.] Lectures on the general histology of the 
Spermatophytes, special attention being given to the physiological 
adaptations of the tissues to their functions. This course must be 
taken in connection with Course 25a. First semester, T., 10 :30-ll :30. 

Professor Benedict. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6a, 7b, and 8b. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

[25a. Plant Histology, Laboratory.] In this course the student 
will be given sufficient practice in microscopical botanical technique 
to enable him to prepare the slides which he will use in his laboratory 
study of the tissues of selected plants. Accurate drawings and descrip- 
tions will be required. A few exercises on the identification of food 
adulterations will be given. This course must be taken in connection 
with Course 24a. First semester, T., Th., 8 :30-ll :30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Professor Benedict. 

26b. The Reproduction and Embryology of the Spermato- 
phytes. — Lectures on the origin and nature of sexual reproduction in 
the flowering plants and the general principles of Spermatophyte em- 
bryology. This course must be taken in connection with Course 27b. 
Second semester, T., 10:30-11:30. Professor Benedict. 

Prerequisite : Courses 24a and 25a. 

27b. Reproduction of the Angiosperms. — A laboratory investiga- 
tion of the origin of the sex cells and the formation of the seed in 
selected Angiosperms. While a few special slides will be supplied 
the student will be required to make his own preparations. This 
course must be taken in connection with Course 26b. Second semester, 
T., Th., 8:30-11:30. Professor Benedict. 

40. Current Problems in Botany. — Lectures, assigned readings, 
and discussions upon present problems in plant physiology and 
cytology. A reading knowledge of French or German is required. 
Two credit hours. Professor Benedict and Dr. C. O. Chambers. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6a, 7b, 8b, 24a, 25a, 26b, 27b, and 35. 

Primarily for Graduates 

30. Current Problems in Zoology. — Assigned readings and dis- 
cussions to accompany courses of research. A reading knowledge 
of French and German is required. Two credit hours. 

Assistant Professor Wieman. 

31. Research. — Credit according to number of hours elected. 

Professor Benedict, Assistant Professor Wieman, 

and Assistant Professor Chambers. 



CHEMISTRY 101 

Evening Course 

50. Principles of Animal Biology. — A lecture and laboratory 
course. The lectures deal with general biological topics, such as 
animal organization, physiology, adaptation, heredity, and evolution. 
In the laboratory certain animals selected as types are dissected 
and compared. Lecture, R, 7:30-9:30; Laboratory, Th., 7:30-9:30. 
Assistant Professor Wieman and Mr. Isaacs. 



CHEMISTRY 

Lauder William Jones, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Chemistry. 
Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Chemistry. 
Edward B. Reemelin, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Physio- 
logical Chemistry. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 
Clarence A. Nash, A. M., . . Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 
Edwin W. Esslinger, A. M., . Instructor in Analytical Chem'stry. 
Ralph Edward Oesper, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 
Mary Louise Nute, A. B., . . Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 
Student Assistants : Henry Marks, Neil Wright, Clifford Rolle. 

For Undergraduates 

la. General Inorganic Chemistry. — The Non-metals. This 
course gives a definite idea of the fundamental laws of general 
chemistry, and furnishes a survey of the important facts concerning 
the chemistry of the non-metals and their compounds. Lectures, 
recitations, and quizzes illustrated by experiments, charts, and 
specimens. Course 2a forms an integral part of, and must accom- 
pany Course la. M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Fry and Assistants. 

2a. General Inorganic Chemistry, Laboratory. — Two laboratory 
exercises per week. First semester. Experiments complementary 
to the subject-matter of Course la. 

Sec I, T., Th, 1 :00-4 :00. 

Sec. II, M, W., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Associate Professor Fry and Assistants. 

3b. General Inorganic Chemistry. — The Metals. A continua- 
tion of Course la. The properties of the metals and their com- 
pounds. Three hours per week. Second semester. Students who 
have completed Courses la and 2a are eligible for this course. It 
must be accompanied by Course 4b. M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Fry and Assistants. 



102 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

4b. General Inorganic Chemistry, Laboratory. — Two laboratory 
exercises per week. Second semester. Experiments complementary 
to the subject-matter of Course 3b. 

Sec. I, T., Th., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Sec. II, M., W., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Associate Professor Fry and Assistants. 

5a. Qualitative Analysis. — Lectures and recitations on the prin- 
ciples and practice of qualitative analysis. Considerable emphasis 
will be laid upon the application of the laws of chemical equilibrium, 
and the theories of solutions and of electrolytic dissociation to the 
practical problems of the analyst. Three exercises a week. First 
semester. M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. Mr. Nash. 

Prerequisite : Courses 3b and 4b. 

6. Qualitative Analysis, Laboratory. — To accompany Course 
5a. During the first few weeks of the semester the student will perform 
important tests commonly used in the processes of analytical 
chemistr)'. The later work of the course will furnish abundant 
training in the qualitative examination of salts, minerals, alloys, etc. 
Two exercises a week, first semester; two laboratory periods and 
one quiz period, second semester. T., Th., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Mr. Nash and Mr. Esslinger. 

7b. Quantitative Analysis.— An introductory laboratory course 
in gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Occasional conferences are 
held, at which analytical methods and calculations are discussed, and 
at which reports are submitted covering assigned reading. Three 
exercises a week. Second semester. M., W., F., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a and 6 (first semester) . Mr. Esslinger. 

8a. Elementary Organic Chemistry. — Three exercises a week. 
First semester. Quizzes and lectures which are experimental, 
covering the chief classes of organic compounds of both the aliphatic 
and aromatic series. This course is arranged to meet the needs of 
those who intend to specialize in chemistry, in medicine, or in 
biology. It serves as a general introduction for those who intend to 
go deeper into the study of organic chemistry. M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Prerequisite : Courses 3b and 4b. Professor Jones. 

9a. Organic Reactions and Preparations. — Laboratory practice 
to accompany the lectures of Course 8a. M., W., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Professor Jones, assisted by Dr. Reemelin. 

Prerequisite : Courses 3b and 4b. 

14b. Metallurgy. — Five credit hours per week. Second semester. 
A study of fuels, refractories, ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy, 
and practice in metallurgical calculations. Emphasis is laid upon 
foundry and steel works processes. Excursions will be made to 



CHEMISTRY 108 

metallurgical establishments in Cincinnati and vicinity. M., T., W., 
Th., 9 :30-10 :30 ; M., 1 :00-4 :00. Assistant Professor Aston. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6, and Physics 1. 

15b. Assaying. — One afternoon a week. Second semester. 
Laboratory practice in the fire assay of ores and base metals for gold, 
silver, and lead. Hours to be arranged. 

Prerequisite: Course 7b. Assistant Professor Aston. 

[16a. Technical Inorganic Chemistry.] Three periods a week. 
First semester. For details consult p. — . M., W., F., 9:30-10:80. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch. 
Prerequisite : Courses 5a and 6. 
Omitted in 1913-14. 

17. Technical Analysis. — The course consists of analyses of typi- 
cal industrial products, involving the use of gravimetric, volumetric, 
gasometric, electrolytic, and colorimetric processes. For -details 
consult p. 173. T., Th, F., 1 :00-4:00. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch, assisted by Mr. Esslinger. 

Prerequisite: Course 7b. 

18b. Technical Organic Chemistry. — For details consult p. — . 
M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Goettsch. 

Prerequisite : Courses 8a, 9a, and 16a. 

[29a. Practical Photography.] One lecture and one laboratory 
period a week. First semester. The course embraces a study of the 
exposure and development of photographic plates ; the treatment of 
defective negatives ; the preparation and use of various printing 
papers ; copying, enlarging, and lantern-slide making. W., 8 :30-9 :30 ; 
F, 1 :00-4 :00. Assistant Professor Goettsch. 

Prerequisites : la, 2a, 3b, and 4b. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

10a. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. — Two exercises a week 
during the first semester. Special topics and recent theories of 
inorganic chemistry, including colloids, reactions in non-aqueous 
solvents ; inactive gases ; radioactive elements and emanations ; the 
electron ; valence, structure, and co-ordination theories. T, Th., 
8 :30-9 :30. Associate Professor Fry. 

Prerequisite: Courses 5a, 6, and 7b. 

11a. Inorganic Preparations. — Three laboratory exercises a 
week. First semester. Experiments supplementary to the subject- 
matter of Course 10a. Hours to be arranged. 

Prerequisite: Course 7b. Associate Professor Fry. 



104 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

12a. Physical Chemistry. — Lectures and recitations. Three exer- 
cises a week. First semester. An introductory course which con- 
siders the general properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, 
as well as the principles determining reaction velocity and the 
equilibria in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. T., Th., S., 
11 :30-12 :30. Mr. Nash. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a, 6a, and 7b, Physics 26a and 27b, 
Mathematics 5. 

13a. Physical Chemistry, Laboratory. — Two exercises a week. 
First semester. Designed to illustrate the principles developed in 
Course 12a, and to provide a knowledge of the common methods 
used in physical-chemical measurements. This course must accom- 
pany Course 12a. Th., R, 1 :00-4 :00. Mr. Nash. 

32b. Electrochemistry. — Lectures and recitations. Three exer- 
cises a week. Second semester. A general consideration of the 
electrical properties of matter with special reference to the theory 
of aqueous solutions. M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. Mr. Nash. 

Prerequisite: 12a. 

33b. Electrochemistry, Laboratory. — Two exercises a week. 
Second semester. Determination of conductivity with its application, 
transference numbers, electromotive force, dielectric constant, etc. 
Th., F., 1 :00-4 :00. This course accompanies Course 32b. 

Mr. Nash. 

[34a. Thermodynamics Applied to Chemistry.] Two exercises 
a week. First semester. Devoted to an elementary consideration of 
the principles of thermodynamics and their amplication to physical- 
chemical problems. The work will be illustrated by the solution of 
many numerical examples. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Nash. 

Prerequisite: Courses 12a and 32b. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

41a. Phase Rule. — Lectures and recitations. A study of the 
phase rule and its applications. Two exercises a week. First 
semester. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Nash. 

Prerequisite: Course 12a. 

20. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — Three lectures and confer- 
ences a week, embracing a systematic study of the principles and 
practices of organic chemistry, and treating of the modes of forma- 
tion, properties, reactions, and constitutional formulae of typical 
members of the most important classes of organic compounds. Hour? 
to be arranged. Professor Jones. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6, 7b, 8a, 9a, and a reading knowledge 
of German and French. 



CHEMISTRY 105 

21. Advanced Organic Chemistry, Laboratory. — Practice in the 
preparation of a number of typical organic compounds. This course 
will require considerable reading in the journals of chemistry and in 
various hand-books and works of reference. Credit according to 
number of hours elected. Professor Jones. 

Prerequisite: As in Course 20b. 

22b. Bio-Chemistry. — Among other subjects, the course will 
take up for discussion the nature of carbohydrates, fats, and protein 
substances; the processes of digestion and metabolism; the chemical 
composition of the body tissues, secretions, and excretions, includ- 
ing the methods employed in their analysis. Second semester, M., 
W., R, 11 :30-12:30. Assistant Professor Reemelin. 

Prerequisite: Courses 8a and 9a. 

22b. Bio-Chemistry, Laboratory. — Laboratory exercises arranged 
to accompany the lectures. Reactions of carbohydrates, fats, and 
protein substances applied to the qualitative detection of, and the 
quantitative estimation of, these substances in body tissues, secre- 
tions, and excretions. Digestion, the analysis of gastric and fecal 
matter and of urine will be considered from the chemical point of 
view. Second semester, M., W., R, 1 :00-4 :00. 

Assistant Professor Reemelin. 

Prerequisite : Courses 8a and 9a. 

24b. History of Chemistry. — Special attention is directed to the 
classical memoirs of the Greek philosophers, the tenets of the 
alchemists, and those researches of the past century that have 
developed the atomic and structure theories of modern chemistry. 
Lectures, collateral readings, and papers. Three exercises per week. 
Second semester. Hours to be arranged. 

Associate Professor Fry. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6, 8a and 9a, or 20b and 21. 

28b. Elementary Spectrum Analysis (Qualitative). — The course 
consists largely of laboratory work. The emission (flame and elec- 
tric sparks) and absorption spectra of inorganic and some organic 
substances are studied from the chemist's point of view. Two labor- 
atory periods a week. Second semester ; hours to be arranged. 

Professor Jones. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6, 8a, and 9a ; Physics, 1 year. 

Primarily for Graduates 

30. Research. — This course requires intensive laboratory work 
under the direction of some member of the department. Problems 
for investigation may be chosen from the following: organic 



1C6 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

chemistry (30a), inorganic chemistry (30b), physical chemistry 
(30c), or industrial chemistry (30d). 

Professor Jones, Associate Professor Fry, 
Assistant Professor Goettsch, Assistant Professor Aston. 

During the summer of 1913, students engaged in research were 
allowed to enroll in the Graduate School. 

35b. Some Special Problems and Theories of Organic Chem- 
istry. — A critical discussion of the working hypotheses and the 
theories of organic chemistry. With this end in view, their ap 4 
plication to the difficulties of certain complex cases are presented 
in detail. Topics for consideration will be chosen each year from 
the following : Optical and geometrical isomerism of compounds of 
carbon, nitrogen, and other elements ; tautomerism ; bivalent carbon 
derivatives ; oxonium compounds ; purine derivatives ; the carbohy- 
drates ; the alkaloids ; the terpenes ; the polypeptides, proteins ; the 
organic dyes, etc. Second semester. Two hours a week, to be 
arranged. Professor Jones. 

40. Journal Club Meetings. — Instructors and advanced students 
of the department present papers dealing with subjects under in- 
vestigation in the department, or critical reviews of papers of 
general interest to those engaged in advanced work or research. 
All students interested in chemistry are invited to attend. Meet- 
ings are held fortnightly, and last one hour. Subjects to be dis- 
cussed are announced one week in advance. 



ECONOMICS 

(The Sinton Professorship) 
Frederick Charles Hicks, Ph. D., Sinton Professor of Economics 

and Commerce. 
James Dysart Magee, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Economics. 
Students desiring a general knowledge of economics are recom- 
mended to take Course 1 or Courses 1 and 2. Courses 11, 12a. and 
13b are required of students taking a major in economics. 

For Undergraduates 
1. Economics. — This course is intended to give the student 
a general view of the subject. It includes a study of (1) the ele- 
ments of economics: wealth, value, price, competition, monopoli- 
zation, production, and distribution; (2) the evolution of indus- 
try from local organization and control during the middle ages, 
through nationalism and the industrial revolution, to modern con- 
ditions; and (3) the leading economic problems of today. Lecture, 
W., 11:30-12:30; Sec. I (for men), M., 11:30-12:30; Sec. II (for 
women), F.. 11 :30-12:30. Professor Hicks and Dr. Magee. 






ECONOMICS 107 

2. Economic History. — A study of industrial development 
since the tenth century, including the economic history of the 
United States. Subjects considered: the local industry of feudal- 
ism, the manorial and guild systems; the rise of nationalism; the 
colonial policy and national regulation of industry under the mer- 
cantile system; the industrial revolution, 1750-1850; and the dis- 
tinguishing features of the complex and highly developed economic 
organization of modern times. Sec. I, T., Th., 11:30-12:30. 

Dr. Magee. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

11. Elements of Economics. — An advanced course in the fun- 
damental principles of economics. The work will consist mainly 
of a comparison of the views of representative economists. 
T., Th., 9 :30-10 :30. Professor Hicks. 

Course 11 is open to students who have completed Courses 1 
and 2 and to others by special permission. 

12a. Industrial Evolution. — An analysis of the modern economic 
system and a study of its development from earlier forms of 
industry. W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. Professor Hicks. 

Course 12a must be preceded or accompanied by Course 11. 

13b. Applied Economics. — The application of economic prin- 
ciples to leading problems, such as socialism, land nationalization, 
labor, trusts, money, transportation, and the tariff. W., F., 
9:30-10:30. - Professor Hicks. 

Course 13b must be preceded by Course 12a. 

[14. Seminary.] For the detailed study of special problems. 
Credit according to number of hours elected. 
Omitted in 1913-14. 

Evening Courses 

1. Economics (See above).— Sec. III. W., 7:30-9:30. 

Professor Hicks. 

2. Economic History (See above).— Sec. II. Th., 7:30-9:30. 

Dr. Magee. 

30. Commercial Geography. — A study of the leading articles of 
commerce, including both raw materials and manufactured products, 
their character and relative importance, the principal sources of 
supply, and their distribution in the world's markets. W., 4 :45-6 :45. 

Dr. Magee. 

31. Statistics. — The principles of the statistical method and their 
application to social and economic problems. M., 4 :45-6 :45. 

Dr. Magee. 



108 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

EDUCATION 

William Paxton Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Professor of the History 

and Principles of Education. 
John William Hall, A. M., Professor of Elementary Education. 
Henry Skinner West, Ph. D., Professor of Secondary Education. 
Cyrus De Witt Mead, A. M.. Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education. 
Abbie Louise Day, B. S., B. Di., Instructor in Elementary Education. 

The following courses may be elected by undergraduates dur- 
ing the Senior year, and be counted toward fulfilling requirements 
for the A. B. degree in the McMicken College of Liberal Arts. 

1. History and Principles of Education. — 6 credits. M., W., 
F., 10:30-11:30. Professor Burris. 

2. Theory and Practice of Teaching. — 8 credits. Three hours 
class-room work and fifteen hours of practice per semester. Hours 
for practice to be arranged before registration. M., W., F., 9 :30- 
10:30. Professor Hall. 

4. School Economy .—2 credits. F., 11 :30-12 :30. Miss Day. 

14. The Teaching of English— 4 credits. M., W., 8:30-9:30. 

Miss Day. 

16. The Teaching of History.— 2 credits. F., 8:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professor Mead. 

20. The Teaching of Mathematics. — 2 credits. Second semes- 
ter, M.. W.. 11 :30-12 :30. Assistant Professor Mead. 

22. The Teaching of Geography. — 2 credits. First semester, 
M., W., 11 :30-12 :30. Assistant Professor Mead. 

Prerequisite Courses: 

Psychology la and lb. 

Philosophy 5a. 

Geology and Geography 1. 

History 15. (For those who did not offer a year's work in 
American history for admission.) 

Education Courses 1, 2 and 4, and eight credits for work 
elected in Courses 14, 16, 20, and 22, making a total of twenty- 
four credits, entitle the graduate to a Teacher's Diploma, conferred 
by the College for Teachers, and a place on the preferred list of 
those eligible to appointment in the Cincinnati schools. 

Students may count Education as one of the two departments 
in each of which they are required to obtain at least sixteen credits 
for graduation. 



ENGLISH 109 

Students who take Education with a view of obtaining a 
Teacher's Diploma should invariably consult with the Dean of the 
College for Teachers before registration. They will be required, 
in case of doubt, to give satisfactory evidence of physical qualifi- 
cations for the work of teaching. 

For further information, including statements in detail con- 
cerning the requirements of professional programs for those zvho 
wish to prepare for various positions in educational work, see an- 
nouncement of the College for Teachers. 



ENGLISH 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

(The Nathaniel Ropes Foundation for the Comparative Study of 

Literature) 

Frank Wadleigh Chandler, Ph. D., Professor of English and 
Ropes Professor of Comparative Literature. 
Emilie Watts McVea, A. M., Assistant Professor of English. 
Benjamin Carlton Van Wye, A. M., Assistant Professor of Pub- 
lic Speaking and of English. 
Clyde William Park, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 
Bertha K. Young, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of English. 
Clarence Dimick Stevens, A. M., Assistant Professor of English. 
Student Assistants : John D. Ellis, A. B., LL. B. ; Estelle Hunt ; 
Elise Loebman, A. M. ; Helen Stanley, A. B. ; Agnes Van Slyck, 
A. M. ; Mary Whitfield, A. B. ; Mattie Winston. 

All students in English, before making their election of courses, 
are advised to consult with some member of the department, and to 
read carefully the departmental bulletin of information as to the 
proper sequence in which such courses should be taken. 

No student should enter or withdraw from a two-semester 
course at the beginning of the second semester without first con- 
sulting both the instructor concerned and the head of the department. 

Students majoring in English are required to do 16 credits of 
English work over and above the University credits allowed them 
for English 1, 2, 3, and 25; but English 1 and 3 (10 credits) are 
prerequisites for entering upon the work of the major in English, 
and students so majoring must also take as part of their course 
either 7a (with 8b) or 10. 

For Undergraduates 

1. English Composition. — This course presents a general sur- 
vey of the principles of English composition and endeavors to en- 



110 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

force them by practice in writing. A certain amount of reading 
in English literature is also required. 

Sec. I, M., W., R, 9:30-10:30. 

Sec. II, T., Th., S., 8:30-9:30. 

Sec. Ill, M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 

Sec. IV, M., W., R, 10 :30-ll :30. 

Sec. V, M., W., R, 1 :00-2 :00. 

Sec. VI, M., W., R, 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professors McVea, Van Wye, Park, 
Young, and Stevens. 

Course 1 is required for all students in the College of Liberal 
Arts in the Freshman year. It cannot be counted towards a major 
in English. 

2a. Argumentation. — First semester, T., Th., 8:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professor Van Wye. 

[2b. Description and Narration.] Second semester, T., Th., 
8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Stevens. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

Courses 2a and 2b are recommended for Sophomores, but cannot 
be counted towards a major in English. 

3. Types of Literature. — An appreciative rather than an his- 
torical study of the principal literary kinds — lyric, narrative verse, 
drama, prose fiction, and essay — illustrated by readings in repre- 
sentative masterpieces, chiefly English. Lectures, class papers, 
discussions. T., Th., 9:30-10:30. Professor Chandler. 

Course 3 is recommended for Freshmen and Sophomores only. 
It is a prerequisite for all students who wish to major in English, 
but cannot be counted toward that major. 

4. Nineteenth Century Prose. — Studies in the thought and 
style of the great prose writers, other than novelists, from Coleridge 
to Carlyle (during the first semester), and from Emerson to Pater 
(during the second semester). M., W., R, 10:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 
Course 4 is recommended for Juniors and Seniors. 

5. Shakespeare. — A study of the life and times of Shakes- 
peare, his dramatic methods, and the literary history of his plays. 
Some of the plays are examined in detail, and most of the others 
are assigned for reading. M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 
Course 5 is recommended for Sophomores. 

6. Victorian Poetry. — A study of the poetical works of Ten- 
nyson, Browning, Arnold, Rossetti, and Swinburne, involving a dis- 



ENGLISH 111 

cussion of their technic, art, growth of mind, general interpreta- 
tion of life, and relation to their time. M., W., R, 8 :30-9 :30. 

Professor Chandler. 
Course 6 is recommended for Juniors and Seniors. 

[11. The English Novel.] This course considers the origin and 
history of the English novel, and discusses its characteristics as 
a form of prose literature. T., Th., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Assistant Professor Stevens. 

[16. Wordsworth and His Contemporaries.] A study of the 
English romantic poets of the early nineteenth century — Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats — involving a 
discussion of their technic, art, growth of mind, general interpre- 
tation of life, and relation to their time. M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Professor Chandler. 

Course 16 is recommended for Juniors and Seniors. 

18. American Literature. — Irving, Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, 
Longfellow, Lowell, Holmes, and some of their contemporaries. 
T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00. Assistant Professor McVea. 

25. Public Speaking. — Control of the voice and body, correct 
enunciation, and practice in effective expression. 

Sec. I, T., Th., 10:30-11:30. 

Sec. II, T., Th., 11:30-12:30. 

Assistant Professor Van Wye. 

Course 25 counts as only one University credit for each semester. 
It is recommended for students who expect to take Course 13, but 
it cannot be counted toward a major in English. 

13. Forms of Public Address. — This course is intended to 
serve as an introduction to debating and as a preparation for ef- 
fective public speaking. T., 1 :00-3 :00. 

Assistant Professor Van Wye. 

Course 13 is open to students who have passed creditably in 
Course 1 and Course 2a. It is recommended for Seniors who are 
candidates for the Jones prizes. 

[26a. The Essay.] A consideration of the origin and history of 
the English essay, involving a study of the rise of periodical liter- 
ature and some reading of foreign examples of the type. First 
semester, M., W., F., 1 :00-2 :00. Assistant Professor Park. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

7a. Old English Prose. — An elementary reading course in 
Old English. First semester, T., Th., S., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 



112 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Either Course 7a or Course 10 (Chaucer) is required of all 
students who choose English as a major subject. Those who elect 
Course 7a must also elect either Course 8b or Course 9b. 

8b. Old English Poetry. — Beowulf or some other long poem, 
supplemented by readings in the history of Old English literature. 
Second semester, T., Th., S., 8:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 

[9b. Early Middle English.] A study of the development of the 
English language and its literature from the Norman Conquest to 
the Age of Chaucer, with especial emphasis upon the flourishing of 
romance. Second semester, T., Th., S., 8:30-9:30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Assistant Professor Young. 

10. Chaucer. — The work and influence of Chaucer : his times, 
sources, contemporaries, and immediate successors, studied chiefly 
from the literary point of view. M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor Stevens. 

Either Course 10 or Course 7a (Old English) is required of all 
students who choose English as a major subject. Those who elect 
Course 7a must also elect Course 8b or Course 9b. 

12. Literary Composition. — This course considers the various 
prose literary forms from the point of view of original composi- 
tion. Only those students are admitted to the course who satisfy 
the instructor of their ability to write well. T., Th., 11 :30-12:30. 

Assistant Professor McVea. 

[14. The English Drama before Shakespeare.] This course con- 
siders the origins of the English drama and its earlier manifesta- 
tions in miracle plays, moralities, and interludes, as well as the 
regular drama to the death of Marlowe. M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Assistant Professor Stevens. 

15. The English Drama from the Death of Marlowe to 1642. — 
A study of Shakespeare's contemporaries and immediate successors 
in the development of the drama. M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. 

Assistant Professor Stevens. 

[27. English Drama Since the Restoration.] A study of the 
development of the drama in England during the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries, with some attention to its foreign relations. 
M., W., F., 1 :00-2 :00. Assistant Professor Park. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

[19a. The English and Scottish Popular Ballads.] A study of 
the characteristics of folk-poetry and of the origin and develop- 
ment of the popular ballad. First semester. T., Th., 1:00-2:00. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Assistant Professor Stevens. 






ENGLISH 113 

21. English Poetry from Spenser to Burns. — A study of the 
development of English poetry, exclusive of the drama, from the 
beginning of the Elizabethan Age through the eras of Milton and 
Pope to the close of the eighteenth century. T., Th., 9:30-10:30. 

Assistant Professor Stevens. 

22. Foreign Backgrounds of English Literature. — An intro- 
duction to the literature of modern Europe, presenting a general 
survey of some of the more important works and tendencies since 
the Renaissance, with particular stress upon such as have proved 
influential in England. T M Th., 2 :00-3 :00. Professor Chandler. 

[23. The Literary Movement of the Eighteenth Century.] A 
detailed study of the characteristics of romanticism and of their 
manifestation in the literature of England, France, and Germany, 
prior to the culmination of the movement in the early nineteenth 
century. W., 4:00-6:00. Professor Chandler. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

24. Recent European Drama. — A study of the new dramatic 
literature, its varieties, technic, aims, and problems, beginning with 
the later plays of Ibsen, and considering the art and thought of such 
other representative writers for the stage as Bjornson, Hauptmann, 
Sudermann, Schnitzler, Maeterlinck, Hervieu, Rostand, D'Annunzio, 
Echegaray, Strindberg, Tchekov, Pinero, Jones, Phillips, Synge, and 
Shaw. W., 4:00-6:00. Professor Chandler. 

For Graduates Only 

20. Seminary. — Studies in Literary Theory. — An examination 
of the principal theories of literature considered historically and 
philosophically. The later portion of the course will be devoted 
to the investigation of special problems in literary criticism. T., 
3:30-5:30. Professor Chandler. 

For Teachers 

For courses available for teachers see Courses 24 and 20, and 
the evening courses. 

Evening Courses 
30. English Composition. 

Sec. I, Th., 7 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Park. 

Sec. II, T., 4:45-6:45. Assistant Professor Stevens. 

[31. Nineteenth Century Prose.] 
Omitted in 1913-14. Assistant Professor Young. 

32. Shakespeare. M., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 

33. Public Speaking. T., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Van Wye. 



114 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

Nevin M. Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Geography. 

J. Ernest Carman, B. S Assistant Professor of Geology. 

Walter H. Bucher, Ph. D., Instructor in Geology. 

For Undergraduates 

1. An introductory study of minerals and rocks, dynamic geol- 
ogy, origin and classification of topographic forms, atmosphere and 
ocean ; followed by a brief study of the physiography of the United 
States. Lectures, M., W., F., 8:30-9:30; Laboratory, M., W., 2:00- 
4:30; T., Th., 9:30-12:00; T., Th., 2:00-4:30; T., Th., 1:00-3:30. 

Professor Fenneman and Dr. Bucher. 

2. General Geology. — This course is primarily for co-operative 
engineering students, but Liberal Arts students will also be admitted. 
An introductory study of minerals and rocks, dynamic geology and 
topography, followed in the second semester by stratigraphic, struc- 
tural, and economic geology. M., T., 9:30-10:30; W., 9:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

9. Historical Geology. — Chiefly the geology of North Amer- 
ica, its physical history, life development and structure; special 
attention given to the economic deposits of each period. Frequent 
local (half-day) excursions noting fossils, stratigraphy, physiog- 
raphy, and economic relations. Lectures, T., Th., 8:30-9:30; 
Laboratory, M., 2:00-4:30. Course 1 is prerequisite. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

Geology 9 is accepted as graduate work by agreement with 
the professor in charge. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

5b. Field Geology and Survey Methods. — The study and map- 
ping of assigned areas in the vicinity of Cincinnati. Students 
work singly or in parties of two, and submit typewritten reports 
with topographic and geologic maps. Second semester. Hours to 
be arranged by agreement with each party. Credit according to 
number of hours elected. Course 1 is prerequisite. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

*7. Mineralogy. — This course embraces (1) geometrical study 
of crystal forms illustrated by wooden models; (2) description 
and classification of minerals, about 400 species being used in lab- 
oratory study; (3) determinative mineralogy and blowpipe analy- 
sis. M., 9 :00-10 :30 ; W., 8 :30-ll :30. Dr. Bucher. 

* Course I is not prerequisite to Course 7, but the latter is not accepted 
as a graduate course for students making Geology a major, unless Course 1 or 
its equivalent has been taken. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 115 

[8. Introductory Paleontology.] The work of this course is 
mainly with fossil invertebrates, their specific features, the age of 
the rocks which contain them, their migrations and association in 
societies. Recognition at sight is emphasized. Three hours, to be 
announced. Assistant Professor Carman. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

[12. Petrology.] This course embraces (1) the optical prin- 
ciples of mineralogy; (2) the microscopic study of minerals in rock 
sections ; (3) a systematic study of rocks, their constitution, struc- 
ture, origin, and classification. Two or three hours, to be announced. 

Course 7 is prerequisite. . 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

13. Special Work in Geology. — Any student in this depart- 
ment may, by agreement with the instructors in charge, register 
for individual study or investigation not described in the list of 
courses. Such work must be regularly supervised and approved 
upon examination or by the preparation of a thesis. Credit 
according to number of hours elected. 

14. Course 14 is outlined under the heading "For Teachers." 
Open to college students only by special agreement with the professor 
in charge. 

16. Course 16 is outlined under the heading "For Teachers." 

For Teachers 

14. General Geology for Teachers. — Elements of dynamic, 
structural, and physiographic geology, being identical with the cor- 
responding parts of Course 1. Lecture, S., 8:30-10:30. Field or 
Laboratory, 10 :30-12 :50. Professor Fenneman. 

16. Advanced Physiography of the United States. — Course 1 (or 
Course 14) and Course 9 are prerequisite. Lecture, W., 4 :00-6 :00 ; 
S., 10:30-11:30. Professor Fenneman. 

Course 16 runs through more than one year, but may be entered 
at the beginning of any semester. 

Course 9 is also given to teachers who have had Course 14. 
Lecture, S., 8:30-10:30; Field or Laboratory, 10:30-12:50. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

Evening Course 

18. Elementary Geology. — Equivalent to the first half of Course 
1, but treating certain subjects more fully. Lecture, T., 7:30-9:30; 
laboratory, Th., 7 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Carman. 



116 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

GERMAN 

Max Poll, Ph. D Professor of the Germanic Languages. 

Claude M. Lotspeich, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of German. 

Eleanor Nippert, A. B., Instructor in German. 

Martin Ludwich, M. E Instructor in German. 

Assistant: Emma Andriessen, A. M. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Elementary German. — Grammar, translation from German 
into English, and elementary exercises in translating into German. 

Sec. I. T., Th.. S.. 8:30-9:30. 
Sec. II. M.. W.. F., 11:30-12:30. 
Sec. Ill, M., W., F., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich and Miss Nippert. 
Course 1 is open to students who have had no German in the 
high school. 

2. German Prose and Poetry. — Reading at sight, grammar, 
composition, and dictation. 

Sec. I. M.. W.. F.. 9:30-10:30. 

Sec. II. M., W.. R. 10 :30-ll :30. 

Sec. III. M.. W., F.. 11:30-12:30. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich and Miss Nippert. 

Course 2 is open to students who have passed in Course 1 or 
who have had two years of German in the high school. 

Course 2 does not count towards a major in German. 

20. German Scientific Prose. — Subjects in natural science. T., 
Th., 11 :30-12 :30. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

Course 20 is open to students who have passed in Course 1 or 
its equivalent. Course 20 does not count towards a major in 
German. If taken after Course 2, Course 20 will count only as a 
half course. 

3. German Composition (Beginners' Course). — German gram- 
mar, conversation, and practice in writing German. T., Th., 10:30- 
11 :30. Miss Nippert. 

Course 3 is open to students who have passed in Course 1. 
Courses 2 and 3 may be advantageously taken together. 

**4. Introduction to German Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. — Lessing's Emilia Galotti, Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans 
and Maria Stuart, Goethe's Iphigenie, Egmont, Tasso and Goetz 
von Berlichingen. Translation and reading at sight. Practice in 



** Students entering the University who have done advanced work in 
German may anticipate this course by passing an examination on the work as 
outlined above, within three weeks after matriculation. 



GERMAN 117 

writing German, based on the reading. This course is conducted 
mainly in German. 

Sec. I, M., W., R, 10 :30-ll :30. 

Sec. II, M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. 

Professor Poll, Miss Nippert, and Assistant. 

Course 4 is open to students who have passed in Course 2. 
Students in this course are urged to take a composition course in 
addition. 

21. German Composition (Intermediate Course). — Practice in 
composition, conversation and in writing German. T., Th., 9 :30- 
10:30. Miss Nippert. 

Courses 4 and 21 may be advantageously taken together. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

5. History of German Literature to the Nineteenth Century, 
with special study of the Classic Periods of the Twelfth and 
Eighteenth Centuries. Among other works the following are read 
in 1913-14 : An Anthology of German Literature, by Calvin Thomas ; 
the Nibelungenlied (translated into modern German by R. Woer- 
ner) ; Lessing's Nathan; Schiller's Wallenstein and Braut von Mes- 
sina, and Goethe's Faust. Lectures in German, collateral reading. 
M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. Professor Poll and Assistant. 

Course 5 is open to students who have passed in Course 4. 

6. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century. — The Ro- 
mantic School. The Novel. The Drama and Lyrics. Lectures, 
collateral reading and written reports by the class. Th., 4:00-6:00. 

Professor Poll. 
Course 6 is open to students who have passed in Course 5. 
10. German Composition (Advanced Course). — Advanced com- 
position and practice in writing German. S., 9 :30-ll :30. 

Professor Poll. 
[30. Glimpses of German Life and Culture.] Papers and dis- 
cussions in German. Advanced composition. S., 9:30-11:30. 
Omitted in 1913-14. Professor Poll. 

Primarily for Graduates 

12. Interpretation of both parts of Faust and Study of the 
Legend. — Collateral reading and written reports. T., 4:00-6:00. 

Professor Poll. 

Course 12 is open to students who have passed in Course 5. 

[lib. German Literature from the Reformation to the Classic 
Period of the Eighteenth Century.] Lectures in German and col- 
lateral reading. Second semester, T., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Poll. 

Course lib is open to students who have passed in Course 5 or 6. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 



118 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

[7. Middle High German.] Wright's Middle High-German 
Primer. Bachmann's Mittelhochdeutsches Lesebuch. Translation 
into modern German. M., 4:00-6:00. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

[8. Old High German.] Braune's Althochdeutsche Grammatik , 
and the same author's Althochdeutsche s Lesebuch are used as text- 
books. Translation into modern German. During a part of the 
second .semester the Old Saxon phonology and morphology will be 
studied and selections from the Heliand will be read. M., 4:00-6:00. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

[13. Gothic] Braune's Gotische Grammatik ; reading of selec- 
tions from Ulfilas, lectures on Germanic philology. W., 4:00-6:00. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

26. Old Norse. — Hensler's Altislacndisches Elementarbuch. 
Reading of selections from the Sagas. In the second semester 
selected poems of the Edda will be read. M., 4:00-6:00. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

[9b. German Seminary.] Willem's Van den vos Reinaerde. Sec- 
ond semester. T., 4:00-6:00. Professor Poll. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

For Teachers 

Courses 10 and 30, outlined above, are intended primarily for 
teachers. 

Evening Courses 

33. Elementary German. — Grammar, translation from German 
into English, and elementary exercises in translating into German. 
W., 7:30-9:30. Mr. Ludwich. 

34. Advanced German, Prose and Poetry. — Translation, sight 
reading, grammar, composition, dictation. T., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

35. Introduction to German Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. — Translation and reading at sight. Practice in writing 
German, based on the reading. This course is conducted in German. 
W., 7 :30-9 :30. Professor Poll. 



GREEK 



Joseph Edward Harry, Ph. D Professor of Greek. 

Arthur James Kinsella, A. M Instructor in Greek. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Oratory — Epic Poetry — Philosophy. — Lysias, six orations 
Herodotus, one book; Iliad, Books XIX-XXIT. 



GREEK 119 

The Lyric Poets. — Selections. Plato: Protagoras; Lysis; 
Laches; Charmides. Collateral reading : two orations of Lysias ; 
two books of the Iliad; Plato's Apology and Crito. M., W., F., 
9:30-10:30, throughout the year. Professor Harry. 

A collateral course is offered by Mr. Kinsella for those stu- 
dents who are unable to attend at this hour. 

2. Greek Prose Composition.— M., 10:30-11:30, throughout the 
year. Mr. Kinsella. 

Course 2 should be taken in connection with Course 1. 

3. The Drama. — Euripides, Hippolytus; Sophocles, Oedipus 
Tyrannus; Aeschylus, Prometheus; Aristophanes, Nubes. Collateral 
reading— Euripides : Alcestis, Ion. M., W., F., 10 :30-ll :30, through- 
out the year. Professor Harry. 

Course 3 is open to students who have completed Course 1. 

4. The Odyssey. — Two hours weekly; to be arranged. 

Mr. Kinsella. 

8. The Life and the Literature of the Ancient Greeks. — Greek 
Life, first semester. Homer, second semester. Th., 10:30-11:30. 

Professor Harry. 
Students who are not acquainted with the Greek language may 
be admitted to Course 8. 

9. Elementary Greek. — First Greek book and grammar. Xeno- 
phon. M., W„ F., 9:30-10:30. Mr. Kinsella. 

10. The New Testament. — A course in grammar and transla- 
tion. Two hours; to be arranged with the instructor. 
Throughout the year. Mr. Kinsella. 

Course 10 alternates with Course 16. 

[11. Advanced Course in the Greek Drama.] Iphigenia, An- 
tigone, Agamemnon, Aves, Ranae. M., W., F., 10 :30-ll :30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Professor Harry. 

12. Xenophon's Hellenica, first semester. Symposium, Mem- 
orabilia, second semester. T., Th., 10:30-11:30. Mr. Kinsella. 

15. Intermediate Greek. — Prose Composition. Homer, I-III. 
M., W., F., 11:30-12:30. Mr. Kinsella. 

Prerequisite: Course 9 or its equivalent. 

[16. Hellenistic Greek] Philo and other writers of this period. 
Two hours throughout the year ; to be arranged with the instructor. 

Course 16 alternates with Course 10. Mr. Kinsella. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

17. First Year Greek.— T., Th.. S., 11:30-12:30. 

Professor Harry. 

18. Advanced Course in Greek Drama. — Bacchae, Ajax, Vespae, 
Pax. T., 2 :00-4 :00 ; Th., 2 :00-3 :00. Mr. Kinsella. 

Course 18 alternates with Course 11. 



120 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

20b. Greek Mythology. — A lecture course with collateral read- 
ing. T., Th, 9:30-10:30. Mr. Kinsella. 

Students who are not acquainted with the Greek language may 
be admitted to Course 20b. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 
13. Greek Art. — A course in the grammar and history of Greek 
art, including architecture. Special attention is given to the spirit 
and principles of plastic art, to the influence of religion and ath- 
letics, to the temples and their decorations, and to the masterpieces 
of the great Greek sculptors. Pre-Hellenic archaeology, Greek 
architecture, and sculpture (1914-15) ; vase paintings, coins, gem 
engraving, wall paintings (1913-14). T., 10:30-11:30. 

This class is limited to forty students. Professor Harry. 

Primarily for Graduates 

5. Rapid Reading.— W., 3 :00-4 :00. Professor Harry. 

6. Practical Exercises in Greek. — F., 3:00-5:00. 

Professor Harry. 

7. Greek Seminary. — The Drama (1913-14) ; The Historians 
(1914-15). M., 3:00-5:00. Professor Harry. 

Course 7 is open to graduates and to those who have com- 
pleted the undergraduate courses in Greek. 



HISTORY 

* Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., Professor of History. 

Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D Associate Professor of. History. 

James Francis Dilworth, A. M., . Instructor in English History. 

Philip W. MacDonald, A. M., Instructor in History. 

Assistants : Lesley Henshaw, A. M., Margaret B. Plimpton, A. B. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Middle Ages — Renaissance. — This course includes the main 
facts of European history from the fall of the Roman Empire to 
the beginning of the Lutheran Reformation. Lectures and recita- 
tions. M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. Mr. MacDonald. 

3. The Revolution and Napoleon. — Beginning with the Bour- 
bon period this course includes a study of the Ancien Regime and 
the French Revolution, and follows the fortunes of Napoleon to 
1815. Lectures and recitations. M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 

Mr. MacDonald. 

13. General Course in English History. — This course, while 
open to all students, is especially recommended for those who de- 

* Absent on leave. 19IS04. 



HISTORY 121 

sire a general introductory course as preparatory to the study of 
both European and American history. The course traces the devel- 
opment of the English people from the earliest times to the pres- 
ent. The method is by lecture, text-book, and source-book. M., 
W., R, 1 :00-2 :00. Mr. Dilworth. 

29. Ancient History to 476, A. D. — This course comprises a 
brief survey of the development of the principal Oriental nations ; 
the political and the social life of the Greeks; the early political 
life and expansion of the Roman people, and their social and eco- 
nomic development under the Empire. T., Th., 8:30-9:30. 

Mr. MacDonald. 

15. General Course in American History. — This course, while 
open to all, is especially recommended for those who have not had 
American history in the high school and for those who contemplate 
taking work in the College for Teachers. The work covers the pe- 
riod from the earliest discoveries to the present time and is based 
largely upon a text-book, supplemented by regular reports and lec- 
tures. Special quiz sections and conference groups at other hours, 
if necessary. M., W., F., 8:30-9:30. Associate Professor Cox. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

25. European History Since 1814. — An advanced course deal- 
ing with the problems of European history in the nineteenth cen- 
tury. France since 1814; Germany since 1814; the Kingdom of 
Italy; the Eastern Question; Colonization, T., Th., 10:30-11:30. 

Open to Seniors ; to Juniors by permission. Mr. MacDonald. 

[46. History of Germany.] Beginning with the early Germans 
this course will follow the history of the German peoples down to 
the present time. The relations of the Germans to the Roman Em- 
pire; conquests of Charles the Great; the Medieval Empire; the 
Reformation; rise of the Hohenzollern dynasty; period of Fred- 
erick the Great; Napoleon; Wars of Liberation; organization of 
the German Empire. T., Th., 10:30-11:30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

20. Spain and Spanish America. — A brief view of the develop- 
ment of the Spanish nation, tracing typical institutions that later 
affected the Spanish colonies; the discovery of America and the 
development of the Spanish colonial system; the struggle for Spanish 
American independence; the subsequent development of selected 
countries in Latin America, their relations with Europe and the 
United States ; Pan-American movements of the present day. 
Lectures and special reports. Open to advanced students. Th., 
9:30-11:30. Associate Professor Cox. 



122 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

21. American Constitutional History.— The course treats of 
the development of governmental institutions during the Colonial 
era, and of the important constitutional questions occurring be- 
tween the Revolution and the Civil War. M.. W., R, 11:30-12:30. 

Associate Professor Cox. 

Open to those who have had Course 15 or an equivalent. 

[22. American Constitutional History (Continued).] A review 
of the leading governmental problems connected with the Civil War 
and Reconstruction Periods, and the subsequent industrial and terri- 
torial expansion of the United States. Lectures and special reports. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Associate Professor Cox. 

[28. Problems of American Expansion.] A general view of the 
territorial development of North America with the United States 
as its chief factor. Emphasis will be given to filibustering operations 
in connection with Spanish-American relations. Lectures and special 
reports. Associate Professor Cox. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

35. The Ohio Valley and the Old Northwest.— A survey of the 
discovery, exploration, and settlement of this locality and of its 
development to the Civil War. Lectures and special reports. Open 
to teachers and advanced students. This is suggested as a prepara- 
tory course for Course 39 and for those who teach local history in 
the grades. S., 9 :30-10 :30. Associate Professor Cox. 

39. Seminary in American History. — Politics and Political 
Leaders of the Ohio Valley. The course is devoted to an intensive 
study, from the original sources, of selected national political issues 
affecting this section, and the social and economic causes underlying 
them. Seniors may be admitted. S., 10:30-12:30. 

Associate Professor Cox. 
Open to properly qualified teachers. 

40. English Constitutional History. — The course traces the de- 
velopment of English political institutions from the Saxon period 
to the present times. Recommended for students who intend to 
enter upon the study of law, and for those who wish to specialize in 
American history. T., Th., 11:30-12:30. Mr. Dilworth. 

[44. English History Since 1856.] This course deals with the 
political, economic, and religious history of England since the close 
of the Crimean War and with the present day problems. Students 
are requested to subscribe to The London Times (Weekly Edition). 
T., Th., 11:30-12:30. Mr. Dilworth. 

Open to Seniors and Juniors. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 



LATIN 123 

Evening Courses 

[48. General Course in English History.] This course, while 
open to all students, is especially recommended for those who desire 
a general introductory course as preparatory to the study of both 
European and American history. The course traces the development 
of the English people from the earliest times to the present. The 
method is by lecture, text-book, and source-book. W., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Mr. Dilworth. 

[47. General Course in American History.] The work of this 
course covers the Colonial and Revolutionary Periods and is based 
largely upon a text-book, supplemented by regular reports and lectures. 
Th., 7 :30-9 :30. Associate Professor Cox. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

49. General Course in American History (Continued). — The 
work of this course covers the period from 1789 to the present 
time, and is conducted in the same manner as Course 47. Th., 
7:30-9:30. Associate Professor Cox. 

55. English Constitutional History. — The course traces the 
development of the English constitution from the Saxon period to 
the present times. Recommended for students who intend to enter 
upon the study of law, and for those who wish to specialize in 
American History. W., 7:30-9:30. Mr. Dilworth. 



LATIN 



John Miller Burnam, Ph. D., Professor of Latin. 

William Tunstall Semple, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Latin. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Livy. — Horace. — Selections from Livy. Selected Odes and 
Epodes of Horace. Informal discussion of the life and thought of 
the times. 

Sec. I, T., Th., S., 8 :30-9 :30. 
Sec. II, M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 
Sec. Ill, M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 

Professor Burnam and Assistant Professor Semple. 

2. Cicero, Tacitus, Plautus, Horace. — Cicero's Laelius, Tacitus' 
Agricola, Plautus' Menaechmi, selections from Horace's Satires 
and Epistles. 

Sec. I, T., Th., S., 9 :30-10 :30. 
Sec. II, M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Assistant Professor Semple. 
Course 2 is open to students who have completed Course 1. 



124 McMlCKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

6. Prose Composition. — One hour per week throughout the 
year. T., 10:30-11:30. Assistant Professor Semple. 

Course 6 is required of all students who choose Latin as a 
major. It may be taken any year after the completion of Course I. 

3. Plautus and Terence.— M., W., R, 11:30-12:30. 

Assistant Professor Semple. 
Course 3 is open to students who have passed in Courses 1 and 2. 

4. Tacitus and Gaius. — Three hours, to be arranged. 

Professor Burnam. 
Course 4 is open to students who have passed in Courses 1 
and 2. 

5. Latin Literature. — A general survey of the life and letters 
of the Roman people from the earliest times until the later Em- 
pire. W., 2:00-3:00. Assistant Professor Semple. 

Primarily for Graduates 

Hours in all cases to be arranged 

9. Latin and Romance Palaeography. — The history of the Latin 
alphabet in Western Europe, from A. D. 1 to the close of the fif- 
teenth century. Students are given abundant practice in reading 
facsimiles. Three hours. Professor Burnam. 

Course 9 must be preceded by at least four years of under- 
graduate work, and requires the ability to read French and German. 

10. Latin Seminary. — 

10a. Cicero. Three hours. 

10b. Virgil. Omitted in 1913-14. 

10c. Caesar. Omitted in 1913-14. 

The seminary considers Caesar, Cicero, and Virgil, in succes- 
sive years in the order mentioned. The author to be studied in 
1913-14 (Course 10a) is Cicero. Professor Burnam. 

12. Graduate Study. — Credit according to work elected and 
completed under the direction of the teaching staff of the de- 
partment. 

Evening Course 

13. Livy. — Horace. — Selections from Livy. Selected Odes and 
Epodes of Horace. Informal discussions of the spirit and life of the 
times. M., 7 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Semple. 



MATHEMATICS 125 

*MATHEMATICS 

Harris Hancock, Ph. D., D. Sc, . . . Professor of Mathematics. 
Stephen Elmer Slocum, Ph. D., Professor of Applied Mathematics. 
Charles Napoleon Moore, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 
Louis Brand, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Florence Cameron Lavvler, B. S., . . Instructor in Mathematics. 
Joseph Henry Kindle, A. M., . . . Instructor in Mathematics. 
Edward Smith, M. S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Algebra — Trigonometry — Analytical Geometry. — Selected 
portions of Algebra and the elementary Theory of Equations. 
Rietz and Crathorne, College Algebra. 

Trigonometry. Crockett, Trigonometry; Rothrock, Trigonom- 
etry. 

Analytical Geometry of Two Dimensions treated from the Car- 
tesian standpoint. Nichols, Analytic Geometry. 

Sec. I, M., T., W., Th., F., 8 :30-9 :30. Miss Lawler. 

Sec. II, M., T„ W., Th., F., 9:30-10:30. 

Assistant Professor Moore. 

Sec. Ill, M., T., W. f Th., F., 10:30-11 :30. Miss Lawler. 

Sec. IV, M., T., W., Th., F., 9:30-10:30. Miss Lawler. 

5. Calculus, Differential and Integral. — Osborne, Calculus; 
Davis, Calculus. M., T., Th., F., 10:30-11:30. 

Sec. I, Professor Hancock. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

8a. Advanced Integral Calculus. — Byerly, Integral Calculus. 
Lectures. M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30, first semester. 

Professor Hancock. 
9b. Differential Equations. — Forsyth, Differential Equations. 
Lectures. M., W., F., 9:30-10:30, second semester. 

Professor Hancock. 
[15. Theory of Equations, Including Determinants.] Burnside 
and Panton, Theory of Equations. Lectures. M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. 
Omitted in 1913-14. Professor Hancock. 

6. Advanced Analytical Geometry of Two Dimensions. — C. 
Smith, Conic Sections. Lectures. T., 2:00-4:00. 

Assistant Professor Moore. 



* See other courses in Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, College of 
Engineering. 



126 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

[7a. Analytical Geometry of Three Dimensions.] The plane, 
straight line and quadric surfaces; theory of surfaces and curves. 
C. Smith, Solid Geometry. Lectures and text. T., Th., S., 10:30- 
11 :30, first semester. Professor Slocum. 

Course 7a is open to graduate students and to those who have 
passed in Course 5. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

Primarily for Graduates 

34. Advanced Algebra.— Part II.— M., Th., 4:00-6:00. 

Professor Hancock. 

lib. Fourier's Series and Spherical Harmonics. — Byerly, Four- 
ier's Series and Spherical Harmonics. This course is intended as 
an introduction to mathematical physics. After a preliminary 
study of certain trigonometric series, Fourier's theorem for the 
development of a function into a trigonometric series is derived, 
and the limitations of its validity investigated. This is followed 
by the study of Lagrange's, Laplace's, and Lame's functions, with 
applications to problems in heat, electricity, potential, elasticity, etc. 
Second semester, Th., 4:00-6:00; S., 9:30-10:30. 

Professor Slocum. 

10a. Theory of Errors and Method of Least Squares. — Wright 
and Hayford, Adjustment of Observations. The general theory of 
the adjustments of observations, with applications to triangulation 
and the derivation of empirical formulas from experimental data. 
First semester, M., 4 :00-5 :00 ; W., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Slocum. 

40. Seminary. — Theoretical and experimental research in some 
special topic of the mechanics of rigid, elastic, fluid, or gaseous 
bodies. Results to be summarized in a form suitable for publica- 
tion. Credit according to number of hours elected. Hours by special 
arrangement. Professor Slocum. 

29. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. S., 9:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Moore. 

The following courses which are given from time to time are 
omitted in 1913-14: 

16a. Theoretical Mechanics. 

16b. The Mathematical Theory of Elasticity. 

26. The History and Teaching of Mathematics. 

30. Theory of Numbers, Part I. — Natural Numbers. 

31. Theory of Numbers, Part II. — Algebraic Numbers. — Dede- 
kind's Theory. 

32. Theory of Numbers, Part III. — Kronecker's Theory. 
24. Elliptic Functions, Part I. — Analysis. 



PHILOSOPHY 127 

25. Application of Elliptic Functions, Part II. 

20. Theory of Maxima and Minima Involving Several 
Variables. The Calculus of Variations. 

36. Vector Analysis. 

28. Theory of Functions. — Lectures on the Theory of Func- 
tions of a Complex Variable. 

33. Advanced Algebra. — Lectures. 

18a. Theory of Minimal Surfaces. 

Evening Courses 

40. Algebra — Trigonometry. — Selected portions of algebra and 
the elementary Theory of Equations. Ashton and Marsh, College 
Algebra. Trigonometry: Rothrock, Trigonometry. F., 7:30-9:30. 

Mr. Smith. 

42. Analytical Geometry and Elementary Calculus. W., 
7:30-9:30. Mr. Kindle. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Guy Allan Tawney, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Philosophy. 
Henry G. Hartmann, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

For Undergraduates 

la. Introduction to Philosophy. — An outline study of the field 
of philosophical discussion, with a definition of its chief problems 
and the method of investigating them. Open to students who have 
completed one year of university work. First semester, M., W., F., 
9 :30-10-30. Professor Tawney. 

2b. Logic. — An introductory course in the theory of reasoning, 
including the essentials of formal logic and the principles of proof. 
Open to students who have completed at least one year of work in 
the University. Second semester, M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Professor Tawney. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

[3a. History of Philosophy from the Italian Renaissance to 
the time of Kant, the opening of the nineteenth century.] First 
semester, M.. W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. Professor Tawney. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

[4b. History of Philosophy from Kant to the Present.] Courses 
3a and 4b will alternate biennially with Courses 5a and 6b. Second 
semester, M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. Professor Tawney. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 



128 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

5a. History of Ancient Philosophy to the beginning of the 
Christian Era.-— First semester, M., W., R, 8 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

6b. History of the Philosophy of the Middle Ages. — Second 
semester, M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

7a. Ethics. — An introduction to the theory of morals. The 
course includes, beside the theory of morality, discussions of selected 
problems of present moral experience. Open to students who have 
completed two years of work in the University. First semester. 

Sec. I, M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 

Sec. II, M., W., F, 1 :00-2 :00. 

Professor Tawney and Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

18b. Ethical Interpretation. — A study of the life of practical 
activity from the ethical standpoint. The fundamental concepts of 
political philosophy, the relation of morality to legislation, the 
morality of the economic order, and the problems of moral training, 
receive special attention. Course 7a is prerequisite. 

Sec. I, M., W, F., 10:30-11:30. 

Sec. II, M., W., F., 1 :00-2 :00. Professor Tawney. 

9a. Social Psychology. — See Psychology 8a. 

This course counts towards a major in either psychology or 
philosophy. Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

10b. Aesthetics. — A discussion of the facts and principles in- 
volved in the experience of the beautiful and in the creation and 
appreciation of the various art-products. The course is to be con- 
ducted by means of lectures, text-book, and assigned readings. 
Second semester, M., W., F., 11:30-12:30. 

Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

11a. Scientific Method. — A study of the general laws of re- 
search and systematic representation in the field of science. First 
semester, M., W., F., 11 :30-12:30. Professor Tawney. 

15b. Scientific Method. — A study of the methods of five groups 
of sciences, namely, the mathematics, biology, physics, psychology, 
and philosophy. Second semester, M., W., F., 11:30-12:30. 

Professor Tawney. 

Primarily for Graduates 

19. The Philosophy of Immanuel Kant with special reference 
to its historical development. T., 12:30-2:30. 

Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

21. The Philosophy of Religious Experience. — This course 
involves a survey of the history of religions, as well as the theory 
of the religious life and a study of some of the problems of religious 
education. Th., 1 :00-3 :00. Professor Tawney. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1*9 

14. Types of Philosophy.— Th., 3:00-5:00. 

Professor Tawney. 
For Teachers 
12. The History of Philosophy— In the fall of 1913 this course 
will begin with the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, it being part of a 
:ycle of courses dealing with the history of philosophy. One hour 
throughout the year. S., 9:30-10:30. Professor Tawney. 

20. Ethics.— S., 8 :30-9 :30. Professor Tawney. 

It should be remembered that work in the Department of 
Philosophy is facilitated by courses in psychology, sociology, political 
science, general history, economics, the history of education, art, and 
Dther allied subjects dealing with human life and the products of 
:ivilization. 

Evening Courses 

22. Ethics. — An outline of the history of morality, the theory 
Df the moral life, and a study of the moral problems of the political 
ind economic organization of society. M., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Professor Tawney. 

23. Logic. Th., 4 :45-6:45. Assistant Professor Hartmann. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Alfred Brodbeck, Director of Physical Education. 

Marguerite Gray, A. B,, . . . Instructor in Physical Education. 

Physical Training for Men. — All students are required to take 
five hours per week in the Department of Physical Education. It 
is expected that these hours will be distributed as follows: Three 
hours per week for all members of the Freshman class (lectures 
on hygiene, one hour, work in the gymnasium, two hours), and two 
hours per week for all members of the Sophomore class. Depar- 
tures from this rule will be allowed only under exceptional con- 
ditions, for which special permission must be secured from the 
Dean in advance. 

A physical examination is required of each student of the two 
lower classes upon entrance and upon completion of the required 
work. Appointments for the examination must be made with the 
Physical Director at the beginning of the first semester. 

Credit: One credit will be given for each semester's work. 

Hours. — Phys. Ed. 1 (Freshmen). Gymnasium, T., Th., 10:30- 
11:30; M.. W., 11:30-12:30; Lecture, R, 2:00-3:00. 

Phys. Ed. 2 (Sophomores), T., Th., 4:00-5:00; T., Th., 11:30- 
12:30. Boxing, wrestling, fencing (voluntary). Mr. Brodbeck. 



130 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Physical Training for Women. — The work is arranged with a 
view to obtaining the best hygienic, corrective and recreative re- 
sults. A physical examination will be made at the beginning of 
the Freshman and at the end of the Sophomore year. 

The course for Freshmen consists of three hours attendance 
per week throughout the year. Two hours each week are spent 
in exercising in the gymnasium; the other hour is devoted to lec- 
tures on hygiene. The lectures must be attended by every member 
of the Freshman class, irrespective of the fact that she may be 
excused from the gymnasium work. 

The course for Sophomores consists of two hours of exercise 
in the gymnasium, prescribed for all members unless excused by 
the Director of Physical Education or on a physician's certificate. 

Credit: One credit will be given for each semester's work. 

Hours— Phys. Ed. 1 (Freshmen), M., W., 1:00-2:00; M., Wi 
2:00-3:00; Lecture, F., 2:00-3:00. 

Phys. Ed. 2 (Sophomores), T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00 ; T., Th., 2 :00-3 :00. 
Voluntary Class.— F., 1 :00-2 :00. Miss Gray. 



PHYSICS 



Louis Trenchard More, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

Samuel James McIntosh Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

Physics. 
Robert E. Clyde Gowdy, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Physics. 

Thomas Lansing Porter, Ph. D Instructor in Physics. 

Assistants: Mr. Evens, Mr. Lorenz, A. M. 

For Undergraduates 

26a. General Physics. — Lectures and recitations on mechanics, 
sound, and heat, illustrated with lecture experiments. First semes- 
ter, M., W., F., 11 :30- 12:30. Professor More and Dr. Gowdy. 

27b. General Physics. — Lectures and recitations on light, elec- 
tricity and magnetism, illustrated with lecture experiments. Second 
semester, M., W., F., 11:30-12:30. 

Professor More and Dr. Gowdy. 

N. B. — The above courses are designed for students in the 
College of Liberal Arts only; they may be elected in the Fresh- 
man year. They will present the fundamental laws and phenomena 
of physics, and will be non-mathematical in treatment. Taken 
with Courses 2a and 22b, Experimental Physics, they satisfy the 
science requirement. 



PHYSICS 131 

28a. Advanced General Physics.— Lectures and recitations on 
Mechanics and Heat. First semester. Twice weekly. 

Dr. Porter. 

29b. Advanced General Physics. — Lectures and recitations on 
Light, Electricity, and Magnetism. Second semester. Twice weekly. 

Dr. Porter. 

Prerequisites for Courses 28 and 29 are Courses 26 and 27, 
and Mathematics 1. 

2a. Experimental Physics. — Laboratory work arranged to ac- 
company General Physics. First semester. 

Associate Professor Allen, Dr. Gowdy, Dr. Porter, 
and Assistants. 
Sec. I, T., Th., 8:30-11:30. 
Sec. II, T., Th., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Sec. Ill, M., F., 1:00-4:00 (for Engineers only). 
Sec. IV, W., 1:00-4:00. 

22b. Experimental Physics.— Laboratory work arranged to ac- 
company General Physics. Second semester. 

Associate Professor Allen, Dr. Gowdy, Dr. Porter, 
and Assistants. 
Sec. I, T., Th., 8 :30-ll :30. 
Sec. II, T., Th., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. Ill, M., W., F., 1:00-4:00 (for Engineers only). 
4. Advanced Experimental Physics. — Experiments in photom- 
etry, spectrum analysis, calibration of weights and thermometers, 
etc., requiring exact measurement. Twice weekly. It may be elected 
either semester. Dr. Gowdy. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

3a. Theoretical Mechanics. — A course of lectures on the mathe- 
matical laws of mechanics. First semester, T., Th., S., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Professor More. 

18b. Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. — A course of lec- 
tures on the mathematical laws of electricity and magnetism. Sec- 
ond semester, T., Th., S., 11 :30-12 :30. Professor More. 

[19a. Theory of Heat.] A course of lectures on the mathe- 
matical laws of heat. First semester, T., Th., S., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Professor More. 

[15b. Theory of Light.] A course of lectures on the mathemat- 
ical laws of light. Second semester, T., Th., S., 11:30-12:30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Professor More. 

The above courses may be elected for a minor in Physics, the 
following courses for a major, in graduate work. 



132 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

8. Experimental Physics. — The exact determination of some 
of the standard and classical experiments. Credit according to 
number of hours elected. Professor More. 

10. Seminary. — The reading and discussion of papers in phy- 
sical journals. T., 4:00-5:00. Professor More. 

16. Physical Manipulations. — A series of exercises in scien- 
tific shop-work. Shop-work; soldering and metal-working, screw- 
cutting and elementary lathe-work. Glass-work and physical proc- 
esses; glass-blowing, cutting, grinding, polishing, silvering; fiber 
suspensions and preparations useful in the laboratory. Hours to 
be arranged. Without credit. Mr. Evens. 

17b. Electric Waves and Wireless Telegraphy. — A course of 
lectures on the radiation emitted by electric and magnetic oscil- 
lators, with applications to wireless telegraphy and the theory of 
light. Second semester, M., W., 4:00-5:00. 

Associate Professor Allen. 

[20b. Ionization and Radio-activity.] A course of lectures and 
experimental demonstrations on the discharge of electricity through 
gases and the properties of the radio-active substances. Second 
semester, twice weekly. Associate Professor Allen. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

For Graduates Only 

7. Lectures on Theoretical Physics. — This course is designed 
to include three years' work. In 1913-14 the lectures discuss the 
theory of heat and generalized co-ordinates; 1914-15, electricity and 
magnetism; 1915-16, light. Twice weekly. Professor More. 

25a. Theoretical Mechanics. — See under Mathematics 16a. 

Professor Slocum. 

9. Research. — Those electing this course are supplied with 
all the apparatus needed, and with the assistance of the Mechanician. 
Daily. Professor More and Associate Professor Allen. 

For Teachers Only 

11. Laboratory Methods for Teachers. — This course comprises 
a set of experiments designed especially for teachers. The exer- 
cises will include those which are usually given in schools, and 
also those of a more difficult nature which illustrate the theoretical 
principles. S.. 8:30-11 :30. Dr. Porter. 

Evening Courses 
30a. General Physics. — Lectures with demonstrations on 
mechanics, heat, and sound. First semester, M., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Allen. 



POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 133 

30b. General Physics. — Lectures with demonstrations on light, 
electricity, and magnetism. Second semester, M., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Allen. 
31a. Experimental Physics. — Laboratory work to accompany 
General Physics. First semester. Sec. V, W., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Dr. Porter. 
31b. Experimental Physics — Laboratory work to accompany 
General Physics. Second semester. Sec. V, W., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Dr. Porter. 



POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., . . Professor of Political Science. 
Clarence Oran Gardner, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political 

Science. 
William Hammond Parker, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Social Science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

1. American Government. — The primary aim of this course is 
to prepare for the duties of citizenship and lay a foundation for the 
further study of political science. The nature and organization of 
our federal government will be studied the first semester, and 
state and local government will be studied the second semester. 
M., W., F., 10:30-11 :30. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

Not open to Freshmen. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 
2a. European Governments. — A study of the nature and organ- 
ization of the principal governments of Europe. First semester, 
M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors and to those students taking 
Course 1. 

2b. International Law. — A study of the principles, rules, and 
customs controlling the states of the civilized world in their relation 
. to each other. Second semester, M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Not open to Freshmen. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

[6a. American Legislatures and Legislative Methods.] A de- 
' tailed study of the manner in which law-making bodies are organ- 
ized and operated. Special attention will be given to the organiza- 
tion and operation of the Ohio General Assembly. Problems before 
| the General Assembly will be considered and practice given in the 
drafting of bills and municipal ordinances. First semester, T., Th., 
8:30-9:30. Professor Lowrie. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 



134 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

[6b. Public Finance and Taxation.] An introductory course in 
the principles of taxation and the existing methods of levying and 
collecting taxes — federal, state, and local. Also a study of the budget 
systems of the countries of the world as well as of states and cities. 
Second semester, T., Th., 8 :30-9 :30. Professor Lowrie. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors and to those students who have taken 
Economics 1. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

11a. Municipal Government. — A comparative study of munici- 
pal organization and administration in the United States and in 
European countries. Special attention is given to social and eco- 
nomic problems connected with urban life. First semester, M., W., 
F., 8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

Not open to Freshmen. 

lib. Municipal Functions. — A study of the activities of the 
modern city. Special attention will be given the problems involved 
in the contemporary development of Cincinnati. This course will 
be given in co-operation with the Municipal Reference Bureau. 
Second semester, M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. Professor Lowrie. 

4b. Political Parties and Party Methods. — A study of the 
theory and organization of political parties in the United States with 
particular reference to party methods and machinery. Second 
semester, T., Th., 8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

Not open to Freshmen. 

[17b. Constitutional Law.] A study of the American Constitu- 
tion, and its development through the interpretation of the Supreme 
Court. Second semester, T., Th., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

25b. Seminar in Charter Making. — A study will be made of the 
newer city charters. Particular attention will be given to the work 
of the Cincinnati Charter Commission. Given in co-operation with 
the Municipal Reference Bureau. Second semester, M., 4:00-6:00. 

Open to those who have had Course 11a. Professor Lowrie. 

3. History of Political Ideas. — A study of the development of 
political thought. The first part of the course is devoted to a series 
of lectures on Oriental, Greek, Roman, and medieval political ideas, 
students being assigned collateral reading in Aristotle, Plato, 
Polybins, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Dante, and others. The 
political philosophers of later date are studied principally from 
their writings, particular attention being given to Machiavelli, Bodin, 
Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill, 
Maine, and Seeley. The relationship between the systems of the 
various philosophers and the history of their times will receive 
special attention. W., 4 :00-G :00. Assistant Professor Gardner. 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 135 

Evening Course 

30. American Government. — M., 7 :30-9 :30. The scope of this 
course is practically the same as that of Course 1 described above. 

Assistant Professor Gardner. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

For Undergraduates 

5. Elementary Sociology. — An introductory course designed to 
present a working theory of the nature of society, the prevailing 
types of social organizations, and the larger problems connected 
therewith. The nature of sociology, facts of social evolution, social 
control, social organization, social ideals, social pathology, methods 
of social investigation, and the history of sociology. T., Th., 9 :30- 
10:30. Assistant Professor Parker. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

7. Modern Social Theories. — Lectures and assigned readings on 
the social theories of Comte, Mill, Spencer, Gumplowicz, Tarde, 
Mackenzie, Ward, Giddings, Small, and others. Particular attention 
is given to the development of social theory and to the consequences 
of the theories of these writers in the field of practical social reform. 
M., W., 10 :30-ll :30. Assistant Professor Parker. 

15. Modern Philanthropy. — A study of the problems of charity. 
Treatment of the pauper, feeble-minded, insane, and of dependent 
children. Reform suggestions regarding the best methods of dealing 
with these classes. As an integral part of this course there will be 
a series of lectures on the scope and method of the work of the 
Associated Charities, the Department of Charities and Corrections 
of the City of Cincinnati, the House of Refuge, the Juvenile Court, 
the Juvenile Protective Association, the National Child Labor Or- 
ganization, and the Social Settlement. M., W., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Assistant Professor Parker. 

20. Criminals and Delinquents. — Problems of Crime. Criminal 
anthropology, physical and psychical. Criminal diagnostics, definition 
of crime, detection and identification of criminals, state control of 
criminals. Criminal therapeutics, penalties, punishment and reforma- 
tion of criminals, jails, prisons, and reformatories. Criminal 
hygienics, police prevention of crime, presumptive criminals. Princi- 
ples of scientific penology, lynch-law, and the trend of crime in 
modern times. T., Th., 10 :30-ll :30. 

Assistant Professor Parker. 

21. Social Problems. — A study of current social problems and 
the influence of certain factors in social evolution. The function, 



136 McMlCKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

origin, forms, development, and problems of the family. Problems 
of population, immigration, the negro, the city, poverty and pauper- 
ism, education, and social progress. T., Th., 11:30-12:30. 

Assistant Professor Parker. 
22. Seminary. — Opportunity is here given for the detailed study 
of special problems in social science. Credit according to number of 
hours elected. Assistant Professor Parker. 

Evening Course 

5. Elementary Sociology. — A fundamental course dealing with 
the origin, composition, evolution, and functions of society. Special 
attention will be given to the study of the existing social organiza- 
tion and certain of the larger problems connected therewith. This 
course is designed to be introductory to all advanced work in the 
field of Social Science. Th., 7:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professor Parker. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Psychology. 

Schachne Isaacs, A. M., Assistant in Psychology. 

Student Assistant : Paul Raymond Stevenson, A. B. 

For Undergraduates 

la. Introductory Psychology. — An analytical study of mental 
phenomena, with special attention to accurate observation and de- 
scription. A general account of the subject matter of psychology. 
First semester. M., W., F., 11:30-12:30. Professor Breese. 

lb. A continuation of la. — Section 1. Second semester. Ml 
W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. Professor Breese. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

2a. Experimental Psychology. — Laboratory course. First sem- 
ester, M., W., F., 2:00-4:30. Professor Breese and Mr. Isaacs. 

2b. Experimental Psychology. — A continuation of 2a. Second 
semester, M., W., F., 2 :00-4 :30. 

Professor Breese and Mr. Isaacs. 

8a. Social Psychology. — The aim of this course is to exhibit 
the human mind in its development within a social environment ; to 
show how, under the influence of the social environment, the native 
tendencies of the mind become gradually organized into systems of 
increasing complexity, and the ways in which they co-operate in 
shaping and sustaining such institutions as come to exist among 



FRENCH 137 

men in civilized societies. Open to students who have had Intro- 
ductory Psychology. First semester, M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Dr. Hartmann. 

9. Mental and Physical Tests. — Laboratory methods. Two 
credits per semester. Hours to be arranged. 

Professor Breese and Mr. Isaacs. 

Primarily for Graduates 

3. Research. — Special investigation in the psychological lab- 
oratory. Hours to be arranged. Professor Breese. 

[4. Seminar.] A critical study of the most important problems 
in psychology. Reports and discussions. Th., 3 :00-5 :00. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Professor Breese. 

[6a. Educational Psychology.] The experimental and statistical 
methods in mental measurements. Intended for advanced students 
and teachers of experience. First semester. Hours to be arranged. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Professor Breese. 

For Teachers 

[5. Elements of Psychology.] A general account of the facts 
of mental life and their application to education. One credit per 
semester for A. B. S., 11:30-12:30. Professor Breese. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

Evening Course 

10. Introductory Psychology. — An analytical study of mental 
phenomena, with special attention to accurate observation and de- 
scription. A general account of the subject matter of psychology. 
|T., 7 :30-9 :30. Professor Breese. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Phillip Ogden, Ph. D Professor of Romance Languages. 

Ralph Emerson Bassett, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance 

Languages. 

Leroy James Cook, A. M Instructor in Frencb. 

Student Assistant : Helen Judith Vickers, A. B. 

FRENCH 

For Undergraduates 

1. Elementary French. — Fraser and Squair. French Grammar 
md Reader.; /Mdrich and Foster. A French Render; F/nanlr, Le 



138 McMlCKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Chien du Capitaine; Coppee, On rend V argent. Composition based 
on Fraser and Squair's French Reader. 

Sec. I, M., W., R, 11:30-12:30. 

Sec. II, T., Th., S., 8 :30-9 :30. Mr. Cook. 

2. Intermediate French. — First semester, Fraser and Squair's 
French Grammar, Part II ; Francois, French Prose Composition; 
dictation and modern texts. Second semester, nineteenth century 
prose writers, etc. Dictation and composition. 

Sec. I, M., W., R, 9 :30-10 :30. 
Sec. II, M., W., R, 9:30-10:30. 
Sec. Ill, T., Th., S., 9:30-10:30. 

Professor Ogden, Miss Vickers, Mr. Cook. 
Course 2 is open to students who have taken Course 1 or its 
equivalent. 

11. French Literature in the Nineteenth Century. — A study of 
the principal authors, supplemented by lectures and collateral read- 
ing on the life and literature of the time. Daudet; Hugo; Zola; 
Loti. M., W., R, 10:30-11:30. Professor Ogden. 

Course 11 is open to students who have passed in Course 2. 

3. French Composition. — Review of the more difficult points 
in French Grammar and Syntax. Dictation. Reproduction of nar- 
iative and descriptive passages read by the instructor from French 
authors. Conversation. Original composition in French. T., Th., 
11:30-12:30. Mr. Cook. 

With the permission of the instructor. 

Course 3 is open to students who have taken Course 2. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

4. French Drama in the Seventeenth Century. — A study of the 
principal authors, supplemented by lectures and collateral reading 
on the life and literature of the time. Corneille. Racine. Moliere 
T., Th., 9:30-10:30. Professor Ogden. 

Course 4 is open to students who have passed in Course 11. 

5. French Drama in the Nineteenth Century. W., F., 1 :00-2 :( 

Mr. Cook. 

10. Old French Readings. — Constans, Chrestomathie de VAnciet 
Franqais. Lectures on historical French grammar. T., 4:00-6:00. 

Professor Ogden. 
Course 10 is open to students who have passed in Course 4 oi 
its equivalent. 

24. Special Studies in Modern French Literature. — Philosophic 
School : Parnassian School ; Symbolists. T„ 4 :00-6 :00. 

Professor Ogden. 



SPANISH 189 

Course 24 is open to students who have passed in Course 4 or 
Course 11. 

26. French Schools of Poetry in the Nineteenth Century. — 
Lectures ; outside reading ; conversation in French. T., Th., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Professor Ogden. 

For Teachers 

30. Intermediate French. — Advanced grammar, composition, 
conversation. One credit per semester for A. B. S., 10 :30-ll :30. 

Mr. Cook. 

24. Course 24, outlined above, is open to teachers, by permis- 
sion, as well as to regular students. 

Teachers who are pursuing graduate studies and are qualified 
to do advanced work in the Romance languages can elect courses 
from the above upon advice from the head of the department. 

SPANISH 

For Undergraduates 
6. Elementary Spanish. — Pronunciation, grammar, composition, 
conversational drill. Text-books : Bassett, Spanish Grammar; 
Hills, Spanish Tales; Padre Isla, Gil Bias de Santillana; Ramos-Aza, 
Zaragiieta. M, W., F., 10 :30-l 1 :30. Assistant Professor Bassett. 

9. Intermediate Spanish. — Selected texts since 1850. Valera, 
Pcpita Jimenez; Pereda, Pedro Sanchez; Perez Galdos, Dona Per- 
fecta; Hartzenbusch, La coja y el encogido. M, W., F., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 
18. Spanish Composition. — Systematic practice in speaking and 
writing. Review of syntax. Business forms. Bassett, Spanish 
Composition; Roman y Salamero, El castellano actual; Harrison, 
■ Spanish Correspondence. T, Th., 1:00-2:00. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

8. Spanish Literature in the XVI and XVII Centuries. — Cer- 
| vantes, Don Quijote; selected plays by Lope de Vega and Calderon. 
History of Spanish literature from the age of Juan II to the 
Bourbons. T., Th., 10:30-11:30. Assistant Professor Bassett. 

Course 8 alternates with Course 22. 

[22. The Picaroon Novel.] Lazarillo de Tormes; Aleman, Guz- 
man de Alfarache (Part I) ; Cervantes, Novelas ejemplares (selec- 
tions) ; Espinel, Marcos de Obrcgon. T., Th, 10:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 

Course 22 alternates with Course 8. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 



140 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Evening Courses 

31. Elementary Spanish. — Pronunciation, grammar, oral prac- 
tice, and introductory reading. F., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 

32. Advanced Spanish. — Grammar review and written exercises, 
selected prose texts, business and letter forms, practice in speaking. 
T., 7:30-9:30. Assistant Professor Bassett. 



ITALIAN 

For Undergraduates 

7. Elementary Italian. — Grandgent, Italian Grammar; De 
Amicis, Cuore; Serao, All' Erta, Sentinella; Testa, L'oro e I'orpello 
Giacosa, Come le foglie. M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 






*DRAWING, MODELING, AND CARVING 

By an arrangement with the Art Academy of Cincinnati (orig- 
inally established as the McMicken School of Design in 1869, and 
a department of the University of Cincinnati from 1871 to 1884, 
when it was transferred to the Cincinnati Museum Association) 
students of the University may elect courses in Drawing, Model- 
ing, and Carving at the Art Academy in 1913-14, and, upon pre- 
sentation of the proper certificate from the Director of the School, 
may receive credit in the Registrar's office tor such courses as 
part of the total number of "credits" required for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. On the payment of a fee of twenty-five dollars 
at the office of the Art Academy, the student is admitted to the 
several day classes (drawing, modeling, carving, and design). For 
the night classes the fee is five dollars. In the Summer Term of ten 
weeks no instruction is given at night. The Winter Term extends 
from September 22, 1913, to May 29, 1914, the Summer Term from 
the middle of June to the end of August. 

The following courses of instruction are offered: 
1. Free-hand Drawing. — From objects and casts. Day classes, 
M., W., F., 8:45-12:45, or M., W., 1:30-4:30, and S., 8:45-12:45. 
Night classes, T., Th., F., 7:15-9:15. 

Miss Young, Miss Miller, Miss Lord, 

Miss Wilson, and Mr. Wiessler. 
Color work in oils, water colors, or pastels is also taught in the 
day classes, but not at night. 



* For the teachers' training course in art, see announcement of the Colleg* 
for Teachers. 






EXTERNAL COURSES 141 

2. Drawing and Painting from Life. — Figure or head. Day 
classes, M., T., W., Th., R, S., 8:45-12:45, and M., T., W., Th., 
F., 2:00-4:00. Night classes, M., T., W., Th., F., 7:15-9:15. 

Mr. Duveneck, Mr. Meakin, and Mr. Wessel. 

Artistic Anatomy is a part of this course. The night classes 
draw the head or figure from life. 

3. Modeling. — From casts. Day classes, T., Th., S., 8:45- 
12:45. Night classes, M., W., 7:15-9:15. Mr. Barnhorn. 

4. Modeling. Advanced Course. — From life. Day classes, M.. 
T., W., Th., F., S., 8:45-12:45. Night classes, M., T., W., Th., F., 
7:15-9:15. Mr. Barnhorn. 

5. Wood Carving.— M., W., F., 12:30-4:30, and S., 8:45-12:45. 

Mr. Fry. 

0. Decorative Design. — The principles of design, preparation 
of decorative motives, and their application to metals, enamels, 
leather, porcelain, etc. T., W., Th., F., 1 :30-4 :30. Miss Riis. 

From the courses above offered a student may elect not more 
than six hours in any one semester. Not more than twelve hours 
of work in the Art Academy will be credited for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. 



EXTERNAL COURSES 

ASTRONOMY 

152. A critical study of the historical development of astronomy 
from the earliest period to modern times. — M., 4:00-5:00, at the 
Walnut Hills Branch Library. Professor Porter. 

ENGLISH 

154. English Romantic Poets. — A study of the great poets of 
the early nineteenth century — Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, 
Shelley, and Keats — involving a discussion of their technic, art, 
growth of mind, general interpretation of life, and relation to their 
time. M., 4 :00-5 :00, at the University School. 

Professor Chandler. 



153. General Course in English Poetry from Chaucer to the 
1 Victorian Period.— W., 4 :00-5 :00, at the Newport High School. 

Assistant Professor McVea. 

4. Nineteenth Century Prose.— T., 3 :30-4 :30, at the College Hill 
School. Assistant Professor Young. 



142 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

GEOGRAPHY 

155. General Principles of Physical Geography. — This course 
of illustrated lectures deals with the features of the earth's surface 
and the processes that are constantly changing them. T., 4 :00-5 :00, 
at the Guilford School. Professor Fenneman. 

HISTORY 

157. The Ohio Valley, the Old Northwest, and the Old South- 
west. — An outline of events from the period of discovery to the 
Civil War, centering around the Ohio River as "the course of 
empire." M., 7:30-8:30 p. m., at the Walnut Hills Branch Library; 
M., 4 :00-5 :00, at the Covington Public Library. 

Associate Professor Cox. 

156. The Colonial Possessions of Great Britain. — This course 
will deal with the relation of English colonization to that of other 
nations, the classification of British dependencies and the extent of 
British dominions, British North America, the West Indies, the 
English in India, English colonization in Australia, English coloniza- 
tion in Cape Colony and South Africa, the Crown Colonies and 
Protectorates, and the Imperial Confederation. Th., 4 :00-5 :00, at 
the Twenty-second District School. Mr. Dilworth. 

PHILOSOPHY 

159. The Theory of the Moral Life. — This course deals with 
the laws of moral growth in the lives of individuals and peoples, 
the main types of ethical theory, and some of the practical moral 
issues of the economic, political, and educational life of America at 
the present time. T., 7 :30-8 :30 p. m., at the Public Library. 

Professor Tawney. 

SOCIOLOGY 

160. Elementary Sociology. — A fundamental course in sociology 
designed to present a working theory of the nature of society, the 
prevailing types of social organizations, and the larger problems 
connected therewith. T., 4:00-5:00, at the Newport High School. 

Assistant Professor Parker, 






161. Modern Philanthropy.— M., 4:00-5:00, at the Washburn 
School. Assistant Professor Parker. 



COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

The College for Teachers is organized under the joint man- 
agement of the Board of Directors of the University and the Board 
of Education of the city of Cincinnati. 

COMMITTEE IN CHARGE 
Charles William Dabney, Ph. D.,LL. D., President of the University. 
Arch I. Carson, M. D., Member of the Board of Directors of the 

University. 
Randall Judson Condon, A. M., Superintendent of Cincinnati 

Schools. 
Emjl Pollak Member of the Board of Education. 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 
Charles William Dabney, Ph. D.,LL.D., President of the University. 
Randall Judson Condon, A. M., Superintendent of Cincinnati 

Schools. 
William Paxton Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Professor of the History 
and Principles of Education, and Dean of the College for Teachers. 
John William Hall, A. M., Professor of Elementary Education. 
Henry Skinner West, Ph. D., Professor of Secondary Education. 
Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Psychology. 
Nevin Melancthon Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology 

and Geography. 
Guy Allan Tawney, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Philosophy. 
*Harris Miller Benedict, A. M., .... Professor of Botany. 
Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., . . . Associate Professor of History. 
Cyrus De Witt Mead, A. M., Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education. 
J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., . Assistant Professor of Geology. 
Henry Gottlieb Hartmann, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Phil- 
osophy. 
Abbie Louise Day, B. S., B. Di., Instructor in Elementary Education. 

Vernon Lantis, A. M., Instructor in Botany. 

Annette Braun, Ph. D., Instructor in Biology. 

Walter Bucher, Ph. D., . . Instructor in Geology and Geography. 
Schachne Isaacs, A. M., Assistant in Psychology. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 
Courses in special subjects are given by the following persons 
connected with the Cincinnati public schools: 

Walter H. Aiken Music. 

William H. Vogel Art and Hand Work. 

* Absent on leave, first semester, 1913-14. 



144 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Carl Ziegler, M. D Physical Training and Hygiene. 

A. H. Steadman Penmanship. 

H. H. Fick German. 

Julia S. Bothwell Kindergarten. 

Mary Elizabeth Hyde Art. 

William P. Teal Art. 

Jeannette Swing Art 

The technical instruction and training in kindergarten courses 
is given by the following persons on the teaching staff of the Cin- 
cinnati Kindergarten Training School : 

Lillian H. Stone Principal. 

Grace Anna Fry Supervisor. 

Josephine Simrall Instructor. 

John Jerome Thompson Art. 

Mrs. W. E. Lewis Physical Training. 

Mary Culbertson Physical Training. 

At the Art Academy of Cincinnati : 
Euzabeth Kellogg History of Art. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College for Teachers is the department of education of 1 . 
the University. It is organized under the joint management off 
the Board of Directors of the University and the Board of Edu-J 
cation of the city of Cincinnati. It is primarily a professional 
school for the training of teachers under University auspices : 
close touch with a cosmopolitan public school system which serves 
as a working laboratory for teachers and students of education 
Affiliated with the college are the Cincinnati Kindergarten Train- 
ing School, the Art Academy of Cincinnati, and the Cincinnati 
Public Schools. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The conditions governing admission, graduation, prerequisites, 
privileges, etc., vary with the different professional programs offered 
and are best indicated in connection therewith, as follows : 

PROGRAM I. For those fitting, primarily, for positions | 
elementary schools. 

Admission. — This program is open to Seniors and graduate; 
and may be pursued during a single year. 

Seniors must be prepared to fulfill all the requirements f< 
graduation in the College of Liberal Arts without being compelled 
to carry more than three hours work per semester in addition t< 
the courses in education indicated below. 



OUTLINE OF PROGRAMS 145 

Prerequisite Courses. — Before entering upon this program 
students must have had, as a part of their college courses, and 
as suitable prerequisites to the courses in education, the equivalent 
of the following : 

Psychology, three hours per week for one year. 

Ethics, three hours per week for one-half year. 

Physiography, five hours per week for one year. 

American history, three hours per week for one year. 

Those who have had a year's study in American history in 
high school shall be exempt from the requirement in this subject. 

Courses Required. — 

Education 1 6 credits. 

Education 2 6 

Laboratory work (30 hours practice teach- 
ing in connection with Education 2) ... .2 " 

Education 4 2 " 

Elected from the following 8 " 

Education 14 4 credits. 

Education 16 2 

Education 20 2 

Education 22 2 u 

Total 24 credits. 

Graduation and Privileges. — Seniors who complete the above 
courses in education may count the same toward the A. B. degree 
in the McMicken College of Liberal Arts and receive a Teacher's 
Diploma from the College for Teachers. This diploma entitles 
the graduate to a place on the preferred list of those who are 
eligible to appointment in the Cincinnati schools without exam- 
ination except in Theory and Practice of Teaching, after two 
! months of successful practice teaching. 

Graduate students, in addition to receiving a Teacher's Di- 

, ploma, will be given opportunity to fulfill the required practice 

! teaching in the public schools during this year of study, so that 

(they may become eligible to appointment in the local schools at 

the end of the year. They will also be permitted, by doing sat- 

; isfactory pieces of independent work in connection with the courses 

; in Education 1 and Education 2, to count either or both of these 

.courses toward the A. M. degree in the Graduate School. They 

will not, however, be permitted to register in other courses in 

the University without the approval of the Dean of the College 

for Teachers, and in no c;ise will they be permitted to choose 



146 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

work in any other department of the University in excess of three 
hours per semester. 

All students pursuing this program have the further privilege 
of taking the brief courses in special subjects given by supervisors 
of the city schools on Saturday mornings (Education 32, 84, 36 
and 38), in lieu of passing examinations in the teaching of these 
subjects. 

PROGRAM II. For those fitting, primarily, for positions 
in secondary schools. 

Admission. — This program is open only to graduates, with 
the approval of the Dean of the College for Teachers, the Dean 
of the Graduate School, and the head or heads of the University 
departments in which the student wishes to pursue advanced study; 
it may be taken in a single year. Students must give satisfactory 
evidence that they are well qualified, personally and otherwise, to 
undertake the work of this program and to become teachers in 
secondary schools. Such students must be willing to give from 6 
to 12 periods per week as assistants in high school departments 
in which they are preparing to teach. Before registration a 
student must also be accepted by the principal of the high school 
and the head of the high school department in which apprenticeship 
is to be served; and in no case while pursuing this program will a 
student be permitted to choose more than the maximum of hours 
indicated below. 

Prerequisite Courses. — Psychology and Ethics, as indicated 
in Program I. 

Courses Required. — 

Education 1, as indicated in Program 1 6 credits. 

Education 3 4 " 

Education 3p, Practical Work (high school 
assisting) 2 

Graduate work in not more than two sub- 
jects which the student is best qualified 
to teach 12 

Total 24 credits. 

Graduation and Privileges. — Completion of this program does 
not entail any privilege as to preference in appointment to positions 
as teachers in the local high schools, as is the case with the com- 
pletion of Program I in relation to the local elementary schools. 
Nor, under the law of this state, can it exempt the graduate from 
an examination for a teacher's high school certificate, as Program 



OUTLINE OF PROGRAMS 147 

I exempts a candidate for a teacher's elementary certificate from 
examination, except in Theory and Practice of Teaching. 

This program, however, with the provision which it makes 
for practical touch with high school work, will entitle graduates 
who complete it in a satisfactory manner to favorable consider- 
ation for positions in accredited schools of the University and in 
high schools generally, both public and private. It is for meet- 
ing the demands upon the University for teachers of this class 
that this program is primarily intended. 

Preference in appointment to positions in the local high schools 
is given to college graduates who have had successful experience 
as regular teachers in elementary or secondary schools, who have 
achieved high rank as students in subjects which they wish to teach, 
who have made a professional study of the principles and problems 
of secondary education, and who obtain satisfactory marks in the 
high school examination conducted by the local Board of Examiners. 

College graduates teaching in local elementary schools who as- 
pire to appointment in the high schools of Cincinnati should pur- 
sue advanced courses in subjects which they wish to teach and 
take Education 3. Provision for doing this will be arranged at 
hours which do not conflict with class room duties. 

PROGRAM III. For those fitting, primarily, for positions 
! in kindergartens. 

Admission. — This program is open to Seniors and graduates 
and may be pursued during a single year. 

Seniors must have not less than ninety credits in the College 
of Liberal Arts, including all required courses in that college, and 
the prerequisite courses indicated below. Both Seniors and grad- 
uates may be permitted to carry Biology 36 or 37, but with this 
exception students shall give their time undividedly to this pro- 
gram. 

Prerequisite Courses — 

Psychology, as in Program I. 

Ethics, as in Program I. 

Education 1. 

Biology 36 and 37. Students who have elected Zo- 
ology in fulfillment of the science requirement in the 
College of Liberal Arts may omit Biology 36; those 
who have elected Botany may omit Biology 37. 

Courses Required. — See list under Kindergarten Training, 
page 156. 



148 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Graduation and Privileges. — Graduates who have completed 
the above program in a satisfactory manner may count the same 
toward the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education conferred 
by the College of Liberal Arts and the College for Teachers 
jointly, and receive diplomas from the Cincinnati Kindergarten 
Training School certifying that they are qualified to be directors 
in kindergartens. They will also be eligible to appointment in the 
local public kindergartens without examination except in the The- 
ory and Practice of Kindergartening. 

PROGRAM IV. For those fitting, primarily, for positions 
as teachers of German in elementary schools. 

Admission. — This program is open to Seniors and graduates, 
and may be pursued during a single year. 

Seniors must be prepared to fulfill all the requirements for 
graduation in the College of Liberal Arts, toward which this pro- 
gram will count to the extent of eighteen credits. 

Prerequisite Courses. — Before entering upon this program 
students must have had, as a part of their previous college courses, 
and as suitable prerequisites to courses in education, the equiva- 
lent of the following: 

Psychology, as in Program I. 

Ethics, as in Program I. 

For those who have had no German in high school, the 

equivalent of German 1, 2, 3, 4, 21, 5 and 10 or 30. 
For those who have had two years of German in high 

school, the equivalent of German 2, 3, 4, 21, 5 and 10 

or 30. 
For those who have had four years of German in high 

school, the equivalent of German 4, 21, 5 and 10 or 30. 

In no case will students be permitted to enter upon this pro- 
gram without the ability to speak the German language readily and 
fluently. 

Courses Required. — 

Education 1 6 credits. 

Education 2 6 

Education 4 2 

Education 30, with fifteen hours practice per 
semester 4 

Total 18 credits. 



OUTLINE OF PROGRAMS 149 

Graduation and Privileges. — The same as in Program I, with 
the following modifications: 

The restrictions as to the amount of other work to be carried 
by students does not apply to those pursuing this program. They 
shall, however, submit their cards to the Dean of the College for 
Teachers for his approval before registration. They should also 
arrange, if possible, to take the courses given on Saturday morn- 
ings by the Supervisors of Drawing and Music in lieu of exam- 
inations in these subjects. 

PROGRAM V. For those fitting for positions as instructors 
in education, supervisors, critic teachers, or administrators in 
educational positions requiring experience and advanced study. 

For meeting the needs of this class of students appropriate 
opportunity is given in advanced courses in education, including 
seminar work, and such courses may be counted toward fulfilling 
requirements for the higher degrees conferred by the Graduate 
School. For further information see statements in connection with 
the description of various courses. 

PROGRAM VI. For those fitting for positions as teachers 
or supervisors of art. 
See pages 158-160. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

Special Courses are offered to teachers in Cincinnati and vi- 
cinity, and are given on Saturdays and at hours during the week 
which do not conflict with the duties of the class-room. Credit 
is given on the books of the Registrar for satisfactory work done 
in these courses. 

For other courses open to teachers, see the announcement of 
the various departments of the McMicken College of Liberal Arts 
under the head "For Teachers." 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE CINCINNATI BOARD 
OF EDUCATION 

For the benefit of students who wish to become teachers in 
the schools of Cincinnati a Circular of Information has been pre- 
pared showing the method of appointment, salaries, and character 
cf the examination for teachers who are candidates for positions 
in the Cincinnati Public Schools. A copy of this circular may be 
had upon application to the Superintendent of Schools or the Dean 
of the College for Teachers. 



150 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

APPOINTMENT COMMITTEE 
The Appointment Committee offers its services, without charge, 
to students seeking appointment to educational positions for which 
they are properly qualified. The Dean of the College as Chair- 
man is assisted by other members of the faculty who are familiar 
with the student's work, and students who are candidates for ap- 
pointment and who desire to avail themselves of the services of 
this committee are invited to register at the office of the Dean, 
on blanks provided for this purpose. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
The following is the list of courses offered for the year 1913- 
14. Certain of these courses are required of candidates for the 
first or preferred list of persons eligible to appointment in the 
Cincinnati schools. Others are intended to meet the needs of ad- 
vanced students of education, as well as of teachers of experience. 
Courses which are prerequisite to the pursuit of the various pro- 
fessional programs for teachers are also included in this announce- 
ment, but with this exception only those which are primarily pro- 
fessional in character will be found here. All courses given in 
the University, many of which are semi-professional in character, 
are open to properly qualified students in the College for Teach- 
ers. (See the announcement of the McMicken College of Liberal 
Arts.) 

EDUCATION 

Education 1. History and Principles of Education. — Lectures, 
required reading, and discussions. Beginning with primitive so- 
ciety, this course considers the various conceptions of education 
as they have arisen in the course of history. Special attention will 
be given to those conceptions which have been most instrumental 
in shaping current tendencies. 

Open to Seniors and graduates. If counted for graduate credit, 
additional work must be done and a thesis submitted. This course is 
also a prerequisite for students taking Program III, and as such may 
be taken during the Junior year. (See page 147.) M., W., F., 10 :30- 
11:30. Professor Burris. 

Education 2. Theory and Practice of Teaching. — Lectures, 
discussions, practical work, and required readings. Development 
of the principles of method of the recitation and their application 
in the proper conduct of class exercises in the several subjects 
of the elementary schools. Three hours of class work and fifteen 
hours of practice per semester. Hours for practice work must be 
arranged with the instructor before registration. Open to Seniors 
and graduates. M., W., F., 9:30-10:80. Professor Hall. 



EDUCATION 151 

Education 3. Secondary Education. — Development of American 
secondary education; function of the secondary school; program of 
studies; educational values; theory of formal discipline; construc- 
tion of curricula ; method of secondary instruction ; introduction to 
the pedagogy of typical high school subjects. Open to graduates 
and teachers ; counting, under certain conditions, four credits. S., 
9 :30-ll :30. Professor West. 

Education 4. School Economy. — Lectures, discussions, and re- 
quired readings. This course will consider principles and prac- 
tice of class-room management, including such problems as pre- 
venting the waste of time and energy, preserving hygienic condi- 
tions, discipline, grading, promotions, tests. Open to Seniors and 
graduates. This course may not be counted for the higher degrees. 
F., 11:30-12:30. Miss Day. 

Education 6. General Method. — This course is similar to Edu- 
cation 2 and is intended especially for appointees to positions in 
the public schools of Cincinnati who have not had a course in 

this subject. S., 8 :30-9 :30. Professor Hall. 

Education 7. Seminar. — Investigations and reports on special 
problems, chiefly in educational administration. Primarily for grad- 
uates, but open also to teachers of experience. W., 4:00-6:00; 
Professor Burris and Professor West. 

Education 12. Seminar. — Investigations and reports on prob- 
lems in the theory and practice of teaching. Actual school-room 
tests will be given to evaluate common methods and practice. 
Results will be tested in a statistical manner. Required readings, 
reports, and discussions on scientific contributions to education. 
Place of meeting to be arranged. For graduates of the College for 
Teachers and others properly qualified. T., 4 :00-6 :00. 

Professor Hall and Assistant Professor Mead. 

Education 13. History of Modern Education. — This course is 
arranged to meet the needs of students in the Cincinnati Kinder- 
garten Training School and of those in the Course for Teachers 
of Art. First semester, M., W., F., 3 :00-4 :00. 

Professor Burris. 

Education 14. The Teaching of English. — Lectures, discus- 
sions, and required readings. This course will consider the se- 
lection and organization of the subject matter and method of 
treatment in the grades of the following subjects: reading, spell- 
ing, literature, composition, and grammar. Open to Seniors and 
graduates; it may be counted toward the A. B. degree. M., W., 
8 :30-9 :30. Miss Day. 



152 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Education 16. The Teaching of History. — Lectures, discus- 
sions, readings, and reports. This course aims to cover the field 
of history as usually presented in elementary schools. Gathering 
material for lesson plans, its arrangement for presentation, the 
consideration of difficulties involved, and the method of overcom- 
ing the same will form the basis of the course. Open to Seniors 
and graduates; it may be counted toward, the A. B. degree. F., 
8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Mead. 

Education 20. The Teaching of Mathematics. — Lectures, dis- 
cussions, and required reading. This course will aim to work 
up portions of material for presentation in the various grades 
according to the course of stud}'-, with devices and methods for 
their use. The principles underlying the above will be developed. 
Open to Seniors and graduates ; it may be counted toward the A. B. 
degree. Second semester, M., W., 11:30-12:30. 

Assistant Professor Mead. 

Education 21. Seat Work and School Room Devices. — Seat 
work based upon and related to the actual class work of the grades. 
The use of illustrative materials, devices, and games, and the princi- 
ples underlying the same. For teachers of the first four grades. 
S., 9 :30-10 :30. Miss Day. 

Education 22. The Teaching of Geography. — Lectures, discus- 
sions, and required readings. This course will deal with the col- 
lection of suitable material for teaching geography in the grades 
and with the organization and method of presentation of this ma- 
terial. Open to Seniors and graduates; it may be counted toward 
the A. B. degree. First semester, M., W., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor Mead. 

Education 28b. Primary Teaching. — This course is for the 
purpose of acquainting prospective directors of kindergartens with 
the subject matter and method of the work done in primary grades, 
with special attention to the first year. Open to Seniors in the 
Cincinnati Kindergarten Training School. Second semester. Hour 
to be arranged. Miss Day. 

Education 30. The Teaching of German. — This course consists 
of instruction, observation and practice teaching, and is intended 
especially for the teachers of German in the elementary schools. 
For the conditions under which students may enter this course see 
Program IV, p. 148. Fifteen hours ©f practice per semester. M, 
9:30-10:30. Supervisor Fick. 

Education 32. The Teaching of Art and Hand Work.— The 
aim of this course is to familiarize those intending to teach it 
the public schools with the art and hand work pursued in th< 
elementary grades at the present time, and u> place before rliet 



BIOLOGY, GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY L53 

the best methods for obtaining satisfactory results. This course 
prepares for the city examination in this subject. First semester, 
S., 8:30-11:30, for twelve weeks. Given at Hughes High School. 

Supervisor Vogel. 

Education 34. The Teaching of Music. — The purpose of the 
course is to give those who contemplate teaching in the public 
schools, or are at present teaching, a systematic and comprehen- 
sive training in the matter and method of school music. This 
course prepares for the city examination in this subject. Second 
semester, S., 8 :30-9 :30. Given at Hughes High School. 

Supervisor Aiken. 

Education 36. The Teaching of Physical Training and Hy- 
giene. — This course is for those fitting for positions in elemen- 
tary schools. It will not be considered sufficient preparation to 
qualify as a special teacher. The course will include theory and 
practice of physical exercise, gymnastic games for the school-room 
and play-ground, school sanitation, and methods of teaching phy- 
siology and hygiene in the grades. Second semester, ^., 10:30-11:30. 
Given at Hughes High School. Supervisor Ziegler. 

Education 38. The Teaching of Penmanship. — This course 
will present the principles underlying the system of penmanship 
taught in the Cincinnati public schools, and will show the best 
methods of teaching it, accompanied by drills for the purpose of 
securing technique. The course prepares for the city examina- 
tion in this subject. Given at Hughes High School. Second 
semester, S., 9 :30-10 :30. Supervisor Steadman. 



BIOLOGY 

For a complete list of all the courses offered by the Department 
of Biology, see the announcement of the McMicken College of 
Liberal Arts. 

38. Insect Life. — A course for beginners. Life histories of 
insects of importance and their relationships to man. Field trips 
and lectures. Two credits per semester. S., 8:30-12:30. 

Dr. Braun. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

For a complete list of all the courses offered by the Depart- 
ment of Geology, see the announcement of the McMicken College 
of Liberal Arts. 

1. An introductory study of minerals and rocks, dynamic geol- 
ogy, origin and classification of topographic forms, atmosphere 
and ocean, followed by a brief study of the physiography of the 



154 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

United States. Lectures, M., W., R, 8:30-9:30; Laboratory, T., 
Th., 2:00-4:30; M., W., 2:00-4:30; T., Th., 9:30-12:00; and T., Th., 
1 :00-3 :30. Professor Fenneman and Dr. Bucher. 

This course is a prerequisite to the study of education as out- 
lined in the professional program for elementary teachers on p. 144. 
It must be taken not later than the Junior year by those students 
who expect to enter upon this program during the Senior year. 
It may be taken as late as the Senior year by those students who 
wish to prepare for teaching in elementary schools after gradua- 
tion from the College of Liberal Arts. 

14. General Geology for Teachers. — Elements of dynamic, 
structural, and physiographic geology. Lecture, S., 8 :30-10 :30 ; field 
or laboratory, 10:30-12:50. Professor Fenneman. 

9. Historical Geology. — Chiefly the geology of North America, 
its physical history, life development and structure. Lecture, S., 
8 :30-10 :30 ; field or laboratory, 10 :30-12 :50. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

16. Advanced Physiography of the United States. — Course 1 
or 14 and Course 9 are prerequisite. Lecture, W., 4:00-6:00; S., 
10:30-11:30. Professor Fenneman. 



HISTORY 



The following course in history is prerequisite to the study 
of education as outlined in the professional program for elemen- 
tary teachers on p. 144 for all students who have not had a year's 
course in American history in high school. Those students who 
wish to complete this program during the Senior year should take 
this course in history not later than the Junior year. If the stu- 
dent wishes to defer preparation for teaching in the elementary 
schools till after receiving the A. B. degree, this course may be 
taken as late as the Senior year. 

For a complete list of all the courses offered in the Depart- 
ment of History, see the announcement of the McMicken Col- 
lege of Liberal Arts. 

History 15. General Course in American History. — This 
course, while open to all, is especially recommended for those who 
have not had American history in the high school and for those 
who contemplate taking work in the College for Teachers. The 
work covers the period from the earliest discoveries to the pres- 
ent time, and is based largely upon a text-book, supplemented by 
regular reports and occasional lectures. Special quiz sections and 
conference groups at other hours if necessary. M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Cox. 



_ 



PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY 155 

History 35. .The Ohio Valley and the Old Northwest.— A 
survey of the discovery, exploration, and settlement of this locality, 
and of its development to the Civil War. Lectures and special 
reports. Open to teachers and advanced students. The course is 
suggested as preparatory to History 39 and for those who teach local 
history in the elementary schools. S., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Associate Professor Cox. 



PHILOSOPHY 

For a complete list of all the courses offered by the Depart- 
ment of Philosophy, see announcement of the McMicken College 
of Liberal Arts. 

7a. Ethics. — An introduction to the theory of morals. The 
course includes, beside the theory of morality, discussion of selected 
problems of present moral experience. Open to students who have 
completed two years of work in the University. First semester, 
M., W., R, in two sections, 10 :30 and 1 :00. 

Professor Tawney and Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

This course is prerequisite to entrance upon professional pro- 
grams, I, II, III, and IV, outlined on pp. 144-149. It should be taken 
in the Junior year by those who pursue a professional program 
during the Senior year. It may be taken in the Senior year by 
those who expect to pursue a professional program after gradua- 
tion from the College of Liberal Arts. 

12. The History of Philosophy. — In the fall of 1913 this course 
began with the philosophy of Immanuel Kant, it being part 
of a cycle of courses dealing with the history of philosophy. One 
hour throughout the year. S., 9 :30-10 :30. Professor Tawney. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

For a complete list of all courses offered by the Department 
of Psychology, see the announcement of the McMicken College of 
Liberal Arts. 

Psychology la. Introductory Psychology. — An analytical study 
of mental phenomena, with special reference to accurate observa- 
tion and description. A general account of the subject matter 
of psychology. First semester, M., W., F., 11:30-12:30. 

Professor Breese. 

Psychology lb. Section II. Educational Psychology. — The 
application of the principles of psychology to education. Second 
semester, M., W., F., 2:00-3:00. Professor Breese. 

Courses la and lb are prerequisite to entrance upon the study 
of education, as indicated in professional programs for teachers 
outlined on pp. 144-149. Those who wish to pursue one of these 



156 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

programs should take these courses in psychology not later than 
the Junior year. Those who wish to qualify for a teacher's di- 
ploma after graduation from the College of Liberal Arts may take 
these prerequisite courses in psychology during the Senior year. 

[Psychology 6a. Educational Psychology.] The experimental 
and statistical methods in mental measurements. Intended for 
advanced students and teachers of experience. First semester. 
Hours to be arranged. Professor Breese. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

[Psychology 5. Elements of Psychology.] A general account of 
the facts of mental life and their application to education. S., 
11 :30-12 :30. Professor Breese. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

For Teachers 

Psychology 7b. Elements of Psychology. — Open to students of 
the Cincinnati Kindergarten Training School and to those in the 
Course for Teachers of Art. Second semester, M., W., F., 
3:00-4:00. Professor Breese. 

Psychology 9. Mental and Physical Tests. — Laboratory meth- 
ods. Three credits per semester. Hours to be arranged. 

Professor Breese and Mr. Isaacs. 



KINDERGARTEN TRAINING 

The following courses in Kindergarten Training, not given at 
the University, may be taken at the Cincinnati Kindergarten Train- 
ing School. The school is located at No. 6 Linton street, Ver- 
nonville. Registration day, Thursday, September 18, 1913. Work 
began on Friday, September 19. 

For conditions governing college students who are fitting pri- 
marily for positions in kindergartens, see Program III, page 147. 

The Cincinnati Kindergarten Training School issues a special 
announcement giving full information, a copy of which may be 
had upon application to the Registrar at the above address. 

COURSES 

Kgtn. 1. Gifts. — This course has for its aim a thorough 
knowledge of the kindergarten material, a comparative study of 
typical and original plays or lessons with the gifts, and a study 
of Froebel's underlying principles. Juniors. First semester, M., 
9:30-11:30. Second semester, two hours, to be arranged. Three 
credits. Miss Stone. 

Kgtn. 2. Handwork. — This course includes both the old and 
new occupations with practice in each. Also the preparation of 






KINDERGARTEN COURSES 157 

simple courses adapted for use in the kindergarten. First semester, 
T., 9:00-11:00. Second semester, Th., 2:30-4:30. Four credits. 

Miss Stone and Special Teachers. 

Kgtn. 3. Rhythms, Songs, and Games. — Juniors and Seniors. 
T., 3 :30-4 :30, throughout the year. Three credits. Miss Fry. 

Each of these courses includes theory and practice, and is in- 
tended to develop resourcefulness and originality in the student, 
as well as to give technical mastery of kindergarten instrumen- 
talities. 

Kgtn. 4. Theory. — This course includes an introductory study 
of Froebel's Mother Play as the basis for story, song, and game 
in kindergarten teaching. Also the study of Froebel's writings, 
for the purpose of discovering the educational laws which form 
the foundation for child development and personal culture. First 
semester, M., Th., 8 :30-9 :30. Second semester, W., 2 :00-3 :00. Six 
credits. Miss Stone, Miss Fry. 

Kgtn. 5. Stories. — This course includes lectures, discussions, 
and reference work concerning the literature of childhood, to- 
gether with regular practice in the telling of stories. Juniors and 
Seniors. Th., 1 :00-2 :00 ; F., 2 :00-3 :00. One credit. 

Miss Simrall. 

Kgtn. 6. Program Construction. — A critical resume of every 
division of kindergarten work and the educational principles in- 
volved. The careful planning of programs for definite periods of 
time and for meeting different conditions. Seniors, First semester, 
T., 1 :50-3 :30. Second semester, W., 1 :30-3 :30. Four credits. 

Miss Bothwell. 

Kgtn. 7. Observation. — Carefully supervised observation of 
the entire morning's work in kindergarten, followed by a discus- 
sion of the various activities and the educational principles in- 
volved. Juniors. First semester, hours to be arranged. Two 
credits. Miss Stone, Miss Fry. 

Kgtn. 8. Practice Teaching. — A minimum of one-half year 
(days to conform to the public school calendar) in private, mis- 
sion, or public school kindergartens, under at least two directors. 
Opportunity for increasing responsibility under careful supervi- 
sion. Additional practice may be required to demonstrate the 
student's ability to satisfactorily conduct every phase of kinder- 
garten work. Juniors and Seniors. Ten credits. 

Miss Stone, Miss Fry. 

Kgtn. 9. Organization of Mothers' Meetings. — A series of 
lectures covering the essentials of parliamentary law and the gen- 
eral purpose and subject matter of mothers' meetings. Short talks 
suitable for different occasions are prepared and given by the stu- 



158 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

dents. Seniors. Second semester. Two hours, to be arranged. 
Two credits. Miss Laws and Miss Stone. 

Kgtn. 10. Art. — Rapid sketching on blackboard; brush work 
in ink and water color; decorative design. Art in kindergarten- 
decoration, pictures, and children's work. Th., 9 :30-ll :30. One 
credit. Mr. John J. Thompson, 

give ease and grace of movement, a wise conservation and use of 

Kgtn. 11. Music. — Study and criticism of kindergarten music, 
the child's voice, rhythm, and development of ear and tone. At- 
tention to instrumental music with each student. Juniors and 
Seniors. Second semester, T., 1 :30-2 :30. One credit. 

Supervisor Aiken. 

Kgtn. 12. Hygiene and Physical Training. — This course includes 
lectures by specialists in each of these lines as well as class work in 
Physical Training. Its aim is to afford knowledge of sanitation, 
food, dress, exercise, rest, children's diseases, and emergencies. To 
energy, and to correlate with games played in the kindergarten such 
movements as are essential to the child's general development. 
Juniors and Seniors. Voice Training and Physical Training, Th., 
2 :00-3 :00. One credit each year. 

Kgtn. 13. Directors' Conference. — Lectures, discussions, sug- 
gestions in program work. 

Occasional talks by prominent kindergartners and specialists in 
education from other cities. M., 2:00-4:00, throughout the year. 
Miss Bothwell. 

COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF ART 

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for positions 
as teachers of art or supervisors of art instruction in public or 
private schools. 

Admission presupposes (a) the satisfactory completion of an 
approved curriculum in a secondary school, and (b) an amount 
of work in art of approved quality equivalent to that represented 
by two years of study in the Art Academy of Cincinnati. It is 
understood, however, that all students are admitted upon a month's 
probation during which they must give satisfactory evidence of a 
high degree of capability in art and show that they are otherwise 
qualified to pursue the course. 

The course is two years in length, during which the student's 
time is divided about equally between the professional program 
of the College for Teachers and studies in art at the Art Acad- 
emy of Cincinnati. The satisfactory completion of the course leads 
to, graduation and a diploma certifying that the holder is quali- 
fied to teach art or supervise art instruction in public or private 
elementary, secondary, and normal schools. 






COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF ART 159 

To students seeking a teacher's training course in art, Cin- 
cinnati offers exceptional opportunities. The Art Academy is a 
thoroughly equipped school for the training of artists. Adjacent 
to it is the Cincinnati Museum, containing large collections of 
paintings and sculpture, as well as of the applied arts. Each month, 
also, special exhibits of contemporary interest are arranged. The 
reference library of the Museum, relating especially to art, the 
Public Library, and the University Library are also available. In 
the University various lectures are open to students. For studies 
in natural history students have access to the Museum of the 
Society of Natural History, and the Cincinnati Zoological Gar- 
den. Among the local art industries the Rookwood Pottery is of 
especial interest. 

The work of observation and practice teaching is done in the 
regular public elementary and high schools of Cincinnati. This 
phase of the course, therefore, is conducted under the ideal con- 
ditions necessary to give the student a truly professional prep- 
aration. In connection with this practice are wrought out lesson- 
plans and outlines of work for the various grades of the elemen- 
tary and high schools, in harmony with the requirements of a 
well graded course of study based upon modern educational prin- 
ciples. In this way the ability of students to organize a progres- 
sive course in art instruction is thoroughly tested. 

For fees in the course for teachers of art see p. 56. 

COURSES 

The following courses of instruction, when not otherwise 
specified, are given at Hughes High School. 

First year students will take Courses 2, 3, 4, and 5 or 9. They 
will spend the forenoon of each week-day, excepting Saturday, in 
work at the Art Academy. They will also take Education 13, the 
first semester, and Psychology 7b, the second semester, at the 
University. (See pp. 151, 156.) 

Second year students will take Courses 1, 6, 7, 8, and 5 or 9. 
On forenoons and afternoons, when not occupied with these courses 
they will continue work at the Art Academy. At the University 
■they will take Education 6. (See p. 151.) 

Art 1. Theory and Practice of Teaching Art. — Principles 
upon which art teaching is based. The function of art in gen- 
jeral education. Consideration of courses of study. Making of 
lesson plans and outlines of work for elementary and secondary 
schools. Principles of criticism. Discussion of methods and de- 
I vices. F., 1 :00-3 :00. Miss Hyde. 



160 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Art 2. Water Colors and Crayons. — Landscape, nature products, 
pose and still life. Practice in arrangement of still life studies for 
the sake of good composition and harmony of color. Tu., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Mr. Teal. 

Art 3. Art Design and Applications. — Study of the principles 
of balance, rhythm and harmony, in line, dark and light, and color. 
Fitness of design in form, tone and color, in relation to various 
applications. Design applied to embroidery, stenciling, weaving, 
basketry, metal and leather work. W., 1 :00-3 :00. Miss Hyde. 

Art 4. Art Construction and Clay Work. — Paper and card- 
board construction. Weaving, stenciling, book binding, block print- 
ing, metal and leather work, basketry, pottery, and knife work. 
Th., 1:00-3:00. Miss Hyde. 

Art 5. Pictorial Composition. — Critical study of landscape 
composition in black and white, in tones of middle gray, and in 
color. Figure compositions in color. Illustrated talks on the old 
masters and comparisons of their work with modern art. Instruc- 
tion in blackboard illustration suited to the needs of teachers of 
regular subjects in elementary and secondary schools. Given in 
alternate years. M., 1 :30-4 :00. Mr. Teal. 

Art 6. Design and Classic Ornament. — An advanced study 
of questions taken up in Art 3. Study of historic ornament. Adap- 
tation of nature forms in design. Influence of materials on design. 
Theory of color. Designing of interiors with the study of original 
color schemes. W., 1:30-4:00. Mr. Teal. 

Art 7. Observation and Practice Teaching. — Two half-days 
per week in the public elementary and secondary schools under 
critical supervision. Webster Public School on Th., 8:30-12:00, 
Miss Swing, critic. Hughes High School, Tuesday forenoon, Miss 
Hyde, critic. 

Art 8. History of Art. — A study and amplification of Rei- 
nach's Apollo with the aid of photographs and plates in the Cin- 
cinnati Art Museum Library. Students required to make notes, 
outlines, and chronological tables. Instruction and practice as guides 
of visitors to the Art Museum. At the Art Museum. Tu., 2 :00-4 :00. 

Miss Kellogg. 

Art 9. Mechanical Drawing. — Use and care of materials and 
instruments. Simple geometric problems. Lettering. Scale draw- 
ing. Isometric and orthographic projections. Intersections. Ma- 
chine drawings. House plans and elevations. Tracing and blue 
printing. Given in alternate years in place of Art 5. M., 1 :30-4 :00. 

Supervisor Vogel. 






COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Charles William Dabney, Ph. D.,LL.D., President of the University. 
ermain Gildersleeve Porter, Ph. D., Director of the Observatory 

and Professor of Astronomy. 

Frederick Charles Hicks, Ph. D., Sinton Professor of Economics 

and Commerce and Dean of the College of Commerce. 

Iarris Hancock, Ph. D., D. Sc, . . Professor of Mathematics. 

vIax Poll, Ph. D., . . . Professor of the Germanic Languages. 

Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., . . . . . Professor of History. 

Louis Trenchard More, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

Ierman Schneider, Sc. D., William Thorns Professor of Civil 

Engineering and Dean of the College of Engineering. 
Stephen Elmer Slocum, Ph. D., Professor of Applied Mathematics. 
ohn Theodore Faig, M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
^evin M. Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Geography. 
^auder William Jones, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Chemistry. 
7 rank Wadleigh Chandler, Ph. D., Professor of English, Ropes 

Professor of Comparative Literature, and Dean of the 

McMicken College of Liberal Arts. 
Phillip Ogden, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Romance Languages. 
Zurtis C. Myers, M. M. E., Professor in Charge of Co-ordination. 
\lexander Massey Wilson, M. E., Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering. 
: * Harris Miller Benedict, A. M., .... Professor of Botany. 
5Elden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., . . Professor of Political Science. 

; , Professor of Zoology. 

HTarry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
\lexander Lewis Jenkins, M. E., Associate Professor of Mechani- 
cal Engineering, 
f Fred Eugene Ayer, C. E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Samuel James McIntosh Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

Physics. 
Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., . . . Associate Professor of History. 
Pharles Napoleon Moore, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 
Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 
Chemistry. 



* Absent on leave, 1913-14. 

** Absent on leave, first semester, 1913-14. 



162 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Benjamin Carlton Van Wye, A. M., Assistant Professor of Pub- 
lic Speaking and English. 
Clarence Raymond Wylie, M. E., Assistant Professor of Electrical 

Engineering. 
J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., Assistant Professor of Geology. 
Louis Brand, A. M.,. . . . Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Clyde William Park, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 
G. M. Braune, C. E., . Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
Clarence D. Stevens, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 

Alfred Brodbeck Director of Physical Education. 

Joseph Henry Kindle, A. M., . . . Instructor in Mathematics. 
Charles Albert Joerger, M. E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
James Francis Dilworth, A. M., . Instructor in English History. 
Harold W. T. Collins, M. E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
Martin Ludwich, M. E., . . Instructor in French and German. 

Robert E. Clyde Gowdy, Ph. D., Instructor in Physics. 

Max B. Robinson, M. E., Instructor in Co-ordination. 

Charles Watkins Brown, Mechanician and Instructor in Labora- 
tory Arts. 
Clarence A. Nash, A. M., . . Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 
George R. Moore, C. E., . . . . Instructor in Civil Engineering. 
Edwin W. Esslinger, A. M., . Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 

Edward Smith, M. S., Instructor in Mathematics. 

Russell B. Witte, B. C. E., . . Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

Other Appointments for the Academic Year 1913-14 

Ralph Edward Oesper, A. M., . Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

Edward J. Lorenz, A. M., Hanna Fellow in Physics. 

James P. Andrews, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

John Gerstle, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

Benedict Salkover, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

Benjamin E. Sive, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

Werner John Suer, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 
OF ENGINEERING 
Candidates for admission as undergraduates must be at least six- 
teen years of age. They must give evidence of having completed 
satisfactorily an amount of preparatory study represented by sixteen 
units, a unit being understood to mean one of the subjects in the 
following table pursued for one full year of five recitation periods 
each week. Of these sixteen units every candidate for admission to 
the College of Engineering must present the following: 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 163 

English. — Three units, in which there can be no "condition." 

Mathematics. — One unit in Algebra and one unit in Plane Geome- 
try, and one-half unit in Solid Geometry. 

History. — One unit. 

In addition to these fixed requirements, the candidates must offer 
a number of units selected from the list of subjects below, sufficient, 
with the units specified above, to amount to a total of sixteen. The 
number of units that may be offered in any subject is shown in the 
following table : 

Number of Units Accepted for Admission 



Minimum Maximum 

English 3 required or « 4 

Latin 1 ~| f ..or 2 or 3 or 4 

Greek 1 ! Threeunits j . . Q r 2or3 

*"»<* 1 \ X&n„ f i ..or2or3or4 

German 1 i one language .. or 2 or 3 or 4 

Spanish 1 J t ..or 2 

General or Medieval and 1 

Modern History 1 ..or 1 

Ancient y> One unit 1 

English ]/ 2 required . .or 1 

American y 2 ..or 1 

American and Civics 1 1 

Algebra 1 required or...l^or 2 

Geometry, Plane 1 required or 1 

Geometry, Solid l / 2 or x / 2 

Trigonometry y 2 or 1 

Civics y 2 y 2 

Physics 1 1 

Chemistry 1 1 

*Zoology 1 1 

*Botany 1 1 

Physical Geography y 2 or 1 

Astronomy y 2 y 2 

Drawing 1 2 

Manual Training 1 2 

For further information regarding the procedure in connection 
with the entrance examinations, the schedule of these examinations, 
definitions of each unit or group of units, and admission on certificate 
from accredited schools, consult the paragraphs under those heads 
to be found in the section of this catalogue relating to the College 
of Liberal Arts. 

ENTRANCE CONDITIONS AND ADMISSION TO 
ADVANCED STANDING 
All students must satisfy the entrance requirements in mathe- 
matics. Students who are deficient in not more than two units of 



* One-half unit will be allowed in Zoology and one-half unit in Botany 
when these two subjects are presented together as one unit in the same year. 



164 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

the sixteen required for admission, excepting those required in mathe- 
matics, may be admitted conditionally to the College of Engineering. 
All such entrance conditions will be removed in case the student 
passes in all of his Freshman work; otherwise, he will be required 
to pass entrance examinations to satisfy said conditions before he 
will be allowed to register for his second year of work at the Uni- 
versity. 

On March 9th, 1912, the Faculty of the College of Engineering 
adopted the following Provisional Grade System: 

1. Entrance Subjects — Students admitted on certificate will be 
expected to have a working knowledge of all subjects on which the 
Freshman subjects depend. Failing to show such working knowl- 
edge, any student, regardless of how he is admitted, may be con- 
ditioned in a subject by his instructor, and be required to show 
proficiency, to the satisfaction of the instructor, within a period not 
to exceed four weeks. Should he fail to acquire this working 
knowledge within the prescribed time, his case will be reported to 
the faculty, who may give him an entrance condition, which must 
be removed by examination before the Freshman subject can be 
repeated. 

2. Advanced Standing — Students who present credits from ap- 
proved colleges will be admitted to advanced standing as heretofore, 
but if it becomes evident that a student's preparation in prerequisite 
studies is inadequate, he will be conditioned by his instructor for a 
period not exceeding four weeks. If at the end of this time, he 
still lacks a working knowledge of the subject, his case will be 
brought to the attention of the faculty, at the discretion of which 
he may be required to repeat, in class, the prerequisite course in 
which he is deficient. 

3. Degrees— -By a ruling of the faculty March 9th, 1912, the 
words "satisfactory completion" of a course were given the follow- 
ing interpretation: Since the subjects in engineering courses are 
definitely prescribed and are nearly all graded in a series of pre- 
requisite and advanced studies, students of all classes will be required 
to show a working knowledge of related subjects belonging to 
earlier years of their course. Any student who fails to show a 
working knowledge of prerequisite studies will be conditioned and 
required to prove to the satisfaction of the instructor — within a 
period not exceeding four weeks — that he has acquired the necessary 
working knowledge of the subject. Should he fail to do this, his 
case will be automatically reported to the faculty, at the discretion 



THE CO-OPERATIVE SYSTEM 165 

of which he may be required to repeat the prerequisite course. This 
regulation affects all students from the date of its adoption. 

All applications for advanced credit must be made within three 
weeks after matriculation to the heads of the departments in which 
advanced standing is desired. Students may be admitted to advanced 
standing either upon presentation of a certificate from a college of 
approved standing or by examination. All students applying for 
advanced standing must first have satisfied the entrance require- 
ments, the same as regular students. 

DEGREES 

The technical degrees of Civil Engineer, Chemical Engineer, 
Electrical Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, and Metallurgical En- 
gineer, are given to those students of the Co-operative Course who 
complete satisfactorily the work scheduled under the respective 
departments. 

The degrees of Bachelor of Civil Engineering, Bachelor of 
Chemical Engineering, Bachelor of Electrical Engineering, and 
Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, will be given to regular 
students who satisfactorily complete the work of the four-year 
course scheduled under the respective departments. 

Candidates for the degrees specified above must spend their last 
year of study in residence in Cincinnati. 

THE CO-OPERATIVE SYSTEM 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The College of Engineering of the University of Cincinnati 
offers two courses : a four-year theoretical course similar to that 
given in other engineering institutions, and a five-year co-operative 
course in which students spend alternate bi-weekly periods in 
practical engineering work, and at the University. 

In the co-operative plan, the practice of engineering is taught in 
a shop or on a railroad under actual commercial conditions, and the 
science underlying the practice is taught in the University. The 
students are divided into two sections, which alternate every two 
weeks; that is to say, during one bi-weekly period, one-half of the 
students are at the University and one-half are in the factories ; at 
the beginning of the next two-week period the sections are changed, 
and those who were at the University go to the shops, and those who 
were in the shops go to the University. Briefly, it is the aim of the 
co-operative course to give the student a thorough training in the 
theory and practice of engineering. 



166 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

The co-operative course is of five years' duration, eleven 
months in the year, there being a vacation from the middle of 
August to the middle of September which is divided between two 
students of one pair. 

Students desiring to enter the University are required to begin 
their work during the month of July preceding their entrance to 
the University. Their entrance is, in a measure, dependent upon the 
character of the work done during this probationary period which 
extends from July to the opening of the University in September. 

Co-operative students are required to obey all regulations of the 
company with which they work, and are subject to all existing labor 
conditions and laws, including those pertaining to liability for 
accident. 

The entrance requirements for this course are precisely the 
same as for the regular four-year course. The theoretical work at 
the University is as thorough as the work given in the regular four- 
year course. None of the courses is abridged and none is omitted. 

The number of positions in the co-operative course is limited 
each year, and applications for positions should be filed with the 
Dean of the Engineering College prior to July 1, 1914. 

Satisfactory board and lodging may be procured in the neigh- 
borhood of the University at prices ranging from $4.50 to $5.50 
per week. The University recommends the boarding houses to the 
students. 

WAGES OF CO-OPERATIVE STUDENTS 

Co-operative students are paid for their work in the shops at 
the same rate as other employees. A new minimum wage scale, 
taking effect July 1, 1913, has been agreed upon by the co-operating 
firms. The new rate begins at 15 cents an hour, and increases 1 
cent an hour every year. In some of the larger machine tool shops 
a modification of this rate is used, beginning at 12 cents an hour, 
and increasing 2 cents an hour every six months, making a final rate 
of 30 cents an hour. These rates are for students of no previous 
practical experience. 

In railroad work, city work, and Traction Company work, 
students are paid at the prevailing rate of regularly employed men; 
thus the rate for beginners on track gang work is 16^ cents an 
hour ; in bridge work, 22^2 cents an hour ; in switch and signal work, 
22y 2 cents an hour; in street paving work, 20 cents an hour; in car 
barn work, 20 cents an hour, etc. 

Students of previous experience are paid what their services 
are worth. The University makes no guarantee above the minimum 
scale agreed upon, but uses every effort to place students to their 
best financial and educational advantage. Students who begin at the 



SHOP work m 

minimum rate are not held to this rate if their abilities are such 
that they can earn more. The wages are paid directly to the students 
by their employers for the actual time worked in the shops. 
Machine shops work 55 hours a week; foundries, traction companies, 
and railroads, 60 hours a week. 

EXPENSES 
The University expenses for tuition and laboratory fees during 
the five years of the course are about $420.00, as follows : 

First year $110.00 

Second year 85.00 

Third year 75.00 

Fourth year 75.00 

Fifth year 75.00 

SHOP WORK 

In all cases, the Dean of the Engineering College and the 
Professor of Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, Chemical, or Metallurgical 
Engineering, as the case may be, confer with the employers in plan- 
ning the course in shop work, so that the students get a logically 
and carefully arranged shop training. 

The work of the shop is co-ordinated with the work of the 
University by a Department of Co-ordination. The shop co- 
ordinator is a college graduate acquainted with shop or field practice. 
He spends every morning at the University and every afternoon in 
the shops. His function is to make as direct co-ordination as possible 
of the work of the shop with the theory of the University. One 
afternoon, for example, he may be at the shops of a local manufac- 
turing company, where he will observe the student apprentices at 
work. He will know what they are turning out, their speeds, their 
feeds and cuts, the angle of the tool, how the batch of work is 
ticketed, how the work is set up, the power drive, everything im- 
portant in connection with the operation. The next week these 
young men will be grouped together with their classmates for two 
periods in class, when he will explain the functions of the particular 
articles, on which the students were working, in the machine which 
the local manufacturing company builds. He will take up all 
questions of speeds, feeds, cuts, accuracy, etc. Figuratively speaking, 
he will take from the student apprentices the blinders which would 
restrict their vision except for this explanatory work. Ultimately, 
all problems of shop organization, shop accounting, cost keeping, 
shop planning, power transmission, heating, lighting, etc., are dis- 
cussed during the course. It will be seen, then, that out of the 
student's own experience is drawn much of his course in mechanism, 
thermodynamics, machine design, strength of materials, shop 
economics, etc. 



168 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

A similar system is followed in railroad work, construction 
work, and in all the other co-operative fields. 

COURSES OFFERED 

Co-operative courses are offered in Chemical Engineering-, Civil 
Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and 
Metallurgical Engineering. 

THE SUMMER TERM 

The summer term begins immediately after Commencement in 
June, and continues for twelve weeks, the students working in 
bi-weekly periods as in the winter term. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

The purpose of the course of study in Chemical Engineering is 
to provide the young engineer with a broad and well-founded knowl- 
edge of chemistry and of mechanical engineering, so that he may 
be prepared to take up the work of assisting in the design and erec- 
tion of chemical machinery, in the arrangement of plants, and the 
working out and improvement of manufacturing processes depend- 
ent wholly or in part upon chemistry or metallurgy; further, it aims 
to equip him so that he may be able to consider propositions, pro- 
cesses, and plans from the combined viewpoint of the chemist and 
engineer. The chemical engineer naturally begins his professional 
career as analyst, draughtsman, or assistant engineer; he is much 
better prepared for the duties of superintendent of a chemical or 
metallurgical establishment than either chemist or mechanical 
engineer. 

The chemical engineer is essentially a modern product, and the 
demand for men with this special training is constantly increasing. 
Indeed, the necessity for the efficient control of plants and processes, 
the economical utilization of power, the conversion of factory by- 
products into marketable commodities, and the adaptation and design 
of mechanical appliances to carry out chemical reaction on a large 
scale, all demand that the technical chemist should be an engineer. 
Graduates from this department of the University are now filling 
positions as superintendents and chemical engineers at blast furnaces, 
steel works, electrolytic establishments, coal tar distillation, and paper 
works, and factories making heavy chemicals, dry colors, printing 
inks, soaps, etc. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 169 

Students who elect this course should be in good physical condi* 
tion and well prepared, since the work is both extensive and inten- 
sive, and almost all the hours of the day not spent in the class-room 
are occupied with work in the laboratory or in the draughting room. 



FOUR-YEAR COURSE IN CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING 

Students who choose the four-year course in Chemical Engineering 
will be required to spend at least two summers in chemical plants 
or in machine shops ; this work will be substituted for the customary 
shop work of an engineering course. 

CO-OPERATIVE COURSE IN CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING 

The studies during the five years of the co-operative course are 
practically identical with those taken by the four-year student in 
the College of Engineering. In some cases slight changes in the 
order have been made to meet the requirements set by the practical 
needs of the students working in the shops. 

During the first two years of the course, a large part of the 
student's time is devoted to subjects fundamental to an engineering 
course in chemistry. With the exception of general inorganic chemis- 
try, an elementary course in metallurgy, and an introduction 
to qualitative analysis, the special courses in chemistry are postponed 
until the second summer and the years following. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING— REGULAR PLAN 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF B. CH. E. 

SUBJECT COURSE Exercises Per Week 

I Sem. II Sera. 

Freshman Year 

Gen'l Inorganic Chemistry. . .Ch. E. la, 2a. 3b, 4b. 5 5 

Algebra and Trigonometry. . . .Math. 1 5 

Analytical Geometry Math. 1 5 

English English 1 3 3 

Elementary German 1 (French 1 | „ „ 

or French ) \ German 1 5 

Descriptive Geometry M. E. 3 2 

Machine Drawing M. E. 1 2 

Gymnasium Phys. Educ. 1 2 2 

Summer work in outside shops. 



170 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Sophomore Year 

Qualitative Analysis Ch. E. 5a, 6a 6 1 

Quantitative Analysis Ch. E. 7b 3 



Differential and Integral l Math>5 , 
Calculus ) 



Senior Year 

Technical Inorganic Chem 
Technical Organic Chem.. 
Chemical Engineering Lab 
Non-Ferrous Metallurgy.. 

Testing of Materials 

Direct Current Machinery 

Elec. Engineering Lab 

Alternating Current Mach 
Thesis ...„„, 



Physics Phys. la, 2a, 21b, 22b. 5 5 

^ -n , ( German 2 3 3 

German or French \ French 2 

Gymnasium Phys. Educ. 2 2 2 

Summer work in outside shops. 



Junior Year 

Elementary Organic Chem. . . .Ch. E. 8a, 9a o 

Physical Chemistry .Ch. E. 12 3 

Physical Chemistrv, Labo- irk tt iqk o 

ratory ' J ui. Ji. idD - 

Electrochemistry Ch. E. 32 3 

Electrochemistry Laboratory.. .Ch. E. 33 2 

Metallurgy Ch. E. 14a 5 

Technical Analysis Ch. E. 17 2 3 

Strength of Materials Ap. Math. 2 3 

Mechanics of Engineering Ap. Math. 1, 3 3 

Steam Engineering M. E. 11 2 l A 2 z / 2 

Summer work. Land Surv'g. .C. E. 3 4 weeks 



..Ch. E. 16a 3 

..Ch. E. 18b 3 

..Ch. E. 36b 3 

. . Met. Eng. 6a 3 

..M. E. 18 1 

..E. E. 1 2y 2 

..E. E. 5 1 1 

..E. E. 12 2V 2 

..Ch. E. 23b 4 



Electives (Six hours throughout Senior Year). 

Adv'd Organic Chemistry. . . Ch. E. 20 5 

Laboratory Ch. E. 21 2 2 

Adv'd Inorganic Chem Ch. E. 10b 2 

Laboratory Ch. E. lib 2 

Metallurgy of Iron and Steel . . Met. Eng. 4 3 

Assaying Ch. E. 15b 1 

Gas Engineering M. E. 23 2 

Compressed Air and Re- { ™ t- q1 q 

frigeration } M ' * dl 

Geology, Mineralogy 5 5 

Economics Economics 1 2 

Sanitary Biology Biology 11 2 2 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 171 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF CH. E. 

„ _ Exercises 

SUBJECT COURSE Per Alternate Week 

I Sem. II Sem. 

First Year Freshman 

Algebra and Trigonometry \ M , . fi , 

Analytical Geometry ] Math * l 6 6 

Chemistry Ch. E. la, 3b 5 5 



Chemistry, Laboratory Ch. E. 2a, 4b 3 3 

Machine Drawing M. E. 1 3 3 

Co-ordination C. 3 2 2 

History 4 4 

Geology 15 2 2 

First Summer Term 

Problem Work in Industrial Chemistry (5 

Descriptive Geometry 5 

Elements of Engineering M. E. 4 5 

Second Year Sophomore 

Calculus Math. 5 6 

Physics, Lectures Phys. la, 21b 6 

Physics, Laboratory Phys. 2a, 22b 2 2 

Metallurgy I Mpt F ln J 5 

Metallurgy, Laboratory \ 1Uet " u la { 3 

Qualitative Analysis Ch. E. 5, 6 6 

English (J 6 

Co-ordination C. 4 2 2 

Second Summer Term 

Qualitative Analysis Ch. E. 5, 6 5 

Elementary Organic Ch. E. 8a, 9a 11 

Third Year Pre-Junior 

Quantitative Analysis Ch. E. 7b 3 5 

Steam Engineering M. E. 11 5 5 

Mechanical Laboratory M. E. 18 2 

Strength of Materials Ap. Math. 2 6 

Mechanics 6 

* Modern Language 6 6 

Third Summer Term 

Technical Analysis Ch. E. 17 6 

Metallography Met. E. 2 5 

Fourth Year Junior 

Technical Analysis Ch. E. 17 2 

Physical Chemistry Ch. E. 12a 5 

* Students who have a reading knowledge of German may elect French. 
In other cases, German must he taken first. 



172 COLLEGE OE ENGINEERING 

Physical Chemistry Lab Ch. E. 13a 2 

Electro-chemistry Ch. E. 32b 5 

Electro-chemistry Lab Ch. E. 33b 2 

Metallurgy of Iron and Steel.. .Met. E. 4b 5 

Electrical Machinery E. E. 1, 9 6 6 

Electrical Laboratory E. E. 5 2 2 

Modern Language German or French 6 6 

Co-ordination C. 8 3 3 

Fourth Summer Term 
Chemical Investigation and Thesis. 
Engineering Design. 

Fifth Year Senior 

Technical Chemistry Ch. E, 16a, 18 5 5 

Technical Chemistry Lab Ch. E. 36b 

Economics 6 6 

Thesis 5 5 



Electives: 

Gas Engineering M. E. 23 

Organic Chemistry. Ch. E. 20. . . . 

Inorganic Preparations Chem. 11 ... . 

Non- Ferrous Metallurgy Met. Eng. 6'. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

COURSES IN DETAIL 

Lauder William Jones, Ph. D., ... Professor of Chemistry. 
Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Chemistry. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 
Clarence A. Nash, A. M., . . Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 
Edwin W. Esslinger, A. M. f . Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 
Ralph Edward Oesper, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 
Student Assistants : James P. Andrews, John Gerstle, Benedict 
Salkover, Benjamin E. Sive, Werner John Suer. 

la. General Inorganic Chemistry. — The non-metals. This 
course gives a definite idea of the fundamental laws of general 
chemistry and furnishes a survey of the important facts concerning 
the chemistry of the non-metals and their compounds. Lectures, 
recitations, and quizzes illustrated by experiments, charts, and 
specimens. Course 2a forms an integral part of, and must accom- 
pany Course la. Assistant Professor Goettsch and Assistants. 

2a. General Inorganic Chemistry, Laboratory. — Three laboratory 
exercises per week. First semester. Experiments complementary 
to the subject-matter of Course la. M., T., W., 1:00-4:00. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch and Assistants. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 173 

3b. General Inorganic Chemistry. — The metals. Continuation 
of Course la. The properties of the metals and their compounds. 
Five hours per week. Second semester. Students who have com- 
pleted Courses la and 2a are eligible for this course. It must be 
accompanied by Course 4b. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch and Assistants. 

4b. General Inorganic Chemistry, Laboratory. — Three laboratory 
exercises per week. Second semester. Experiments complementary 
to the subject-matter of Course 3b. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch and Assistants. 

10a. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. — Two exercises a week. 
First semester. The less familiar elements and their compounds, and 
the more recent theories of inorganic chemistry. 

Prerequisite: Courses 5a, 6, and 7b. Associate Professor Fry. 

11a. Inorganic Preparations. — Three laboratory exercises a 
week. First semester. Associate Professor Fry. 

Prerequisite : Course 7b. 

5a. Qualitative Analysis. — Lectures and recitations on the 
principles and practice of qualitative analysis. Considerable em- 
phasis is laid upon the application of the laws of chemical 
equilibrium and the theories of solutions and of electrolytic disso- 
ciation to the practical problems of the analyst. Three exercises 
a week for one semester. Mr. Nash. 

Prerequisite: Courses 3b and 4b. 

6. Qualitative Analysis, Laboratory. — To accompany Course 5. 
During the first few weeks the student will perform the most im- 
portant tests commonly used in the processes of analytical chemistry. 
The later work of the course will furnish training in the qualitative 
examination of salts, minerals, alloys, etc. Two exercises a week, 
first semester. Two laboratory periods and one quiz period, second 
semester. Mr. Nash and Mr. Esslinger. 

7. Quantitative Analysis. — An introductory laboratory course 
in gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Occasional conferences will 
be held at which analytical methods and calculations will be dis- 
cussed, and at which reports will be submitted covering assigned 
reading. Three exercises a week. Second semester. Given during 
first semester for co-operative engineers. Mr. Esslinger. 

Prerequisite: Courses 5a and 6 (first semester). 

17. Technical Analysis. — Analyses of typical industrial products. 
Gravimetric, volumetric, gasometric, electrolytic and colorimetric 
processes, involving the use of such instruments as polariscopes. 



174 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

refractometers, colorimeters, specific gravity balances, calorimeters, 
pyrometers, and other apparatus for rapid determinations by physi- 
cal means. The aim is to study typical methods of analysis. Some of 
the topics covered in the past have been analyses of fuel, cement, 
ores, iron and steel, water, gas, fertilizers, soaps, and food. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch and Mr. Esslinger. 
Prerequisite: Course 7b. 

8a. Elementary Organic Chemistry. — Quizzes and lectures 
which are experimental covering the chief classes of organic com- 
pounds of both the aliphatic and the aromatic series. Arranged to 
meet the needs of those who intend to specialize in chemistry, in 
medicine, in biology, or in engineering, and serves as a general 
introduction for those who intend to go deeper into the study of 
organic chemistry. Professor Jones. 

Prerequisite: Courses 3b and 4b. 

9a. Organic Reactions and Preparations. — Laboratory practice, 
consisting of two exercises a week to accompany the lectures of 
Course 8a. Professor Jones and Assistant Professor Reemelin. 
Professor Jones and Assistant Professor Reemelin. 

Prerequisite : Courses 3b and 4b. 

20. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — Lectures, embracing a sys- 
tematic study of the principles and practices of organic chemistry, 
and treating of the modes of formation, properties, and constitu- 
tional formulae of typical members of the most important classes 
of organic compounds. Three exercises a week throughout the year. 

Professor Jones. 
Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6, 7b, 8a, 9a, and a reading knowledge 
of German and French. 

21. Advanced Organic Chemistry, Laboratory. — Practice in the 
preparation of a number of typical organic compounds. Two or 
three exercises a week throughout the year. Professor Jones. 

12a. Physical Chemistry. — Lectures and recitations. Three 
exercises a week. First semester. An introductory course which 
considers the general properties of gases, liquids, solids, and 
solutions, as well as the principles determining reaction velocity 
and the equilibria in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems 1 . 

Prerequisite : Chemistry 5a, 6a and 7b, Physics 26a and 27b, 
Mathematics 5. Mr. Nash. 

13a. Physical Chemistry, Laboratory. — Two exercises a week. 
First semester. Designed to illustrate the principles developed in 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 175 

Course 12a, and to provide a working knowledge of the common 
methods used in physical-chemical measurements. This course must 
accompany Course 12a. Mr. Nash. 

32b. Electrochemistry. — Lectures and recitations. Three exer- 
cises a week. Second semester. A general consideration of the 
electrical properties of matter with special reference to the theory of 
aqueous solutions. Mr. Nash. 

Prerequisite : 12a. 

33b. Electrochemistry, Laboratory. — Two exercises a week. 
Second semester. Determination of conductivity with its application, 
transference numbers, electromotive force, dielectric constant, etc. 
Must accompany Course 32b. Mr. Nash. 

[34a. Thermodynamics Applied to Chemistry.] Two exercises 
a week. First semester. Devoted to an elementary consideration 
of the principles of thermodynamics and their application to 
physical-chemical problems. The work will be illustrated by the 
solution of numerous numerical examples. Mr. Nash. 

Prerequisite: 12a and 32b. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

41a. Phase Rule. — Lectures and recitations. The phase rule 
and its applications. Two exercises a week. Hours to be arranged. 
Prerequisite: Course 12a. Mr. Nash. 

14b. Metallurgy. — Five periods a week. Second semester. 
A study of fuels, refractories, ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy, 
and practice in metallurgical calculations. Especial emphasis is laid 
upon foundry and steel works processes, and excursions are made 
to metallurgical establishments in Cincinnati and vicinity. 

Assistant Professor Aston. 

Prerequisite: Course 5a and Physics 1. 

15b. Assaying. — One afternoon a week. Second semester. 
Laboratory practice in the fire assay of ores and base metals for 
gold, silver and lead. Assistant Professor Aston. 

Prerequisite : Course 7b. 

[16a. Technical Inorganic Chemistry.] Three periods a week. 
First semester. Lectures and recitations upon important inorganic 
chemical industries. Especial attention is paid to plant equipment 
and costs. Assistant Professor Goettsch. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a and 6. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 



176 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

18b. Technical Organic Chemistry. — Three periods a week. 
Second semester. Lectures and recitations upon selected organic 
chemical industries. Especial attention is directed to plant equip- 
ment and costs. Assistant Professor Goettsch. 

Prerequisite: Courses 8a and 16a. 

36b. Technical Chemistry, Laboratory. — It is not intended that 
the course should consist of the preparation of a prescribed list of 
chemical compounds, but rather of a number of independent prob- 
lems considering the technical manufacture of important inorganic 
and organic chemicals. The work will include the testing of raw 
material and finished product ; the preparation of cost sheets, showing- 
prices of material used and time spent; a consideration of the 
possibility of utilizing any by-products ; and, in some cases, the de- 
sign of a factory calculated for a certain output. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch and Assistant. 

[29a. Practical Photography.] Laboratory work in the exposure 
and development of plates predominates, followed by a study of 
various printing methods. Some time is devoted to copying, enlarg- 
ing and the making of lantern slides. One lecture and one laboratory 
exercise per week. First semester. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch. 

Prerequisite: General Inorganic Chemistry (la, 2a, 3b, 4b). 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

26. Summer Work (Sophomore). — A memoir, illustrated by 
drawings, descriptive of some subject of technical interest. An ac- 
count of work done during the summer in an industrial laboratory 
or works will, if satisfactory, be accepted as an equivalent of the 
memoir. 

Summer work reports and memoirs must be handed in by No- 
vember 1st. 

27. Summer Work (Junior). — A memoir, illustrated by draw- 
ings, descriptive of some manufacturing industry. The memoir 
should be accompanied by a report of work performed in the labora- 
tory or works. 

Summer work reports and memoirs must be handed in by No- 
vember 1st. 

23b Thesis, Laboratory. — Four laboratory periods a week de- 
voted to the solution of some problem in technical chemistry or 
metallurgy, including collateral reading and practice in bibliography. 
This course is designed for Senior students who are required to pre- 
pare a thesis for graduation. 

Professor Jones, Assistant Professor Goettsch, 
Assistant Professor Aston, Mr. Nash. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 177 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

The purpose of this course is to give a bread education in those 
subjects which form the basis of all branches of technical education, 
and a special training in those subjects comprised under the term 
"Civil Engineering." Its aim is to prepare the young engineer to take 
up the work of assisting in the design and construction of bridges, 
steel mills, and high steel buildings ; to aid in the location and con- 
struction of steam and electric railways, sewerage and water supply 
systems; and to undertake, intelligently, supervision of work in the 
allied fields of mining, architectural and electrical engineering and 
general contracting. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 
CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

The Civil Engineering Department co-operates with railroads, 
structural steel shops, reinforced concrete construction companies, 
general contractors, and the Engineering Department of the city of 
Cincinnati. 

Students employed on railroad work start as laborers in a 
section gang. This work includes main line, yard, and extra gang 
work. In the bridge and building department, experience is gained 
in the repair of bridges, the building of culverts, and other con- 
struction work done by this department. The signal department 
affords opportunity for the student to become familiar with the 
installation, operation, and maintenance of the various signal sys- 
tems. One summer is spent in a steel fabrication plant and one 
summer in a frog switch and signal factory. In the last year of the 
course, the student is assigned to minor supervisory work in con- 
nection with heavy construction. As opportunity permits and the 
ability of the student warrants, he acts as assistant foreman and 
timekeeper in the various departments. 

Students desiring municipal work start as laborers in the street 
repair department of the city or with contractors doing city work. 
After sufficient experience, they are appointed as rodmen and 
inspectors in the engineering department of the city. 

In structural work, the student spends the first year in a 
structural steel shop familiarizing himself with structural steel 
fabrication. This is followed by work in reinforced concrete con- 
struction and general contracting work. 

The outside work in civil engineering aims first, to give students 
actual experience in the doing of work, and second, to train them to 
supervise work that is done by others. While there is a definite plan 
outlined and agreed to by each employer, promotion is dependent 
upon the ability and application of the student. 



178 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



CIVIL ENGINEERING— REGULAR PLAN 
COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF B. C. E. 



Subject 



Course 



Exercises Per Week 
I Sem. II Sem. 



Freshman Year 

Trigonometry and Algebra. . . . Math. 1 4 

Analytical Geometry Math. 1 4 

Chemistry Ch. E. la, 2a, 3b, 4b. . . 5 5 

Descriptive Geometry C. E. 1 3 

Mechanical Drawing M. E. 1 3 

English English 1 3 3 

French or German j g^^.::::"" \ 3 3 

Physical Education Phys. Ednc. 1 2 2 



SUMMER TERM 



Land Surveying. 



,C. E. 3. .Not given in summer of 1912. 



Sophomore Year 

Calculus Math. 5 4 

Physics Physics la, 21b 3 

Physics Laboratory Physics 2a, 22b 2 

Construction Drawing C. E. 4 2 

Cement, Theory and Lab C. E. 5 

Mechanics of Engineering Ap. Math. 2 

Metallurgy Met. E. la 

English English 2 2 

French or German j *£*$;;;;; ;;;;■; } 3 

Physical Education Phys. Educ. 2 2 



Junior Year 



Dynamics 

Roofs and Bridges. . . . 
Railroad Construction. 
Railroad Surveying. . . 

Hydraulics 

Hydraulic Machinery. 

Economics 

Geology and Physiography 
Materials Laboratory 



Ap. Math. 3 2V 2 



..C. E. 9 3 

..C. E. 10 3 

..C. E. 11 

. .C. E. 13 3 

..M. E. 27 

. . Economics 1 2 

. . See GeoL.Announcem't 5 

..M. E. 16 1 



Senior Year 

Astronomy Astronomy 2a, 3b 1 

Bridge Design C. E. 14 3 

Bridges, Higher Structures. . . C. E. 15 

Sanitary Engineering C. E. 18 3 

Sanitary Biology Biol. 9 1 

Elements of Electrical En- \ E E 12 4 

gineering i 

Practical Problems C. E. 17 4 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 179 

CIVIL ENGINEERING— CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF C. E. 

„ , Exercises 

SUBJECT COURSE Per Alternate Week 

I Sem. II Sem. 

First Year Freshman 

Trigonometry and Algebra Math. 1 6 

Analytical Geometry Math. 1 6 

Chemistry Ch. E. la, 3b 5 5 

Chemistry, Laboratory Ch. E. 2a, 4b 3 3 

Machine Drawing M. E. 1 3 

Descriptive Geometry C. E. 1 3 

Co-ordination Co 2 2 

Elements of Engineering 3 3 

Physical Education 2 2 

First Summer Term. 

Elements of Engineering C. E. 20 6 

Problems in Industrial Chemistry G 

Descriptive Geometry C. E. 2 5 

Second Year Sophomore 

Calculus Math. 5 6 6 

Physics Physics la, 21b 6 (> 

Physics, Laboratory Physics 2a, 22b 2 3 

Metallurgy I Met F la \ 4 

Metallurgy, Laboratory / ~ VieL ^ ia \ 3 

English 5 

Construction Drawing C. E. 4 3 

Co-ordination C. 6 2 2 

Physical Education 2 2 

Second Summer Term 

Hydraulics C. E. 13 

Plane and Topographic Sur- 
veying C. E. 3 11 

Third Year Pre-Junior 

Electrical Machinery E. E. 1, 9 6 6" 

Electrical Laboratory E. E. 5 2 2 

Strength of Materials Ap. Math. 2 6 

Mechanics Ap. Math. 1 6* 

Cement Theory and Lab C. E. 5 3 

Railroad Surveying C. E. 10, 11 3 

Modern Language 6 

Fourth Year Junior 

Steam Engineering M. E. 11 6 

Mechanical Laboratory M. E. 18 2 

Roofs and Bridges C. E. 9 8 8 

Structural Design C. E. 14 8 

Co-ordination C. 8 3 3 

Modern Language 6 6 



180 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Fifth Year Senior 

Engineering Design C. E. 14 6 6 

Economics 5 5 

Geology 7 7 

Engineering Design C. E. 17 3 3 

Engineering Design C. E. 18 5 5 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

COURSES IN DETAIL 

Herman Schneider, Sc. D., William Thorns Professor of Civil 

Engineering. 
* Fred Eugene Ayer, C. E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
G. M. Braune, C. E., . . Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 
George R. Moore, C. E., . . . . Instructor in Civil Engineering. 
Russell Bennett Witte, B. C. E., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

1. Descriptive Geometry. — Projections of lines, planes, and 
solids, with practical applications. Isometric and perspective draw- 
ing. Free-hand drawing. Mr. Witte. 

2. Descriptive Geometry, Practical Applications. — Summer term. 

Assistant Professor Braune. 

3. Land Surveying. — The theory and use of the transit and 
level. The theory of land surveying with practical problems. The 
surveying of areas in city and country, and computations of the 
same, together with maps and profiles. — Summer term. 

Assistant Professor Braune and Mr. Moore. 

20. Elements of Engineering. — The solution of problems by the 
triangle of forces; stresses in simple structural parts and beams. 
Design of beams. — Summer term. 

Assistant Professor Braune and Mr. Moore. 

4. Construction Drawing. — Stereotomy, dams, piers, culverts, 
trestles. Practical applications of descriptive geometry to sewer de- 
tails, pipe intersections, arch construction, etc. 

Assistant Professor Braune and Mr. Moore. 

5. Cement. — Theory and manufacture. Analysis of raw ma- 
terials. Calculation of mix. Standard laboratory tests on cement, 
mortar and concrete. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch and Mr. Moore. 

9. Roofs and Bridges. — Calculation of stresses in framed struc- 
tures under static and moving loads by both graphic and analytic 
methods. Assistant Professor Braune. 



Absent on leave, 1913-14. 






CIVIL ENGINEERING 181 

10. Railroad Construction. — The construction of subgrade, 
roadbed, trestles, tunnels, and drains; maintenance of way and or- 
ganization. Rolling stock. Mr. Witte. 

11. Railroad Surveying. — The reconnaissance, preliminary and 
location methods, with theory of tangents, curves, crossovers, and 
turnouts^ Field work exemplifying practical application of theory. 

Mr. Witte. 

13. Hydraulics. — Theory of the flow of water through orifices, 
tubes, pipes, and channels. River and sewer hydraulics and naval 
hydro-mechanics, stream gauging and hydrographic surveying. — Sum- 
mer term. Assistant Professor Braune. 

14. Structural Design. — Contracts and office work. Shops and 
shop practice. Design of roof truss, plate girder, and pin connected 
span, including the important details. Specifications. Inspection trips. 

Assistant Professor Braune. 

15. Higher Structures. — Cantilever, draw, suspension, and 
arched structures. Assistant Professor Braune. 

17. Engineering Design, Practical Problems. — Design of sewer- 
age and water supply systems, and reinforced concrete structures. 
Higher structures. Professor Schneider, 

Assistant Professor Braune, Mr. Moore. 

18. Sanitary Engineering. — Sewage collection and disposal. 
Sewer details. Water purification and supply. Design of a sewerage 
and water supply system. Mr. Moore. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers courses on two 
distinct plans. The first is called the regular course and is com- 
pleted in four years, the student working in the University each week 
during the college year and in the shops during the summer. The 
second is called the co-operative course and is completed in five 
years, the student working alternately in the College of Engineering 
one week and in a city shop the next. A description of the co-opera- 
tive plan is given elsewhere in this catalogue. 

During the first two years, the work in the University is chiefly 
in history, mathematics, physics, chemistry, and drafting, and forms 
a basis for more specialized work in later years. Beginning with the 
third and junior years, specialized work is taken up. Inasmuch as 
the professional electrical engineer needs a comprehensive knowledge 
of mechanical engineering, many of the technical subjects of the Me- 



182 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

chanical Department are included in the Electrical Course. Thus 
steam engineering and machine design with laboratory work and 
drafting, together with applied mathematics, are studied during the 
third year. 

In addition to the purely technical subjects, many cultural sub- 
jects are introduced throughout the course, subjects which every man 
of education should know; for a professional engineer should be a 
broadly educated man, capable of filling the highest positions in 
astive life. 

The curricula and details of the courses are given below: 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

The co-operative students of electrical engineering follow many 
diverse lines of practical experience. It is hardly possible to discuss 
these activities in detail. But there is a general method underlying- 
all forms of practical work, so that practically the same degree of 
progressive development is obtained. 

All Freshmen spend a year in some foundry or machine shop, 
for the purpose of becoming familiar with general shop practice and 
the conditions of labor. Those who take up manufacturing work, 
such as is offered by the Bullock Electric Company or the Triumph 
Electric Company, spend practically the second and third years in 
the machine, controller, winding, and assembling departments. In 
this way, they become thoroughly familiar with the varied processes 
involved in the manufacture of electrical machinery, and with the 
details of shop organization. The fourth year is usually spent in 
testing direct current machinery, and the fifth year in the testing of 
alternating current machinery. 

During the past year, arrangements have been made with the 
Cincinnati Traction Company, so that a number of our students 
spend at least the second and third years in the car barns. The 
work includes the inspection, repair, and testing of the various types 
of equipment used by the Traction Company. 

At present, a number of students are employed in telephone 
work. Their practical experience depends upon the operating con- 
ditions, and involves both inside and outside inspection, repair, 
testing, and construction. 

Students of electrical engineering are also engaged in co- 
operative work with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company. The 
practical experience with this company is of a varied character, and 
depends largely upon the ability of the students. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 183 

The Warner Elevator Company employs a number of students 
in the co-operative course in electrical engineering. This work 
furnishes the very best opportunities for the observation of the 
mechanical and electrical details of modern elevator practice. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING— REGULAR PLAN 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF B. E. E. 
Subject Course e ™ *£ £«* 

Freshman Year 

Algebra and Trigonometry. . . . Math. 1 5 

Analytical Geometry Math. 1 5 

Chemistry Ch. E. la, 2a, 3b, 4b ... 5 5 

Descriptive Geometry M. E. 3 3 

Freehand Drawing 1 1 

Machine Drawing M. E. 1 2 



German or French j&SK: 



3 



English English 1 3 3 

Physical Education Phys. Educ. 1 2 2 

Summer work in shops. 

Sophomore Year 

Calculus Math. 5 3 3 

Physics Physics la, 21b 3 3 

Experimental Physics Physics 2a, 22b 2 2 

Mechanism M. E. 6 2 

Drawing and Sketching M. E. 7 1 1 

Steam Engineering M. E. 11 3 3 

Mechanical Laboratory M. E. 18 1 1 

Machine Drawing M. E. 9 2 

Metallurgy Met. E. la 4 

Metallurgical Laboratory 1.5 

History 1 1 

English Eng. 2 

2 
French 2 

Physical Education Phys. Educ. 2 2 2 

Summer work in shops. 5 

Electrical Engineering E. E. 12 3 

(Alt. weeks) 

Junior Year 

Elementary Design. 



German or French I S5 rrn fV 



Elementary Problems E. E. 12 3 

Electrical Machinery E. E. 1, 9 3 3 

Electrical Laboratory E. E. 5 1 1 

(Alt. weeks) 

Mechanics of Engineering. ...Ap. Math. 1. 3 5 5 

Physics Physics 5, 13 3 2 

Machine Design M. E. 13, 14, 19 5 2 

Graphics of Mechanics M. E. 17 2 

Summer Term, Land Surv'g. . C. E. 3 4 weeks 



184 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



Senior Year 

Alternating Current Mach E. E. 3. . 

Advanced Design E. E. 15. 

Elec. Power Transmission E. E. 4.. 

Advanced E. E. Laboratory. . .E. E. 7.. 

Electric Power Stations E. E. 11. 

Gas Engineering M. E. 23 

Advanced Mechan. Lab M. E. 25 

Mechanical Power Stations. . .M. E. 29 
Advanced Integral Calculus ... Math. 8a 

Differential Equations Math. 9b 

Thesis E. E. 8.. 



3 


3 


3 


3 


3 




3 


3 




1 


3 





1 


1 




1 


3 






3 


3 


3 



Electives 

Telegraphy and Telephony E. E. 13 3 

Illumination E. E. 10 2 

Advanced Physics 3 



Railroad Construction. 
Steam Turbines.. 



,C. E. 10 3 

M. E. 24 2 



Economics Economics 1 . 

Heating and Ventilation M. E. 30 

Geology Geol. 2 

Electric Railways 

Thermodynamics M. E. 21 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 



Exercises 

Per Alternate Week 

I Sem. II Sem. 



COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF E. E 
Subject Course 

First Year Freshman 

Algebra and Trigonometry. . ) ,,.. - R 

Analytical Geometry ...} Math « l 6 

Chemistry Ch. E. la, 3b 5 

Chemistry, Laboratory Ch. E. 2a, 4b 3 

Machine Drawing M.E.I 2 

Co-ordination C. 1 2 

Physical Education 2 

Elements of Engineering M. E. 4 3 

First Summer Term — Five weeks. 

Problems in Industrial Chemistry 6 

Descriptive Geometry 5 

Elements of Engineering M. E. 4 6 

Second Year Sophomore 

Calculus Math. 5 6 

Physics, Lectures Phys. la, 21b 6 

Physics, Laboratory Phys. 2a, 22b 2 

Metallurgy Met. E. la 4 

Metallurgical Laboratory 3 

Drawing and Sketching M. E. 7 

Co-ordination C. 2 2 

Physical Education 2 

English 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 185 

Second Summer Term. 

Mechanical Laboratory M. E. 18 4 

Mechanism M. E. 6 6 

Drawing and Sketching M. E. 7 7 

Third Year Pre-Junior 

Physics, Laboratory Phys. 13 2 

Modern Language 5 5 

Steam Engineering M. E. 11 6 6 

Mechanical Laboratory M. E. 18 2 2 

Strength of Materials Ap. Math. 2 6 6 

Mathematics 4 

Inspection Trips 1 1 

Third Summer Term 

English 6 

Elementary Problems E. E. 12 4 

Elementary Laboratory 

and Reports E. E. 13 7 

Fourth Year Junior 

Electrical Machinery E. E. 1, 9 6 6 

Electrical Laboratory E. E. 5 2 2 

Machine Design M. E. 13 5 

Machine Drawing and 1 i\/r t? i i o 

Shop Inspection ] M * *" 14 d 

Modern Language 6 G 

Co-ordination C. 8 3 3 

Hydraulic Mach M. E. 27 5 

Electrical Design E. E. 2 3 

Fourth Summer Term 

App. Math, in Elec. Eng 6 

Special Problems 4 

Elec. Design E. E. 2 3 

Elec. Lab E. E. 7 4 

Fifth Year Senior 

Alternating Current Ma- } f f o 4 4 

chinery ( 

Electrical Laboratory and ) t- ^ „ o o 

Visits S ' * 3 

Electrical Design adv E. E. 15 2 2 

Gas Engineering M. E. 23 5 

Production Engineering C. 9 5 

Economics 6 6 

Thesis E. E. 8 5 

Electives 

Telegraphy and Telephony E. E. 13 5 

Illumination E. E. 10 4 

Electric Railways E. E. 6 5 

Advanced Integral Calculus. . .Math. 8a 5 

Differential Equations Math. 9b 5 



186 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

No time is provided in the co-operative schedule for these 
electives. They are offered only to those who may have credits in 
any of the regularly scheduled subjects, and consist of individual 
reading and laboratory work, with occasional consultations. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

COURSES IN DETAIL 

Alexander Massey Wilson, M. E., Professor of Electrical En- 
gineering. 
Clarence Raymond Wylie, M. E., Assistant Professor of Electrical 

Engineering. 

1. Direct Current Machinery. — Fundamental principles of direct 
current machinery; characteristics, construction and operation of 
dynamos, motors and instruments. Assistant Professor Wylie. 

9. Alternating Currents. — Alternating electromotive force and 
current; resistance, inductance, and capacity in alternating current 
circuits, graphical and analytical treatment ; theory of the alternating 
current generator ; polyphase currents. 

Assistant Professor Wylie. 

5. Electrical Engineering, Laboratory. — Use and care of elec- 
trical instruments; characteristics of electric circuits; study of mag- 
netic properties of iron and steel; operation of direct current dyna- 
mos and motors, with tests for characteristics, efficiency and losses. 

Assistant Professor Wylie. 

2. Electrical Design. — Principles and methods employed in the 
design of direct current machinery. Professor Wilson. 

3. Alternating Current Machinery. — Theorv, characteristics, and 
performance of alternators, synchronous motors, rotary converters, 
transformers, frequency converters, induction motors, and commuta- 
tor motors. Analytical and graphical treatment of alternating cur- 
rent circuits. Professor Wilson. 

4. Electric Power Transmission. — Electric conductors; distribut- 
ing systems; interior wiring; long-distance transmission; economy in 
the design of circuits; line construction. 

Assistant Professor Wylie. 

6. Electric Railways. — The railway motor ; controllers ; rolling 
stock and equipment; train performance; power distribution; in- 
terurban electric railways. Assistant Professor Wylie. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 187 

7. Advanced Electrical Engineering, Laboratory. — Measurement 
of power in alternating current circuits; experimental study of char- 
acteristics of alternators, transformers; single and polyphase induc- 
tion motors; rotary converters, etc. 

Assistant Professor Wylie. 

10. Illumination. — Principles of photometry; light sources- 
flame, illuminants, electric incandescent lamps, electric arc lamps; 
shades and reflectors; domestic illumination; lighting of large in- 
teriors ; street lighting ; decorative illumination. 

Professor Wilson. 

11. Electric Power Stations. — The central power station, lo- 
cation and general arrangement; selection of generating units; 
switch gear; station wiring; storage battery. The substation. 

Professor Wilson, 

8. Thesis. — Special assignments. 

15. Electrical Design (Advanced). — A continuation of Course 
2, attention being given especially to the construction of alternating 
current machinery and installations. Professor Wilson. 

16. Alternating Currents (Advanced). — The course deals with 
the more complex problems in alternating current theory as applied 
to inductive machinery and long-distance power transmission. 

Professor Wilson. 

12. Elementary Problems. — For students during third summer. 

13. Elementary Laboratory. — For students during third sum- 
mer. Miscellaneous laboratory in connection with problems. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

The University of Cincinnati is situated in the very heart of the 
manufacturing district of the Middle States, and is surrounded on 
all sides, within easy reach, by manufacturing communities, whose 
reputation is international. The students, therefore, have exceptional 
opportunities for visiting and studying many kinds of factories, and 
may see carried out in practice what is discussed in the class-room 
and laboratory. These extensive and varied manufacturing plants 
are, as it were, a great laboratory where machines, tools, and motors 
of every kind are made and tested. This is a rare condition of things, 
indeed, and offers to the student advantages quite superior to those 
provided by the largest engineering laboratory. The managers of 
these plants afford every opportunity to the students for study and 
test9. 



188 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Again, these large and diversified manufacturing interests sur- 
round the student with the proper engineering atmosphere, and bring 
him into almost daily contact with work and men in his chosen field. 
Naturally there is a great demand for young and trained engineers 
in such surroundings. Graduates are actively and successfully en- 
gaged in the different branches of mechanical engineering. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

The student of mechanical engineering finds at Cincinnati a wide 
field from which to select work fitted to his ability and temperament. 
Besides the power plants and railroad and car shops that are to be 
found in its vicinity, there are many factories which work up raw 
materials into a wide variety of machines. One group of factories 
is composed of machine tool builders; another group manufactures 
steam and air machinery, refrigerating plants, valves and fittings, 
pipe coverings, and insulating materials. 

Co-operative students in mechanical engineering spend half of 
their time working in the factories, some of which are the largest of 
their kinds in the world, and thus obtain the training that will make 
it possible for them to hold responsible positions as production 
engineers, superintendents, assistant superintendents, mechanical 
engineers, and designers. Co-operative students are at present 
working in foundries, steel works, machine tool shops, engine- 
building shops, drawing rooms, and time-setting and planning 
departments. About half of the graduates secure positions in the 
factories in which they have worked. 

The training given at the University covers the work of the 
usual four-year course in mechanical engineering. Shop practice 
courses and purely descriptive matter have been eliminated, since 
this experience is gained in the factories of the city. The University 
work and the work in the factories are complementary, and the 
courses within the University have been carefully co-ordinated. The 
mechanical engineering laboratory is new and modern, and is fitted 
for experimental work in the testing of materials, machine tools, 
turbines, steam engines, producers, gas engines, and air machinery. 
Tests on refrigerating machinery are made in a plant of full size 
near the University. The University power plant of 900 H. P. has 
been arranged particularly for the testing of boilers. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 189 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING— REGULAR PLAN 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF B. M. E. 

q r TnTTR^F Exercises Per Week 

SUBJECT BOURSE j g em n gem 

Freshman Year 

Algebra and Trigonometry. . . . Math. 1 5 

Analytical Geometry Math. 1 5 

English *. English 1 3 3 

Chemistry Ch. E. la, 2a. 3b. 4b. . . 5 5 

Descriptive Geometry C. E. 1 3 

German or French j £™> £;;;;;;;;;} 3 3 

Machine Drawing M. E. 1 3 

Elements of Engineering M. E. 4 2 2 

Physical Education Phys. Educ. 1 2 2 

Summer work in shops. 

Sophomore Year 

Calculus Math. 5 4 4 

Physics Physics la. 21b, 2a. 22b 4 4y 2 

Steam Engineering M. E. 11 3 3 

Machine Drawing M. E. 9 1 2y 2 

Metallurgy Met. E. la 4 

German or French j prSVi } 3 3 



Physical Education Phys. Educ. 2 2 2 

M. E. Laboratory M. E. 18 1 1 

Graphics M. E. 12 1 

Elements of Engineering M. E. 4 2 2 

Summer work in shops. 

Junior Year 

Mechanics of Engineering. . . .Ap. Math. 2, 1 3 3 

Machine Design M. E. 13 2y 2 

Machine Design M. E. 14. 19 2 2 

Physics Physics 13 2 1 

Electrical Machinery E. E. 1, 9 3 3 

Electrical Laboratory E. E. 5 2 2 

Economics 2y 2 2 l / 2 

Mathematics 1 

Hydraulic Machinery M. E. 27 2*/ 2 

English 2 l / 2 

Summer work. Land Surv'g. . . C. E. 3 4 weeks 

Senior Year 

Thermodynamics M. E. 21 2 l / 2 

Valve Gears M. E. 22 5 

Gas Engineering M. E. 23 2y 2 

Steam Turbines M. E. 24 2 

Mechanical Laboratory M. E. 25 2 2 

Engineering Design M. E. 28 4 3 

Heating and Ventilating M. E. 30 2 

Production Engineering 2 x / 2 

Machine Shop Tools M. E. 15 1*4 

Thesis M. E. 39 



190 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



Electives : 

Astronomy Astronomy 2a, 3b 1 

Electric Power Trans- \t? t? 4 3 

mission J 

Geology 5 

Alternating Current Mach'y- . . E. E. 3 5 

Electrical Laboratory E. E. 7 2 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 
CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF M. E. 

SUBJECT CoURSE Per AftTrni S e eS Week 

First Year Freshman r Sem. n Sem. 

Algebra and Trigonometry. K/u-i , R A 

Analytical Geometry . . \ Math ' ! 6 6 

General Inorganic Chemistry. .Ch. E. la, 3b 5 5 

General Inorganic Chemistry 1 ru -^ „ au q o 

Laboratory J ' 

Machine Drawing M. E. 1 3 

Descriptive Geometry C. E. 1 3 

Co-ordination C. 1 2 2 

Elements of Engineering M. E. 4 3 3 

First Summer Term 

Elements of Engineering M. E. 4 6 

Problems in Industrial Chemistry 6 

Descriptive Geometry 5 

Second Year Sophomore 

Dm ct\c£L* nd Integral } Math - 5 6 6 

Physics (Gen'e'rai) '.'.'.'.'.. ','.'. .... Physics la, 21b 6 6 

Experimental Physics Physics 2a, 22b 2 3 

Metallurgy . | M E la \ 6 

Metallurgy, Laboratory ) ' <> 

English English 5 

Drawing M. E. 9 2 

Co-ordination C. 2 2 

Second Summer Term 

Mechanism M. E. 6 6 

Drawing and Sketching M. E. 7 7 

Mechanical Laboratory M. E. 18 4 



Third ¥ear Pre-Junior 

Mathematics Math 2 

Steam Engineering M. E. 11 6 

Physics, Laboratory Physics 13 3 

Strength of Materials Ap. Math. 2 6 

Mechanics Ap. Math. 1 « 

Mechanical Laboratory M. E. 18 2 2 

Modern Language 5 5 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 191 

Third Summer Term 

Electrical Engineering 7 

Graphics M. E. 17 5 

Steam Engineering M. E. 11 5 

Fourth Year Junior 

Modern Language 6 6 

Machine Design M. E. 13 5 

Machine Design M. E. 14, 19 4 4 

Electrical Machinery E. E. 1, 9 6 6 

Electrical Laboratory E. E. 5 2 2 

Co-ordination C. 8 3 3 

Hydraulic Machinery M. E. 27 5 

Fourth Summer Term 

Engineering Design M. E. 28 12 

Experimental Engineering M. E. 25 5 

Fifth Year Senior 

Gas Engineering M. E. 23 5 

Machine Shop Tools M. E. 15 3 

Experimental Engineering M. E. 25 2 

Economics 5 5 

Thermodynamics M. E. 21 2 5 

Engineering Design M. E. 28 4 2 

Production Engineering C 5 

Thesis 5 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

COURSES IN DETAIL 

John Theodore Faig, M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
Alexander Lewis Jenkins, M. E., Associate Professor of 

Mechanical Engineering. 
Harold W. T. Collins, M. E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
Charles Albert Joerger, M. E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

1. Machine Drawing. — Details of standard machine parts, bolts, 
nuts, screws, etc. Methods of detailing pulleys, gears, shafting, 
and machine elements. Elementary descriptive geometry. 

Mr. Joerger and Mr. Moore. 

4. Elements of Engineering. — The solution of problems by 
the triangle of forces ; stresses in simple structural parts and beams. 

Professor Faig and Mr. Joerger. 

6. Mechanism. — A study of the transformation and modifica- 
tion of motion by means of toothed wheels, cams, screws, links, 
belts and chains. Kinematics of cone pulleys, speed boxes, back- 
gears and complete trains of mechanism; feeds and speeds on ma- 
chine tools ; curves of velocity and acceleration for shapers, en- 
gines, riveters and other linkages; proportions for spur, bevel, 
worm and spiral gears; advantages of the various standard pro- 
portions for gear teeth. Associate Professor Jenkins. 



192 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

7. Drawing and Sketching. — Graphic representation of vari- 
ous methods of transmitting and modifying motions by means of 
mechanical devices. Cams, links, and toothed wheels. 

Associate Professor Jenkins. 

9. Machine Drawing. — Detail drawings from measurements of 
machines. Assembled drawings of machines. Mr. . 

11. Steam Engineering. — Elements and economy of simple 
and complete steam plants. Fuels, combustion, boilers, furnaces, 
stokers, smoke prevention, superheaters, coal and ash handling, 
chimneys, mechanical draft, steam engines, turbines, condensers. 

Professor Faig and Mr. Collins. 

13. Machine Design. — Rational and empirical formulae for 
the design of fastenings, links, shafts, couplings, clutches, belt- 
ing, chains, and toothed wheels. Design of frames for engines, 
machine tools, and cranes. Associate Professor Jenkins. 

14. Machine Design. — Design of a punching and shearing ma- 
chine. Development of rational and empirical formulae for de- 
termining the size of each element. Assembled and detailed draw- 
ings and complete calculations for a given machine are required 
of each student. Associate Professor Jenkins. 

15. Machine Shop Tools. — A study of the forces, power and 
speed required to remove metal by turning, drilling, milling, and 
planing; the change in the efficiency and durability of tools pro- 
duced by varying the angles, feeds, and speeds; feeds and speeds 
of various metal cutting machines compared with experimental 
laws based on authoritative tests. Associate Professor Jenkins. 

17. Graphics of Mechanism. — A study of the forces involved 
in mechanisms, their direction and magnitude, and of the median-* 
ical efficiencies of various combinations of elements. 

Associate Professor Jenkins. 

18. Engineering Laboratory. — Tensile, compressive, and tor- 
sional tests of materials of construction, including iron, brass, steel, 
wood, brick, stone, leather belting, and concrete. Standardization 
of instruments; indicating; brake tests of steam engines, hot-air 
engines, and gas engines. Tests of machine tools. Tests of 
bearing metals and oils. Mr. Collins, Mr. . 

19. Machine Design. — A definite problem involving the design 
of a complete machine, to be presented in the form of working 
drawings, with written description and calculation of parts. Cata- 
logues, text-books, and engineering journals are freely consulted. 

Associate Professor Jenkins. 
21. Thermodynamics.— Elastic media as heat carriers. Ther- 
modynamics of gases, saturated vapors, and superheated steam. 
Temperature-entropy diagrams of the various cycles. Application 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 193 

of thermodynamics to steam and gas engines, air compressors, and 
refrigerating machines. Professor Faig. 

22. Valve Gears. — Analytical and graphical analysis of valve 
mechanisms. Methods of laying out the various forms of valve 
gears, link motions and reversing gears for the economical dis- 
tribution of steam. Design of valves and governors for prime 
movers. Professor Faig. 

23. Gas Engineering. — Gas and oil engines. Power and effi- 
ciency. Frictional and valvular losses. Design, based upon an as- 
sumed card. Gas characteristics. Producer gas equipments and 
gas distribution. Professor Faig. 

24. Steam Turbines. — Historical development. Modern types. 
Critical study of the turbine as a heat motor and as a machine. 
Comparison with the most approved types of reciprocating engines. 

Professor Faig. 

25. Experimental Engineering. — Characteristics and economy 
of heat motors and their variation with conditions of operation. 
Analysis and full accounting of power losses. Experimental study 
of the forces acting on metal cutting tools. The efficiencies of 
machine tools. Determination of highest cutting speed of tools. 

Professor Faig and Mr. Collins. 

27. Hydraulic Machinery. — A study of the various types of 
hydrostatic presses, elevators, motors, turbines, accumulators, in- 
tensifiers, jacks, and tools. Hydraulic transmission of power and 
accessories; high pressure control; various types of pumps, their 
efficiencies and uses. Associate Professor Jenkins. 

28. Engineering Design. — A definite problem in the design or 
investigation of a machine, prime mover, auxiliary or plant. Free 
reference to machines and plants in the city bearing on the problem 
and to the library. Professor Faig. 

[29. Power Plants.] Lectures on the mechanical engineering of 
power plants. Professor Faig. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

30. Heating and Ventilation. — Methods of heating buildings 
by hot air, steam, and water. Motors, blowers, and mechanisms 
used in ventilating. Professor Faig. 

[31. Compressed Air and Refrigeration.] Air compressors, 
motors and tools. Air storage and power transmission. Refrig- 
eration. Professor Faig. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

39. Thesis. — Modified research or original design. Hours to 
bt arranged. Professor Faig, Associate Professor Jenkins, 

Mr. Collins and Mr. Joerger. 



194 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

Students who select this course will receive shop training in 
foundries, steel works and other similar establishments. It is con- 
templated to make the experience cover not only the purely metal- 
lurgical department, but also the related machine shop and me- 
chanical departments. The entire course, including shop experience 
and university work, is arranged with a view to training men for 
executive positions in metallurgical works. 

The first two years of the course will be identical with those 
of the co-operative course in Chemical Engineering. During the 
remaining years, courses in chemistry and other engineering subjects 
will form part of the curriculum, but special attention will be paid to 
metallurgy. 

METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

The aim of the Co-operative Course in metallurgical engineering 
is to train men for executive positions in metallurgical industries; 
and since Cincinnati is in the center of an iron manufacturing 
district, and since also this branch is the predominant one of the 
metallurgical industries of the Central States, the attention of the 
course has been centered upon the problems in the metallurgy of 
iron and steel. 

The practice of metallurgy is in large part the application of 
general engineering principles, and the course is built upon a founda- 
tion of mathematics and sciences which are generally recognized as 
fundamental to a sound engineering training; in addition, consider- 
able time is devoted to the study of applied subjects in mechanical 
and electrical engineering. But metallurgy as a specialized branch 
of engineering practice is primarily dependent upon chemistry, and 
this subject occupies a prominent place in the earlier years of the 
course. 

Direct instruction in metallurgy is given by means of class-room 
and laboratory work in the general principles of the art, and their 
application to the manufacture and treatment of iron and steel, and 
to the recovery of the more common metals other than iron. Con- 
siderable attention is given to the rapidly expanding field of utility 
of the electric current in the production of high temperatures for 
metallurgical operations. And the greatest emphasis is placed upon 
the application of the various metals and alloys to engineering con- 
struction; this training being gained by the study of the constitution 
of alloys, by chemical and physical tests of these materials, and by 
metallographic examination with the microscope and pyrometer. 



i 



METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 195 

The laboratories are equipped with the necessary furnaces, 
pyrometers, microscopes, and other accessory apparatus for the 
instruction work involved in the general subjects, and for the more 
advanced study of a specialized and investigative nature, which 
occupies a prominent place in the later years of the course. 

Students in metallurgical engineering are placed in direct con- 
tact with the work and problems of this profession through co- 
operation with the industries of Cincinnati and vicinity. The first 
year is usually spent in the foundry, and the second in the machine 
shop. After this preliminary stage, more direct specialization is 
obtained by placing the men in foundries, coke ovens, blast furnaces, 
steel works and rolling mills, forge works, heat treatment depart- 
ments, and industries of like metallurgical interest. 

During the whole of the student's course, the shop work is 
planned and supervised by the University shop co-ordinators, and 
the problems encountered are discussed in special classes at the 
University which are arranged for this purpose. 



METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 
CO-OPERATIVE PLAN 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE DEGREE OF MET. E. 

Exercises 

Subject Course Per Alternate Week 

I Sem. II Sem. 

First Year Freshman 

Algebra and Trigonometry. .)„,. , ( . (] 

Analytical Geometry \ Math ' * G ° 

Chemistry Ch. E. la, 3b 5 5 

Chemistry, Laboratory Ch. E. 2a, 4b 3 3 

Machine Drawing M.E.I 3 3 

Co-ordination C. 3 2 2 

History 6 6 

First Summer Term 

Problems in Industrial Chemistry 6 

Descriptive Geometry 5 

Elements of Engineering 6 

Second Year Sophomore 

Calculus Math. 5 6 6 

Physics, Lectures Phys. la, 21b 6 6 

Physics, Laboratory Phys. 2a, 22b 2 3 

Metallurgy i ,, , t- 1o / 5 

Metallurgy, Laboratory \ Met u la 1 3 

Qualitative Analysis Ch. E. 5, 6 5 

English 6 

Co-ordination C. 4 2 2 



196 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



Second Summer Term 



Qualitative Analysis Ch. E. 5, 6. 

Quantitative Analysis Ch. E. 7. . . 



12 



Third Year Pre-Junior 

Quantitative Analysis Ch. E. 7 3 

Physical Chemistry Ch. E. 12a 5 

Physical Chemistry, Lab Ch. E. 13a 2 

Electro Chemistry Ch. E. 32b 5 

Electro Chemistry, Lab Ch. E. 33b 2 

Steam Engineering M. E. 11 6 6 

Strength of Materials Ap. Math. 2 6 

Mechanics 6 

Modern Language 6 6 

Testing Laboratory M. E. 18 2 

Third Summer Term 

Metallography £ Met F 2 \ 5 

Metallography Lab J Met - *" * { 3 

Technical Analysis Ch. E. 17 5 

Fourth Year Junior 

Metallurgical Calculations Met. E. 3a 5 

Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. .Met. E. 4b 5 

Geology Geology 5 5 

Electrical Machinery E. E. 1 and 9 6 6 

Electrical Laboratory E. E. 5 2 2 

Modern Language 6 6 

Co-ordination 3 3 

Fourth Summer Term 

Metallurgical Investigation Met. E. 5 5 

Engineering Design 5 

Conference Met. E. 9 2 

Fifth Year Senior 

Non-Ferrous Metallurgy Met. E. 6a 5 

Electro-Metallurgy i Met E 7b { i 

Electro-Metallurgy, Lab f iViet ' r " ' D I 2 

Thesis Met. E. 8 2 4 

Economics 6 6 

Conference Met. E. 9 2 2 

Elective*: 

Hydraulic Machinery M. E. 27 

Gas Engineering M. E. 23 

Experimental Engineering M. E. 25 

Technical Chemistry Ch. E. 16a 



METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 197 

METALLURGY AND METALLURGICAL 
ENGINEERING 

COURSES IN DETAIL 

Lauder William Jones, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Chemistry. 
Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Chemistry. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 
Clarence A. Nash, A. M.. . . Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 

Courses in Chemistry: A detailed description of the courses 
in Chemistry which form a part of the work required of the student 
in Metallurgical Engineering will be found under "Courses in 
Detail, Chemical Engineering," pp. 172-176. 

General Inorganic Chemistry, p. 172. 
Qualitative Analysis, p. 173. 
Quantitative Analysis, p. 173. 
Physical Chemistry, p. 174. 
Electro-Chemistry, p. 175. 
Technical Analysis, p. 173. 

The following courses in Metallurgy and related subjects con- 
stitute the special training of students pursuing the course in 

Metallurgical Engineering. 

la. Engineering Metallurgy. — Lecture and laboratory course 
dealing with general principles in the metallurgy of constructive 
materials. Fuels, fluxes, slags, and refractory materials. Furnace 
types, efficiencies, and control. The extraction of iron, copper, lead, 
and zinc. Properties of industrial metals and alloys. 

2. Metallography. — Lectures and laboratory work in the 
theory of the constitution of alloys. Pyrometer and the interpreta- 
tion of cooling curves and freezing point diagrams. Microscopic 
examination of alloys and the relations of structure and physical 
properties. The heat treatment of steel. 

3a. Metallurgical Calculations. — Class room study in the use 
of physical and chemical data in the calculation of metallurgical 
problems. Thermal reactions and their application to the efficiency 
of apparatus and processes. 

4b. Metallurgy of Iron and Steel. — Lectures on the ores of 
iron and their treatment. Furnaces and materials of service in the 
iron industry. The manufacture of pig iron and steel. Rolling mill 
and casting methods. The properties of iron and steel. 



198 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

5. Metallurgical Investigation. — Individual problems in ad- 
vanced metallurgical research. Pyrometry, microscopic examination, 
heat treatment, slags, refractory materials, and study of special 
steels and industrial alloys. 

6a. Non-Ferrous Metallurgy. — Lectures on the more common 
metals other than iron. The ores and their treatment, and the 
processes for the recovery of copper, lead, zinc, and some of the 
minor metals. 

7b. Electro-Metallurgy. — Lectures and laboratory work on the 
principles of the generation of heat by means of the electric current. 
Types of furnaces and development in special industries. The 
electrometallurgy of iron and steel. 

8. Thesis. — A special metallurgical problem of experiment or 
design. 

9. Conference. — A weekly meeting for the discussion of specific 
problems or details of processes or operations which cannot con- 
sistently be covered in the regular classes. A clearing house for 
the consideration of scattered topics of interest to the metallurgical 
engineer. 



CO-ORDINATION 

Curtis C. Myers, M. M. E., Professor in Charge of Co-ordination. 
* Fred Eugene Ayer, C. E., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 
Max B. Robinson, M. E., Instructor in Co-ordination. 

C. 1, 3, 5. For First Year Students. (Freshmen). 

Discussion of questions arising in students' work. Shop visits 
and lectures showing the scope of the engineering professions. Il- 
lustrations showing efficient methods of performing simple opera- 
tions. 

C. 2, 4, 6. For Second Year Students. 

Discussion of questions arising in students' work. Shop visits 
and lectures with detailed reports and problems continuing the 
work begun in the first year. Time study and efficiency data. 

C. 1 and 2 for mechanical and electrical engineers. Professor 
Myers and Mr. Robinson. 

C. 3 and 4 for metallurgical engineers. Assistant Professor 
Aston. 

C. 5 and 6 for civil engineers. 

Assistant Professor Braune and Mr. Moore. 



Absent en leave. 1913-14. 



GENERAL COURSES 199 

Courses 8, 9 for all Co-operative Engineers. 

C. 8. Production Engineering. — Lectures and recitations. Fac- 
tory organization and cost accounting. Routing of work. Labor 
and time-saving machinery. Power economy. Inspection and test- 
ing. Contracts and patents. For fourth year students. 

C. 9. Production Engineering. — Lectures and recitations. — Re- 
lation between capital and labor. Fatigue and incentive. Sales 
organization. Process efficiency. Business economy. Special prob- 
lems. For fifth year students. 

C. 10. Shop Processes and Tools. — Jigs and fixtures. Punches 
and dies. Labor saving devices. Processes in the shop. Analysis of 
necessary tools which enter into the manufacture of various machine 
parts on an interchangeable basis. 

SPECIAL COURSES IN ENGINEERING 

Special courses for young men who have had practical experi- 
ence in some branch of Engineering and who desire to become 
more efficient in the advanced theory of their work, will be ar- 
ranged by the Dean of the College of Engineering, and every fa- 
cility will be offered to enable such men to obtain the special work 
which they desire without their being candidates for the engineer- 
ing degrees. 

GENERAL COURSES 
APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

1. Technical Mechanics. — Slocum, Theory and Practice of 
Mechanics; Sanborn, Mechanics Problems. A course in applied 
mechanics, comprising kinematics, kinetics, statics, and dynamics, 
with technical applications. Second semester, Sec. I, 9 :30-10 :30, 
Sec. II, 11 -.30-12 :30, daily. Professor Slocum. 

2. Strength of Materials. — Slocum and Hancock, Strength of 
Materials; Shepard, Problems in the Strength of Materials. An 
introductory course in the mechanics of materials, including the 
fundamental relations between stress and deformation, tensile, com- 
pressive and shearing stresses, Hooke's law and Young's modulus, 
Poisson's ratio, modulus of rigidity, theory of beams, elastic curve, 
shear and bending moment diagrams, columns, torsion, combined 
bending and torsion, curved pieces, elements of graphical statics, 
arches and arched ribs, retaining walls and foundations, with 
numerous practical applications. First semester, Sec. I, 9 :30-10 :30, 
Sec. II, 11 :30-12 :30, daily. Professor Slocum. 



200 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

[16a. Theoretical Mechanics.] First semester, M., 4:00-6:00; 
W., 4:00-5:00. Professor Slocum. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

[16b. The Mathematical Theory of Elasticity.] Second semes- 
ter, M., 4 :00-6 :00 ; W., 4 :00-5 :00. Professor Slocum. 
Omitted in 1913-14. 

10a. Theory of Errors and Method of Least Squares. — First 
semester, M., 4:00-5:00; W., 4:01-3:00. Professor Slocum. 

lib. Fourier's Series and Spherical Harmonics. — Second sem- 
ester, M., 4:00-5:00; Th., 4:00-6:00. Professor Slocum. 

[26. The History and Teaching of Mathematics.] M., 4:00-6:00. 
Throughout the year. Professor Slocum. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

30. Seminary. — Hours by special arrangement. 

Professor Slocum. 
For detailed description of Courses 16a, 16b, 10a, lib, 26, and 30, 
see Mathematics, College of Liberal Arts. 

ASTRONOMY 

2a. General Astronomy. — Text-book: Young's Manual of As- 
tronomy. Professor Porter. 

3b. General Astronomy. — Text-book: Young's Manual of As- 
tronomy. Professor Porter. 

For Courses 2a and 3b, Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry and 
Calculus will be required. Course 3b is open only to those who 
have taken Course 2a. 

4a. Celestial Mechanics. — Investigation of the fundamental 
equations of motion and of the formulae for determining the posi- 
tions of bodies revolving about the sun. Text-book: Watson's 
Theoretical Astronomy. Professor Porter. 

5b. Computation of a parabolic orbit from three observations 
and of an elliptic orbit with perturbations. Text-book: Watson's 
Theoretical Astronomy. Professor Porter. 

Courses 4a and 5b are given at the Observatory. 

BIOLOGY 

[9. Sanitary Biology.] Lectures on the biological principles in- 
volved in sanitary engineering, designed to enable the engineer to 
solve local problems in sanitation and to appreciate the significance 
of specialists' reports. Professor Benedict. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 



GENERAL COURSES 201 

ECONOMICS 

(The Sinton Professorship) 

1. Economics. — This course is intended to give the student a 
general view of the subject. It includes the study of (1) the ele- 
ments of economics: wealth, value, price, competition, monopoliza- 
tion, production, and distribution; (2) the evolution of industry 
from local organization and control during the Middle Ages, through 
nationalism and the industrial revolution, to modern conditions, 
and (3) the leading economic problems of to-day. M., T., W., Th., 
R, 8 :30-9 :30. Dr. Magee. 

ENGLISH 

1. English Composition. — This course presents a general sur- 
vey of the principles of English composition and endeavors to enforce 
them by practice in writing. A certain amount of reading in English 
literature is also required. (For regular students only.) 

Assistant Professors McVea, Young, Van Wye, 
Park, Stevens. 

2a. Argumentation. — (For regular students only.) First sem- 
ester, T., Th., 8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Van Wye. 

2c. Advanced English Composition. — This course includes 
practice in the writing and criticism of expository and argumen- 
tative compositions. Models for class exercises are taken from 
current issues of a standard technical journal. The collection and 
use of bibliography for long themes is an important part of the work. 
Some time is devoted to the study of literary types. (For second 
year co-operative students only.) First semester, M., T., W., Th., 
F., 10 :30-ll :30. Assistant Professor Park. 

In the following courses for co-operative students, inspection- 
trip, laboratory, and special reports are written under the direction 
of the English Department. One hour of credit is given for the 
work of each semester and for that of each summer term. Written 
criticism of reports is supplemented by conferences, and, in the 
first year, by lectures on the principles of English Composition. 
Conference hours to be arranged. 

41. First- Year Reports and Conferences. — Three credits. 

42. Second-Year Reports and Conferences. — Two credits. 
(Omitted during the first semester.) 

43. Third-Year Reports and Conferences. — Three credits. 

44. Fourth-Year Reports and Conferences. — Three credits. 

45. Fifth-Year Reports and Conferences. — Two credits. The 
work of this year includes the preparation of a thesis. 

Assistant Professor Park, Mr. . 



202 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

1. An introductory study of minerals and rocks, dynamic 
geology, origin and classification of topographic forms, atmosphere 
and ocean; followed by a brief study of the physiography of the 
United States. Lectures, M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. Laboratory sections 
meet as follows : 

M., W., 2:00-4:30. 

T., Th, 9:30-12:00. 

T., Th., 2:00-4:30. 

T., Th., 1 :00-3 :30. Professor Fenneman and Dr. Bucher. 

2. General Geology. — This course is primarily for co-operative 
engineering students, but Liberal Arts students will also be admitted. 
An introductory study of minerals and rocks, dynamic geology and 
topography, followed in the second semester by stratigraphic, struc- 
tural, and economic geology. Three hours. Lectures, M., T., 
9:30-10:30; Laboratory, W., 9:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

5b. Field Geology and Survey Methods. — The study and map- 
ping of assigned areas in the vicinity of Cincinnati. Students work 
singly or in parties of two, and submit typewritten reports with 
topographic and geologic maps. Second semester. Hours to be 
arranged by agreement with each party. Credit according to number 
of hours elected. Course 1 is prerequisite. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

9. Historical Geology. — Chiefly the geology of North America, 
its physical history, life development and structure; special atten- 
tion given to the economic deposits of each period. Frequent local 
(half-day) excursions noting fossils, stratigraphy, physiography, 
and economic relations. Lectures, T., Th., 8:30-9:30; Laboratory, 
M., 2 :00-4 :30. Course 1 is prerequisite. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

[15. An Introductory Course in Geology for First-Year Co- 
operative Engineers.] Lecture, M., T., 9:30-10:30. 

Omitted in 1913-14. Assistant Professor Carman. 



GERMAN, FRENCH, OR SPANISH 

40. Elementary German, French, or Spanish, for Co-operative 
Students. — Grammar, translation from German, French, or Spanish, 
into English, and elementary exercises in translating into German, 
French, or Spanish. Conversation in the foreign tongue. 

Mr. Ludwich. 



GENERAL COURSES 208 

41. Second Year German, French, or Spanish, for Co-operative 
Students. — Translation from German, French, or Spanish, into 
English, with special emphasis on scientific and commercial German, 
French, or Spanish. This course is given wholly in the foreign 
tongue. Mr. Ludwich. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Algebra — Trigonometry — Analytical Geometry. — Selected 
portions of algebra and the elementary theory of equations. Rietz 
and Crathorne, College Algebra. Trigonometry: Munay, Trig- 
onometry. 

Analytical Geometry of Two Dimensions treated from the Car- 
tesian standpoint. Riggs, Analytical Geometry. 

Sec. I, Mr. Kindle, 8 :30-9 :30, daily. 

Sec. II, Mr. Smith, 8 :30-9 :30, daily. 

Sec. Ill, Assistant Professor Brand, 8 :30-9 :30, daily. 

Sec. IV, Assistant Professor Moore, 9:30-10:30, M., T., W., 
Th., F. (For regular Freshmen.) 

5. Calculus, Differential and Integral.— Osborne, Calculus; 
Davis, Calculus. 

Sec. I, Professor Hancock, 10:30-11:30, M„ T., Th., F. 
Sec. II, Assistant Professor Brand, 9 :30-10 :30, daily. 
Sec. Ill, Mr. Kindle, 9 :30-10 :30, daily. 
Sec. IV, Mr. Smith, 9 :30-10 :30, daily. 

35. Colloquium. — Calculus; applications. 

Sec. I, Assistant Professor Brand. ~) 

Sec. II, Mr. Kindle. [■ W., Th., 1 :00-5 :00. 

Sec. Ill, Mr. Smith. ) 

[6a. Advanced Analytical Geometry of Two Dimensions.] C. 
Smith, Conic Sections. Lectures. Mr. Kindle. 

Course 6a is open to those who have passed in Course 5. 
Omitted in 1913-14. 

[7b. Analytical Geometry of Three Dimensions.] The plane, 
straight line, and quadric surfaces; theory of surfaces and curves. 
C. Smith, Solid Geometry. Lectures. Mr. Kindle. 

Course 7b is open to those who have passed in Course 5. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

8a. Advanced Integral Calculus. — Byerly, Integral Calculus. 
Lectures. Professor Hancock. 



204 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Training. — All students are required to take five hours 
per week in the Department of Physical Education. It is expected 
that these hours will be distributed as follows : Three hours per 
week for all members of the Freshman class (lectures on hygiene, 
one hour; work in the gymnasium, two hours), and two hours per 
week for all members of the Sophomore class. Departures from this 
rule wilf be allowed under exceptional conditions only, for which 
special permission must be secured from the Dean in advance. 

A physical examination is required of each student of the two 
lower classes upon entrance and upon completion of the required 
work. Appointments for the examination should be made with 
the Physical Director at the beginning of the first semester. 

Credit : One credit will be given for each semester's work. 

Mr. Brodbeck. 

PHYSICS 

la. General Physics. — Lectures and recitations on Heat and 
Mechanics, illustrated with experimental demonstrations. M., T., 
W., Th., F., S., 8 :30-9 :30. Associate Professor Allen. 

21b. General Physics. — Lectures and recitations on Light, 
Electricity, and Magnetism, illustrated with experimental demon- 
strations. M., T., W., Th., F., S, 8 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Allen. 

2a. Experimental Physics. — Laboratory work arranged to ac- 
company Course la. M., F., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Associate Professor Allen and Dr. Gowdy. 

22b. Experimental Physics. — Laboratory work arranged to ac- 
company Course 21b. W., F., 1:00-4:00; S., 10:30-1:00. 

Associate Professor Allen and Dr. Gowdy. 

13b. Electrical Measurements. — Laboratory exercises with in- 
struments of precision. W., Th., 1 :00-5 :00. 

Associate Professor Allen. 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Charles William Dabney, Ph. D., LL. D., President of the University. 

Christian R. Holmes, M. D., Professor of Otology and Dean of the 
8 E. Eighth St. College of Medicine. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 
mology and Secretary of the Faculty of the College of Medicine. 
4 W. Seventh St. 

J. C. Mackenzie, M. D., Clinical Professor of Medicine, Emeritus. 

624 W. Eighth St. 

Chauncey D. Palmer, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 
Reading Rd. and Forest Ave., Avondale. cology, Emeritus. 

Byron Stanton, M. D., Professor of Diseases of Women and 
Savannah Ave., College Hill. Children, Emeritus. 

Alexander Greer Drury, A. M., M. D., Professor of Hygiene, 
836 Lincoln Ave. Emeritus. 

Stephen Cooper Ayres, A. M., M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology, 
4 W. Seventh St. Emeritus. 

Philip Zenner, A. IVL, M. D., . Professor of Neurology, Emeritus. 

14 Glenn Building. 

E. W. Walker, M. D., . Professor of Clinical Surgery, Emeritus. 
30 W. Eighth St. 

The names of the teaching staff are arranged by departments : 

Henry McElderry Knower, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Anatomy. 

3436 Middleton Ave., Clifton. 

Edward F. Malone, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

The Maplewood, Clifton. 

Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 
345 Thrall Ave., Clifton. Comparative Anatomy. 

, Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 

Martin H. Fischer, M. D., Joseph Eichberg Professor of Physiology. 

The Maplewood, Clifton. 

Edmund M. Baehr, M. D., . Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Fourth and Sycamore Sts. 



Lauder W. Jones, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

3457 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. 

Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

2269 Washington Ave., Norwood. 

Edward B. Reemelin, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
3471 Cheviot Ave., Westwood. and of Physiological Chemistry. 



206 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

Paul Gerhardt Woolley, B. S., M. D., . Professor of Pathology. 

343 Bryant Ave., Clifton. 

William Buchanan Wherry, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor of 

The Cumberland, Avondale. Bacteriology. 

Charles Goosmann, M. D., Instructor in Pathology. 

1203 Walnut St. 

Gilbert Mombach, M. D., Instructor in Pathology. 

22 W. Seventh St. 



Julius H. Eichberg, Ph. G., Ph. D., M. D., Professor of Materia 
55 Groton Building. Medica, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics. 

, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

C. C. Fihe, M. D., Lecturer in Dietetics and Instructor in Thera- 
19 W. Seventh St. (32) peutics. 

Rufus Southworth, A. M., M. D., Assistant Professor of Thera- 

Fountain Ave., Glendale. peutics. 

William C. Herman, Ph. G., M. D., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Sidney Lange, A. B., M. D., Lecturer and Demonstrator of Radiology. 
5 Garfield PI. 

H. Kennon Dunham, M. D., Lecturer and Demonstrator of Elec- 

McMillan St. and Auburn Ave., Mt. Auburn. trotherapeutics. 

Louis G. Schrickel, Ph. G., M. D., Instructor in Pharmacy and 

1635 Walnut St. Pharmacist to Dispensary. 



Edwin W. Mitchell, A. B., M. D., . . . Professor of Medicine. 

4 W. Seventh St. v 

George A. Fackler, M. D., ... Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 
Oliver P. Holt, M. D., . . . . Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
134 W. Ninth St. 

John Ernest Greiwe, A. M., M. D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

32 Garfield PI. 

Mark A. Brown, M. D., . . . Associate Professor of Medicine. 

628 Elm St. 

Henry Wald Bettmann, B. L., M. D., Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

Allan Ramsey, B. S., M. D., . Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Oscar Berghausen, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 
Charles Sumner Rockhill, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

705 Livingston Building. 
C. C. Fihe, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 
Louis G. Heyn, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

22 W. Seventh St. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 207 

Otto J. Seibert, M. D., .... Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

913 Dayton St. 

Charles P. Kennedy, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

3329 Gilbert Ave., Walnut Hills. 

John S. Grisard, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

3870 Ivanhoe Ave., Norwood, O. 

J. D. Spelman, M. D., .... Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

1828 Freeman Ave. 

Julius G. Stammel, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

3477 Montgomery Ave., Evanston. 

Marcus E. Wilson, M. D„ . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

248 Pike St. 

Henry Lynde Woodward, M. D., Demonstrator of Clinical 
Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. Microscopy in Medicine. 



B. K. Rachford, M. D., Professor of Paediatrics. 

323 Broadway. 

Alfred Friedlander, A. B., M. D.. Associate Professor of Paediatrics. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

Frank H. Lamb, A. M., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 

940 E. McMillan St. Paediatrics. 

Max Dreyfoos, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
19 W. Seventh St. 

Edward A. Wagner, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

3104 Jefferson Ave., Clifton. 

Edward D. Allgaier, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

3001 Epworth Ave., Westwood. 

John T. Batte, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Charles K. Ervin, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

2 Klinckhamer Building. 

E. I. Fogel, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

723 W. Eighth St. 

William J. Graf, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

Melrose Building, Walnut Hill?. 
Georges Rasetti, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

16 Garfield PI. 

Ida M. Westlake, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

Y. W. C. A., 20 E. Eighth St. 
Iames M. Bentley, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

705 Livingston Building. 

Frank W. Case, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

2807 Erie Ave. 

Eric R. Twachtman, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

Seventh and Race Sts. 

Charles A. Stammel, Jr., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

1202 Vine St. 



208 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

Frank Warren Langdon, M. D Professor of Psychiatry. 

4003 Rose Hill Ave. 

Herman Henry Hoppe, A. M., M. D., . Professor of Neurology. 

19 W. Seventh St. 
David I. Wolfstein, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Nervous 

22 W. Seventh St. Diseases. 

Edmund M. Baehr, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Nervous 

Fourth and Sycamore Sts. Diseases. 

Robert Tngram, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor inPsychiatry. 

510 Clark St. 

Charles E. Kiely, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 

City Hospital. 



Meyer L. Heidingsfeld, Ph. B., M. D., Professor of Dermatology 

19 W. Seventh St. and Syphilology. 

Augustus Ravogli, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Dermatology 

5 Garfield PI. and Syphilology. 

Elmore B. Tauber, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

19 W. Seventh St. Syphilology. 

James W. Miller, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

Seventh and Race Sts. Syphilology. 

Moses Scholtz, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

22 W. Seventh St. Syphilology. 



Joseph Ransohoff, M. D., F. R. C. S. (Eng\), Professor of Surgery. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

John Chadwick Oliver, M. D., . Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Berkshire Building. 

Charles Edward Caldwell, A. M., M. D., Associate Professor of 
Surgical Anatomy and Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
4 W. Seventh St. 

E. Otis Smith, M. D., Adjunct Professor of Genito-Urinary Dis- 

19 W. Seventh St. eases. 

Frank Fee, M. D Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

22 W. Seventh St. 
Carl Hiller, M. D., . . Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Harry Hayes Hines, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

34 W. Eighth St. 

Goodrich Barbour Rhodes, A. B., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor 

4 W. Seventh St. of Surgery. 

Dudley White Palmer, B. S., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 

4 W. Seventh St. Surgery. 
Charles A. Langdale, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

5 Garfield PI. 

Casper F. Hegner, M. D Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Berkshire Building. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 209 

John A. Caldwell, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

350 Ludlow Ave., Clifton. 

Dudley Webb, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

409 Broadway. 
William A. Lucas, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

351 Bryant Ave., Clifton. 

J. Edward Pirrung, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

1218 Walnut St. 

Carleton G. Crisler, M. D., . Assistant Demonstrator in Surgery. 

Groton Building. 

Ralph Staley, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

421 Clark St. 

Charles T. Souther, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

Berkshire Building. 

Guy Giffen, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

5 Garfield PL 



Simon Pendleton Kramer, M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

22 W Seventh St. 



Albert Henry Freiberg, M. D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Robert Carothers, M. D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

400 Broadway. 

Robert Daniel Maddox, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Orthopedic 

4 W. Seventh St. Surgery. 

R. B. Cofield, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Orthopedic 

19 W. Seventh St. Surgery. 

E. Gustav Zinke, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

William D. Porter, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 

Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. 

George M. Allen, M. D., . . . Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 

2404 Auburn Ave. 

James William Rowe, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Ob- 

20 W. Ninth St. stetrics. 
Henry Lynde Woodward, M. D., . . . Instructor in Obstetrics. 

Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. 



Charles Lybrand Bonifield, M. D., . Professor of Gynecology. 

409 Broadway. 

Charles Alfred Lee Reed, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical 

60 Groton Building. Gynecology. 

John M. Withrow, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

22 W. Seventh St. 

Rufus Bartlett Hall, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical 

19 Berkshire Building. Gynecology. 

Sigmar Stark, M. D., . . . . Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
11 Vi E. Eighth St. 



210 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

John D. Miller, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

Cor. Eighth and Elm Sts. 

Joseph A. Hall, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

19 Berkshire Building. 

Benjamin W. Gaines, M. D., . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

409 Broadway. 
John E. Stemler, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

103 W. McMillan St. 
Joseph S. Podesta, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

4 28 Broadway. 
Philip Dorger, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

Berkshire Building. 

Walter R. Griess, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 
21 Garfield Pi. 



Robert Sattler, M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

30 Groton Building. 

Derrick T. Vail, M. D., . Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

24 E. Eighth St. 
Walter Forchheimer, A. B., M. D., Clinical Professor of Ophthal- 

Fourth and Sycamore Sts. mology. 

Charles W. Tangeman, M. D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

20 W. Ninth St. 
Victor Ray, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

30 Groton Building. 

Wylie McLean Ayres, A. B., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 

4 W. Seventh St. Ophthalmology. 

John Ranly, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

936 Clark St. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 
mology and Secretary of the Faculty of the College of Medicine. 
4 W. Seventh St. 

Clarence J. King, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 

Groton Building. mology. 

K. L. Stoll, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Horace F. Tangeman, M. D„ Assistant Clinical Instructor in 

20 W. Ninth St. Ophthalmology. 
Frank U. Swing, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 

705-06 Livingston Building. mology. 

Christian R. Holmes, M. D., Professor of Otology and Dean of the 

8 E. Eighth St. College of Medicine. 

John Albert Thompson, B. S., A. M., M. D., Professor of Laryn- 

Berkshire Building, 628 Elm St. gologv. 

John Wesley Murphy, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Laryn- 
i W. Seventh St. gology and Otology. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 211 

Samuel Iglauer, B. S., M. D., . Associate Professor of Otology. 

22 W. Seventh St. 
Walter E. Murphy, M. D., Associate Professor of Laryngology and 
Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, Laryngology, and Otology. 

Berkshire Building. 

William Mithoefer, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 
19 W. Seventh St. Laryngology, and Otology. 

W. J. Thomasson, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 
942 York St., Newport, Ky. Laryngology, and Otology. 

Robert W. Bledsoe, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and 

1005 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. Otology. 

S. Bertha Dauch, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 

2924 Vaughn St., Mt. Auburn. Laryngology, and Otology. 

Charles Jones, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 

19 W. Seventh St. Laryngology, and Otology. 

George L. Krieger, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Laryngology 

4804 Central Ave., Madisonville. and Otology. 

Robert Stevenson, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Laryngology 

22 W. Seventh St. and Otology. 



John Howard Landis, M. D., Professor of Hygiene. 

City Hall. 

LECTURER ON SPECIAL TOPICS 
Hon. James B. Swing, Medical Jurisprudence. 

Union Trust Building. 

OTHER OFFICERS 
J. DeWitt Schonwald, M. D., . . . . Director of Dispensary. 

5654 Hamilton Ave., College Hill. 

L. M. Prince, Optician. 

108 W. Fourth St. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D., .... Secretary of the Medical Faculty. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

Daniel Laurence, B. S., Secretary of the University. 

Office, 6 McMicken Hall, Burnet Woods. 

Frances Currie, . Secretary and Librarian of the Medical College. 

Ill E. Auburn Ave. 
Anna L. Hook, . . Secretary to the Dean of the Medical College. 

2123 Sinton Ave. 

TECHNICAL ASSISTANTS 
Henry Louhier, Anatomy. 

McMicken Cottage. 

Daisy Clark, Pathology. 

320 Broadway. 

Joseph Kupka, Physiology. 

2221 Victor St. 



212 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

THE COLLEGE DISPENSARY 

Director of Dispensary : J. DeWitt Schonwald, M. D. 
Physician-in-Chief : George A. Fackler, M. D. 
Surgeon-in-Chief : John C. Oliver, M. D. 
Gynecologist-in-Chief : Charles L. Bonifield, M. D. 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 
A. General Medicine 
Physician-in-Chief : George A. Fackler, M. D. 
Assistant Physicians : 

Oscar Berghausen, M. D. John S. Grisard, M. D. 

Otto J. Seibert, M. D. J. D. Spelman, M. D. 

Charles P. Kennedy, M. D. Marcus E. Wilson, M. D. 

Julius G. Stammel, M. D. 

B. Neurology 
Neurologist: H. H. Hoppe, M. D. 

Assistant Neurologist : Charles E. Kiely, A. B., M. D. 

C. Paediatrics 
Paediatrician: B. K. Rachford, M. D. 

Assistant Paediatricians : 

Max Dreyfoos, M. D. William J. Graf, M. D. 

Edward A. Wagner, M. D. Georges Rasetti, M. D. 

Edward D. Allgaier, M. D. Ida M. Westlake, M. D. 

John T. Batte, M. D. James M. Bentley, M. D. 

Charles K. Ervin, M. D. Frank W. Case, M. D. 

E. I. Fogel, M. D. Eric R. Twachtman. A. B., M. D. 
Charles A. Stammel, Jr., M. D. 



DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

A. General Surgery 
Surgeon: John C. Oliver, M. D. 
Assistant Surgeons: 

Goodrich B. Rhodes, M. D. W. A. Lucas, M. D. 

John A. Caldwell, M. D. C. G. Crisler, M. D. 

Dudley W. Palmer, M. D. J. E. Pirrung, M. D. 

Guy Giffen, M. D. 

B. Ophthalmology 
Ophthalmologist: Charles W. Tangeman, M. D. 
Assistant Ophthalmologists : 

Walter Forchheimer, M. D. John Ranly, M. D. 

Charles W. Tangeman, M. D. Frank B. Cross, M. D. 
Victor Ray, M. D. Clarence J. King, M. D. 

Wylie McL. Ayers, M. D. Horace F. Tangeman, M. D. 

Frank U. Swing, M. D. 



THE COLLEGE DISPENSARY 213 

C. Otolaryngology 

Oto-laryngologist : Walter E. Murphy, M. D. 

Assistant Otolaryngologists : 

Wade Thrasher, M. D. W. T. Thomasson, M. D. 

Charles Jones, M. D. Sophia Dauch, M. D. 

William Mithoefer, M. D. Robert W. Bledsoe, M. D. 

D. Genito-Urinary Surgery 
Genito-Urinary Surgeon : E. O. Smith, M. D. 
Assistant Genito-Urinary Surgeons: 

Dudley Webb, M. D. Ralph Staley, M. D. 

E. Dermatology 
Dermatologist: Meyer L. Heidingsfeld, M. D. 
Assistant Dermatologists : 

Elmore B. Tauber, M. D. James W. Miller, M. D. 

Moses Scholtz, M. D. 

F. Orthopedic Surgery 
Orthopedic Surgeon : Albert Freiberg, M. D. 
Assistant Orthopedic Surgeons: Robert D. Maddox, M. D. 

R. B. Cofield, M. D. 



DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS 

A. Gynecology 

Gynecologist : Charles L. Bonifield, M. D. 

Assistant Gynecologists : 

John D. Miller, M. D. John E. Stemler, M. D. 

Benjamin W. Gaines, M. D. Joseph S. Podesta, M. D. 
Joseph A, Hall, M. D. Walter R. Griess, M. D. 

Philip Dorger, M. D. 

B. Obstetrics 
Obstetrician : E. Gustav Zinke, M. D. 
Assistant Obstetrician : Henry Lynde Woodward, M. D. 

Physicians of the Maternity Society 
J. H. Caldwell, M. D. G. Rasetti, M. D. 

Gilbert Mombach, M. D. Ida M. Westlake, M. D. 

R. A. Van Voast, M. D. James M. Bentley, M. D. 

Grace M. Boswell, M. D. J. D. Schonwald, M. D. 

W. J. Graf, M. D. Robert Reid, M. D. 

C. A. S. Williams, M. D. 



214 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

EQUIPMENT 

BUILDINGS 

The College is located on the McMicken homestead lot, between 
McMicken and Clifton Avenues, at the head of Elm Street. The 
lot has a frontage of three hundred feet between these avenues, 
the college building being nearer Clifton Avenue, and the dispen- 
sary building on McMicken Avenue. The college building con- 
tains lecture, recitation, and laboratory rooms. It is a four-story 
structure, of brick and cut stone, with iron stairways and internal 
finish of substantial character. 

On the basement floor are the laboratories of anatomy, and a 
locker-room. On the first floor are the Dean's office, museum, and 
the library and reading-room. The second floor provides accommo- 
dations for the laboratories of bacteriology, pathology, and experi- 
mental surgery. On the third floor are two large lecture rooms, 
furnished with opera chairs with tablet arms. The fourth floor is 
occupied by the pharmacological laboratory. 

The dispensary building is a one-story brick structure, 123 by 
50 feet, and contains fourteen rooms, a dispensing drug-room, and 
a room for the necessary chemical microscopical investigation of 
cases presenting themselves for treatment. 

MUSEUMS 

The museum contains a large number of anatomical and patho- 
logical specimens, including the Mussey and the Shotwell collec- 
tions. Both of these valuable collections illustrate the effects of 
diseases and injuries of bone and joints. The former was the 
gift of the late Dr. Nathaniel Pendleton Dandridge. The museum 
also contains a number of anatomical specimens, wet and dry, 
including a collection of skeletons for student use, and models 
and charts illustrating the anatomy of the organs of the special 
senses. 

In the laboratories of anatomy and pathology there are also 
fairly complete collections of specimens which are used for teach- 
ing and demonstration. The laboratory of anatomy has a large 
number of well preserved specimens of the central nervous system 
and several series of sections of the human body, beside preparations 
to illustrate the structure of the various organs. The laboratory 
of pathology possesses a very good collection of Kaiserling speci- 
mens illustrating pathological changes in the different organs of 
the body. Students of pathology also have access to the excellent 
museum of the Cincinnati Hospital, which contains hundreds of 
specimens, many of them rare or unusual. Most of the specimens 
in this museum are wet, but there is a large collection of dry osteo- 
logical specimens, and a hundred or more gelatine preparations. 



LIST OF MEDICAL JOURNALS IN THE LIBRARY 215 

MEDICAL LIBRARIES 

The library facilities of the College of Medicine are large. In 
1911 Miss Lena Dandridge presented to the college the library and 
library furniture of the late Dr. N. P. Dandridge, and, in addi- 
tion to this gift, Miss Dandridge gives annually, a sum of money for 
the equipment and endowment of the surgical library, which is 
known as the Dandridge Memorial. The Whittaker Medical Li- 
brary, bequeathed by the late Professor James T. Whittaker, com- 
prises 1,547 volumes and 538 pamphlets. The Seely Library, of the 
late Professor W. W. Seely, given to the college by Mrs. Seely, 
contains over a thousand volumes and many pamphlets. Mrs. Eich- 
berg has recently presented to the college the library of the late Dr. 
Joseph Eichberg, and the Library Association of Cincinnati has 
given to the college its very valuable collection of books. The 
library of the Cincinnati Hospital contains about 20,000 volumes, 
consisting largely of complete files of the most important medical 
periodicals of the world. Students of this college have access 
therefore to a very complete literary material, which covers every 
branch of the medical and related sciences. 

CURRENT LITERATURE IN THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

American Chemical Journal, American Journal of Anatomy, 
American Journal of Physiology, American Journal of Psychology, 
American Naturalist, Anatomical Record, Anatomische Anzeiger, 
Annalen der Chemie (Liebig), Annalen der Physik mit Beiblatter, 
Annales de Chimie et de Physique, L'annee Psychologies e, Archiv 
fur Entwicklungsmechanik der Organismen, Archiv fur mikros- 
kopische Anatomie und Entwicklungsgeschichte, Berichte der 
deutschen chemischen Gesellschaft, Biological Bulletin, British Jour- 
nal of Psychology, Bulletin de la Societe Chimique de France, 
Chemisches Centralblatt, Comptes rendus des sciences, Health, Jour- 
nal of Abnormal Psychology, Journal of Comparative Neurology 
and Physiology, Journal of Experimental Zoology, Journal of Mor- 
phology, Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods, 
Journal of Physical Chemistry, Journal of the Chemical Society 
(London), Journal of the Royal Microscopical Society, Philosoph- 
ical Transactions of the Royal Society (London) B. Biological, Pop- 
ular Science Monthly, Psychological Bulletin, Quarterly Journal of 
Microscopical Science, Science, Science Abstracts (both series). 
Survey, Zeitschrift fur physikalische Chemie, Zeitschrift fiir Psycho- 
logic und Physiologic der Sinnesorgane. 



216 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

CURRENT LITERATURE IN THE CINCINNATI HOSPITAL 

LIBRARY 

Albany Medical Annals, American Journal of Anatomy, Ameri- 
can Journal of Insanity, American Journal of the Medical Sciences, 
American Journal of Obstetrics, American Journal of Physiology, 
American Journal of Psychology, Annales Gynecologiques, Annales 
de lTnstitute Pasteur, Annales des Maladies des Oranges Genito- 
Urinaires, Annals Medico-Psychologiques, Annals of Surgery, Archiv 
fur Anatomie und Physiologie (Anat. Abth.), Archives de Medicine 
experimentale et d'Anatomie, Archiv fur pathologische Anatomie 
(Virchow), Archiv fur klinische Chirurgie, Archiv fur Hygiene, 
Archives Internationales Laryngologique, Archiv fur Laryngologie 
und Rhinologie, Archives Generates de Medicine, Archiv fur Ohren- 
heilkunde, Archiv fur Ophthalmologic (von Graefe), Archiv fur ex- 
perimentale Pathologic und Pharmakologie, Archives of Pediatrics, 
Archiv fur Psychiatrie, Archives of the Roentgen Ray, Beitrage fur 
pathologische Anatomie (Ziegler), Beitrage zur Klinik der Tuber- 
kulose, Berliner Klinik, Berliner klinische Wochenschrift, Biochem- 
ische Zeitschrift, Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, Brain, 
Bristol Medico-Chirurgical Journal, British Medical Journal, Bulle- 
tin of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Bulletin de la Societe Anato- 
mique de Paris, Canada Lancet, Centralblatt fur Bakteriologie ( Orig- 
inal und Referate), Centralblatt fur die medicinischen Wissen- 
schaften, Centralblatt fur allgemeine Pathologie (Ziegler), Comptes 
rendus de la Societe de Biologie de Paris, Dermatologisches Cen- 
tralblatt, Deutsche Zeitschrift fur Chirurgie, Deutsches Archiv fiir 
klinische Medicin, Deutsche medicinische Wochenschrift, Deutsche 
Zeitschrift fiir Nervenheilkunde, Dublin Journal of Medical Science, 
Edinburgh Medical Journal, Fortschritte der Medicin. 

Heart, Index Medicus, Internationales Centralblatt fiir Ohren- 
heilkunde, Interstate Medical Journal, Jahresbericht iiber die Fort- 
schritte der gesamten Medizin, Jahrbiicher fiir Psychiatrie und 
Neurologie, Janus, Journal of the American Medical Association, 
Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, Journal of Biological Chem- 
istry, Journal of Cutaneous Diseases, Journal of Infectious Diseases, 
Journal of Laryngology and Rhinology, Journal of Medical Re- 
search, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Journal de Medicine et 
de Chirurgie practique, Journal of Mental Science, Journal of Ner- 
vous and Mental Diseases, Journal of Comparative Neurology and 
Psychology, Journal of Pathology and Bacteriology, Journal of 
Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Journal of Physiol- 
ogy, Klinische Monatsblatter fiir Augenheilkunde, Lancet, Lancet- 
Clinic, Medical Press and Circular. 

Medical Record, Medizinische Klinik, Military Surgeon, Monat- 
schrift fiir Geburtshilfe und Gynakologie, Munchener medicinische 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 217 

Wochenschrift, Neurologisches Centralblatt, New Orleans Medical 
and Surgical Journal, Philippine Journal of Science (Medical Sec- 
tion), Practitioner, Public Health, Revue de Chirurgie, Revue de 
Medicine, St. Paul Medical Journal, Sammlung klinischer Vortrage, 
Schmidts Jahrbiicher, Therapeutic Gazette, Therapeutische Monat- 
schrift, Wiener klinische Wochenschrift, Wiener medicinische 
Wochenschrift, Zentralblatt fur Chirurgie, Zentralblatt fur Gynak- 
ologie, Zentralblatt fur innere Medicin, Zeitschrift fur orthopadische 
Chirurgie, Zeitschrift fur Hygiene, Zeitschrift fur Krebsforschung, 
Zeitschrift fur klinische Medicin/ Zeitschrift fiir Immunitatsfor- 
schung und experimentelle Therapie. 

CURRENT LITERATURE IN THE MEDICAL COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 

The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, The American 
Journal of Obstetrics and Diseases of Women and Children, The 
American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery, Annals of Surgery, 
Archives Internationales de Chirurgie, The Boston Medical and 
Surgical Journal, Journal de Chirurgie, The Lancet, Surgery, 
Gynecology, and Obstetrics, American Journal of Anatomy, 
Anatomical Record, Anatomischer Anzeiger, Archiv f. mikro- 
skopische Anatomie, Archiv f. Entwicklungsmechanik (Roux), 
Ergebnisse der Anatomie und Entwickelungsgeschichte (Merkel und 
Bonnet), Le Nevraxe, Monatsschrift f. Psychiatrie und Neurologie, 
Trabajos del Laboratorio d. Investig. Biolog. Madrid, Journal f. 
Psychologie u. Neurologie, Arbeiten a. d. Hirnanatomischen Institut 
in Zurich, Arbeiten a. d. Neurologischen Institut in Wien. 

LABORATORIES 

The laboratories of chemistry, physiology, histology, and 
embryology, are located in the University buildings ; the laboratories 
of pharmacology, pathology, bacteriology, surgery, and practical 
anatomy, are located in the Medical College building ; the laboratory 
of clinical microscopy is in the City Hospital. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

The candidate for admission must obtain the medical student's 
entrance certificate issued by the examiner for the Ohio State Board. 
The regulations for securing this certificate may be obtained from 
Professor K. D. Swartzel, secretary of the Ohio State Medical 
Board, Columbus, Ohio. 

The candidate must present satisfactory evidence of having 
completed, in addition to a first grade high school course (four 



218 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

years' work representing sixteen credits), the requirements stated 
in the pre-medical college course as outlined on page 223; or he 
will be required to take an examination in these subjects or satisfy 
the admission committee of this institution that the courses which 
he offers to cover this ground are equivalent to those specified in 
our pre-medical course. Candidates are advised to obtain from the 
general University catalogue the detailed description of the contents 
of the course in order to understand the scope of this work. 

Conditional Entrance 

Candidates who lack a part of the requirements for admission 
to this College may be admitted conditionally to the first year's 
medical work, provided the admission committee can be convinced 
that such conditions are not too excessive to interfere with the 
regular work. Conditional entrance will only be permitted to those 
who evidently can remove such conditions before the beginning of 
the second year. Candidates shall communicate with the College 
in advance, but must meet the admission committee in September 
at the time scheduled for entrance examinations. 

The candidate must present a certificate of moral character, 
signed by two physicians of good standing in the state in which he 
last resided. 

The certificate issued by the examiner has two uses : 

(1) It certifies that the holder has satisfied the minimum 
educational requirements, as fixed by law, for admission to medical 
colleges. It is therefore a prerequisite for matriculation in any 
medical college of the state. An applicant for admission to a 
medical college having entrance requirements that are higher than 
the requirements for this certificate must: (a) secure this certificate, 
and (b) satisfy the registrar of that college with reference to all 
additional requirements. 

(2) It, together with the medical diploma, must be submitted 
to the secretary of the State Medical Board by an applicant for 
admission to the examinations required of all who wish to practice 
medicine in the State of Ohio. It is also required of practitioners 
of other states who wish to take advantage of a reciprocity 
agreement. 

ADVANCED STANDING, GRADUATION, 
AND OTHER INFORMATION 

CREDIT FOR COURSES IN COLLEGES OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The Ohio State Medical Board has ruled that advanced time 
credit to liberal arts college graduates can only be recognized 



ADVANCED STANDING AND GRADUATION 219 

when the candidate has done, during his academic course, the 
science work comprised in the first year of the medical course. 
This ruling prevents the giving of advanced standing, except to 
graduates of colleges maintaining a definitely organized premed- 
ical course, including human anatomy. 

The Federation of Examining and Reciprocating Boards has 
also ruled that it will not recognize advanced time standing given 
for work in colleges of liberal arts unless the college gives one or 
more years of the regular medical course and holds itself open 
to inspection by medical boards. No advanced standing can thus 
be allowed on account of any ordinary literary or scientific de- 
gree whatever. 

Students who have taken, in colleges of liberal arts recog- 
nized by this University, courses the full equivalent of similar 
courses offered in this Medical College, and produce certificates 
of this fact, need not repeat these courses here. Such credits do 
not entitle the student to advanced time standing; for, according 
to the rulings above cited, such subject credits for work not taken 
at a medical college can not shorten the required residence to less 
than four years. 

CREDIT FOR WORK IN MEDICAL COLLEGES 

Students from accredited medical colleges may be admitted to 
advanced standing under the following rules: 

1. They must present satisfactory evidence that they have met 
our requirements for admission to a medical college. They must 
present evidence that they have satisfactorily completed courses 
of the same scope and extent as the courses for which they seek 
credit. 

2. They must present credentials from the registrar or cor- 
responding officer of the medical college attended, showing that 
they have been registered medical students in residence for the 
time for which credit is sought. 

9. In order to obtain credit for a whole or any part of a course, 
the student must file with the Dean, before the opening of the 
college year, a credit application blank, in duplicate, showing where 
the work was done, the names of the professors, dates of the be- 
ginning and the end of the course, the number of hours per week 
and weeks in the course, the total number of lectures or quizzes of 
laboratory or clinical work, and the grades received in it. This 
application should be accompanied by certificates, supporting the 
above facts, from the registrar of the college or the professor un- 
der whom the work was done, by the catalogue or schedule of the 



220 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

institution, and by note-books of the student in laboratory courses. 
In the absence of satisfactory certificates, an informal examination 
may be required on the whole or a part of the subject. This appli- 
cation, with the supporting evidence, will be submitted to the pro- 
fessors in charge, who will decide what credits are recommended. 
This recommendation must then be approved by the Committee on 
Advanced Standing, and returned to the Dean, in duplicate. One 
copy will be filed and one returned to the student. 

4. Any course or part of a course required by this college 
which has not been sufficiently covered by the previous work of the 
students must be taken in a manner satisfactory to the professor 
in charge of the department. 

GRADUATES IN MEDICINE 

A graduate from another medical college may obtain a diploma 
from this college only under the following conditions: 

1. He must comply with the conditions for admission to this 
college, submit the required time and subject credits from the col- 
lege from which he graduated, as required above, together with 
his diploma. 

2. He must be in residence at this college one full college 
year, and take all the courses not covered by his subject credits* 
repeating such courses of the fourth year as the faculty may re- 
quire. When this has been done, he may elect such additional 
courses as he may choose. 

3. The total of all courses taken in this college must not be 
less than required of the fourth-year class. 

4. He must pass examinations in all the courses in which he 
has been found deficient and all the regular examinations of the 
fourth year, and conform to all other requirements for graduation 
applying to the students of this college. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Graduates of medicine or others desiring to take courses not 
leading to graduation may be registered as special students and be 
admitted to such courses as they are fitted to undertake without 
preliminary examinations, but only by permission of the professor 
in charge of the course and upon payment of the fees required. 
The work so done may be accepted for credit later, under the rules 
of "Credit for Work in Medical Colleges," above stated. 



PROMOTIONS 221 

REQUIREMENTS FOR COMPLETION OF A COURSE 

The satisfactory completion of a course shall be determined by 
the professor in charge, through examinations, records of attend- 
ance, and the work of the student. To pass in a course the student 
must comply with the following: 

1. He must have attended 80 per cent of the scheduled lec- 
tures, recitations, quizzes, laboratory periods, and clinical or other 
appointments in the course. 

2. He must have received a grade of 75 per cent. 

A student who has failed in a course may be required, at the 
discretion of his professor, to repeat his attendance upon a part or 
the whole of the course, or he may only be re-examined after a 
suitable period of study. Attendance on vacation courses or private 
instruction will only be accepted by the faculty on recommendation 
of the professor in charge. 

PROMOTIONS 

Promotions from one class to another will be made by the 
Committee on Advanced Standing and Promotion after the last 
examination of the session, and the student will be advised of his 
standing within thirty days. Students will not be permitted to 
enter a higher class until they have shown their fitness to carry 
on the work of the lower class. 

Candidates for graduation failing in any subjects may be re- 
quired to repeat their attendance in such courses as the faculty 
directs. Those who have failed in three courses or more must re- 
peat their attendance on all the courses in which they have failed 
and such others as the faculty may direct. When these conditions 
of attendance have been satisfied, re-examination will be granted in 
one subject in September or October; in two subjects in January. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

To receive a diploma from this college the student must com- 
ply with the following conditions: 

1. The regulations of the Ohio State Medical Board in regard 
to registration as a medical student and admission to the college 
(as above explained). 

2. He must have been in residence in a medical college recog- 
nized by this University for at least four years, and his last year 
of residence must have been in this college. 

3. He must have attended at least 80 per cent of all the sched- 
uled appointments of the courses, and have attained to a satisfactory 
standing in all the required courses. 



222 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

4. He must have passed all courses of the first three years 
before beginning his Senior year. 

5. He must have discharged all his financial obligations. 

6. Diplomas will only be granted at the regular examinations 
of this college, when they will be conferred upon the candidates in 
person by the President of the University. 

OHIO STATE MEDICAL BOARD EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations for license to practice medicine and surgery in 
the State of Ohio are given twice each year by the State Med- 
ical Board. The dates are usually announced six months in ad- 
vance. They usually occur in June and December, about the 10th 
of the month. Conditions for entrance to these examinations may 
be summed up as follows : 

1. The candidate must have a preliminary training equivalent 
to graduation from a first-class high school having a four-year 
course. 

2. He must have registered with the Board of Ohio or some 
other state at least three years previous to the time of examination. 

3. Except in cases of men with the bachelor's degree who have 
completed in an undergraduate liberal arts college all the scientific 
work of the first medical year, the period of residence in medical 
colleges must have been four years. 

4. He must present a diploma of a medical college recognized 
by the Ohio Board. 

5. He must pay an examination fee of twenty-five dollars to 
the Board, which will be returned to him in case he is not admitted 
to examination, but is not returned if he is admitted or fails. 

Licensure by the Ohio State Board carries with it the privilege 
of registering for practice in certain other states, provided, in cer- 
tain states, that a definite premedical course has been followed. As 
the regulations governing medical education and licensure to prac- 
tice in Ohio, are high, the permission to practice is likely to be 
effected in all the states in which the laws permit reciprocity in 
these matters. Details in regard to the conditions in any particular 
state may be learned by addressing the Secretary of the Ohio 
State Medical Board, The State House, Columbus, Ohio. 

ROYAL COLLEGES OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS OF 
ENGLAND 

The Ohio-Miami Medical College has been officially notified 
bj the Conjoint Examining Boards of the Royal Colleges of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons of England that "it has been added to the 



SIX- YEAR COMBINED COURSE 22-S 

list of schools recognized by this Board, whose graduates may be 
admitted to the final examination, on producing the required certifi- 
cates of professional training and of having passed a recognized 
preliminary examination in general education." 

SIX-YEAR COMBINED COLLEGIATE AND MEDICAL 

COURSE 

(Leads to the degrees B. S., M. D.) 

The entrance requirements to this course will be those of the 
College of Liberal Arts of the University of Cincinnati. (See p. 72.) 
The first year of the course will consist of the following courses, 
which are described in the Announcement of the College of Liberal 
Arts under the corresponding numbers. It should be noted that five 
hours of credit for a laboratory course includes three lecture hours 
and two laboratory periods of three hours each. 

First Year 

Chemistry — 5 hours: First semester, Courses 1 and 2; second 
semester, Courses 3 and 4. If a student 
enters with advanced credits in chemistry, 
he shall take physical chemistry. 

Physics — 5 hours: Lecture Courses 26 and 27; Laboratory 
Courses 2 and 22. 

English — 3 hours: Course 1. 

German — 3 hours, Course 1 ; or French — 3 hours, Course 1. 

Physical Education — 1 hour. 

The one-year college course in German is equivalent to two 
years in the High School, and in addition to this, as will be seen, 
there will be required, in the second year, a course in Scientific 
German, aimed to give the student a reading knowledge of German. 
Students who present on entrance an equivalent of German 1, and 
a reading knowledge of German, are required to take French 1 in 
their first year, and may substitute an elective for Scientific German 
in the second year; or those who present only the equivalent of 
German 1 will be obliged to take the Scientific German of the second 
year schedule in their first year. In this case French may be taken 
in the second year in place of German. 

Second Year 

Chemistry — 5 hours: First semester, Courses 5 and 6 which 
have been formed by abbreviating and 
combining courses formerly described as 
5, 6, and 7. Second semester, organic 
chemistry. 



224 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

Biology — 5 hours: First semester, Courses 1 and 2; second 
semester, Courses 3 and 4. In addition 
to this, students are recommended to 
take a summer course in Biology at the 
Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods 
Hole, Mass. 

Scientific German — 3 hours (see paragraph on French and 
German under "First Year"). 

Elective — 3 hours. 

The third, fourth, fifth, and sixth years of this combined course 
are the regular years of the Medical College. 

ATHLETICS 

Athletics are so controlled in the University that they play an 
important part in the college life of the student without seriously 
interfering with his interest in class-room work. 

A large part of the work is done out of doors during good 
weather, and such games as football, baseball, basketball, tennis, 
and track athletics are a part of the students' training. Lessons 
in boxing and fencing are also given to students interested in this 
form of exercise. 

The new gymnasium with its modern equipment — cork-covered 
running track, white-tiled swimming pool, and spacious locker 
rooms — is the most complete institution of its kind in the West. 

An athletic field has recently been provided, and its equipment 
is now complete. It contains a baseball diamond, a football gridiron, 
and a quarter-mile cinder track, with a one hundred and twenty-four 
straight-away extending in front of the grandstand. The proximity 
of this field to the gymnasium makes it a particularly valuable 
addition to the athletic equipment of the University. 

All athletics and gymnastics are in charge of the Director of 
Physical Education and his assistants. 

HOW TO REACH THE COLLEGE 

The buildings are most conveniently reached by the Clifton- 
Ludlow street car line. 



ANATOMY 225 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANATOMY 

Henry McElderry Knower, Ph. D., . . Professor of Anatomy. 
Edward F. Malone, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
Robert Chambers, Jr., A. M., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of 

Histology and Comparative Anatomy. 
, .... Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 

1. Embryology. — Given by the Department of Zoology. (See 
catalogue of the College of Liberal Arts, Courses 19a and 20a.) 
An elementary course of lectures and laboratory work to review the 
essentials of the history of the germ cells, germ-layers, embryo 
formation, and the origin and early stages of the organs. * Ninety- 
six hours. Two credit hours. 

Assistant Professor Chambers and Mr. . 

Required of Freshmen who have not had embryology. Those 
who have had an equivalent and do not need to supplement their 
work in Zoology, are advised to elect further work in Human 
Embryology, foetal membranes, etc., or special Histology in the 
Department of Anatomy. 

2. Histology and Organology. — This course is planned to 
emphasize the view that the subject is merely a further microscopic 
analysis of the gross structure of the body. The course is concerned 
with the anatomy of functional units and their combinations. The 
structure of tissues and organs is studied by approved methods and 
the best technical procedures are taught. Embryology is constantly 
referred to. The material is human wherever possible. A labora- 
tory course with supplemental lectures. Two hundred hours. Three 
credit hours. Assistant Professor Chambers and Mr. . 

Required of Freshmen. 

3. Gross Human Anatomy. — Practical study of the human body 
in the dissecting room, where the students' work demonstrates all 
aspects of the gross structure of the body. The laboratory work is 
accompanied by frequent lectures and informal conferences aimed 
to make clear the correct principles of the analysis and reconstruc- 
tion of the body. Osteology is included in this course, and embryo- 
logical relations are constantly insisted upon. The anatomy of parts 
is studied in close correlation with their physiology. Seven credit 
hours (330 hours for Freshmen; 200 hours for Sophomores). 

Professor Knower, Assistant Professor Malone. 
Required of Freshmen and Sophomores. 

* Values in terms of credit hours are given for those courses which may 
be elected by students of the Graduate School or of the College of Liberal Arts. 



226 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

4. Topographical Anatomy. — Regional relations reviewed with 
the aid of sections of the body, special preparations, and models. 
The main facts of the embryological history of topographical rela- 
tions are reviewed in connection with this work. Thirty-six hours. 
One and one-half credit hours. Professor Knower. 

To be elected by Sophomores who have completed the required 
work by April 20. 

5. Advanced Anatomy. — A number of advanced students are 
availing themselves of the opportunities for special work offered by 
this department. October to June. Professor Knower. 

6a. Neurological Anatomy. — A. — Gross and Microscopic Anatomy 
of the Central Nervous System. — This course consists of laboratory 
exercises, lectures, and lantern demonstrations. The nervous system 
is studied from two points of view: (1) The gross and microscopic 
structure, and (2) the connections of different portions of the 
nervous system to form the mechanisms which underlie its various 
functions. Forty-five hours. One credit hour. 

Required of Freshmen. Assistant Professor Malone. 

6b. Neurological Anatomy. — B. — Correlational Anatomy. — This 
course is planned to furnish the student with a valuable review of 
anatomy from a novel point of view. The relations of the nervous 
system to the various activities of the entire body are studied. This 
presupposes a knowledge of the gross and microscopic structure of 
the body. The student must necessarily bring together, in consider- 
ing each system, all of his knowledge of the anatomy and physiology 
previously learned piecemeal. He learns to correlate the various 
functional mechanisms of the human nervous system with those of 
the rest of the body. The mechanisms involved in the heart beat, 
respiration, speech, mastication, voluntary and visceral movements, 
secretion, etc., will be considered with reference to the actual 
anatomical structure and relations of those portions of the body 
which co-operate to carry on such activities. Forty-eight hours. 
One credit hour. Assistant Professor Malone. 

Required of Sophomores, who must have already finished dis- 
section and have taken Course A or an equivalent. 

7. Advanced Neurology. — Open to two or three persons who 
have had the necessary preliminary training. Neuro-histological 
technique, experimental pathological histology, studies in the finer 
histology, the comparative anatomy of the vertebrate nervous 
system, or the construction of models may be selected. There are 
available very extensive series of the brain of man and the higher 
vertebrates, and of human embryos of various stages of develop- 
ment. October to June. Assistant Professor Malone. 

Any of the above courses are open to undergraduate or graduate 



PHYSIOLOGY 227 

students of the University who can show the necessary preliminary 
preparation, and desire credits in these subjects toward degrees other 
than the Medical Degree. As special rulings giving the conditions 
under which such work may be undertaken have been passed by the 
faculties of both the College of Liberal Arts and the Graduate 
School, applicants should first consult the Deans of those faculties. 
Those interested in research or other special work in Anatomy are 
requested to apply to the Professor of Anatomy. 

8. Surgical Anatomy. — Lectures with demonstrations are given 
in this subject, in the Junior year, by a member of the Surgical Staff. 
(See page 237.) 



PHYSIOLOGY 

(The Joseph Eichberg Chair of Physiology) 
Martin H. Fischer, M. D., Joseph Eichberg Professor of Physiology. 
Edmund M. Baehr, M. D., . . Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

For the coming academic year only such courses in physiology 
will be given under the direction of this department as are required 
for graduation in medicine, and such as are necessary to meet the 
desires of graduate or special students and practitioners of medi- 
cine. The courses will be given in the buildings of the University 
in Burnet Woods and, in part, in the Ohio-Miami Medical College 
Building. Courses in physiology for general science students are 
offered by the Department of Biology; courses in physiological 
chemistry for general science and medical students, by the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

1. Medical Physiology. — The general physiology of the cell; 
the physiology of the blood and the circulation; the physiology of 
respiration ; the physiology of muscle and nerve. A lecture and 
conference course. Fifty hours. Three credit hours. 

Professor Fischer. 

2. Medical Physiology. — The physiology of alimentation; the 
physiology of absorption and secretion; the physiology of animal 
heat. A lecture and conference course. Fifty hours. Three credit 
hours. Professor Fischer. 

3. Medical Physiology. — A laboratory course designed to illus- 
trate the classical experiments upon which our present knowledge of 
the subject rests. The work is arranged to parallel, as nearly as 
possible, the didactic work of Courses 1 and 2. One hundred hours. 
Two credit hours. 

Professor Fischer and Assistant Professor Baehr. 



228 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

4. Medical Physiology. — The physiology of metabolism; the 
physiology of the ductless glands ; the physiology of the spinal cord. 
A lecture and conference course. Forty-five hours. 

Professor Fischer. 

5. Medical Physiology.— The physiology of the brain and the 
special senses. A lecture and conference course. Forty-five hours. 
Three credit hours. Assistant Professor Baehr. 

6. Medical Physiology. — A laboratory course in the physiology 
of the central nervous system and the special senses. This course 
parallels Course 5. Eighty hours. Three credit hours. 

Professor Baehr. 
RESEARCH 

7. Research. — Open to any qualified person after consultation 
with the head of the department. 



CHEMISTRY 



Lauder W. Jones, Ph. D Professor of Chemistry. 

Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Edward B. Reemelin, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Chem- 
istry and of Physiological Chemistry. 
During the year 1913-14 the courses in chemistry will be given 
at the University. The courses announced below will be taken by 
Freshmen. 

Students who have received full credit for general inorganic 
chemistry and for organic chemistry may elect work at the Uni- 
versity in analytical chemistry (Courses 5a, 6, 7) or in physical 
chemistry (Courses 12 and 13). These courses are entirely optional, 
but students who can arrange to take them are strongly urged to 
do so. 

For premedical courses in general inorganic chemistry see 
Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts (Courses la, 2a, 3b, 4b). 

8a. Elementary Organic Chemistry. — The course comprises 
quizzes and lectures which are experimental to a certain extent, and 
deals with the chief classes of organic compounds of both the ali- 
phatic and the aromatic series. First semester, forty-five hours. 
Three credit hours. To be accompanied by laboratory course 9a. 

Professor Jones and Dr. Reemelin. 

9a. Organic Reactions and Preparations. — A course of labora- 
tory practice arranged to accompany the lectures of Course 8a. A 






PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY 229 

number of simple organic substances will be made with the view to 
furnishing, by the fewest illustrations possible, the largest variety 
of typical reactions and manipulations. First semester, ninety hours. 
Two credit hours. 

Professor Jones and Assistant Professor Reemelin, 

22b. Bio-Chemistry. — Among other subjects the course will 
take up for discussion the nature of carbohydrates, fats, and proteid 
substances ; the facts and theories relating to the processes of diges- 
tion and metabolism; the chemical composition of the body tissues, 
secretions, and excretions, including the methods employed in their 
analysis. Second semester, forty-five hours. Three credit hours. 

Assistant Professor Reemelin. 

22b. Bio-Chemistry, Laboratory. — Laboratory exercises ar- 
ranged to accompany the lectures, and to acquaint the student with 
the distinctive reactions of carbohydrates, fats, and proteid sub- 
stances. The student will be expected to learn the application of 
these tests to the qualitative detection of, and the quantitative esti- 
mation of, these substances in body tissues, secretions, and excre- 
tions. Digestion, the analysis of gastric and fecal matter, and of 
urine will be considered from the chemical point of view. Second 
semester, 135 hours. Three credit hours. 

Assistant Professor Reemelin. 



PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

( Chair of Pathology) 

Paul Gerhardt Woolley, B. S., M. D., Professor of Pathology. 
William Buchanan Wherrv, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor 

of Bacteriology. 

Charles Goosmann, M. D Instructor in Pathology. 

Gilbert Mombach, M. D., Instructor in Pathology. 

The work of the Department of Pathology and Bacteriology is 
progressive. Commencing with bacteriology and with lectures and 
conferences in general pathology in the fall semester, it is continued, 
after January first, by a laboratory course in parasitology. This is 
followed by a systematic course in special pathology, which extends 
through the second semester. Also during the second semester a 
course in serum reactions (see Medicine 3) is given which forms 
a connecting link between general pathology and clinical medicine. 
In the Junior year, students see a considerable amount of animal 
pathology in the course of their work in the slaughter house and 
meat inspections. In the Senior year, students are given demon- 
strations in gross pathology with informal discussions on systemic 
pathology. 



230 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

1. Infection and Immunity. — Lectures on infection and immun- 
ity, together with recitations covering the ground gone over by the 
students in their laboratory work, and the special text-book assign- 
ments. The course must be taken in conjunction with Course 2. 
First semester, twenty-five hours. One and one-half credit hours. 

Associate Professor Wherry. 
Course 1 is open only to those students who have qualified in 
inorganic and organic chemistry, biology, and histology. 

2. Bacteriology. — The course is designed to give the student 
a general survey of the subject. In the laboratory the student pre- 
pares his own culture media, thus gaining an intimate acquaintance 
with the principles of sterilization. Representative types of the non- 
pathogenic and the important pathogenic organisms are studied. 
Pathologic material from the City Hospital gives the student a 
first-hand acquaintance with many of the organisms which are 
pathogenic for man, and with the methods of isolating and iden- 
tifying them. Some of the more pathogenic protozoa are demon- 
strated. First semester, one hundred and forty-eight hours. Three 
credit hours. Associate Professor Wherry. 

3. General Pathology. — Lectures in general pathology, with es- 
pecial reference to inflammation, progressive and regressive cellular 
changes, tumors and the causes of disease, and recitations covering 
the ground gone over in the lectures and laboratory work. Thirty 
hours. Professor Woolley. 

Course 3 must be taken in conjunction with Course 4 and must 
be preceded by Courses 1 and 2. 

4. General and Special Pathology. — The basis of the work is 
a laboratory course in which microscopic work is combined with a 
study of fresh gross and museum specimens. Sections of diseased 
tissues are stained and mounted by the student, who records a 
description of each and makes drawings of them. All of the tissues 
of the body are studied in this way, and the various lesions are 
discussed from cellular, organic, and systemic standpoints. Second 
semester, one hundred and thirty-five hours. Three credit hours. 

Professor Woolley and Dr. Goosmann. 

5. Post-Mortem Demonstrations. — The course consists of the 
demonstration of fresh gross material and of materials preserved 
on ice. Autopsies are witnessed by the students of the Junior and 
Senior years who are required to assist in making them and to take 
notes and record them in protocols. Sixty hours. 

Professor Woolley and Assistants. 

6. Parasitology. — Lectures on the more important parasites of 
man. Illustrated by gross and microscopic specimens. Thirty-six 
hours. Professor Wherry. 






MATERIA MEDIC A AND PHARMACOLOGY 231 

7. Conferences. — Special topics are studied by individual stu- 
dents and presented before the instructor and class for discussion. 

Professor Woolley, Associate Professor Wherry. 

8. Research. — Open to any qualified person after consultation 
with the head of the department. 

9. Gynecologic Pathology. — Lectures and demonstrations illus- 
trating the abnormal physiologic and anatomic changes connected 
with the female pelvic organs. Senior year, 16 hours. 

Dr. Mombach. 

10. Surgical Pathology. — Lectures and demonstrations illustrat- 
ing certain processes connected with pathologic diagnosis of speci- 
mens removed at surgical operations. Senior year, 16 hours. 



MATERIA MEDICA, PHARMACOLOGY, AND 
THERAPEUTICS 

Julius H. Eichberg, Ph. G., Ph. D., M. D., Professor of Materia 
Medica, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics. 

, Associate Professor of Pharmacology. 

Rufus Southworth, A. M. f M. D., Assistant Professor of Thera- 
peutics. 

C. C. Fihe, M. D., Instructor in Dietetics. 

William C. Herman, Ph. G., M. D., . Instructor in Pharmacology. 
Sidney Lange, A. B., M. D., Lecturer and Demonstrator of Radiology. 
H. Kennon Dunham, M. D., Lecturer and Demonstrator of Electro- 
therapeutics. 
Louis G. Schrickel, Ph. G., M. D., . . Instructor in Pharmacy. 

The work of the Department of Pharmacology, Materia Medica, 
and Therapeutics is carried on in the lecture rooms of the College, 
in the dispensary clinics, and in the wards and laboratories of the 
Cincinnati Hospital. 

1. Pharmacology. — A lecture course, supplemented by Course 3, 
in which the physiological action of drugs is presented, and which 
is intended to give the student a clear idea of the general principles 
of drug therapy. Continued in Course 4. Professor Eichberg. 

2. Pharmacology and Metrology. — Recitations in pharmacology 
and instruction in metrology, incompatibilities, and prescription 
writing. Thirty hours. Dr. Herman. 

3. Pharmacology, Laboratory. — The work will consist of exer- 
cises in gross pharmacognosy; plant histology; general reaction of 
plant constituents; metrology; pharmaceutic methods and prepara- 



232 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

tions; dispensing; incompatibilities; isolation of alkaloids; study of 
changes in urine induced by drugs ; the action of drugs on 
hemoglobin, and on red corpuscles; chemic antidotes; and experi- 
ments which the students will conduct for themselves illustrating 
the physiological and toxicological action of the more important 
drugs. . 

4. Therapeutics. — Lectures on the specific indications, as well 
as the general principles, of treatment. Professor Eichberg. 

5. Therapeutics. — Lectures in the methods of treatment without 
drugs, including higher therapy, etc., and recitations in general 
therapeutics. Assistant Professor Southworth. 

6. Dietetics. — A lecture course on the composition and effects 
of diet, including the methods of preparation. Dr. Fihe. 

7. Electrotherapeutics. — Lectures on the principles of magnet- 
ism and electricity; units and measurements of electricity, both 
dynamic and static; induced electricity; applications of electricity 
to diagnosis; electrical apparatus, coils, interruptors, etc. Fifteen 
hours. Dr. Dunham. 

8. Radiology. — Lectures on radiology; considerations on the 
physics of the X-Ray; effect of the X-Ray upon the tissues of th« 
body; radio-diagnosis and radio-therapeutics. Fifteen hours. 

Dr. Lange. 

9. Radiology and Electrotherapeutics. — A practical course in 
the electrotherapeutic laboratory of the College, in the radiographic 
department of the Cincinnati Hospital and at the Tuberculosis 
Hospital. Forty hours. Drs. Dunham and Lange. 

10. Therapeutic Clinics. — These clinics are all in connection 
with the dispensary medical clinics and the Hospital. 



MEDICINE 



Edwin W. Mitchell, A. B., M. D., . . . Professor of Medicine. 
George A. Fackler, M. D., . . . Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Oliver P. Holt, M. D., . . . . Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
John Ernest Greiwe, M. D., . Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Mark A. Brown, M. D., . . . Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Henry Wald Bettmann, B. L., M. D., Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 
Allan Ramsey, B. S., M. D., . Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Oscar Berghausen, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Charles Sumner Rockhill, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

C. C. Fihe, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Louis G. Heyn, M. D Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Henry Lynde Woodward, M. D Demonstrator of Clinical 

Microscopy. 



MEDICINE 233 

Otto J. Seibert, M. D., .... Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Charles P. Kennedy, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

John S. Grisard. M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

J. D. Spelman, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Marcus E. Wilson, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Julius G. Stammel, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

The work of the Department of Medicine is carried on in the 
lecture rooms of the College building, in the College Dispensary, in 
the wards, laboratories, and amphitheatres of the Good Samaritan 
and the Cincinnati Hospitals, and in the wards of the Contagious 
Disease Hospital. 

1. Physical Diagnosis. — Lectures, demonstrations, and practical 
exercises illustrating the methods of physical exploration of the 
body. Associate Professor Greiwe. 

2. Clinical Microscopy. — A practical laboratory course in the 
methods of examining blood, sputum, urine, gastric contents, feces, 
cerebro-spinal fluid, exudates, and transudates. Dr. Woodward. 

3. Serum Reactions in the Infectious Diseases. — A conference 
and laboratory course illustrating the methods of investigating the 
serum reactions in various infectious diseases. It includes the 
application of the Wassermann and Noguchi methods and other 
useful diagnostic and curative procedures. 

Assistant Professor Berghausen. 
3a. Serum Diagnosis and Therapeusis. — A lecture and confer- 
ence course with practical demonstrations in immunology and 
immuno-diagnostics, including the preparation and administration of 
vaccines, sera, etc. Sophomore year, — hours. 

Assistant Professor Berghausen. 
3b. Infectious Diseases. — A lecture-conference course on the 
infectious diseases which are not taken up in the Department of 
Paediatrics. Junior year, — hours. 

Assistant Professor Berghausen. 

4. The Diseases of the Stomach, Intestines and Liver. — A series 
of lectures on the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of th« 
gastro-intestine tract. Adjunct Professor Bettmann. 

5. The Diseases of the Heart and Lungs. — A series of lectures 
on the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the cardiac and 

respiratory systems. 

Professor Mitchell and Assistant Professor Ramsey. 

6. Constitutional Diseases and Diseases of the Blood and Duct- 
less Glands. — A series of lectures on the diagnosis and treatment 
of these diseases. Associate Professor Brown. 



234 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

7. Dispensary Clinics. — Each member of the Junior class spends 
two hours daily throughout half the year in the medical clinic, where 
he has practical experience and instruction in history taking, physical 
examination, diagnosis, and treatment of medical cases. 

Assistant Professor Berghausen, Drs. Seibert, Kennedy, 
Grisard, Spelman, Stammel, and Wilson. 

8. Hospital Ward Classes. — Each member of the Senior class 
spends two hours daily for two months in the medical wards of the 
Cincinnati Hospital. During this time he serves as a clinical clerk 
in taking histories, making clinical examinations, etc., becoming 
thoroughly acquainted in the wards with the methods of examining 
and caring for hospital patients. Part of this time is spent in making 
rounds with the staff officers under whose direction he is working. 

Professors Mitchell, Fackler, Holt, Eichberg; 
Associate Professors Greiwe and Brown ; 
Dr. Bell and Assistants. 

9. Clinical Lectures. — Clinical lectures on selected topics are 
delivered daily throughout the year in the amphitheatre of the 
Cincinnati Hospital and of the Good Samaritan Hospital. These 
lectures are delivered at times that do not conflict with bedside work. 

Professors Mitchell, Fackler, Holt ; Associate 
Professors Greiwe and Brown. 



PAEDIATRICS 

B. K. Rachford, M. D., Professor of Paediatrics. 

Alfred Friedlander, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor of Paediatrics. 
Frank H. Lamb, A. M., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 

Paediatrics. 
Max Dreyfoos, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
Edward A. Wagner, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
Charles K. Ervin, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

E. I. Fogel, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

William J. Graf, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
Edward D. Allgaier, M. D., . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
John T. Batte, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
Georges Rasetti, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
Ida M. Westlake, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
James M. Bentley, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
Frank W. Case, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
Eric R. Twachtman, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 
Charles A. Stammel, M. D., . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 






PAEDIATRICS 285 

The work of the Department of Paediatrics is conducted in the 
lecture rooms of the College building, in the College Dispensary, in 
the wards, amphitheatre, and laboratories of the City Hospital, in 
the amphitheatre of the Good Samaritan Hospital, and in the wards 
of the Contagious Disease Hospital. 

1. Diseases of Children. — A series of lectures on diseases of 
the gastro-intestinal-tract and nutritional disorders; genito-urinary 
diseases; functional diseases of the nervous system; tuberculosis; 
and diseases of the blood. Thirty hours. Professor Rachford. 

2. Diseases of Children. — A series of lectures on the acute 
infectious diseases (especially the acute exanthema, cerebro-spinal 
meningitis, anterior poliomyelitis); diseases of the heart; and 
diseases of the ductless glands. Fifteen hours. 

Associate Professor Friedlander. 

3. Dispensary Clinics. — Each member of the Senior class attends 
the paediatric clinic two hours daily for five weeks, during 
which time he has an excellent opportunity to see and study the more 
common, and some of the uncommon, diseases of children. This 
clinic is a large one, the attendance in 1912-13 being 5,011. In 
addition to the attention paid to the patient, much pains are spent in 
this clinic in following patients to their homes and in remedying 
the social causes of disease. For this purpose three special nurses 
are employed, and students have opportunities, and are urged to 
accept them, of seeing and studying home conditions. 

Professor Rachford; Associate Professor Friedlander; 
Assistant Professor Lamb ; Drs. Dreyfoos, Wagner, 
Allgaier, Batte, Ervin, Fogel, Graf, Rasetti, West- 
lake, Bentley, Case, Twachtman, and Stammel. 

4. Hospital Ward Classes. — Each member of the Senior class 
spends a certain amount of time (see bedside schedule) in the 
children's wards of the Cincinnati Hospital, and in the contagious 
disease wards of the new Hospital. Here instruction and oppor- 
tunities for study are offered by the various members of the staff. 
Ninety hours. 

Professors Rachford and Eichberg; Associate Professor 
Friedlander; Assistant Professor Lamb; Drs. Bell 
and Wagner. 

5. Clinical Lectures. — Clinical lectures are delivered at regular 
intervals, in the amphitheatres of the Cincinnati and Good Samaritan 
Hospitals, to Senior students. One hundred and eight hours. 

Professor Rachford, Associate Professor Friedlander, 
and Assistant Professor Lamb. 



236 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY 

Frank Warren Langdon, M. D., . . . Professor of Psychiatry. 
Herman Henry Hoppe, A. M., M. D., . . Professor of Neurology. 
David I. Wolfstein, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Nervous 

Diseases. 

Edmund M. Baehr, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Nervous 

Diseases and Lecturer on the History of Medicine. 

Robert Ingram, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Charles E. Kiely, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 

1. Psychiatry. — Lectures on Mental Diseases. 

Professor Langdon. 

2. Psychiatric Clinics. — Bedside and conference study of mental 
diseases in the wards of the Cincinnati Hospital and, through the 
courtesy of Dr. F. W. Harmon, at Longview State Hospital for the 
Insane. 

Professors Langdon and Hoppe; Assistant Professors 
Wolfstein and Baehr, and Drs. Zenner and Ingram. 
8. Nervous Diseases. — Lectures on the functional and organic 
diseases of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves, illustrated 
by charts and by a large collection of mounted sections. 

Professor Hoppe. 

4. Neurologic Clinics. — Each Senior student devotes a specified 
number of two-hour periods to bedside and conference study of 
neurologic cases in the Cincinnati Hospital. 

Professor Hoppe, Assistant Professor Wolfstein, and 
Dr. Kiely. 

5. Dispensary Clinics in Neurology. — 

Professor Hoppe, Assistant Professor Baehr, Dr. Kiely. 



DERMATOLOGY AND SYPHILOLOGY 

Meyer L. Heidingsfeld, Ph. B., M. D., Professor of Dermatology and 

Syphilology. 

Augustus Ravogli, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Dermatology 

and Syphilology. 

Elmore B. Tauber, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

Syphilology. 

James W. Miller, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

Syphilology. 

Moses Scholtz, Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and Syphilology. 
1. Lectures on the hyperemias, inflammations, hypertrophies, 

atrophies, new growths, tuberculosis, and parasitic diseases of the 

skin; syphilis, diseases of the nails, hair, hair follicles, sweat and 



SURGERY 237 

sebaceous glands. The lectures are supplemented with demonstra- 
tions from several hundred colored lantern slides. 

Professor Heidingsfeld. 

2. Dermatologic Clinics. — Each Senior devotes a definite amount 
of time to the clinical study of syphilis and dermatologic cases in 

the dispensary. 

Professor Heidingsfeld, and Drs. Tauber, Miller, 
and Scholtz. 



SURGERY 



Joseph Ransohoff, M. D., F. R. C. S. (Eng.), Professor of Surgery. 

John Chadwick Oliver, M. D., . Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Charles Edward Caldwell, A. M., M. D., Associate Professor of 

Surgical Anatomy and Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

, Adjunct Professor of Surgery. 

E. Otis Smith, M. D., . . Adjunct Professor of Genito-Urinary 

Diseases. 

Frank Fee, M. D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Carl Hiller, M. D., . . Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Harry Hayes Hines, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
Casper F. Hegner, M. D., . . . Assistant Professor of Surgery. 
Goodrich Barbour Rhodes, A. B., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor 

of Surgery. 
Dudley White Palmer, B. S., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 

Surgery. 
John A. Caldwell, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 
Dudley Webb, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
J. Edward Pirrung, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 
William A. Lucas, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 
Ralph Staley, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Charles T. Souther, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

Guy Giffen, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

Carleton G. Crisler, M. D., Demonstrator in Surgery. 

The work of the Department of Surgery is carried on in the 
lecture rooms of the College, in the College Dispensary, in the 
wards, operating rooms, amphitheatre, and laboratories of the Cin- 
cinnati Hospital, and in the amphitheatre, wards, and operating 
rooms of the Good Samaritan Hospital. 

1. Surgical and Applied Anatomy. — This course consists of 
lectures which are illustrated by dissections of, and demonstrations 
upon, the cadaver. Associate Professor Caldwell. 



238 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

2. The Principles of Surgery. — Wounds, infections, diseases of 
bones, fractures and dislocations, diseases of blood-vessels, lym- 
phatics, muscles and tendons, nerves, tumors. Aseptic and anti- 
septic principles. Thirty hours. Dr. Hegner. 

3. Surgical Laboratory. — Physiologic surgery, shock, anesthesia, 
hemorrhage, experimental infections; surgical technique, surgical 
dressings, minor operations. Thirty hours. 

Assistant Professor Hiller. 

4. Surgery. — Informal lectures on the surgery of the head, 
spine, back, and chest. The causes, effects, methods of diagnosis 
and methods of treatment are discussed. Professor Ransohoff. 

5. Surgery. — Informal lectures on the surgery of the abdomen, 
rectum, and anus. The causes, effects, methods of diagnosis and the 
methods of treatment are discussed. Professor Ransohoff. 

6. Surgery. — Informal lectures on the surgical diseases of the 
thyroid and mammary glands. The causes, effects, methods of 
diagnosis and the methods of treatment are discussed. 

Professor Oliver. 

7. Genito-Urinary Surgery. — Lectures on the surgery of the 
genito-urinary organs, including the causes, effects, diagnosis and 
methods of treatment. Adjunct Professor Smith. 

8. Dispensary Clinics. — Each member of the Junior class spends 
two hours daily throughout half the year in the Surgical Clinic, 
where he has practical experience and instruction in history taking, 
methods of examination, diagnosis and treatment of ambulatory 
surgical cases. Drs. Caldwell, Rhodes, Pirrung, Lucas, 

Crisler, and Souther. 

9. Hospital Ward Classes. — Each member of the Senior class 
spends two hours daily for two months in the surgical wards of the 
Cincinnati Hospital. During this time he serves as a clinical 
clerk, taking histories, making clinical examinations, etc., becoming 
thoroughly acquainted in other wards with the methods of caring 
for hospital patients. The student is present at operations on all 
his own patients and at many others. Part of the time is spent in 
making rounds with the staff officer under whose direction he is 
working. Professors Ransohoff, Oliver, Caldwell, Fee, Dr. 

Carson, and Assistants. 

10. Clinical Lectures. — Clinical lectures on selected topics are 
delivered daily throughout the year in the amphitheatres of the 
Cincinnati and Good Samaritan Hospitals. These lectures are given 
at times which do not conflict with bedside work. 

Professors Ransohoff, Oliver, Caldwell, Fee, and 
Dr. Carson. 



i 



ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY, OBSTETRICS 289 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY 

Albert Henry Freiberg, M. D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 
Robert Carothers, M. D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 
R. B. Cofield, M. D., . Clinical Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
Robert Daniel Maddox, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Orthopedic 

Surgery. 

1. Orthopedic Surgery. — Lectures on the etiology of deformi- 
ties. Diagnostic principles; principal chapters of special orthopedic 
surgery. Illustration by stereopticon, radiograms, and orthopedic 
apparatus. Thirty hours. Professor Freiberg. 

2. Dispensary Clinics. — Each member of the Senior class de- 
votes a specified number of days to service in the Orthopedic Clinic, 
where a fair number of interesting cases are treated. This clinic 
is equipped with the necessary equipment for treating certain classes 
of orthopedic cases, and the patients are under the supervision of a 
trained nurse, part of whose duty it is to follow patients to their 
homes, and there instruct them. 

Professor Freiberg, Drs. Maddox and Cofield. 

3. Hospital Ward Classes. — A certain amount of the time of 
each Senior student is devoted to study of orthopedic cases in the 
wards of the Cincinnati Hospital. 

Professors Freiberg and Carothers, and Assistants. 

4. Clinical Lectures. — Clinical lectures are delivered at stated 
times in the amphitheatre of the Cincinnati Hospital. 

Professors Freiberg and Carothers. 



OBSTETRICS 

E. Gustav Zinke, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

William D. Porter, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 
George M. Allen, M. D., . . . Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 
James William Rowe, A. B., M. D., . . Assistant Professor of 

Obstetrics. 
Henry Lynde Woodward, M. D., . . . Instructor in Obstetrics. 

1. The Anatomy and Physiology of Pregnancy. — Menstruation 
and ovulation; the diseases of the fetus. The changes within the 
maternal organism and the diseases of the new-born. Mechanism 
and management of labor and the pathology of pregnancy. Lectures, 
sixty hours. Assistant Professor Rowe. 

2. Obstetrics. — Lectures on the pathology of labor and the 
puerperium, with indications for, and methods of operative pro- 
cedures. Professor Zinke. 



2i0 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

3. Clinical Lectures. — Clinical lectures are delivered at stated 
times in the amphitheatre of the Cincinnati Hospital. 

Professors Porter and Allen. 

4. Obstetrics. — Recitations in Obstetrics. Supplementary to 
Courses 1 and 2. Dr. Woodward. 

5. Obstetric Clinics. — Obstetric clinics are held in the wards of 
the Cincinnati Hospital, and in the homes of patients who make 
applications to the out-patient department. The hospital work is 
attended by very small groups of Senior students. The out-patient 
work is attended by Junior students, one student being present at 
each case. 

The out-patient work is in charge of the physicians of the 
Maternity Society of Cincinnati, to whom all out-patients are 
referred, and these cases, together with those applying to the 
Maternity Society, make, altogether, about 300 cases per annum. 
The teaching in connection with these cases is strictly personal 
and practical, and each case is cared for at the time of labor and 
in convalescence by a visiting nurse of the Maternity Society. 



GYNECOLOGY 

Charles Lybrand Bonifield, M. D., . . Professor of Gynecology. 
Charles Alfred Lee Reed, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical 

Gynecology. 
John M. Withrow, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
Rufus Bartlett Hall, A. M., M. D., . . . Professor of Clinical 

Gynecology. 
Sigmar Stark, M. D., . . . . Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
John D. Miller, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 
Joseph A. Hall, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 
Benjamin W. Gaines, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 
John E. Stemler, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 
Joseph S. Podesta, M. E., . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 
Philip Dorger, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 
Walter R. Griess, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

1. Gynecology. — Lectures on gynecology, embracing a general 
consideration of gynecologic etiology. Diagnosis; malformations, 
diseases, and displacements of the uterus ; disorders of menstruation ; 
diseases of the urethra, bladder, and ureters ; endometritis ; diseases 
of the vulva and vagina; pelvic inflammation, pyosalpinx. 

Professor Bonifield. 

2. Gynecology. — Lectures on gynecology, embracing fibroid 
tumors, malignant diseases, and tuberculosis of the uterus ; tumors 



OPHTHALMOLOGY 241 

of the ovaries, solid and cystic ; tuberculosis of the tubes and ovaries ; 
tubal pregnancy; technique and after-treatment of abdominal section 
for pelvic diseases. Fifteen hours. Professor Bonifield. 

3. Dispensary Clinics. — Each member of the Senior class 
spends two hours daily for a specified number of days in the 
gynecologic clinic of the dispensary. Here he receives practical 
instruction and experience in the methods of examination, diag- 
nosis and treatment of ambulatory cases. 

4. Hospital Ward Classes. — Each member of the Senior class 
spends a specified number of days in the gynecological wards of the 
Cincinnati Hospital, where he serves as clinical clerk, and as a 
spectator at operations. He therefore obtains valuable and practical 
experience in the methods of caring for hospital patients. 

5. Clinical Lectures. — Clinical lectures on selected topics are 
delivered at stated times in the amphitheatres of the Cincinnati and 
Good Samaritan Hospitals. 



OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Robert Sattler, M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Derrick T. Vail, M. D., . Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Walter Forchheimer, A. B., M. D., . . . Clinical Professor of 

Ophthalmology. 
Charles W. Tangeman, M. D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Victor Ray, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Wylie McLean Ayres, A. B., M. D. t Assistant Clinical Professor of 

Ophthalmology. 
John Ranly, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Frank B. Cross, M. D., . . . . Assistant Clinical Instructor in 

Ophthalmology. 
Clarence J. King, M. D., . . . Assistant Clinical Instructor in 

Ophthalmology. 
K. L. Stoll, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Horace F. Tangeman, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in 

Ophthalmology. 
Frank U. Swing, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 
mology. 
The aim of instruction in Ophthalmology is to afford the 
student ample opportunity to study the essentials of the pathology 
of the more important ocular lesions, and to impress him with the 
importance of a practical knowledge of Ophthalmology and its close 
relationship to Internal medicine. The course is divided into didactic 
and clinical teaching, the first semester being devoted to recitations 
and lectures, and the second wholly to clinical work at the University 



242 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

dispensary, Ophthalmic Hospital, and Cincinnati Hospital, under the 
personal direction of Professor Sattler and a corps of assistants. 
An effort will be made to make the clinical course eminently 
practical and supplementary to the various departments of Internal 
medicine for those students who, through predilection and proficiency, 
desire to prepare for postgraduate instruction in Ophthalmology. 

1. The Pathology of Ocular Lesions. — Lectures on the 
pathology of ocular lesions, supplemented by clinical instruction in 
the Cincinnati Hospital. Small class demonstrations in embryology 
and bacteriology of the eye, in the use of the ophthalmoscope, and 
refraction work at the Ophthalmic Hospital. Forty-eight hours. 

Professor Sattler. 

2. Dispensary Clinics. — Each Senior student spends a specified 
number of two-hour periods in daily attendance at the ophthal- 
mologic clinic of the dispensary. Here he receives practical instruc- 
tion and experience in dealing with the common affections of 
the eyes. Thirty hours. 

Professors W. Forchheimer and Tangeman ; Assistant 
Professors Ray and Ayres ; Drs. Ranly, Cross, King, 
Stoll, Tangeman, Swing. 

3. [Hospital Ward Classes.] Each Senior student spends 
specified number of two-hour periods in ward examinations of 
ophthalmic cases in the Cincinnati Hospital. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

4. Clinical Lectures. — A certain number of clinical lectures in 
diseases of the eyes are delivered in the amphitheatre of tht 
Cincinnati Hospital. Professors Sattler and Vail. 



OTOLARYNGOLOGY 

Christian R. Holmes, M. D., Professor of Otology. 

John Albert Thompson, B. S., A. M., M. D., Professor of Laryn- 
gology. 
John Wesley Murphy, A. M., M. D., . . Clinical Professor of 

Laryngology and Otology-. 

Samuel Iglauer, B. S., M. D., . Associate Professor of Otology. 

Walter E. Murphy, M. D., Associate Professor of Laryngology, 

and Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, Laryngology, and Otology. 

William Mithoefer, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 

Laryngology, and Otology. 
W. J. Thomasson, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 

Laryngology, and Otology. 
S. Bertha Dauch, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 

Laryngology, and Otology. 



HYGIENE 243 

Charles Jones, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 

Laryngology, and Otology. 
George L. Krieger, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Laryngology 

and Otology. 
Robert Stevenson, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Laryngology 

and Otology. 
Robert W. Bledsoe, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and 

Otology. 

1. Laryngology. — A series of lectures on the diseases of the 
nose, mouth, pharynx, and larynx. These lectures are illustrated 
by wet and dry specimens and supplemented by demonstrations of 
operative technique. Professor Thompson. 

2. Otology. — A series of lectures on diseases of the ear. 

Professor Holmes and Associate Professor Iglauer. 

3. Dispensary Clinics. — Each Senior spends a specified number 
of two-hour periods in the oto-laryngologic clinic of the Dispensary, 
where he receives practical experience in the diagnosis and treat- 
ment of cases. 

Professor J. W. Murphy; Associate Professors Iglauer 
and Murphy (W. E.), and Drs. Williams, Mit- 
hoef er, Thomasson, Dauch, Weintz, Krieger, Steven- 
son, and Bledsoe. 

[4. Ward Classes.] Ward classes of Senior students are held 
at the Cincinnati Hospital. During this service many operations 
may be witnessed. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

5. Clinical Lectures. — 



HYGIENE 

John Howard Landis, M. D., Professor of Hygiene. 

1. The Hygiene of Food. — Transmissible diseases, quarantine, 
immunity, and preventive inoculation. Air, water, and soil, personal 
hygiene; municipal hygiene; disposal of refuse and dead; disinfec- 
tion. 

Co-operative Course With the Board of Health 

During the session of 1911-12, a Co-operative Course with the 
Board of Health was introduced, whereby a student in his Junior 
year divides his time between active service in the Board of 
Health, and the regular work of the College of Medicine. The 
students assigned to the Board of Health are distributed among 



244 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

its various departments to do chemical and bacteriologic work (the 
examination of milk and water, and testing for typhoid fever, tuber- 
culosis, diphtheria, etc.); to do sanitary inspection and fumigation; 
to trace the sources of infections; to make food, dairy, bakery, 
barber shop, and school inspections; to practice preventive inocula- 
tion and vaccination; to study the methods of disposal of sewage 
and of the dead, and to serve in the city dispensaries. Through 
the cordial co-operation of the Anti-tuberculosis League and the 
staff of the Cincinnati Tuberculosis Hospital, students will be able 
to participate in their work and will have the advantage of first- 
hand experience with one of the best organized preventive cam- 
paigns of the day. The students take part not only in the 
laboratory and field work of the Board of Health, but also in its 
office work, where they study methods of making reports, of 
compiling statistics and of keeping records. The service with the 
Board of Health includes daily conferences with the officers of the 
Health Department, at which the methods of Boards of Health are 
discussed and elucidated. 

Students serving in this way in the Health Department are 
expected to keep the same hours as are kept by the officials with 
whom they are serving. Records of each student's efficiency in his 
practical work are kept and filed at the college at each transfer. 



MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE AND ECONOMICS 

James B. Swing, Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence and Economics. 

1. Medical Jurisprudence and Economics. — Origin of our law 
courts and procedure; introduction of testimony; expert witnesses. 
Legal rights and duties of physicians; ethics; nature and value of 
evidence in cases of wounds, asphyxia, etc.; homicide and suicide; 
history of the law of insurance, etc. ; accident cases. History of the 
law of insanity ; legal responsibility in crime ; contracts, testamentary 
capacity. Personal identity. Business methods. Changes in the 
human body after death ; post mortem. Purposes of organization. 
Rape: pregnancy; abortion, infanticide. Lectures, sixteen hours. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Just as the development of practical laboratory work marks the 
evolution of teaching in the first two years of medical training of 
this day, so does the greater employment of demonstrative methods 
in hospital and dispensary indicate the excellence of the curriculum 



THE CINCINNATI HOSPITAL 245 

of a modern school of medicine, in its Junior and Senior years. The 
Ohio-Miami Medical College of the University of Cincinnati has, in 
this respect, a v/ealth of available material to offer the student in 
his third and fourth years which is excelled in few if any cities in 
the United States. This is true both in regard to the quantity and 
variety of clinical material, and to its accessibility to the student. 

THE CINCINNATI HOSPITAL 

Cincinnati has six large hospitals. Of these the largest is the 
Cincinnati Hospital, with a capacity of 500 beds. The clinical material 
at this hospital alone would amply suffice for the thorough teaching 
of practical medicine in all of its branches to a large medical school. 
During the college year the large amphitheater of this hospital is 
used for operative clinics and informal clinical lectures to the Senior 
class. Twelve hours per week are also utilized for bedside teaching 
by the Senior and Junior Attending Staff of the hospital, the 
classes being subdivided into sections for this purpose. The student 
is thus enabled to spend the entire forenoon of each day during his 
Senior year in practical clinical work. The sections of the Senior 
class attending the clinical lectures at the Good Samaritan Hospital 
on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays are given bedside instruc- 
tion in this hospital on these days. The morgue of the hospital 
contains a smaller amphitheatre in which the autopsies are made 
and the abundant pathological material is demonstrated by the 
pathologists of the hospital. 

The thoroughly equipped laboratory of radiography is utilized 
for demonstration of both the therapeutic and diagnostic uses of 
the X-Ray. This work is given to the class in sections. 

The contagious wards of the new City Hospital were opened 
during the summer of 1911. The group of buildings contains 
120 beds, and students are assigned in groups to study the 
cases which are sent there, and receive instruction by the attending 
physicians. 

The New Cincinnati Hospital, now nearly completed, will be in 
full operation by the opening of the session of 1914-15. It is no 
exaggeration to say that in this hospital, which is the largest and 
most thoroughly equipped general hospital in the United States, the 
students of the Medical Department of the University of Cincinnati 
will have as good advantages for clinical and pathological instruc- 
tion as can be obtained anvwhere in the world. 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

MEDICAL STAFF 

President : B. K. Rachford, M. D. 
Vice-President: Robert Carothers, M. D. 
Secretary : M. L. Heidingsfeld, M. D. 
Librarian : E. W. Mitchell, M. D. 



CONSULTING STAFF 

Physician: J. C. Mackenzie, M. D. 

Neurologist: Philip Zenner, M. D. 

Obstetrician and Gynecologist: C. D. Palmer, M. D. 

Oculists : 

C. R. Holmes, M. D. S. C. Ayres, M. D. 

VISITING STAFF 
Physicians : 

E. W. Mitchell, M. D. John E. Greiwe, M. D. 

George A. Fackler, M. D. Mark A. Brown, M. D. 

Oliver P. Holt, M. D. 

Physicians to the Contagious Wards of the new Hospital : 



Albert J. Bell, M. D. 

Neurologists : 

H. H. Hoppe, M. D. 

Surgeons : 

Joseph Ransohoff, M. D. 
John C. Oliver, M. D. 
Arch I. Carson, M. D. 

Orthopedic Surgeons: 
A. H. Freiberg, M. D. 

Dermatologists : 

A. Ravogli, M. D. 

Laryngologists and Aurists : 
Samuel Iglauer, M. D. 

Oculists : 

Robert Sattler, M. D. 

Obstetricians : 

W. D. Porter, M. D. 

Gynecologists : 

Charles A. L. Reed, M. D. 
John M. Withrow, M. D. 



Julius C. Eichberg, M. D. 
D. I. Wolfstein, M. D. 



C. E. Caldwell, M. D. 
S. P. Kramer, M. D. 
Frank Fee, M. D. 



Robert Carothers, M. D. 
M. L. Heidingsfeld, M. D. 
J. W. Murphy, M. D. 
D. T. Vail, M. D. 
G. M. Allen, M. D. 



Rufus B. Hall, M. D. 
Sigmar Stark, M. D. 



THE CINCINNATI HOSPITAL 



247 



Podiatrists : 

B. K. Rachford, M. D. 



Alfred Friedlander, M. D. 



Pathologist and Director of the Laboratories: 
P. G. Woolley, M. D. 

Bacteriologist and Assistant Director of the Laboratories: 
W. B. Wherry, M. D. 

Radiographer: Sidney Lange, M. D. 



Cystoscopists : 

E. O. Smith, M. D. 

Dentists : 

H. C. Matlack, M. D. 



Dudley Webb, M. D. 
E. G. Betty, M. D. 



JUNIOR VISITING STAFF 
Physicians : 

L. G. Heyn, M. D. 

H. L. Woodward, M. D. 



Allan Ramsey, M. D. 



Neurologists : 

E. M. Baehr, M. D. 

Surgeons : 

Carl Hiller, M. D. 
H. H. Hines, M. D. 
Charles A. Langdale, M. D. 

Orthopedic Surgeons : 

Robert D. Maddox, M. D. 

Laryngologists : 

G. A. Hinnen, M. D. 

Oculists : 

Victor Ray, M. D. 

Obstetrician : 

William Gillespie, M. D. 

Podiatrists : 

F. H. Lamb, M. D. 

Dermatologists : 

Elmore E. Tauber, M. D. 

Gynecologist : 

James W r . Rowe, M. D. 



Robert Ingram, M. D. 



D. W. Palmer, M. D. 
C. F. Hegner, M. D. 
G. B. Rhodes, M. D. 



Robert B. Cofield, M. D. 
C. H. Weintz, M. D. 
Jesse Wyler, M. D. 
M. A. Tate, M. D. 
E. A. Wagner, M. D. 
C. J. Broeman, M. D. 
Joseph A. Hall, M. D. 



248 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



Assistant Bacteriologist; William H. Peters, M. D. 
Assistant Radiographer: Wm. M. Doughty, M. D. 
Clinical and Pathological Laboratory and Museum: 



A. E. Osmond, M. D. 
Joseph T. Kennedy, M. D. 
Charles Goosmann, M. D. 
W. A. Lucas, M. D. 
Oscar Berghausen, M. D. 
Gordon F. McKim, M. D. 



Herbert Brown, M. D. 
Starr Ford, M. D. 
Gilbert Mombach, M. D. 
John A. Caldwell, M. D. 
William Graf, M. D. 
Frank Swing, M. D. 



Resident Physician in Pathology : E. D. Allgaier, M. D. 
Resident Physician: Charles T. McDevitt, M. D. 

In 1887 the Board of Trustees of the Cincinnati Hospital author- 
ized the organization of the staff for the purpose of teaching, under 
the title of the Clinical and Pathological School of the Cincinnati 
Hospital. Since 1896 this school has been in affiliation with the 
medical department of the University of Cincinnati. 

The hospital requires the payment of a fee of ten dollars for the 
privilege of clinical instruction in this school. This privilege is open 
to all third and fourth year medical students in the city who are 
registered under the state law. 

The fees collected from the students are used to support the 
hospital library and museum. 



CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL SCHOOL 
CINCINNATI HOSPITAL 

Amphitheater Clinics and Bedside Instruction 
1912-13 





HOUR 


MON. 


TUBS. 


WED. 


THURS. 


FRI. 


sat. ; 


Oct. 1912 

TO 


8:30 
to 
9:80 


Crelive 
Mitchell 


Ransohoff 
Oliver 


Caldwell 
Holt 


Hoppe 

Carothers 

Poole 


G. H. Allen 

Withrow 

Stark 


Ravogll 
Sanier 
S. E. Allen 


Feb. 1913 


9:30 

to 

11:30 


BEDSIDE CLASSES 


February 

TO 

June 1913 


8:80 

to 
9:30 


Brown 
FaeRlcr 


Carson 
Whitacre 


Kramer 


Woifsteln 
rreiberg 
Rachford 


Porter 

Hall 

Reed 


CO 

I-i 


9:80 

to 

11:80 


BEDSIDE CLASSES 



THE GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL 249 

THE GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL 

The clinical instruction of this important hospital is conducted 
exclusively by the faculty, as follows : Dr. C. L. Bonifield, President, 
and Dr. C. C. Fihe, Secretary. The members of the staff are: 
Medicine, Drs. John E. Greiwe and C. C. Fihe; Juniors, Drs. A. E. 
Osmond and Starr Ford; Surgery, Drs. Robert Carothers and Carl 
Hiller; Junior, Drs. J. E. Pirrung and Goodrich B. Rhodes, M. D. ; 
Gynecology, Drs. C. L. Bonifield, C. A. L. Reed, and John D. Miller ; 
Junior, Dr. B. W. Gaines; Neurology, Dr. Herman H. Hoppe; 
Junior, Dr. E. M. Baehr ; Nose and Throat, Drs. A. B. Thrasher and 
William Mithoefer ; Junior, Dr. Robert Stevenson ; Eye, Drs. Wylie 
Ayres and John Ranly; Junior, Dr. VV. Keller; Children, Dr. Frank 
Lamb ; Genito-urinary, Dr. E. O. Smith ; Junior, Dr. Dudley Webb ; 
Skin, Dr. J. W. Miller ; X-Ray, Dr. Sidney Lange. 

The Good Samaritan contains about one hundred beds. 
There is also, as a tributary, an outdoor department in connection 
with the hospital, adding materially to its resources. An abundance 
of clinical material is thus afforded both in the Departments of 
Medicine and Surgery, and this material is utilized for the instruction 
of groups of students on three mornings of each week. See bedside 
schedule. 

Students of this College only are eligible for interneship in the 
Good Samaritan Hospital. There are four positions filled annually. 

CINCINNATI TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL 

The Cincinnati Tuberculosis Hospital is a municipal institution 
of 330 beds. It is organized on modern lines with a full-time medical 
superintendent and an independent staff of specialists. In this 
hospital the members of the Junior class spend 128 hours during the 
second semester in a detailed clinical and sociologic study of tuber- 
culosis. This study forms a continuation of the work in the Board 
of Health. 

The members of the staff are as follows : 

C. S. Rockhill, M. D., Medical Director and Superintendent; 
William Mithoefer, M. D.; Dudley Palmer, M. D.; R. D. Maddox, 
M. D.; Kennon Dunham, M. D. ; W. McL. Ayres, M. D. ; and 
Clifford Kennedy, M. D. 

OTHER HOSPITALS OF CINCINNATI 

The Faculty of the Ohio-Miami Medical College is also very 
largely represented in the staffs of Christ's Hospital, the Jewish 
Hospital, the German Deaconess Hospital, St. Mary's Hospital, 



250 COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

and the Episcopal Hospital for Children. While no regular place 
in the college schedule is allotted for clinical teaching in these 
institutions, there is abundant opportunity for utilizing their large 
amount of clinical material. 



LONGVIEW STATE HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE 

A course of clinical lectures on mental diseases is given at 
Longview State Hospital for the Insane from January to April each 
year. This course is given through the courtesy and under the super- 
vision of Dr. F. W. Harmon, the superintendent of the Hospital, by 
members of the Faculty of the Ohio-Miami Medical College. There 
is an enormous amount of material in this hospital available for the 
purpose of illustration, and it is unsurpassed in its variety. Admis- 
sion to these lectures is open to practitioners and Senior students. 
Provision is made in the schedule of the Senior year for attendance 
upon this course; it is mandatory and entitles to credit. 

In 1913 the exercises at Longview were as follows : February 8, 
Dr. Langdon, Introductory; February 15, Dr. Hoppe, The Manic- 
Depressive Psychoses; February 22, Dr. Wolfstein, Dementia 
Praecox; March 1, Dr. Zenner, Paresis; March 8, Dr. Baehr, 
Exhaustive Psychoses; March 15, Dr. Ingram, Melancholia; 
March 29, Dr. Hoppe, Paranoia; April 5, Dr. Wolfstein, Drug and 
Alcohol Psychoses. 

THE COLLEGE DISPENSARY 

The College conducts a dispensary for ambulatory cases in a 
building devoted entirely to this purpose. The clinic building is 
situated on the north side of McMicken avenue, at the head of Elm 
Street, upon the McMicken homestead grounds, and is therefore 
conveniently close to the College building. It is in charge of a 
salaried director. 

The clinics are open from 10 :30 a. m. to 1 :00 p. m. for medical 
and surgical cases, and from 3:30 to 6:00 p. m. for paediatric, 
gynecologic, ophthalmologic, oto-laryngologic, neurologic, derma- 
tologic, orthopedic, obstetric, and genito-urinary surgical cases. The 
morning clinics are exclusively for Junior students; the afternoon 
for Seniors. 

Each clinic has the use of at least two rooms ; one for consulta- 
tions and examinations ; one for demonstrations. 

The annual attendance at these clinics is large. In the year 
1912-13, about 20,000 cases were recorded, of which number, at 
least half were new cases. These cases are studied by small groups 



CHILDREN'S, ORTHOPEDIC, OBSTETRIC CLINICS 251 

of students under the supervision of the clinicians. The attendance 
of the clinicians is arranged so that two are always on duty to 
advise and demonstrate. Efficient teaching is therefore obtained. 

CHILDREN'S CLINIC 

The division of Paediatrics has charge not only of the usual 
patients who come for treatment, but also of those of the Ohio 
Maternity Society. This division has an annual sum of money, 
placed at its disposal by Mrs. Emery, which is expended in dis- 
tributing certified milk, and in paying two visiting nurses who follow 
patients to their homes. 

ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC 

The division of Orthopedics also has been given an annual 
sum of money by an anonymous donor, and this money is to be 
expended in equipping a gymnasium, and in paying for the services 
of an attending nurse and a visiting nurse. 

OBSTETRIC CLINIC 

During the spring of 1912, an agreement was consummated 
with the Maternity Society of Cincinnati, whereby all of the patients 
making application to our clinic should be taken care of by the 
physicians and nurses of that society, provided students were 
allowed to attend such cases and receive instruction. The obstetrical 
work of the Maternity Society is under the supervision of Dr. 
Woodward of the Faculty of the College, and a corps of competent 
physicians. The nurses of the Visiting Nurse Association attend 
all cases. Students therefore see obstetrical cases under the most 
fortunate scientific and moral conditions. The number of cases 
attended each year is about 300. 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



FACULTY 
Charles William Dabney, Ph. D., LL. D., President of the 

Office, 10 McMicken Hall. UNIVERSITY. 

Frederick C. Hicks, Ph. D., Dean and Professor of Economics and 
Office, 8 McMicken Hall. Commerce. 

John C. Duncan, Ph. D., Professor of Administration and Ac- 
countancy. 

, Professor of Finance. 

, . . . Professor of Commerce and Transportation. 

Nathan Isaacs, Ph. D., LL. B., . . Lecturer on Commercial Law. 

Member of the Faculty of the Cincinnati Law School 

Charles W. Dupuis, Lecturer on Investments. 

Cashier Second National Bank. 

Harvey M. Manss, A. B., Lecturer on Advertising. 

Of the J. Walter Thompson Advertising Company. 

Henry M. Brouse, Lecturer on Administration. 

Auditor, Gale Brothers. 

Ernest A. Roden, Lecturer on Accounting. 

Public Accountant and Auditor. 

Edward A. Sisson, A. B., Lecturer on Banking. 

Assistant Secretary, Central Trust and Safe Deposit Company. 

George R. Lamb, C. P. A., Lecturer on Accounting. 

Accountant. 



OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
Henry S. West, Ph. D., .... Director of School Affiliation. 

Office, 2 McMicken Hall. 

Alfred Brodbeck, Director of Physical Education. 

Gymnasium Building. 

Daniel Laurence, B. S., Secretary of the University. 

Office, 5 McMicken Hall. 

Charles Albert Read, A. B., . Librarian of the University Library. 

Van Wormer Library Building. 

Lelia Garvin Hartmann, B. L., Registrar. 

Office, 7 McMicken Hall. 

Thomas L. McJoynt, .... Secretary, College of Commerce. 

Office, S3 McMicken Hall. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 253 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College of Commerce has been organized for the purpose 
of providing opportunity for higher commercial education. It was 
established in 1906 as a separate institution, largely the outgrowth of 
evening classes held under the patronage of the Cincinnati Chapter 
of the American Institute of Banking, and became a part of the 
University in 1912. 

The time has come when it is worth while for the young man 
who desires to achieve success in a business career to begin by learn- 
ing what the experience of others has to teach. The saving of waste 
is an important element in modern industry. It is in keeping with 
this idea that the wasteful method which requires business men to 
learn everything anew for themselves through their own experience 
should give place to a system which provides opportunity for each 
generation to know the results of the efforts of the preceding genera- 
tion. It is thereby enabled to start somewhat in advance of where its 
predecessor did, and so to attain larger results. 

There are, of course, many phases of business which every man 
must learn for himself, but business experience has developed prin- 
ciples and methods of procedure which can be taught. Moreover, 
these principles and methods have become so far standardized as to 
constitute a useful foundation upon which to build the experience 
of the individual. 

In this respect, an interesting parallel may be drawn between 
preparation for the legal and medical professions, on the one hand, 
and preparation for a commercial career, on the other. Not very 
many years ago it was believed that training for law could best be 
secured in the office of a practicing attorney, and training for medi- 
cine, in the office of a physician. Today, those desiring to enter these 
professions avail themselves of the facilities offered by the colleges 
of law and of medicine. None of these colleges professes to qualify 
its graduates to become at once leaders in their respective fields. 
To their college training must be added practical experience. 
Yet few, if any, now question that the preparation afforded by such 
institutions makes possible more rapid progress in the practice of 
those professions and, what is even more important, a far greater 
ultimate achievement. 

In like manner, colleges for commercial training do not under- 
take to turn out ready-made captains of industry, but they do expect 
to assist in laying a foundation which, when combined with the 



254 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

training of practical experience, will enable the business man to 
attain larger results. 

ADMISSION 

The courses offered are open to all who are qualified to pursue 
them with profit. The College has been established for the purpose 
of supplying scientific instruction in the fundamental principles and 
practices of commerce with a view to increasing the efficiency of 
those who contemplate engaging in business or who have already 
entered upon such a career. To this end its facilities are available 
to every one whose training, either in school or in actual business, is 
such as to enable him to utilize them to advantage. 

Students are admitted (a) as candidates for a degree, (b) as 
candidates for a diploma, or (c) as special students. 

Candidates for a degree are expected to satisfy the regular 
college entrance requirements and to complete a pre-commercial 
course consisting of forty college credit hours and two years' suc- 
cessful business experience, or of sixty college credit hours, i. e., 
the equivalent of two years' college work. 

A credit hour is one recitation hour a week carried through a 
semester or half year. 

The college credit hours must include the following : 

English Composition 4 credit hours 

Economics 4 " 

Economic History 4 

Commercial Geography 4 " 

Statistics 4 " 

Logic 4 " 

Ethics 4 " 

Psychology 4 " 

Mathematics 8 

Six credit hours in science may be substituted for four of the 
eight credit hours in mathematics. 

Eight credit hours in German, French, or Spanish may be sub- 
stituted for an equal amount of the required work listed above, 
subject to the approval of the faculty. 

Opportunity to secure this preparation is afforded by the College 
of Liberal Arts of the University of Cincinnati, which offers, in 
addition to the regular day classes, late afternoon and evening 



ADMISSION 



255 



classes so adjusted as to enable the students to combine class work 
with practical business training. The following schedule has been 
arranged : 







Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


In 

to 

V 


4:45 

to 

6:45 




English 
Composition 




Logic 




m 

U 


7:30 

to 

9:30 






Economics 


Economic 
History 


Mathematics 


In 

u 


4:45 

to 
6:45 


Statistics 




Commercial 
Geography 






c 
o 


7:30 

to 
9:30 


Ethics 


Psychology 






Mathematics 



In the two years' business training, the student is required to 
pursue a course of investigation under the direction of the teachers 
of the College of Commerce. Special schedules will be prepared with 
a view to directing the student's observation of business activities 
so as to make it effective as an essential part of his preparation for 
the work of the College of Commerce. 

Candidates for a Diploma. — Persons are admitted as candidates 
for a diploma upon giving satisfactory evidence that their scholar- 
ship and business experience are adequate. They are required to 
submit to the Committee on Admission a detailed description of their 
educational and business training and to supplement this with such 
additional preparation as in the judgment of the committee may be 
desirable. Application blanks will be supplied upon request. 

Special Students. — The classes of the College of Commerce 
are open to those who wish instruction along special lines only, 
provided they are of suitable age and business experience. Those 
desiring to enroll as special students are required to satisfy the 
Committee on Admission that they are able to carry on the work 
desired. 

Any student who, after entering, becomes a candidate for a 
degree or for a diploma, will receive credit for all courses satisfac- 
torily completed, but before becoming a candidate for a degree or 
for a diploma, he must satisfy the entrance requirements. 

All students are amenable to the same regulations in matters of 
class work, examinations, discipline, etc. 

Applications for admission should be addressed to the Dean of 
the College of Commerce, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



256 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

REGISTRATION 

Registration in 1913 began on Thursday, September 18, and 
closed on Saturday, September 20. The office was open during 
the evening of each of these days from 7 :30 to 9 :30. Students 
registering on any other days than those designated above were 
required to pay a registration fee of one dollar. 

No person will be admitted to any course after the beginning 
of the semester, unless a good and sufficient excuse for not entering 
at the opening of the semester be presented to the Dean; and in 
no event will any person be permitted to enter the work of any 
semester after the close of the third week of that semester. In 
accordance with this regulation no person was admitted to the 
work of the first semester of 1913-14 after October 11, 1913. 

The steps in registration are as follows : 

(1) Secure from the Dean and fill out a Course Card. 

(2) Obtain from the Registrar a registration blank; fill out the 
same and present to the Registrar and secure a Card of Matricula- 
tion Fees. 

(3) Pay the registration and library and the tuition fees to the 
Clerk of the Board and get a receipt therefor. 

(4) File the Course Card and in the case of new students the 
Cards of Admission in the box prepared for that purpose in the 
Registrar's office. 

FEES 

Students taking work in the College of Commerce are charged 
a registration and library fee of $5.00 per year. The tuition for a 
full year's work of five courses is $50.00. Those taking less than a 
full year's work are charged $6.00 per recitation hour per year. 
Thus the tuition for one two-hour course is $12.00 a year. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The course of study is planned to combine and co-ordinate theory 
and practice. Though differing in the details of organization, the 
basic principle is the same as that of the Co-operative Engineering 
Course. 

Though not as yet fully developed, the course will require three 
full years of work for its completion. This work will consist 
of two parts carried on simultaneously : the first composed of courses 
at the University; the second, of practice in one or more fields of 
business. 



PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 257 

College Courses.— During the first year, the student will give his 
attention to a group of fundamental subjects, a general knowledge of 
which is important in all kinds of commercial activity. These are: 

Fundamental Principles of Commerce, 
Business Administration, 
Principles of Accounting, 
Banking and Credit, 
Commercial Contracts. 

The second year's work will consist, in part, of additional funda- 
mental subjects and, in part, of courses selected with reference to the 
special field for which the student desires to prepare. The required 
courses during this second year are : 

Barometrics of Business, 
Commercial Law. 

In addition to these, the student will select, subject to the approval 
of the faculty, three two-hour year courses or their equivalent in 
half-year courses. 

The subjects in the third year are elective, in order that the student 
may, if he so desires, confine his attention to a special field. At least 
five two-hour courses or their equivalent in half-year courses will be 
selected, subject to the approval of the faculty. 

In the present stage of development of the College, the number 
of available electives is necessarily limited, but it is intended to 
increase these until opportunity for study is afforded in all the fields 
which properly belong in a College of Commerce. 

Business Practice. — Throughout the three years, the student is 
expected to be in business and to carry on, under the supervision of 
the faculty of the College of Commerce, a carefully planned study of 
the business in which he is engaged. This will involve regular reports 
and conferences. Failure to meet successfully the practical demands 
of business will debar the student from continuing as a candidate 
for a degree. 

Except as required in the regular schedule of studies, no student 
will be allowed to take more than ten hours of class work a week, 
of which not more than six hours, i. e., three two-hour courses or 
their equivalent, may be taken from 7 :30 to 9 :30. 



258 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

GRADUATION 

Degree. — The degree of Bachelor of Commercial Science will be 
conferred upon the following conditions : 

(1) The completion of the course of study as outlined, con- 
sisting of sixty *credit hours and of three years' successful business 
experience, including a systematic study of the business concerned. 

(2) The preparation of a satisfactory thesis relating to the 
business in which the student has been engaged, with special refer- 
ence to the application thereto of the subjects studied in the College. 
The paper must show that the writer has the ability not only to 
gather data, but also to correlate and apply the same in solving 
commercial problems. 

Only such students as have satisfied the entrance requirements 
prescribed for candidates for a degree may receive the degree of 
Bachelor of Commercial Science. 

Diploma. — A diploma in Commerce will be given to those who, 
having been duly approved as candidates therefor, complete sixty 
credit hours as described in the Plan of Instruction and three years' 
successful business practice. 

Certificate. — A certificate will be awarded to special students 
upon the completion of a duly approved group of selected subjects. 



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT 

A special course has been arranged for those who desire to obtain 
the Certified Public Accountant certificate. 



EVENING ACADEMIC COURSES 

The University of Cincinnati offers also evening academic courses, 
which are open to students in the College of Commerce. For detailed 
information concerning these courses, address the Supervisor of 
Evening Courses. 



* For definition of credit hour, see p. 254. Two hours of laboratory work in 
the College of Commerce are considered equivalent to one recitation hour. 



SCHEDULE OF COURSES 



259 



00 

O 

o 

o 

Q 
W 

o 

GO 



FRIDAY 


* Accounting 1 
Laboratory 


be 

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<*1 


< 
Q 
w 
M 

W 
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*Business 
Administration 

fBarometrics of 
Business 


* Commercial Law 1 
Adv. Accounting 
Investments 


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Q 

CO 

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260 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

* Required of regular first year students, 
f Required of regular second year students. 

ADMINISTRATION AND ACCOUNTANCY 

* 1. Business Administration. — A consideration of the physical 
factors which influence plant layouts, structures, and labor problems, 
followed by a discussion of the different types of organization neces- 
sary for financial and managerial administrative control. Th., 
4 : 45_6 :45. 

* 2. Principles of Accountancy. — This course is the foundation of 
all work in accounting. The student is made familiar with the keep- 
ing of accounts of various kinds of business, mercantile, industrial, 
and financial; the accounting for various types of business organiza- 
tion ; the methods of preparing the industrial and commercial statistics 
of a plant, for the purpose of making proper deductions as to the 
efficiency of departments and the soundness of business policy. This 
course includes drill in the designing of accounting systems for the 
different kinds of business considered. Lecture, F., 7 :30 — 9 :30 ; 
Laboratory, F., 4 :45 — 6 :45. 

3. Advanced Accounting. — This is a problem course including 
the consideration of the principles of Cost Accounting, the handling of 
capital, revenue, dissolution of partnership, realization, liquidation, 
insolvency, good-will, treatment of bad debts, suspense, maintenance, 
depreciation, reserve and sinking funds, contingent funds, secret 
reserves and the like. In this course are also considered the special 
topics of executor accounts, insurance accounts, and accounting for 
municipalities and other public bodies. Th., 7 :30 — 9 :30. 

4. Auditing. — Discussion of the duties and responsibilities of an 
auditor; the kinds of audits that can be made and the value of each; 
the auditor's report, what it should contain ; his certificate, its value ; 
the preparation of audit reports. W., 7 :30 — 9 :30. 

COMMERCE 

* 1. Fundamental Principles of Commerce. — The first part of this 
course will be devoted to the following subjects : an analysis of the 
nature of exchange ; value and the conditions which determine it ; 
price and price making, with special reference to the nature and 
influence of competition and monopoly; the relation of money and 
price. 

There will follow a study of special price problems, such as the 
nature and function of a standard of value and the requisites for 
securing an adequate standard; the relation between purchases and 






COMMERCE 261 

sales, especially in the case of exports and imports, and the effect 
upon price of internal revenue and import duties; domestic and 
foreign rates of exchange; transportation rates. 

The purpose of this course is twofold: (1) to formulate the 
principles which determine price ; and (2) to ascertain the nature 
of fair price and the method by which it can be secured. T., 
4:45—6:45. 

f 2. Barometrics of Business. — A study of the phenomena that 
are commonly regarded as signs of the trend of business activity, and 
of the various plans of combining them with a view to forecasting 
business conditions. Among the most important of the subjects to 
be considered are commodity prices, bank clearings, loans and dis- 
counts, crop and metal statistics, foreign trade, gold movements and 
money rates, investment conditions, railroad conditions, and business 
failures. Special attention will be given to crises and depressions. 
Th, 4:45—6:45. 

3. Advertising in Modern Merchandising. — This course will 
outline the theory of advertising and apply it to the business of today. 
It will include: the scope of advertising; its place in modern com- 
merce; what psychology has contributed to advertising; forms and 
media of advertising; the part played by population and its distribu- 
tion; copy and layout; advertising to men; advertising to women; 
building an advertising campaign and interlocking it with the sales 
campaign ; advertising as a business. M., 7 :30 — 9 :30. 

4. Railroad Transportation, Car Service and Demurrage. — The 
subjects treated in this course are : 

(a) The nature and scope of transportation ; the origin of the 
American railway, its growth and the present railway system of the 
United States. 

(b) The railway corporation and its charter; railway capital- 
ization, earnings, expenses and dividends; railway freight, passenger 
and express service ; the accounts and statistics of the railway service. 

(c) Theory of rates and fares; rate making in practice; freight 
classifications ; railway competition, pools, and traffic associations. 

(d) Demurrage and car service; bills of lading and contracts; 
the handling of claims. 

[(e) Railroad regulation by the state and national government; 
the Interstate Commerce Act.] 

Omitted in 1913-14. 



262 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

COMMERCIAL LAW 

*1. Commercial Contracts. — This course begins with a brief anal- 
ysis of law and a description of the place of contract in jurisprudence. 
It then takes up the essential elements in the formation of contracts; 
offer and acceptance ; form and consideration ; contracts that must be 
in writing under the statute of frauds; the capacity of infants, cor- 
porations, and others to contract ; the reality of consent as affected 
by mistake, fraud, undue influence, and duress ; and illegality because 
in violation of the statutes or of the common law, or contrary to 
public policy, or fraudulent. There follows a consideration of the 
operation of contracts; their interpretation and construction; and 
the various modes of discharge of contracts, by agreement, by per- 
formance including payment and tender, by impossibility of perform- 
ance, by operation of law, and by breach. The course concludes with 
a discussion of breach of contract, damages, and specific performance. 
This course should precede all other courses in commercial law. 
Th., 7:30—9:30. 

1 2. Law of Commercial and Banking Paper. — The following is 
the outline of this course : 

(a) Negotiable instruments payable in money. This will include : 
The general rules governing all negotiable instruments treated under 
the following heads : form and interpretation ; consideration, negotia- 
tion; rights of holder; liabilities of parties; presentation for pay- 
ment; notice of dishonor; discharge of negotiable instruments. Drafts 
(bills of exchange), treated under the following heads: form and 
interpretation; acceptance; presentation for acceptance; protest; 
acceptance for honor; payment for honor; bills in a set. Promissory 
notes, bonds, checks and certificates of deposit treated under the fol- 
lowing heads : form and interpretation ; general provisions. 

(b) Negotiable instruments payable in securities. There will be 
considered : warehouse receipts, bills of lading and certificates of stock, 
the issue of, rights and obligations under, negotiation and transfer of. 

(c) Non-negotiable credit contracts. Book accounts, guaranty, 
and suretyship. W., 7 :30— 9 :30. 

[3. Law of Partnership and of Business Corporations.] The first 
half of the term will be given to the law of partnership, and the 
second half to the law of business corporations. The outline of the I 
course is as follows : 

(a) Partnership; what constitutes a partnership; classification 
and definition of partnership; contract of partnership; firm as entity; I 
firm name and good will; capital of firm; partnership property; rights 
and liabilities of partners among themselves ; rights and liabilities of 






FINANCE 263 

partners as to third persons; actions; dissolution; joint stock com- 
panies ; limited partnership. 

(b) Business corporations; definitions and legal status; forma- 
tion and organization; charter, code of regulations, and by-laws; 
directors and officers; capital stock and bonds; stockholders; 
legal aspect of corporate accounts ; dissolution ; consolidation ; reor- 
ganization. 

Omitted in 1913-14. 

FINANCE 

* 1. Banking. — The functions and methods of modern banks. 
There will be included a description of the organization and various 
departments of banks; national and state banks; savings banks and 
trust companies; discounts and deposits; the various forms of bank 
paper, drafts, certificates of deposit, letters of credit, and others; 
and foreign exchange. The leading banking systems will be compared 
and the problems of modern banking will be considered. M., 7 :30 — 9 :30. 

2. Investments. — A study of the fundamental principles under- 
lying the correct investment of funds : distribution of risk and selec- 
tion in accordance with requirements, involving a consideration of 
safety of principal and interest; convertibility; stability of market 
price; regularity of income; prospect of appreciation in value; con- 
venience and freedom from care, etc. 

The various kinds of investments will be described and their 
distinguishing characteristics compared : bonds, municipal, railroad, 
public service, corporation, irrigation, timber, and others; stocks, 
railroad, large and small corporation ; listed and unlisted securities ; 
real estate mortgages and real estate ; savings bank deposits ; and 
life insurance. Railroad and corporation reports will be analyzed 
from the investor's standpoint. 

The course will include also consideration of the functions of 
the dealers in investment securities; the underwriting houses and the 
stock brokers; the stock market, the mechanism of the stock 
exchange, speculation; the money market; and panics and crises in 
their relation to investments. Th., 7 :30— 9 :30. 

[3. Corporation Finance.] Methods of financing a corporation ; 
forms of securities employed; their issue and sale; watered stock; 
amortization ; the relation of shareholders, creditors, and the general 
public to corporation finance; the nature and purpose of state 
regulation. 

Omitted in 1913-14, 



264 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

INSURANCE 

During the academic year 1913-14, special lectures on insurance 
will be given as follows : 

History of Life Insurance 

Principles and Theory of Life Insurance 

Economic Value of Life Insurance 

Calculation of the Premium 

Life Insurance as a Protection and Investment 

Organization and Administration 

Medical Selection 

Legal Phases of Life Insurance 

Conservation as Applied to Life Insurance 

The Field and the Agent 

GERMAN, FRENCH, SPANISH 

Facilities will be provided for those desiring to secure a com- 
mercial knowledge of German, French, or Spanish. 






FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 
1913-1914 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The D. A. R. Fellowship in American History for 1913-14 was 
awarded to Margaret Beach Plimpton. 

The Hanna Fellowship in Physics for 1913-14 was awarded to 
Edward Joseph Lorenz. 

The Armstrong-Hunter Scholarship for 1913-14 was awarded to 
Helen Abigail Stanley. 

A scholarship in the Law School for 1913-14 was awarded to 
James Willett Pottenger. 

University scholarships for 1913-14 were awarded to the fol- 
lowing students in the Graduate School : 

William H. Dresch (Philosophy) 
Freda Gleason (Latin) 
Aubrey Highton (Physics) 
Elizabeth Hyndman (Education) 
Ruth Hyndman (Education) 
Leonora Neuffer (Chemistry) 
Mary L. Nute (Botany) 
M. Cannon Sneed (Chemistry) 

McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
Phi Beta Kappa 
The following students were elected to membership in the 
Phi Beta Kappa Honorary Fraternity: 

Helen Stanley Katherine Goodman 

Artie Hartshorn Bertha Baehr 

Leonora Neuffer Grace Naomi Matthews 

Raymond Werner Edith Kirschner 

Pauline Haffner Marius Rasinsky 

Sidney Tedesche Grace Lillian Ruggles 

Mary Louise Nute Herbert Shaffer 

Scholarships 

The Comegys Scholarship of fifty dollars was awarded to 
Walter Alan Mclntire. 

The McMicken Honorary Scholarships were awarded to the 
following Seniors: 

Madeline Keiser Simon Cohen 

Estelle Hunt Grace Jones 

Edna O'Brien Louis Mischkind 



266 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

The twelve Thorns Honorary Scholarships were awarded to 
the following six Juniors : 

Helen Kinsey Miriam Urbansky 

Frederick Franz Jessie Getzendanner 

Norma Pahren Ethel Winston 

And to the following six Sophomores : 

Mary Mudge Dorothy Anderson 

Ethel Goldsmith Lucile Saurer 

Thomas Caie Naomi Rasinsky 

The Julius Fleischmann Scholarships in the University, offered 
for the year 1913-14, to the members of the graduating classes in 
the accredited schools of the University outside of Cincinnati, were 
awarded as follows : 

Dorothy Breuer, 2140 Williams Ave., Norwood, O. 

Harriette Case, 113 E. Eighth St., Covington, Ky. 

Ralph A. Carmichael, Loveland, O. 

Elizabeth May Clark, Ohio Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Jessie Ines Cosbey, Rossmoyne, O. 

Karl Hetsch, 626 York St., Newport, Ky. 

Katherine Hickok, 47 W. Fourth St., Covington, Ky. 

William Koehler, 1202 Central Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Esther Ranz, Blue Ash, O. 

Clara Belle Riddle, Hamilton, O. 

Mary Agnes Straub, 325 Retreat St., Bellevue, Ky. 

Marcus Taylor, 1600 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Marguerite Tierney, 233 Burns Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Louise Warren, 630 Third St., Newport, Ky. 

The Optimist Club Scholarships, offered for the year 1913-14, 
were awarded to the following students in the University: 
Oscar See, Blue Ash, O. 
Harold Frederic Richards, Dayton, Ky. 

The Union Bethel Scholarships in Social Science, offered for 
the year 1913-14, to four advanced students in the Department of 
Social Science, were awarded as follows : 

Chauncey H. Hand Neil Wright 

Earl Wagner Clinton Wunder 

Prizes 

The first Jones Prize of forty dollars for the best English 
oration was awarded to Marius Rasinsky. 



INTERNESHIPS AWARDED IN 1913 267 

The second Jones Prize of twenty dollars for the second best 
English oration was awarded to Sibyl Marjorie Heck. 

The Henry Hochstetter Prize in Chemistry, of the value of forty 
dollars, for the best graduating thesis in Chemistry, was awarded 
to Taylor W. Anstead. 

The Robert Patterson McKibbin Memorial Prize, a gold medal 
of the value of twenty-five dollars, was awarded to Robert Heuck. 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

(Ohio-Miami Medical College) 

The successful competitors in 1912-13 for places as resident 
physicians in hospitals were as follows: 

Cincinnati Hospital 

Charles E. Kiely Jacob C. Hutzelman 

Laurence A. Petty William L. Shannon 

Gilbert F. Thompson Edward Kuck 

Ellis R. Bader Robert P. Williams 

James S. Williams Ray Vaughen 

Edward Kennedy Clarence L. Hans 

Christ Hospital 
Arthur E. Koch 

Good Samaritan Hospital 
Harry W. Fitzpatrick Osa Hoerner 

Harry J. Hammond William J. Reuter 

Government Hospital, National Military Home 

Dayton, Ohio 

Webster F. Keller 

Jewish Hospital 
Howard R. Heckert Thomas W. Mahoney 

Harry M. Brown Verner T. Scott 

New York Polyclinic Medical School and Hospital 

New York City 

Joseph L. DeCourcy 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 
Covington, Ky. 
Charles E. Neal 



268 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

HOLDERS OF FELLOWSHIPS SINCE 1900 
Fellowships by Courtesy: 

Eliab Washburn Coy 1906-07 

Frederick Alwin King 1906-07 

Gordon Woods Thayer 1908-09 

Nathan Tovio Isaacs 1910-11 

Elliott Smith 1910-11 

D. A. R. Fellowship in American History : 

George Washington Johnson 1900-01 

Mabel Sara Carpenter 1901-02 

Alice McGuffey Morrill 1902-03, 1903-04 

Isaac J. Cox 1904-05 

Frank P. Goodwin 1905-06 

Helen L. Stein 1906-07 

Marie Paula Dickore 1907-08 

Henrietta Marie Mackzum 1909-10 

Lesley Henshaw 1910-11 

Elizabeth Thorndyke 1911-12 

Reginald C. McGrane 1912-13 

Margaret Beach Plimpton 1913-14 

Alliance Francaise Scholarship in French : 

Alice Wilson 1905-06 

Louis Selbert 1908-09 

Carrie May Perin 1909-10 

Colonial Dames Fellowship in Ohio Valley History : 

Theodore T. Belote 1906-07 

Earl Francis Colborn 1907-08 

Edgar Chew Sweeney 1908-09 

Paul Philip Rover 1909-10 

H. Dora Stecker 1910-11, 1911-12 

Hanna Fellowship in Physics: 

Robert E. Clyde Gowdy 1906-07, 1907-08, 1908-09 

Edward G. Rieman 1909-10, 1910-11 

Sebastian J. Mauchly 1911-12, 1912-13 

Edward Joseph Lorenz 1913-14 

Teaching Fellowship in Chemistry: 

Harry Shipley Fry 1901- 

Geoffrey Arthur Gray 1902- 

Ralph Ballard Dimmick 1906- 






HOLDERS OF FELLOWSHIPS SINCE 1900 269 

Teaching Fellowship in Economics : 

Eugene Ewald Agger 1901-02 

Teaching Fellowship in Biology : 

William O. Pauli 1902-03 

Mabel Spellmire 1903-04 

Joseph Hughes Shaw 1904-05 

Stanley Rossiter Benedict 1905-06 

Leon D. Peaslee 1907-08, 1908-09 

Louis W. Sauer 1907-08, 1908-09 

Vernon Lantis 1909-10, 1910-11 

Teaching Fellowship in Philosophy : 

Abraham Cronbach 1902-03 

Teaching Fellowship in English : 

Arthur James Kinsella 1903-04 

Elizabeth Merrill 1904-05 

Teaching Fellowship in Modern Languages : 

Elsie Metz 1903-04 

Teaching Fellowship in Physics : 

Harry L. Wieman and Earl Farnau 1903-04 

Herbert M. Hughes 1904-05 

Fellowship in Physics : 

William Bell Cartmel 1905-06 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1913 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Doctor of Philosophy 

Hecker, Charles H 2881 Williams Ave. 

Mauchly, Sebastian Jacob 2706 Eden Ave. 

Master of Arts 

Bentley, Louise Estelle 3471 Cornell Pi. 

Bergman, Erich Frank 20 E. Rochelle St. 

Braam, Maximilian 5805 Glenview Ave., College Hill 

Hoban, May Belle 1363 Myrtle Ave. 

James, Arthur Lebanon, O. 

Leist, Amelia 4012 Elsmere Ave., Norwood, O. 

Levinger, Lee Joseph 207 Hearne Ave. 

McGrane, Reginald Charles 422 Hopkins St. 

McMillan, Olive Gertrude 2840 Observatory Ave. 

March, Cora Wyoming, O. 

Metz, Elsie Lauretta 2648 Melrose Ave. 

Oskamp, Pearl C West Loveland Heights, O. 

Sanders, Ethel 2918 Montana Ave. 

Southgate, Virginia 2221 Nelson Ave. 

Van Pelt, Charlotte Ruth 6115 Navarre PI., Madisonville 

McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Bachelor of Arts 

Ahlers, Helen Gertrude 1301 California Ave., Bond Hill 

Baehr, Bertha Marie 3868 Oakley Ave. 

Bausch, Lillib Olive 1754 Brewster Ave. 

Becker, Marie 3831 Cass Ave. 

Bridge, Josiah 1325 Yarmouth Ave. 

Buehler, Edwin Charles 932 Ludlow Ave. 

Burns, Margherita Ormsby 1804 Laurel Ave., College Hill 

Caldwell, Dorothy 410 W. Eighth St. 

Caliman, William Moses 2618 Kemper Lane 

Cantor, Ethel 18 Landon Court 

Carter, Jennie Lillias North Bend Rd. 

Cloude, Helen Louise 2210 Kemper Lane 

Crissey, Lena Maude 1029 Wesley Ave. 

Daly, Margaret Mary 583 Grand Ave., Price Hill 

Davidson, Hugh Moyer Williamsburg, 0. 

Davis, Adolph Morris 345 Forest Ave. 

Davis, John Evan 530 Prospect PI. 

Dieckman, Elsa Pauline 2243 Spring Grove Ave. 

Edwards, Irene 2905 Woodburn Ave. 

Embshoff, Hilda 802 Delhi Ave. 

Fettweis, Martha Anna 107 E. University Ave. 

Fisher, Marion Eleanor 404 Crestline Ave., Price Hill 

Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Mary 1047 Considine Ave. 

Fox, Mary Agnes 4 St. Leger Flats 

Frank, Lucie Eugenia 3000 Reading Rd. 

Friason, Ethel Camille 1021 Foraker Ave. 



I 



DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1913 271 

Gehr, Mary Anna 540 Grand Ave. 

Gleason, Freda Louise 2005 Delaware Ave., Norwood, O. 

Goodman, Katharine Herbert 1551 Garrard St., Covington, Ky. 

Gruesser, Emily Caroline 3565 Trimble Ave. 

Haffner, Pauline Juliane 541 Howell Ave. 

Halben, Eleanor von der 3145 Bishop St. 

Halprin, Julius Newark, N. J. 

Hance, Robert Theodore 723 Freeman Ave. 

Hartlieb, Ruth Columbia 2465 W. McMicken Ave. 

Hartshorn, Artie Laurence 6115 Liberty Ave., Pleasant Ridge 

Heck, Sibyl Marjorie 3757 Darwin Ave. 

Heizer, Mary Elizabeth 2016 Hudson Ave., Norwood, O. 

Heuck, Robert 3336 Jefferson Ave. 

Keim, Edith Rose 3526 Bevis Ave., Evanston 

Kelly, Nina 1320 Burdette Ave. 

Kendall, Dorothy Carter 4 St. James PI. 

Kirschner, Edith Emma 5145 Main Ave., Norwood, O. 

Kleinschmidt, Emma Rapid Run Pike 

Koch, Adelaide Augustine 3217 Gilbert Ave. 

Krebs, Gertrude C 1612 Hoffner St. 

Lavell, Robert James 3005 Junietta Ave. 

Lindenlaub, Ella 345 Thrall Ave. 

Livingston, Sadie Etta Hill 1609 Baymiller St. 

London, Henriette 3579 Bogart Ave. 

Long, Charlotte Mae 3003 Hackberry St. 

Lorenz, Eleanor Mary North Bend Rd. 

Magnin, Edgar Fogel San Francisco, Ca!., and 857 Rockdale Ave. 

Marckworth, Olivia Marie. Ramona Ave., Westwood 

Mason, Mame Charlotte 2231 St. James Ave. 

Matthews, Grace Naomi 3531 Zumstein Ave. 

Mayerberg, Samuel Spier The Wilhelm 

Meador, Mildred 814 Considine Ave. 

Meininger, Freda Bernardina 1638 Pulte St. 

Meyer, Jacob Isa Oakland, Cal. 

Moorhaus, Olga Fredda 1900 Clarion Ave. 

Morrow, Isabella Greer ." 947 Chateau Ave. 

Neuffer, Leonora Lockland, O. 

Nute, Mary Louise 5 Marguerite Flats, Norwood, O. 

Patterson, Lulu Annette 1346 Edwards Rd. 

Peale, Corinne Wunder 1820 Freeman Ave. 

Plimpton, Margaret Beach 731 Grand Ave., Price Hill 

Poor, Elizabeth Beatrice 1787 Humboldt Ave. 

Pottenger, James Willett 1641 Laurel Ave. 

Pottenger, William Townley 1641 Laurel Ave. 

Ranshaw, Virginia Travis 1030 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

Rasinsky, Marius Maple and Harvey Aves. 

Rechtin, Loretta 3104 Gilbert Ave. 

Rickel, Gilbert John 2185 Harrison Ave. 

Rodgers, Hazel Marie 479 Considine Ave. 

Rouse, Gladys Louesa 2219 Ohio Ave. 

Ruggles, Lillian Grace 2132 St. James Ave. 

Schell, Robert Mercer 132 W. Ninth St. 

Schneider, Erma Lillian Robinson Rd., Pleasant Ridge, O. 

Seiwert, Joseph John 4000 Spring Grove Ave. 

Shaffer, Herbert 312 Straight St. 

Simon, Mary Emma 457 Considine Ave. 

Stanley, Helen Abigail 3576 Zumstein Ave. 



272 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Steinkamp, Edythe Henrietta 1627 Waverly Ave. 

Steward, Florence Marie 1852 Columbia Ave. 

Tedesche, Sidney 3433 Carthage Ave. 

Thomas, Mary Louise 2241 Cameron Ave., Norwood, O. 

Tracy, Kathleen Eugenia 532 Howell Ave. 

Trisler, Mabel Elizabeth Madisonville, O. 

Wachs, Stanley Eugene 235 Hosea Ave. 

Wait, Mary Ethel 4011 Columbia Ave. 

Walker, Jane Elizabeth 3712 Sachem Ave. 

Wartcki, Sarah Millie 815 Oak St. 

Weiss, Hiram Bertram 3314 Perkins Ave. 

Werner, Raymond Edmund 1053 Wesley Ave. 

Wiedemer, Lottie Becht 4821 Linden St., Norwood, O. 

Williams, Susie Pearl 3973 W. Belle PI., St. Louis, Mo. 

Zeller, Elsie May 3112 W. Eighth St., Price Hill 

THE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 
Bachelor of Arts in Education 

Lindsey, Helen M 1352 Grace Ave., Hyde Park 

Stewart, Marjorie 18 The Roslyn 

Teacher's Diploma 

In Elementary Education 

Ahlers, Helen Gertrude 1301 California Ave. 

Bausch, Lillie Olive 1754 Brewster Ave. 

Becker, Marie 3831 Cass Ave. 

Bernstein, Archibald 2863 Stanton Ave. 

Burns, Margherita Ormsby 1804 Laurel Ave., College Hill 

Caldwell, Dorothy 410 W. Eighth St. 

Caliman, William Moses 2618 Kemper Lane 

Canter, Ethel 18 Landon Court 

Cloude, Helen Louise 2210 Kemper Lane 

Daly, Margaret Mary 583 Grand Ave., Price Hill 

Dieckman, Elsa Pauline 2243 Spring Grove Ave. 

Edwards, Irene 2905 Woodburn Ave. 

Embshoff, Hilda 802 Delhi Ave. 

Fettweis, Martha Anna 107 E. University Ave. 

Fisher, Marion Eleanor 404 Crestline Ave., Price Hiil 

Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Mary 1047 Considine Ave. 

Friason, Ethel Camille 1021 Foraker Ave. 

G'ehr, Mary Anna 540 Grand Ave. 

Gruesser, Emily Caroline 3565 Trimble Ave. 

Haffner, Pauline Juliane 541 Howell Ave. 

Halben, Eleanor von der 3145 Bishop St. 

Hartlieb, Ruth Columbia 2465 W. McMicken Ave. 

Heck, Sibyl Marjorie 3757 Darwin Ave. 

Heizer, Mary Elizabeth 2016 Hudson Ave., Norwood, O. 

Keim, Edith Rose 3526 Bevis Ave., Evanston 

Kendall, Dorothy Carter 4 St. James PI. 

Kirschner, Edith Emma 5145 Main Ave., Norwood, O. 

Koch, Adelaide Augustine 3217 Gilbert Ave. 

Krebs, Gertrude C 1612 Hoffncr St. 

Lavell, Robert James 3005 Junietta Ave., Westwood 

Lindenlaub, Ella 345 Thrall Ave. 

Livingston, Sadie Etta Hill 1609 Baymiller St. 






DEGREES CONFERRED IN 1913 273 

London, Henriette 3579 Bogart Ave. 

Long, Charlotte Mae 3005 Hackberry St. 

Lorenz, Eleanor Mary E. North Bend Rd., College Hill 

Matthews, Grace Naomi 3531 Zumstein Ave., Hyde Park 

Meador, Mildred 814 Considine Ave., Price Hill 

Meininger, Freda Bernardina 1658 Pulte St. 

Morrow, Isabella Greer 947 Chateau Ave., Price Hill 

Patterson, Lulu Annette 1346 Edwards Rd. 

Peale, Corinne Wunder 1S20 Freeman Ave. 

Poor, Elizabeth Beatrice 1787 Humboldt Ave. 

Rattermann, Katherine 510 York St. 

Rechtin, Loretta 3104 Gilbert Ave. 

Rodgers, Hazel Marie 479 Considine Ave., Price Hill 

Ruggles, Lillian Grace 2132 St. James Ave. 

Schneider, Erna Lillian Robinson Rd., Pleasant Ridge 

Seiwert, Joseph John 4000 Spring Grove Ave. 

Steinkamp, Edythe Henrietta 1627 Waverly Ave. 

Tracy, Kathleen Eugenia 532 Howell Ave. 

Trisler, Mabel Elizabeth. .. .Cincinnati, Station M, R. F. D. 10, Madisonville 

Wait, Mary Ethel 4011 Columbia Ave. 

Walker, Jane Elizabeth 3712 Sachem Ave. 

Wartcki, Sarah Millie 815 Oak St. 

Williams, Susie Pearl 3973 W. Belle PL, St. Louis, Mo. 

Zeller, Elsie May 3112 W. Eighth St., Price Hill 

In Art 

Chace, May Lydia. 2610 Stratford Ave. 

Hildwein, Edna Flora 539 E. Liberty St. 

Hottendorf, Ida 810 Richmond St. 

Wharton, Edith A 325 Fourth Ave., Dayton, Ky. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
Bachelor of Chemical Engineering 

Batsner, Arthur Mills 238 Albany Ave. 

Bachelor of Civil Engineering 

Barr, Ingle Williams 1231 Grace Ave., Hyde Park 

Biedinger, John Robert 548 Ridgeway Ave. 

Buerger, Frederick Clarence 105 W. Charlton St. 

Goettle, Richard Joseph 622 Orient Ave., Winton PI. 

Witte, Russell Bennett 2627 Moorman Ave. 

Bachelor of Electrical Engineering 

Perry, Stanley 2319 Stratford Ave. 

Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering 

Jones, Rufus Bell 4349 Columbia Ave., Madisonville 

Chemical Engineer 

Anstead, Taylor William 908 Columbia St., Newport, Ky. 

Civil Engineer 

Leue, Conrad F Cincinnati, O. 

Electrical Engineer 

Brueggeman, John George Ill W. University Ave. 

Davis, Adolph H 837 Oak St. 

Nocka, Karl William Batesville, Ind. 



274 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Mechanical Engineer 

Bodenstein, William Edward 827 Ann St., Newport, Ky. 

Bkeitenbach, Herman John 28 Mulberry St. 

Colburn, Bethuel Vincent Jamestown, N. Y. 

Flohr, Ralph Charles 253 Van Voast Ave., Bellevue, Ky. 

Getz, Charles Howard Dayton, O. 

Haines, Philip Goble Portland, Ore. 

Haucic, Richard John 231 Fosdick St. 

Lytle, Charles Walter Wolcott, N. Y. 

Peaslee, Willetts 2340 Ohio Ave. 

Peets, Wilbur J Macomb, 111. 

Roehm, Erwin Grant 4268 Colerain Ave. 

Schneider, Joseph Herman Henderson, Ky. 

Tangeman, Walter W 2706 Eden Ave. 

Zugelter, George Emil 207 Eiliott Ave., Arlington Heights, O. 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
Doctor of Medicine 

Bader, Ellis Robert Hamilton, O. 

Brown, Henry Mollineaux New Vienna, O. 

DeCourcy, Joseph Luke 827 W. Eighth St. 

Fitzpatrick, Harry Watterson Somerset, Ky. 

Hammond, Harry Joseph 23 Walden Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Hans, Clarence Louis 2000 Western Ave. 

Heckert, Howard Ray Cairo, W. Va. 

Hoerner, Osa Lewisburg, O. 

Hutzelman, Jacob Casper Hamilton, O. 

Keller, Webster Fels 3102 Jefferson Ave. 

Kennedy, Edward 1821 Kinney Ave. 

Kiely, Charles Edward 420 Broadway 

Koch, Arthur E 810 York St., Newport, Ky. 

Kuck, Edward 1727 Highland Ave. 

Mahoney, Thomas William 235 E. North St., Springfield, O. 

Neal, Charles E Covington, Ky. 

Petty, Laurence Arthur Charleston, W. Va. 

Reuter, William James North Bend Rd., Mt. Airy, O. 

Scott, Verner Trenary Manchester, O. 

Shannon, William Lawrence 925 Saratoga St., Newport, Ky. 

Smith, Warde Byron Austin, O. 

Thompson, Gilbert Frank 603 Lexington Ave., Newport, Ky. 

VanLue, Joyce W Gettysburg, O. 

Vaughen, Ray West Union, O. 

Williams, James Stanley Mercerville, O. 

Williams, Robert Parvin Harrisburg, Pa. 

SUMMARY OF GRADUATES, JUNE, 1913 

Graduate School 17 

McMicken College of Liberal Arts 98 

College for Teachers 62 

College of Engineering 27 

College of Medicine 26 



Total 230 

Twice Counted (taking two degrees) 54 



Net total 1'6 






REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The D. A. R. Fellow in American History 

Plimpton, Margaret Beach (History) 731 Grand Ave., Price Hill 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 

The Hanna Fellow in Physics 

Lorenz, Edward Joseph (Physics) 633 W. McMicken Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1911; A. M., Ibid, 1912 

University Scholars 

Dresch, William Hauck (Philosophy) Lynchburg, O. 

A. B., Ohio Northern University, 1909; B. D., Garrett Bible Institute, 1911 
Gleason, Freda (Romance Languages) 2005 Delaware Ave., Norwood, O. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Highton, Aubrey H. (Physics) 604 Greenup St., Covington, Ky. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 
Hyndman, Elizabeth (Education) 324 Mills Ave., Wyoming, O. 

A. B., Leland Stanford Junior University, 1913 
Hyndman, Ruth (Education) 324 Mills Ave., Wyoming, O. 

A. B., University of Illinois, 1908 
Neuffer, Leonora (Chemistry) Lockland, O. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Nute, Mary Louise (Biology) The Marguerite, Norwood, O. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 

Graduate Students 

Albray, Sarah Abbie (History) 2629 Alms PI. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1899 
Allen, Helen Jeanette (Education) 2404 Auburn Ave. 

A. B., Vassar College, 1913 
Allgaier, Jennie S. (English) 2921 Werk Rd., Westwood 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1901; A. M., Ibid, 1904 
Andrew, Agnes Knox (Education) 3600 Shaw Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1903 
Andriessen, Emma (German) 116 Parker St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1908; A. M., Ibid, 1912 
Arundel, Mary E. (Geology) 332 Ellen St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 
Aulick, Edwin C. (Latin) 18 E. Seventh St. 

A. B., University of Kentucky, 1891, 
Baker, Esther Mary (Romance Languages) 3510 Zinsle Ave., Kennedy 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 
Bankard, Mrs. Florence C. (Philosophy) The Clermont 

A. B., Goucher College, 1903; A. M., University of Cincinnati, 1912 
Baumann, George (English) 2549 Fairview Ave. 

A. B., University of Chicago, 1910 



276 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Becker, Marie (Mathematics) 3831 Cass Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Bergman, Erich F. (English) 20 E. Rochelle St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1908; A. M., Ibid, 1913 
Bernstein, Archibald (Romance Languages) 2863 Stanton Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910; A. M., Ibid, 1912 
Bernstein, Doris (English) 2863 Stanton Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 

Bigler, Elberta (English) 217 Bosley St. 

B. L., University of Cincinnati, 1898 

Bingman, Carl Wilson (Education) 914 Hawthorne St. 

B. Ped., Ohio University, 1911 
Bloch, Emily Martha (Greek) 70 Albany PI. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1887 
Bogle, Elizabeth (Latin) 2313 Wheeler St. 

A. B., Western College, 190S 
Braam, Maximilian (German) 5805 Glenview Ave., College Hill 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1906; A. M., Ibid, 1913 
Braun, Emma Lucy (Biology) , 2702 May St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910; A. M., Ibid, 1913 
Bridge, Josiah (Geology) 1325 Yarmouth Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Brown, Janet Beggs (Education) 183 Grand Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Burns, Carolyn Ormsby (Mathematics) College Hill 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1907; A. M., Ibid, 1908 
Burns, Helen Ormsby (Physics) 1804 Larch Ave., College Hill 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Butterfield, Emmett Earle (Mathematics) Hamilton, O. 

Ph. B., Mt. Union-Scio, 1911 
Cantor, Ethel (English) 18 Landon Court 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 

Cockerill, M. Almeda (English) 20 N. Tenth St., Washington Court House 

B. L., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1907 

Conant, Roger Lewis (Economics) 5709 Arnsby PI. 

A. B., Columbia University, 1895; A. M., University of Cincinnati, 1912 
Conner, Marjorie Miller (History) 711 Woodbine Ave., Hartwell 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1911 
Cravens, Frances O. (English) The Roanoke 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1908 
Crouch, Stephen D. (Philosophy) 2514 Hackberry St. 

A. B., Trinity College, Texas, 1911 
Davidson, Charles Lowell (Education) 3 Leroy Court 

A. B., Yale University, 1907 
Deutsch, Edith R. (German) 3600 Wilson Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 
Dubois, Clovis Pringle (Philosophy) Reeves PI. 

A. B., Lebanon University, 1902; Lane Seminary, 1905 
Egartner, Zachaeus Thomas (Philosophy) 1914 Harrison Ave. 

New College, Edinburgh 
Elliott, Clifford W. (History) 20 N. Tenth St., Hamilton, O. 

A. B., Miami University, 1912 
Embshoff, Hilda (Mathematics) 802 Delhi Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 

Esslinger, Edwin W. (Chemistry) 2331 Wheeler St. 

B. S., University of Michigan, 1907; A. M., Johns Hopkins University, 1912 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 277 

Evans, William Anders (Education) Newport, Ky. 

A. B., Denison University, 1906 

Ficken, Richard Oscar (German) Moore's Hill, Ind. 

B. S., Moore's Hill, 1906 

Files, Ellery K. (Chemistry) 3411 Clifton Ave. 

B. S., Nebraska Wesleyan University, 1908; A. M., University of Nebraska, 
1910 
Fink, Clara (Biology) Lockland, O. 

A. B., Miami University, 1910 
Foster, Jr., Joseph Buck (Philosophy) Mt. Washington 

A. B., Delaware College, 1906 
Foster, Samuel Ernest (English) Lane Seminary 

A. B., Cedarville College, 1913 
Frank, Lucie (English) 3000 Reading Rd. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Furness, Mary Baker (English) The Barclay 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 
Gibson, Martha Jane (Greek) Pleasant Ridge 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Gilbert, Mary Alice (English) 4408 Erie Ave. 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1911 
Goldsmith, Adele (English) 3148 Harvey Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1906 
Gosling, Thomas Warrington (Education) 559 Evanswood PI. 

A. B., Yale University, 1891,; A. M., Ibid, 190!,; Ph. D., University of Cin- 
cinnati, 1911 
Halliday, Clifford (Miss) (German) College Hill 

A. B., Ohio State University, 1913 
Hance, Robert Theodore (Biology) 723 Freeman Ave. 

A. B„ University of Cincinnati, 1913 

Hawley, Mrs. Eleanor C. (English) 2 Hedgerow Lane 

B. S., St. Lawrence University, 1902 

Heck, Jean Olive (English) 3757 Darwin Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1907; A. M., Ibid, 1908 
Heck, Sibyl M. (English) 3757 Darwin Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Heckler, Ruby May K. (Education) 219 Bodman Ave. 

A. B., Leland Stanford Junior University, 1913 
Heisel, Emma Elizabeth (Education) 308 Shillito St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1901 
Heller, James Gutheim (Philosophy) 315 Hearne Ave. 

A. B., Tulane University, 1912 
Henshaw, Lesley (History) 1928 Bigelow St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910; A. M., Ibid, 1911 
Hirsch, Effie Wyler (English) 4015 Beechwood Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1900 
Hoban, May Belle (English) 1363 Myrtle Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1903; A. M., Ibid, 1913 
Hoeck, Louis George (Philosophy) 2822 Highland Ave. 

Glasgow University and Nezv Church Theological Seminary, Cambridge, Mass., 
189k 
Hoffheimer, Edith (Social Science) The Madrid 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Homburg, Emil (Chemistry) 104 W. Clifton Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1902; A. M., Ibid, 1909 
FIowe, Clayton Morgan (Mathematics) 508 Riddle Rd. 

A. B., Oberlin College, 1910 



278 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Howell, Sara Jean {History) 2611 Ashland Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1900 
Hubbard, Edgar (English) 304 Broadway 

A. B., Trinity College, Texas, 1913 

Hunter, Florence (Latin) 715 Woodbine Ave., Hartwel! 

B. L., Ohio Wesleyan University, 1899 

Ihrig, Roscoe M. (German) 233 Hearne Ave. 

Ph. B., Wooster University, 1901; Ph. M., University of Chicago, 1909 
Isaacs, Raphael (Biology) 3552 Bogart Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1911; A. M., Ibid, 1912 
Isaacs, Schachne (Psychology) 3552 Bogart Ave. 

A. B„ University of Cincinnati, 1910; A. M., Ibid, 1912 
James, Arthur (Psychology) Lebanon, O. 

A. B., Lebanon University, 1911; A. M., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Kendall, Dorothy C. (English) 4 St. James P!. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 

Kiel, Anna (German) 2400 E. Montana Ave. 

B. S., New York University, 1912 

Kindle, Joseph H. (Mathematics) 2706 Eden Ave. 

A. B., Ohio State University, 1905; A. M., Ibid, 1907 
King, Robert Lee (English) Lane Seminary 

A. B., Arkansas Cumberland University, 1913 
Koehler, Katherine Louise (English) 2807 Bellevue Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1907 
Kohnky, Emma (English) Cor. Crown St. and Essex Pi. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1909; A. M., Ibid, 1911 
Kreimer, Edith (Romance Languages) Mooney Ave., Hyde Park 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1909; A. M., Ibid, 1911 
Krim, Isidore Abraham (Philosophy) 369 Howell Ave. 

A. B„ Oskaloosa College, 1912 
Kroger, Lucile Ida (English) 768 N. Crescent Ave. 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1911 
Lantis, Vernon (Biology) 238 McCormick PI. 

A. B., Miami University, 1909; A. M., University of Cincinnati, 1911 
Lawson, James Thomas (Philosophy) Rising Sun, Ind. 

A. B., Transylvania University, 1905 
Levi, Isabelle J. (Education) 3469 Trimble Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1909 
Livingston, Sadie (History) 1609 Baymiller St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Loebman, Elise Reis (English) 524 Hickman St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1909; A. M., Ibid, 1910 
Logan, Helen Goodman (English) 3492 Cheviot Ave. 

A. B., Wellesley College, 1913 
London, Henriette (German) 3579 Bogart Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Lorenz, Eleanor (Mathematics) E. North Bend Rd. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Lotspeich, Mrs. Helen Gibbons (English) 416 Resor Ave. 

Student, University of Leipsic, 1902; A. M., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Lotter, Frederick D. (Geology) 2425 McMicken Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Ludwich, Martin H. (German) 262 Albion PI. 

A. B., Konigsberg Gymnasium, 1899; A. M., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
MacMillan, David Wallace (Philosophy) 140 W. McMillan St 

A. B., University of Iowa, 1893 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1018-14 279 

Mack, Edward {Philosophy) Lane Seminary 

A. B., Davidson College, 1886; A, M., Ibid, 1887 
Madden, Fannie (Romance Languages) 6121 Clason St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1907 
Maltaner, Frank (Anatomy) Pleasant Ridge 

A. B., Leland Stanford Junior University, 1912; A. M., Ibid, 1913 
March, Cora (History) Wyoming, O. 

A. B., Wooster University, 1896; A. M., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Mauchly, Sebastian J. (Physics) 2706 Eden Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1911; Ph. D., Ibid, 1913 
Mayerberg, Samuel Spier (Social Science) The Wilhelm 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 
Metzger, Ruth Harriet (Social Science) 516 Hickman Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1911; A. M., Ibid, 1912 
Morris, James Westley (Political Science) 15 E. Eighth St. 

A. B., Miami University, 1912 
Morris, Lucile (Philosophy) 2846 Harrison Ave. 

A. B., Welle sley College, 1913 
Murray, Alma Darst (English) 502 Clinton St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1909 
Nagel, Laura Henriette (English) 2932 Montana Ave. 

A. B., Welle sley College, 1913 
Nicholson, Arch H. (English) Lane Seminary 

A. B., Arkansas Cumberland University, 1913 
Nippert, Eleanore C. (German) The Laurel 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1903 
Oesper, Ralph Edward (Chemistry) 2559 Fairview Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1908; A. M., Ibid, 1909 
Oskamp, Pearl C. (Philosophy) ' West Loveland Heights, O. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Palmer, Mrs. Florence Prather (English) 33 E. McMillan St. 

A. B., Vassar College, 1908 

Parker, Mrs. Harriet W. L. (Philosophy) 2 Glen Armand St. 

B. L., Bucknell University, 189^; A. M., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Patterson, Lulu Annette (Political Science) . . . .1346 Edwards Rd., Hyde Park 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Perin, Carrie M. (Romance Languages) ....... .4613 Central Ave., Madisonville 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Phipps, Jessie (Romance Languages) 506 Boal St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1908 
Pierce, Rose P. (Latin) 2330 Robertson St., Norwood, O. 

A. B., Miami University, 1912 
Porter, Christine (Philosophy) Erie and Zumstein Aves. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Raitt, Anna Hall (Biology) 1875 Fairfax Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1911; A. M., Ibid, 1912 
Reed, Samuel Richard (English) Lane Seminary 

A. B., Arkansas Cumberland University, 1913 
Rickel, Gilbert John (Mathematics) 2185 Harrison Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Rosin, Amy (Romance Languages) 727 E. Ridgeway Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 190!f 

Rounds, Charles Rufus (Education) 6108 Epworth St.. Madisonville 

B. S., Ohio University, 1913 

Rue, Alvin Owsley (English) Lane Seminary 

B. L., Trinity College, Texas, 1913 



280 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Sanders, Ethel {Mathematics) 2918 Montana Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1907; A. M., Ibid, 1913 
Sarasohn, Israel Joshua (Philosophy) 369 Howell Ave. 

A. B., Clark University, 1912 
Schneider, Erma Lillian (Philosophy) Pleasant Ridge 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1918 
Sckutzkwer, Marie (German) 3434 Lyleburn PL 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1909 
Sears, Isabel (Education) Glendale, O. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1905 
Shaffer, Lucy Kennedy (German) 2260 Park Ave. 

A. B., Smith College, 1908 
Slutz, Earl Ransom (Philosophy) 1840 Josephine St. 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan College, 1906; B. D., Drezv Theological Seminary, 1909 
Smith, Edward S. (Mathematics) 3826 Forest Ave., Norwood, O. 

M. S., University of Virginia, 1912 
Sneed, Mayce Cannon (Chemistry) 827 Maple Ave., Newport, Ky. 

A. B., Peabody College for Teachers, 1910 

Southgate, Virginia (Mathematics) 2221 Nelson Ave. 

B. S., Hanover College, 1892 

Spencer, William A. (Economics) 2916 Gilbert Ave. 

A. B., Northwestern University, 1910 
Stanley, Helen Abigail (English) 3576 Zumstein Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Steinau, Irene (Romance Languages) 3445 Mooney Ave., Hyde Park 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1909 
Stevenson, Paul Raymond (Psychology) 3228 Wold Ave. 

A. B., Park College, 1909 
Swan, Howard (English) 2510 Kemper Lane 

Diploma from London Technical College, 1881 
Tackenberg, Charles W. (English) 124 E. University Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1909 
Templeton, David Henry (Philosophy) Lane Seminary 

A. B., Trinity College, Texas, 1910 
Thomas, Mary Louise (Philosophy) 2241 Cameron Ave., Norwood, O. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Thorndyke, Elizabeth (History) 533 Camden Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1909; A. M., Ibid, 1912 
Van Slyck, Agnes E. (English) 328 Rockdale Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 

Van Winkle, Edwin C. (Education) 2930 Carthage Ave., Pleasant Ridge 

B. S. in Education, Ohio University, 1913 

Vickers, Helen Judith (Romance Languages) 3885 Reading Rd. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1908 
Von Stein, Alice E. (English) The Tevanagh 

A. B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1906 
Wagner, Stella M. (English) Cor. Ninth and Linn Sts. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1906 

Waite, Mary Gloyd (Psychology) The Delmoor 

B. S., Columbia University, 1909 

Walker, Alfred Marshall (Education) 577 Considine Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1900 
Wallace, Adlai Grover (Philosophy) Lane Seminary 

A. B., Arkansas Cumberland University, 1913 

Walls, Callie King (History) 2706 Eden Ave. 

B. S., Ohio University, 1912 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 281 

Ward, Bertha Evans (English) 6 Lane Seminary 

A. B., University of Chicago, 1912 
Wartcki, Sarah M. (English) 815 Oak St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Werner, Louis F. (Chemistry) 914 Oak St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 

White, John W. (Philosophy) Lane Seminary 

B. L., Trinity College, Texas, 1910 

Whitfield, Mary Dunn (English) 6028 Oak Ave., College Hill 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1910 
Wiedemer, Lottie (Education) 4821 Linden St., Norwood, O. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 
Williams, Cora (Biology) 717 Center St., Bellevue, Ky. 

M. S., University of Kentucky, 1903 
Woellner, Fredric (Education) 1617 Dudley St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1912 

Yancey, Robert Lee (Education) 36 W. Tenth St., Covington, Ky. 

A. B., Fisk University, 1889 
Zeller, Elsie M. (English) 729 Considine Ave. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1913 

McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Seniors 

Abrams, Samuel Joshua New York City, and 515 W. Ridgeway Ave. 

Ackerson, Estelle 307 Grove Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Bardes, Eugenia Catherine 128 W. McMillan St. 

Barrett, Oscar Slack 2303 Grandview Ave. 

Bolan, Bessie Margaret 22 E. Eighth St., Covington, Ky. 

Brumleve, Camille 123 Hosea St. 

Cantor, Hyman Bernard Buffalo, N. Y., and 1639 Clayton St. 

Clark, Hazel June 3243 Epworth Ave., Westwood 

Cohen, Simon Baltimore, Md., and 3589 Wilson Ave. 

Cowell, Sarah Jane 3015 Woodburn Ave. 

Cummins, Mary Dorothy 3453 Cornell PI. 

Dabney, Katherine Brent 1 The Romaine 

D' Amour, Martha Paula 7 The Eistun 

D'Arcy, Frances Elizabeth 454 E. Fifth St. 

Davis, Marguerite 235 Albion PI. 

Dean, Adelaide 826 Liberty St. 

Dones, Elisabeth Jane 5915 Sierra St., Madisonville 

Elhoff, Edna Amanda 3251 Vine St. 

Eppinger, Jeanette 2242 Vine St. 

Fay, Sarah Helen 325 Reiiiy Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Forthman, William 3033 Percy Ave. 

Freehof, Solomon Bennett, Washington, D. C, and S. E. Cor. Highland and 

McMillan Sts. 

Geoghegan, Marguerite 2108 Fulton Ave. 

Gilbert, Grace M 328 Albany Ave. 

Goodhart, Sadie Isabel 506 Hale Ave. 

Grodsky, David Hyman 207 Forest Ave. 

Gup, Samuel Marcus Mobile, Ala., and Flat P, The Wilhelm 

Hand, Chauncey Harris 2558 Eden Ave. 

Hoffman, Julius Joseph 3245 Bishop St. 

Hunt, Estelle Augusta 3344 Whitfield Ave. 

Inskeep, Harold Elwood 1328 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 



282 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Jacobs, Frederick Rudolph 1266 Iliff Ave. 

Jenkins, Ruth Le Marian 839 Washington Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Jones, Arthur David Cleves, O., and 3447 Jefferson Ave. 

Jones, Grace Elizabeth 2215 Cameron Ave., Norwood, O. 

Joslin, Florence 514 Camden Ave. 

Kautz, Mary Kathryn 1209 Walnut St. 

Keiser, Madeline Henrietta 245 McCormick PI. 

Krehbiel, Marie 328 McGregor Ave. 

Le Clere, John Burk 2256 Beechmont Ave., Mt. Washington 

Linnard, Elizabeth Charlotte 2550 N. Ingleside PI. 

Lippert, Otto Carl Ferdinand 1601 Freeman Ave. 

Loeb, Martha 829 Rockdale Ave. 

Louis, Irene Lucile 420 Elizabeth St. 

Ludwig, Lowell Hobart 1011 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

McIntire, Walter Alan .2318 Williams Ave., Norwood, O. 

McKee, Florence Louise 2201 Nelson Ave. 

Mihalovitch, Amy Fletcher Kasota and Delaware Aves. 

Miller, Grace Eva Highland and Beech Aves. 

Mischkind, Louis Arthur Brooklyn, N. Y., and 369 Howell Ave. 

Mombach, Blanche Althof 70 Albany Ave. 

Montgomery, Charlotte F 2325 Maryland Ave. 

Neave, Arthur Stuart 461 Considine Ave. 

O'Brien, Edna 2721 Woodburn Ave. 

O'Hara, Etta Marie 3047 Hackberry St. 

Orth, Helen 1925 Crown Ave., Norwood, O. 

Page, Mary Katherine 1344 Locust St. 

Phillips, Annetta Bodman Ave. and Young St. 

Phillips, Katherine 2525 Gilbert Ave. 

Rabenstein, Ruth Margherita 3429 Boudinot Ave. 

Robinson, Burton Emmal 3119 Imperial Ave. 

Rosen, Jerome 515 Ridgeway Ave. 

Scheuer, Irma 1522 Blair Ave. 

Seaman, Ruth Gordon 2312 Harper Ave., Norwood, O. 

See, Oscar Franklin Blue Ash, O. 

Sherwood, Evelyn Dallas 2329 Ashland Ave. 

Silver, Abraham Hillel. New York City, and 1358 Burdette Ave. 

Silver, Maxwell ISew York City, and 1358 Burdette Ave. 

Simon, Mary Emma 457 Considine Ave. 

Stansbury, Charles Bertram 272 McCormick PI. 

Stephens, Alice Virginia 2238 Nelson Ave. 

Steiss, Lillian Esther 2327 Burnet Ave. 

Struke, Norma Louise 3334 Jefferson Ave. 

Suer, Werner John 2352 Harper Ave., Norwood, O. 

Tarshish, Jacob 3158 Harvey Ave. 

Tedtmann, Martha Florence 414 Betts St. 

Thiesing, Catherine Marie 3019 Bathgate St. 

Van Tyne, Elizabeth Lucy 212 Chelsea PI., Delhi 

Wagner, Earl William 1114 Draper St. 

Whallon, Mary Roberta 1532 Chase Ave. 

Wilfert, Elsie 358 Bryant Ave. 

Willey, Ruth Magdalen 3453 Whitfield Ave. 

Wissel, Clara Anna Sta. K, Mt. Airy, O. 

Witham, Marie Alis 3711 Morris PI. 

Wolfrom, Gertrude Marie 201 Maine Ave., Elmwood PI., O. 

Wright, Neii The Delmoor 

Wunder, Clinton 1640 Pullan Ave. 









REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 283 

Juniors 

Ackret, Max Conrad 3264 McHenry Ave. 

Ballentine, Clara L 4722 Ward St., Madisonville 

Bauer, Bessie May Pleasant Ridge, O. 

Baum, Hilda Christina 3130 Fairfax Ave. 

Belsinger, Ralph Edward 804 Grand Ave. 

Beschorman, Katherine Marie 6546 Montgomery Rd., Norwood, O. 

Bettman, Louise 3739 Reading Rd. 

Blank, Laura 1048 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Bridge, Agnes Hill 1325 Yarmouth Ave., Bond Hill 

Brown, Karline Meyerfield 510 Hale Ave. 

Burgoyne, Margaret 19 The Roanoke 

Caldwell, Genevieve 828 Beecher St. 

Card, Lorna Doone = . Silverton, O. 

Cellarius, Mary Elizabeth Forest and Hudson Aves., Norwood, O. 

Claassen, Ella Anna 2723 Scioto St. 

Cook, Stanley E 116 Huntington PI. 

Cornuelle, Herbert Cumming 6400 Desmond St., Madisonville 

Cornuelle, Ralph Dudley 6400 Desmond St., Madisonville 

Crockett, Helen Lael 304 Broadway 

Crozier, Helen Edith 8 The Glenwood, College Hill 

Dearness, Donald Frederick 2654 Harrison Ave. 

Devou, Margaret Louise Pleasant Ridge 

Dieckmann, Alma Sophie 2243 Spring Grove Ave. 

Dieringer, Stella Marie 3901 Dickson Ave. 

Downer, Jr., John 3722 Woodland Ave., Hyde Park 

Drucker, Fannie Nathalie 3460 Knott Ave. 

Dury, Florence 529 W. Ridgeway Ave. 

Farrar, Dorothy Davis 4018 Thirtieth St., Oakley 

Fillmore, Annie Louise 2254 Park Ave., Norwood, O. 

Fischbach, Veronica M 1604 Sycamore St. 

Foote, Helen Allee 1773 Humboldt Ave. 

Foote, Katherine Cornealia 1773 Humboldt Ave. 

Francis, Flora L 3432 Hazelwood Ave. 

Franz, Frederic William 219 Wade St. 

Friedman, Benjamin New York City, and 3455 Whitfield Ave. 

Geiger, Ruth Maria 1330 Bremen St. 

Geohegan, Kenneth Price .820 Mt. Hope Rd. 

Gerling, Matilda 248 Loraine Ave. 

Getzendanner, Jessie Tumy 4540 Erie Ave. 

Gibson, Roberta Moore 2224 Kemper Lane 

Gordon, Arthur Wentworth 2210 Ohio Ave. 

Grace, Loretta Angela 1912 Colerain Ave. 

Halben, Matilda von der 3145 Bishop St. 

Hays, Lenore Flora 207 Albany Ave. 

Hoffmann, Clara Eva 2908 Urwiler Ave., Westwood 

Howland, Harriet Elise 2365 Kemper Lane 

Jokers, Ethel 3556 Burch Ave., Hyde Park 

Joseph, Ruth Bloch 353 Hearne Ave. 

Keim, Helen Elizabeth 3526 Bevis Ave. 

Keller, Ruth Haskell 4700 dickering Ave. 

Kohler, Henry C 706 W. Eighth St. 

Krouse, Katherine Kaichen 274 Helen St. 

Krucker, Elsie Louise 1432 E. McMillan St. 

Kyte, Marguerite Louise 3430 Berry Ave. 

Lally, Ella May 4706 Central Ave., Madisonville 



284 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Langenheim, Norma Miriam 1627 Sycamore St. 

Lazaron, Bertha 2452 Highland Ave. 

Leibert, Julius Louisville, Ky., and 2372 Stratford Ave. 

Lyon, Norman Morais 627 Rockdale Ave. 

Mann, Louise 3540 Zumstein Ave., Hyde Park 

Molony, Iphigene Helen Hamilton Ave., College Hill 

Morgan, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth The Roanoke 

Murdoch, Ruth Gertrude 3414 Osage Ave., Price Hill 

Musekamp, Freda Elizabeth 3919 Harrison Ave. 

Myers, Agnes Pauline 3326 Fairfield Ave. 

Nocka, Ruth Magdalene. 4810 Wesley Ave., Norwood, O. 

Otten, Freda 3016 Scioto St. 

Pahren, Norma 382 Terrace Ave. 

Phillips, Paul 1424 E. McMillan St. 

Pociey, Josephine Violet 1722 Hewitt Ave. 

Richardson, Ruth Katharine 2632 Kemper Lane 

Rolle, Clifford Jay 3803 Glenway Ave. 

Ryan, Ruth 3207 Mozart Ave. 

Schradin, William 2540 Park Ave. 

Schroeder, Esther Lydia 425 Ridgeway Ave. 

Schultz, Gladys Louise 1053 Richwood Ave. 

Scovill, Dorothea Haven Cor. Bodman and Young Sts. 

Serodino, Madolin Marie 2223 Cameron Ave., Norwood, O. 

Sherike, Alice Louise 430 E. Liberty St. 

Snabley, Victorine Mary 630 Neave St. 

Snyder, John Wesley 1321 E. Third St. 

Stickney, Gertrude Clara 709 Longview Ave., Carthage 

Taylor, Helen Catherine 3130 Harvey Ave. 

Taylor, Iona May Wathen 1620 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Taylor, Jean Kimball Glendale, O. 

Toothman, Madolene Marguerite 4602 Central Ave., Madisonville 

Tracy, Margaret Anthony 532 Howell Ave. 

Urbansky, Miriam Belle 431 Forest Ave. 

Venning, Katharine Shepherd 3204 Bishop St. 

Volkert, Esther Florence 3502 Stacey Ave. 

Wachtel, Irma 3463 Harvey Ave. 

Wagner, Harold Harr 1114 Draper St. 

Waldman, Bessie 5835 Hamilton Ave., College Hill 

Wilkinson, Ruth Stafford 1055 Richwood Ave. 

Wilkinson, Warren Hager Sterling Hotel 

Williams, Sophia Maurice 954 Locust St. 

Winston, Ethel Forbes 8 Oak Ave., Hartwell 

Winston, Mattie 959 Hatch St. 

Woodson, Neola Estella 2722 Ashland Ave. 

Wuest, Alma Marie 158 W. McMillan St. 

Sophomores 

Acomb, Margaret Janet 6103 Liberty St., Pleasant Ridge 

Anderson, Dorothy 4749 Winton Rd. 

Appel, Jeannette 4511 Homer Ave., Madisonville 

Baehr, Jr., Leonard Kasper 3868 Oakley Ave. 

Beitzel, Anne Harriet 2316 Neison Ave. 

Benson, Pauline Elizabeth 3028 Hackberry St. 

Benzinger, Martin Richard Oakland, Cal., and 2915 Auburn Ave. 

Bergmeier, Edwin Herman 2415 W. Clifton Ave. 

Biddle, Virginia Temple S61 Lexington Ave. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 285 

Bleier, Coralie 3460 Knott Ave. 

Brand, Lester William 14 W. Charlton St. 

Brill, Walter Henry 3930 Huston Ave., Norwood, O. 

Brooks, Gertrude Wilder 1455 Tecoma Ave., College Hill 

Brown, Helen Edmunds 2215 Washington Ave., Norwood, O. 

Brown, Helen Marie 2717 Cleinview Ave. 

Caie, Thomas Joplin 435 Riddle Rd. 

Chambers, Enolia Irene 3182 McHenry Ave. 

Claassen, Harry Louis 2723 Scioto St. 

Clark, Frederick Roy W r illiamstown, Ky. 

Cline, Alfreda Buchanan 3752 Isabella Ave., Hyde Park 

Cook, Jerome H The Wilhelm 

Cooper, Lois Belle 1525 Lincoln Ave. 

Cramer, Helen Avenue 1564 Glen Parker Ave. 

Curtin, Angela Marie 2411 Ashland Ave. 

Daniels, Verna Carolyn 120 Calhoun St. 

Davis, Edward Philadelphia, Pa., and 409 Union St. 

Davis, Johanna Sommerfield 347 Forest Ave. 

Dinkelaker, Selma Ella Howland PI. 

Ewald, Elsa Louise 2612 Fenton Ave. 

Fay, Genevieve 325 Reilley Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Fels, Cora Ingerbar 3091 Beekman St. 

Felter, Dorah Helen 1728 Chase Ave. 

Finkelstein, Joseph Dayton, O., and 409 Union St. 

Fischbach, Victor William Newport, Ky., and McCormick PI. 

Franklin, John Harcourt 2006 Clarion Ave. 

Gibbons, Martha Belle North Bend Rd., College Hill 

Goldsmith, Ethel Fanny 255 Hearne Ave. 

Grant, Bertha Loomis 3618 Woodford Rd., Kennedy 

Gregg, Jr., Ellis Bailey 565 Terrace Ave. 

Guhmann, Ruth Barbara 240 Hosea Ave. 

Harte, Dorothy Olive 5413 Wetzell Ave., Madisonville 

Hartman, Mabel Gertrude Mt. Washington 

Harvey, Frank Harris 2050 Symmes St. 

Henle, Claire 827 Oak St. 

Hill, Esther Annis Milford, O. 

Holsberg, Ethel Frances 260 Ehrman Ave. 

Hoppe, Henry Herman 1820 Dexter Ave. 

Hyde, Bertha May 814 Lincoln Ave. 

Isaacs, Nesha 3552 Bogart Ave. 

James, Edward Murdock 310 Oak St. 

Johnston, Ruth Jeannette 1719 Hewitt Ave. 

Jones, Frances Louise 4349 Columbia Ave., Madisonville 

Joseph, David Berman 3010 Melrose Ave. 

Kahn, Marie B 3975 Beechwood Ave. 

Kaplan, Samuel Shammai 2812 Stanton Ave. 

Kemper, Elizabeth Shirley Lane Seminary. 

Kennedy, Jennie Killam 4223 Williamson PI. 

Koch, Herbert Frank 325 Hearne Ave. 

Kreimer, Albert George 2901 Erie Ave. 

La May, Ethel Roberta 5310 Ravenna St., Madisonville 

Levi, Ruth Mildred 812 Mann PI. 

Lindsley, Florence Elmore 4546 Edgewood Ave., Winton PI. 

Lyle, Alice Franklin 203 Wooiper Ave. 

Lynch, Mary Beatrice Hollister 225 Albion PI. 

Lyon, Philip Edmund 5505 Arnsby PL, Madisonville 

Lytle, Lawrence Roy 2064 Eastern Ave. 



286 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

McDonough, Ethel Helen Claypoole Ave., Price Hill 

McGregor, Anna Laura 3734 Oakley Ave. 

McNutt, Helen Grace 5654 Glenview Ave., College Hiil 

Macht, Wolfe Newburgh, N. Y., and 38 W. McMillan St. 

Martin, Anna Caroline 820 Beecher St. 

Martin, Edna Eugenie 820 Beecher St. 

Martin, Robert Scott Anna, O. 

Merz, Edna Margaret 3436 Cheviot Ave., Westwood 

Moorman, Thomas Aquin McMillan St. and Moorman Ave. 

Morten, Ruth Dunham 2015 Hudson Ave., Norwood, O. 

Mudge, Mary Rosalie 19 E. Eighth St., Covington, Ky. 

Nadel, Ernestine 833 Wade St. 

Nevitt, Edyth Leannah 1027 Wesley Ave. 

Nimmo, Edward A 6452 Lower River Rd. 

Oskamp, Elizabeth West Loveland Heights, O. 

Paul, Elvira Marcella 2364 Victor St. 

Perin, Rhoda Pearl 3631 Morris PI. 

Pfleger, Margaret Claire 3523 Clifton Ave. 

Pluckebaum, Dorothy Elizabeth 850 W. Fifth St. 

Porter, Nina 3450 Zumstein Ave. 

Rasinsky, Naomi 3416 Larona Ave. 

Reece, John Andrews 2318 Ashland Ave. 

Richards, Harold Frederic 413 Fifth Ave., Dayton, Ky. 

Richardson, Olive May 564 Delta Ave. 

Richmond, Harry Raymond 807 E. Ridgeway Ave. 

Rieman, Mary Ellen 501 E. Third St. 

Riesenberg, Alphonse Gerard 1029 Columbia St., Newport, Ky. 

Riffe, Laura Cassedy Eighteenth St. and Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

Robinson, Edward Stevens 15 The Crescent 

Rosenthal, Evelyn 991 Marion Ave. 

Rosenthal, Theresa Matilda 3666 Reading Rd. 

Rubel, Vere Lina 920 Burton Ave. 

Rucker, Margaret Clarke The Romaine 

Rypins, Frederick Israel 389 Howell Ave. 

Sanders, Adelaide Wilhelmine 1630 Sutter Ave., N. Fairmount 

Sauer, Alma Genevieve N. E. Cor. Central Ave. and Baymiller St. 

Saunders, Adlai Carlisle 845 Dayton St. 

Scheuermann, Alfred Arthur 2931 Jefferson Ave. 

Segel, Alexander 3600 Wilson Ave. 

Shaffer, Susan Lewis 2260 Park Ave. 

Shigley, Celestine Lida 843 Ridgeway Ave. 

Sibbald, Lucille Fay 1818 Fairfax Ave. 

Smith, Dorothy Gertrude 3787 Warsaw Ave. 

Spencer, Greta 167 Twain Ave., Sayler Park 

Stapleford, Abigail Dilworth 2640 Beekman St. 

Stern, Bernard Joseph Chicago, 111., and 3446 Wilson Ave. 

Stewart, Mary Isabella 1 Park PI., Mt. Auburn 

Stifel, Catherine Marie 3927 Colerain Ave. 

Straus, Florence Leahnore 3259 Fredonia Ave. 

Swineford, Helen Agnes 147 Elm St., Ludlow, Ky. 

Taylor, Cella Dayton. Ky. 

Thompson, Margaret Viola 400 Grand Ave. 

Toms, Alice Elizabeth 223 Calhoun St. 

Turner, Darwin Romanes 1074 W. Liberty St. 

Vaupel, Jean Clara 6024 Ferris Ave., College Ilil' 

Wager, Irene 3312 Columbia Ave. 

Walton, Clara Virginia 12 The Elstun 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 287 

Weatherby, Lorene Emma 1643 Vandalia St., Northside 

Weber, Marie Rosalie 2405 Norwood Ave., Norwood, O. 

Wessel, Harvey Edward New York City, and 809 Oak St. 

Wilder, Eugenia Elizabeth 3292 Montana Ave. 

Wirth, Margaret Louise 622 Prospect PI. 

Wright, Pearl Mae 2528 Chatham St. 

Freshmen 

Albert, Marion Caroline 5 The Romaine 

Allee, Alice Bragdon 2362 S. Elm St. 

Alms, Flora Freeda 3211 Glendora Ave. 

Appel, Elsie 4511 Homer Ave., Madisonville 

Bancroft, June Seifried The Glencoe Hotel 

Barasch, Nathan E Bayonne, N. J., and 369 Howell Ave. 

Barkley, Alma Burkart 3456 Liston Ave. 

Barnes, Vernon Cary Mt. Healthy, O. 

Barnett, Leland Meyer 1937 Hudson Ave., Norwood, O. 

Bauer, Paul Jacob 3605 Dawson Ave. 

Beaman, Lusanna June Sidney, O., and 3126 Durrell Ave. 

Beresford, Curtis Renshaw , 854 Lincoln Ave. 

Berry, David Everett Gallipolis, O., and 428 Eighth St. 

Bogen, Jessie 943 Summit Ave., Price Hill 

Boss, Ralph Langdon 4014 Main Ave., Norwood, O. 

Braunecker, Helen Augusta 246 Hosea Ave. 

Braunwart, Helen Louise 228 Shillito St. 

Breuer, Dorothy 2140 Williams Ave., Norwood, O. 

Brown, Elaine Caruth 937 E. McMillan St. 

Brown, Vida Chapman 937 E. McMillan St. 

Brueggeman, Harriet Sweeney 214 Dorchester Ave. 

Brunhoff, Sophie Wilhelmina 215 Forest Ave. 

Buckman, Alice 524 Prospect PI. 

Buckner, Sophie Harrison 808 Ludlow Ave. 

Buente, Sibyl 4253 Hamilton Ave. 

Bullerdick, Ellen Martha 4823 Hamilton Ave. 

Burgoyne, Helen Henderson 19 The Roanoke 

Busching, Howard Ellsworth 504 Walnut St., Elmwood PI., O. 

Buttenwieser, Paul 3208 Fredonia Ave. 

Butterfield, Bryant Sydney 4411 Erie Ave., Madisonville 

Caldwell, Tirzah 410 W. Eighth St. 

Cale, Howard Lamont Dublin, Ind., and 15 E. Seventh St. 

Cale, Willard George Dublin, Ind., and 15 E. Seventh St. 

Campbell, Margaret 726 Sturgis Ave., Hartwell, O. 

Card, Rotha Genevieve Silverton, O. 

Carmichael, Ralph Allison Loveland, O. 

Case, Henriette Sewell 113 E. Eighth St., Covington, Ky. 

Clark, Elizabeth May Ohio Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Clift, May 4028 Clifton Ave. 

Cohen, Nelson Jenn 2724 Mitchell Ave., Hyde Park 

Cord, Helen 1950 Hopkins Ave., Norwood, O. 

Cosbey, Jessie Rossmoyne, O., and 500 Delta Ave. 

Cramer, Helen Celeste 128 Malvern PI. 

Crider, Vera Madeline 2631 Halstead St. 

Cromwell, Elwood Lewis 3013 Alms PI. 

Crowe, Eunice Marie 757 Purcell Ave. 

Davidson, Carleton Frederick 1764 Humboldt Ave. 

Davis, John Francis Cambridge, O., and 228 Atkinson St. 

Day, Karl S 3807 Spencer Ave., Norwood, O. 



288 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Dooley, Edward Meagher Glendale, O. 

Donnelly, Joseph Lawrence 291 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Dudley, Grace Elizabeth 2218 Burnet Ave. 

Duke, Dorothy The Anthony, Seminary PI. 

Eckstein, Jr., Gustav 1547 Linn St. 

Edmonds, Charles P Wausau, Wis., and 350 Terrace Ave. 

Elberg, Etta Louise 510 Walnut St., Elmwood PI., O. 

Engelhardt, Jr., Edward Charles 2108 Ravine St. 

Farlice, Elnetta Amanda 314 John St. 

Feldman, Abraham Jebiel New York City, and 1356 Burdette Ave. 

Fels, Ida Jeanette 3091 Beekman St. 

Ferry, Dorothy Witherby 5 The Belmont 

Fineberg, Solomon Pittsburg, Pa., and 369 Howell Avt •. 

Fischbach, Glenna Pretzingeu 1604 Sycamore St. 

Flagler, Marjory Curtis 7373 Lower River Rd. 

Foster, Alma Virginia Portsmouth, O., and 3334 Bonaparte Ave. 

Frank, Felicia 319 W. Rockdale Ave. 

Friedrich, Jr., Charles 4510 Homer Ave., Madisonvilie 

G'artelman, Clifford Adam 529 York St. 

Geenberg, Henry 3 Le Roy Court 

Geohegan, Edmund Harrison 820 Mt. Hope Rd. 

Geyer, Emma Dorothy 2972 Werk Rd., Westwood 

Gibson, Aileen Mae 905 Third Ave., Dayton, Ky. 

Goettsch, Marianne 145 University Ave. 

Gregg, Clifford Cilley 565 Terrace Ave. 

Gregory, Alexander 301 Calhoun St. 

Gregson, Anita Hull 3622 Zumstein Ave., Hyde Park 

Gregson, Marie Kerfoot 3622 Zumstein Ave., Hyde Park 

Gromme, Emma Dorothy 1832 Brewster Ave. 

Grossman, Ralph 845 Lexington Ave. 

Grothaus, Ethel Louise Oak St. and Highland Ave. 

Guckenberger, Thelma 3469 Brookline Ave. 

Haile, Ralph Virden 811 Lexington Ave. 

Hall, Frank Kincaid Rapid Run Rd., Price Hill 

Hall, George Thomas 138 Kinsey Ave. 

Hannaford, Roger Edwin 2540 Trevor PI. 

Hartmann, George Edgar 3398 Hillside Ave. 

Haslinger, Emma Sophie 93 Mulberry St. 

Hatfield, Martha Eugenia The Dexter 

Hauck, Emilie Margaret 935 Dayton St. 

Hays, Sara Hanauer 3551 Alaska Ave. 

Heard, Katherine Mong 3637 Edwards Rd. 

Heger, Evelyn Elizabeth Towne Ave., Bond Hill 

Heilbrun, Margery Servillia 3628 Washington Ave. 

Heile, Elmore 38 E. McMillan St. 

Helbig, Carl Franklin College Hill 

Hetsch, Justus Karl 626 York St., Newport, Ky. 

Heyl, Helen Marcella 2402 Upland PI. 

Hickok, Katherine Cramer 47 W. Fourth St., Covington, Ky. 

Hiller, Grace Richmond 2455 Madison Rd. 

Hoehn, Bertha Louise 3113 Gloss Ave., Pleasant Ridge 

Hollo way, Clarence Norway Ave. 

Holzberg, Julius 260 Ehrman Ave. 

IIuling, May Catherine 3026 Woodside Ave. 

Hunt, Margaret Charlotte 5405 Wetzel Ave., Madisonviile 

Ideson, Eleanor Gertrude 2156 Cameron Ave., Norwood, O. 

Isaacs, Stanley Morris 6 The Harvey 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1918-14 289 

Israel, Edward L 3589 Wilson Ave. 

Johnson, Frederick Augustus 861 Beecher St. 

Jones, Dorothy Cartwright 12 Bella Vista PI. 

Jones, Margaretta Abigail 4349 Erie Ave., Madisonville 

Kasson, Lee Brooks 28 Blue Grass Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Keller, Adeline Louise 218 Stetson St. 

Kemper, Samuel Frederick 2209 Fulton Ave. 

Keyser, Wendell Munro Hotel 

Klappert, Ruth Mildred Tebbs 2936 Woodburn Ave. 

Koehler, William Augustus 1202 Central Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Kotzin, Godfrey 243 Hearne Ave. 

Krueger, Justine 917 Garfield Ave., Price Hill 

Kunschik, Emma Augusta 3206 Madison Rd. 

Lambert, Margaret Louise 223 W. Twenty-first St., Covington, Ky. 

Landman, Solomon 3455 Whitfield Ave. 

Le Clere, Mildred Grace Mt. Washington 

Lillard, Davis 1745 Chase Ave. 

Littell, Hazel Grace 1603 Ruth Ave. 

Lusby, Helen Alison 943 E. Third St. 

Lyle, Donald Johnson 203 Woolper Ave. 

McCarthy, Alice Marie 1937 Clarion Ave. 

McDevitt, Lester William 275 McCormick PI. 

McGowan, Carolyn Lehman 9 The Haydock 

McIntyre, Laura Mildred 2318 Williams Ave., Norwood, O. 

McKinley, Ruth Elizabeth 5727 Davey Ave., College Hill 

Maddux, Howard Stanley 421 Delta Ave. 

Marcus, Jacob Wheeling, W. Va., and 521 Ridgeway Ave. 

Mark, Jerome Baltimore, Md., and 369 Howell Ave. 

Matre, Edna Clara 4505 Hamilton Ave. 

Mendelsohn, John 350 Rockdale Ave. 

Mendelsohn, Samuel Felix Newark, N. J., and 435 Ridgeway Ave. 

Messham, Mary Florence Silverton, O. 

Michael, Lillian 1521 Hapsburg Ave. 

Mitchell, Mary Lucile 2312 Sauer Ave. 

Montgomery, Harriet Letcher Salt Lake City, Utah, and 527 Hale Ave. 

Morris, Gertrude Ellen Loveland, O. 

Motz, John Louis 337 Albany Ave. 

Murray, Willa Lillian 502 Clinton St. 

Nelson, Clifford Joseph 654 Rockdale Ave. 

Nestley, Edward Julius 235 W. Seventh St., Newport, Ky. 

Neu, Katherine 2113 Colerain Ave. 

Nonnez, Henry 2327 Ashland Ave. 

Noonan, Charles Stewart 332 W. Rockdale Ave. 

Northcutt, John T 1901 Vine St. 

Oehlmann, William Christian 2411 Moerlein Ave. 

O'Hara, Laura M 3047 Hackberry St. 

Osborn, Josephine 3439 Whitfield Ave. 

Ott, Reuben Ervin Frederick 820 York St. 

Otting, Edith Agnes 806 Park Ave. 

Otto, Carl Everett 1 Highway Ave., W. Covington, Ky. 

Peaslee, Patricia Dorothy 3218 Warsaw Ave. 

Perkins, Hildegarde 3459 Observatory PI., Hyde Park 

Perkins, Margaret Belmont Ave., College Hill 

Peters, Walter Frederic 943 Sunset Ave., Price Hill 

Phares, Lavilla 3719 Terrace PI. 

Pichel, Sweet Marie 233 Goodman St. 

Pitcher, Georgia 424 Hopkins St. 



290 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Poelking, Gertrude Estelle 2707 Alms PI. 

Pollitt, Basil Hubbard 2242 Frances Lane 

Pressler, Louise Carolyn 3649 Archer St. 

Ragan, Maude Belle 721 W. Eighth St. 

Ranz, Esther Blue Ash, O. 

Reinecke, Lucy Agnes 9 The Parkside 

Richards, Pollie Ann Erie Ave. and Arnsby PI. 

Richardson, Bayle Manser 86 W. McMillan St. 

Riddle, Clara Belle Hamilton, O., and 131 Park Ave., Hartwell 

Riker, Albert Joyce Oakland, Md., and 1916 Bigelow St. 

Rosenberg, David 500 Hale Ave. 

Ross, Frances Moyer Mover PI., Linwood 

Rost, Norma Beatrice 2411 Fairview Ave. 

Rouda, Alvin Harry 1322 Chapel St. 

Royer, Lucile Marie 744 Mt. Hope Rd. 

Rulison, Jeanette Elizabeth 6006 Prentice St., Madisonville 

Runck, Frances Roberta 928 Locust St. 

Ryan, Esther Elizabeth 3207 Mozart Ave., Westwood 

Sachs, Marie Hellman 932 Avondale Ave. 

Salkover, Meyer Bernard 1720 Dexter Ave. 

Schade, Arthur Albert 241 Emming St. 

Schaefer, Alvine Bertha 4216 Leeper St. 

Schaefer, William Ralph 362 Howell Ave. 

Schoenwandt, Helen Bertha 1926 Bigelow St. 

Schmidt, Irma Mary 3005 Scioto St. 

Schroder, Pauline 438 Rockdale Ave. 

Schuchardt, Cecelia Agnes 691 N. Crescent Ave. 

Schwallie, Eva Marie 2218 Cameron Ave., Norwood, O. 

Seiter, Jeanette Errett 2201 Highland Ave. 

Shafer, Ralph Newton 319 Stites Ave. 

Siebler, Salmen Korkes 862 E. Rockdale Ave. 

Simpson, Laura Carroll College Hill 

Smith, Harold Waterman 2215 Norwood Ave., Norwood, O. 

Staats, Chester Clyde 225 Bosley St. 

Stevens, Dorothy Scovil 3627 Edwards Rd. 

Stevenson, Mary Thomas 17 Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Straub, Mary Agnes 325 Retreat St., Bellevue, Ky. 

Straus, Robert Lee Maysville, Ky., and College Hill 

Sudbrink, Elsie Wilhelmina 1374 Avon PL 

Tangeman, Helen 2815 Burnet Ave. 

Tashman, Rachel 1647 Clayton St. 

Taylor, Dorothea Cockaym 3826 Spencer Ave., Norwood, O. 

Taylor, Irene Marshall 6139 Montgomery Pike, Pleasant Ridge 

Taylor, Marcus Buell 1600 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Taylor, Max Freeman 1600 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Thiel, Walda Marguerite 172 Bosley St. 

Tierney, Marguerite Esther 233 Burns Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Tobin, Ellen Louise Kennedy Heights, O. 

Tracy, Caroline Barrett 532 Howell Ave. 

Turley, Harold Edwin Burney, Ind., and 1215 Elm St. 

Turner, Jack 1835 S. Turner Ave. 

Valerio, Bernice 907 Elberon Ave. 

Vanderbilt, Ethel 1134 Sherman Ave. 

Voss, Leroy Charles 3443 Burch Ave. 

Warren, Louise Beatrice 630 E. Third St., Newport, Ky. 

Wascerwitz, Philip Fogel San Francisco, Cal., and 369 Howell Ave. 

W ATKINS, Anne Mae 63 E. Ninth St., Covington, Ky. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 291 

Weber, Elsie Margaret . 208 Baxter Ave. 

Westerlund, Agnes 130 Division St., Bellevue, Ky. 

Wilshire, Sidney Gordon 710 Linden Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Wilson, George Henry Winchester, O. 

Wintermeyer, Walter Henry 1001 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

Wright, Helen Louise 2452 Highland Ave. 

Wulfekoetter, Gertrude Mariax Louise 3202 Harrison Ave., Westwood 

Wydman, Dorothea Garrard 1330 Grace Ave., Hyde Park 

Zimmerman, Frances Cameron Glendale, O. 

Irregular Students 

Berman, Tressa C 861 Lexington Ave. 

Brown, Lucy Atwater 183 Grand Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Carey, Alice Virginia 3538 Epworth Ave., Westwood 

Emerson, Saradelle Bellevue and Samuel Aves., College Hill 

Evans, Sara Mildred 4009 Floral Ave., Norwood, O. 

Ginsberg, William Abraham 3404 Telford Ave. 

Harris, Marie Kathryn 602 E. Third St., Newport, Ky. 

Harris, Helen Priscilla 3653 Washington Ave. 

Hoffheimer, Amy R 6 W. Summerfield Ave. 

Kaplan, Dora E 16 The Cumberland 

Levy, Adele i 1735 Dexter Ave. 

Morris, James Forestville, O. 

Oppenheimer, Rosalyn 14 Landon Court 

Selig, Hannah Lewin 709 S. Crescent St. 

Senior, Fanny 318 Rockdale Ave. 

Steinau, Stella 3445 Mooney Ave. 

Straus, Herbert Cerf 603 Rockdale Ave. 

Tannian, Kathryn 4205 Dana Ave. 

Weiss, Max Homestead, Pa., and 857 Rockdale Ave. 

Special Students 

Beaumont, John Herbert 2633 Bellevue Ave. 

Birch, Mabel Hubbard 315 Wayne Ave. 

Brownell, Adelia 134 Elm St., Wyoming, O. 

Butler, Rachael 1 New Westminster Bldg. 

Dabney, Mrs. Charles W The Romaine 

Davis, Edith J 345 Forest Ave. 

Faulwetter, Lenora Catherine 276 W. Fifth St., Covington, Ky. 

Gaston, Fannie R 3441 Observatory Ave. 

Gerding, Jane 4 Leroy Court 

G'ibbs, Clinton 2817 Preston Ave. 

Goldberg, Etta W 3491 Wilson Ave. 

Goldberg, Jacob M Bronx, New York, and 537 Betts St. 

Goldenberg, Grace Delaney 1711 Brewster Ave. 

Goldenstein, Raphael Portland, Ore., and 312 Straight St. 

Hardin, Oliver Wendell Lincoln Ave. 

Holtmann, Frieda 259 Greendale Ave. 

Hume, Phillip Russel Walton, Ky., and Y. M. C. A., Covington, Ky. 

Kadisevitz, Isidore E 925 W. Seventh St. 

Kahr, Johanna 259 Greendale Ave. 

Katzenberger, Edith Fanny 3015 Bathgate Ave. 

Kaufman, Jean B 617 Forest Ave. 

Klein, Beatrice Rose 705 Glenwood Ave. 

Klein, Julia R 2372 Stratford Ave. 

Kramer, Elmer Charles 8302 Monteith Ave. 

Lichtenstein, Morris Russia, and 3 LeRoy Court 



292 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Lowman, Evelyn Theresa 715 S. Crescent Ave. 

McClelland, John Mills Sandusky, O. 

Mageer, Ora Anna Tremont and Caroline Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Monahan, Fae M 2749 Observatory Ave. 

Moore, Charlotte Spokane, Wash., and Highland Ave. 

Moore, Lucille Dorette 3450 Clifton Ave. 

Myers, Mrs. Florence 3432 Lyleburn PI. 

Nulsen, Marie Elaine 2323 Madison Ave., Norwood, O. 

Pixley, Marie Louise Portsmouth, O., and 2027 Auburn Ave. 

Rammelsberg, Alice Belmont Ave., College Hill 

Robinson, Max Brewster 2650 Bellevue Ave. 

Rodenberg, Albert Henry 4910 Eastern Ave. 

Russel, Mildred Shaw and Wabash Aves. 

Salesky, Joseph E New York City, and Howell Ave. 

Sauerston, Sybilla Martha 313 Overton Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Schnucks, Julia Mary 830 Poplar Ave. 

Schroeder, Carl Atmore 1605 Clayton Ave. 

Siekman, Charles Achilles 350 Terrace Ave. 

Spoenem an, Walter Herman 2514 Ravine Ave. 

Stix, Elizabeth F 3243 Delaware Ave. 

Teasdale, Anna The Harvey 

Thomson, Mrs. Alexander 5907 Belmont Ave. 

Thomas, Ralph Dayton, O., and 1215 Elm St. 

Trager, Elma Hortense 3863 Reading Rd. 

Trounstine, Helen 782 Clinton Springs Ave. 

Villensky, Ethel 1013 E. McMillan St. 

Wagner, Dorothy Elizabeth 1114 Draper St. 

Weiss, Rose Clara 271 W. McMillan St. 

Whitfield, Florence Winifred 1028 Oak Ave., College Hill 

Witt, Mrs. Catherine L 1613 Dexter Ave. 

Unclassified Students 

Teachers in Special Courses 

Aldrich, Laura E 3413 Burch Ave. 

Baldridge, Edward Holmes 4 Oak Ave., Hartweli 

Becker, Lillie 416 Hawthorne Ave. 

Bieler, Flora 240 E. University Ave. 

Boyd, Emma 2876 Montana Ave. 

Burdge, Alice Virginia 1873 Kinney Ave. 

Burghardt, Frederick K 103 Juergens Ave. 

Chidlaw, William M Cleves, O. 

Claassen, Clara M 4025 Elsmere Ave., Norwood, O. 

Cornwell, Mrs. Irene D 3568 Rosedale PI. 

Dearness, Frederick William 2654 Harrison Ave. 

Dunn, Jesse K 3458 Cheviot Ave. 

Findeiss, Rose Louise 2303 Park Ave. 

Flick, Catherine ..721 W. Ninth St. 

Geisenhofer, Katherine 1615 Pullan Ave. 

Gibert, Marie 1828 Fairfax Ave. 

Grieser, Adolphus Louis 3039 Montana Ave. 

Grosse, Simon J 5123 Wetzel Ave. 

Harper, Grace M 828 Maple Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Hauer, Frank J 3254 Montana Ave. 

Heckermann, Ruth 642 Monroe Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Herrle, Karl 3240 Bishop St. 

Mill, Edith Anna 3 The Roanoke 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 293 

Holdt, Clara W \ 421 Ludlow Ave. 

Holdt, Meta Sta. L, Route 3, City 

Housh, William K 238 Gilman Ave. 

Hummel, Stella M 922 E. McMillan 

Huseman, Louise 1357 Broadway 

Johnson, Charles W 2315 Williams Ave. 

Johnston, John B 1719 Hewitt Ave. 

Jones, Winifred 922 Nassau St. 

Kaefer, William 407 Ludlow Ave. 

McKenzie, Minnie Elizabeth 3274 Nash Ave. 

Minks, Floyd G 232 Calhoun St. 

Osborne, Virginia A 3439 Whitfield Ave. 

Picker, Adolph 25 E. McMillan St. 

Platz, Anna Marie 92 E. Mitchell Ave. 

Powers, James P 205 Emma St., Covington, Ky. 

Regenstein, Anna Belle 24 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Reszke, Felix Eugene 2230 Spring Grove Ave. 

Schick, Alfred C , 2117 Hatmaker St. 

Schiel, Luella 540 Terrace Ave. 

Schiel, Louis M 540 Terrace Ave. 

Schlotman, Robert C 3443 Pleasant View Ave. 

Schoepfel, Cora 832 Clinton St. 

Schriefer, Elsie 2358 Wheeler St. 

Schriefer, Verona Louise 2358 Wheeler St. 

Skillman, Ada Marie 224 Williams Ave., Lockiand, O. 

Stuntz, Edna Mary 2981 Observatory Ave. 

Telker, Minna J 220 Fosdick St. 

Thayer, Warren Nelson Spring St., Norwood, O. 

Trisler, Anna H Plainville, O. 

Trisler, Early Clinton Plainville, O. 

Williams, Katherine M 4425 Station Ave., Winton PI. 

Wilson, Arthur L Newtown, O. 

Winter, Elizabeth M. B Egbert Ave. 

Winter, Emma Egbert Ave. 

Evening Students 

Acomb, Helen Janet 5642 Ridge Ave. 

Acomb, Irene Alice 5642 Ridge Ave. 

Ahlers, John Frederick 1307 California Ave. 

Albers, Frank Joseph 1320 Broadway 

Allen, Forest Rose 1529 Gilpin Ave. 

Allen, Zay Marie 1529 Gilpin Ave. 

Anderson, Yeatman 485 Riddle Rd. 

Andrews, Clinton H Lane Seminary 

Appel, Louis Karl 264 Calhoun 

Austin, Edgar Coville Cincinnati Hospital 

Baehr, Edmund M 3868 Oakley Ave. 

Baer, Sigmund C 3465 Reading Rd. 

Baker, Edgar Hubbard 2210 Ohio Ave. 

Baldwin, Harriet 2631 Hemlock St. 

Ball, Sue Addie 1734 Baymiller St. 

Barr, Charles Hugh 3326 Glenmary Ave. 

Barr, Ingle H 1231 Grace Ave. 

Bartlett, Francis Thornton 740 Woodbine Ave., Hartwell 

Bast, John E 1611 Waverly Ave. 

Bates, Florence Adele 2606 Park Ave. 

Baumgartner, Alfred 463 Warner St. 



294 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Bayley, Lillian M S473 Knott Ave. 

Beigel, Herbert Arthur 1623 Tremont St. 

Bell, Mary Jane 119 Seventieth St. 

Bernheim, Ruth Grace 2241 Kemper Lane 

Bieler, Flora 240 E. University Ave. 

Bien, Susan Josephine 3026 Woodburn Ave. 

Billian, Augusta 308 W. McMillan St. 

Blackburn, Alexander Joseph 1708 Brewster Ave. 

Blanchard, Jennie 56 The South Warwick 

Blanton, William Spencer 718 Orchard St., Newport, Ky. 

Bloch, Martin 528 Ridgeway Ave. 

Boesch, Bertha 8324 Westside Ave. 

Botts, T. Reed 3831 Llewellyn Ave. 

Boyle, Blair 670 June St. 

Brice, Gertrude Lima, O., and Kemper Lane and Locust St. 

Browder, Lillian May 4809 Winona Terrace 

Brueckner, Erna Katherine 2917 Jefferson Ave. 

Buchanan, Charles Byrns 3323 Spokane Ave. 

Bullerdick, Ethel 4323 Hamilton Ave. 

Bungenstock, August Gerard 1281 Beech Ave. 

Burdge, Alice 1875 Kinney Ave. 

Burridge, L. E 485 Riddle Rd. 

Caie, Thomas J 435 Riddle Rd. 

Caliman, Samuel David 2618 Kemper Lane 

Callahan, Florence M 966 Hawthorne Ave. 

Gallon, Albert Milford, O. 

Carr, Nora Gentry (Mrs.) 554 Evanswood PI. 

Carr, Ossian E 554 Evanswood PL 

Claassen, Clara Margaret 4025 Elsmere Ave., Norwood, O. 

Clarke, Robert Henry Nashville, Tenn., and Lane Seminary 

Clarke, Ernst George 2541 Vine St. 

Clyde, Edgar Adam 523 Considine Ave. 

Coffin, William Marmaduke 3449 Wilson Ave. 

Collins, Isabel 826 Maple Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Conant, Gertrude Greenwood 5709 Arnsby PI., Madisonville 

Conant, Roger L 5709 Arnsby PI., Madisonville 

Condit, Arthur Thomas Flat G, The Wilton 

Cone, Maude R Glencoe Hotel 

Coombs, Joseph E Ft. Mitchell, Covington, Ky. 

Cox, Isabel 3246 Woodburn Ave. 

Cregmile, Margaret Zay Anna Louise Inn 

Curry, Elsie Clay Carlisle, Ky., and 291 Southern Ave. 

Daniels, Verna Carolyn 120 Calhoun St. 

Darr, Theresa Beatrice 3977 Lowry Ave., Avondale 

Davis, Beulah Gladys 2358 Gilbert Ave. 

Davis, Edith Stella 826 Maple Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Davis, George Howard 4627 Glenshade Ave. 

Decker, Edna May 830 Main St., Covington, Ky. 

Decker, Raymond William 2280 Spring Grove Ave. 

DeMar, Annie Rohan City Hospital 

DePrad, Pherrell Anderson 828 Clark St. 

Deuschle, Cecilia Agnes 2415 Fairview Ave. 

Dickens, Mervin 3770 Drake Ave. 

Dieckmann, Alvina Henrietta 3416 Cornell PI. 

Dieckmann, Otto 3416 Cornell PI. 

Dorman, Sarah Bird ' 7417 Carthage Ave. 

Dornseifer, Ethel May 1612 Palm St., Northside 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 295 

Dourson, Mary Catherine 3117 Ahrens St. 

Dowling, Gertrude Mary 611 Crown St. 

Downer, Jr., John 3722 Woodland Ave. 

Draper, Mary Ruth 4324 Lafayette Ave. 

Dresch, William Haucic Lynchburg, O. 

Droege, Loyola Emma 68 E. Eighth St., Covington, Ky. 

Droste, Archibald J 868 Rockdale Ave. 

Dulle, Arthur George 2218 Wheeler St. 

Dunn, Jesse K 3458 Cheviot Ave. 

Eckstein, Lucia 1547 Linn St. 

Edwards, Alameda Mae 315 W. Seventh St. 

Edwards, Marion Flat 3, 2905 Woodburn Ave. 

Eger, Alfred 1814 Fairfax Ave. 

Eisenschmidt, Frederica Emma 2111 Loth St. 

Elliott, Carrie Kinsinger 2110 Fulton Ave. 

Elliott, Mrs. Helen G 2110 Fulton Ave. 

Elsche, Estella Thirteenth and Main Sts. 

Englander, Frieda 1361 Burdette Ave. 

Erskine, Hulda 20 E. Eighth St. 

Evans, Anne Elizabeth 2336 Burnet Ave. 

Evans, Robert Johnson 633 Carlisle Ave. 

Eversman, Madeline Catherine 574 Purcell Ave., Price Hill 

Eyrich, Jr., George Frederick 3127 Glendora Ave. 

Fahnestocic, Leroy 3001 Observatory Ave. 

Fain, Martha Gillespie The Roanoke 

Faulkner, James Burton Flat 3, 2346 Auburn Ave. 

Fechheimer, Louis F 250 Korthern Ave. 

Fechheimer, Ruth 250 Northern Ave. 

Feldmann, Mary Helen 1623 Greenup St., Covington, Ky. 

Feldmann, Ottmar J 1623 Greenup St., Covington, Ky. 

Fischer, Elizabeth 2133 Sinton Ave. 

Flick, Catherine 721 W. Ninth St. 

Flynn, Edward Matthew 2417 Salutaris Ave. 

Forthman, Martha Louise Bracken Rd., Westwood 

Forthman, Robert Bracken Rd., Westwood 

Foster, Margaret Alice 2362 Auburn Ave., and 36 Mills Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Fox, Eugene 605 Milton St. 

Frank, Carl Fred 2540 Homestead PI. 

Frankel, Desha 21 Eastbourne Terrace 

Franken, Bertha 717 Ninth St. 

Franklin, Bluma Flat P, The Wilhelm 

Franklin, John 2006 Clarion Ave. 

Franz, George 25 Eastbourne Terrace 

Frederick, Tess 1017 Baymiller St. 

Fridman, Jennie 1501 Lincoln St. 

Frisch, David 927 Richmond St. 

Fuhrmann, Kenneth Flint 2107 West Clifton Ave. 

Fuller, Fred William 2321 Clifton Ave. 

Furness, Mary Baker The Barclay 

Gemberg, Harry 950 West Seventh St. 

Geiger, Ruth Mame 1330 Bremen St. 

Giessler, Clara Cecilia 1244 Ellis St. 

Geringer, Albert Connell 3485 Colerain Ave. 

Gibert, Marie 1828 Fairfax Ave. 

Ginberg, Harris 9 LeRoy Court 

Ginsberg, William 3404 Telford Ave. 

Goodman, Madeline Elizabeth 3129 Harvard Ave. 



296 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Gores, Guioo 2928 Hackberry St. 

Grad, Sarah Belle 631 West Ninth St. 

G'raef, Albert August 1723 Central Ave. 

Grau, Maude Estella 728 Park Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Green, Stella Mary 403 Dorchester Ave. 

Groneweg, Ernst 3362 Morrison Ave. 

Grossman, John 717 Laurel Ave. 

Gruber, Walter Wilbur 4126 34th St., Oakley 

Guertin, Grace 1239 East Third St. 

Haeckl, Laura Crescence 1756 Powers St. 

Halsey, Jesse 2726 Cleinview Ave. 

Hamano, George T Lane Seminary 

Hammond, John Marshall 306 West Seventh St. 

Hanau, Alma Louise 607 Riddle Rd. 

Happe, Charles 957 Hawthorne Ave. 

Happersberger, Emelin 2302 Kemper Lane 

Happersberger, Herbert 2302 Kemper Lane 

Happersberger, Paula 3202 Kemper Lane 

Hargitt, Mary Bell 810 N. Crescent Ave. 

Hargitt, Robert Palmer 810 N. Crescent Ave. 

Harper, Grace Martha 828 Maple Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Harper, Hazel 4227 Cherry St. 

Harris, Elizabeth 3901 Llewellyn Ave. 

Harris, Samuel Richmond 628 Shillito St. 

Hauck, Carrie 1522 Central Ave. 

Hauck, George W 457 Dayton St. 

Haumesser, Hedwig Pleasant Ridge 

Hauss, Kathryn Viola 1528 Elm St. 

Hawley, Margaret B Syracuse, N. Y., and 2214 Slane Ave., Norwood, O. 

Hehemann, Frederick Herman 1651 Queen City Ave. 

Helm, August 3760 Clyde St. 

Helman, Mabel Rockwood 2527 Erie Ave. 

Hengge, Jr., Peter Paul 2604 Jefferson Ave. 

Hermann, Jos. M 2501 Homestead PI. 

Hettrich, Walter John 15 W. Seventh St. 

Hickman, Thomas Lane Seminar) 

Hicks, Louis Ray 4716 Ward St 

Higgins, Chester Bellevue, Mich., and 3615 Morris St. 

Hill, Edith Anna 3 The Roanoke 

Hiller, Carl A 2205 Wheeler St. 

Hines, Allie Marshall 56 The Warwick 

Hirst, Mary Julia 985 Paradrome St. 

Hissem, Helen Hunt 12 The Madrid 

Hoehn, Ruth Jenny 3113 Gloss Ave., Pleasant Ridge 

Hoffman, Minnie 1729 Carl St. 

Hoffmeier, Louise Sophie Mt. Healthy, O., and 3206 Madison Rd. 

Holdt, Martha 558 Howell Ave. 

Hooke, Ruth Catherine 1518 Vine St. 

Hottendorf, Elizabeth 810 Richmond St. 

Howe, Clayton Morgan 508 Riddle Rd. 

Howlett, Eleanor Mary 1901 Hopkins Ave., Norwood, O. 

Huheey, Floretta Kate 1526 Garrard St., Covington, Ky. 

Hummel, Stella M 922 E. McMillan St. 

Hutcheson, William Teleford 2113 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Inkrot, Henry J 3822 Floral Ave., Norwood, O. 

Jacobs, William Veith 553 Mitchell Ave. 

Jenkins, Bertram W 2806 Madison Ave. 









REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 297 

Johannigman, John G 481 Riddle Rd. 

Johnson, Charles W 2315 Williams Ave., Norwood, O. 

Johnson, Clarence Nathaniel 3259 Gaff Ave. 

Johnson, Eva May 4921 Wesley Ave., Norwood, O. 

Jones, Anne 443 Riddle Rd. 

Jones, Effie Mae 3815 Hazel Ave., Norwood, O. 

Jones, Edward Safford 3323 Spokane Ave. 

Jordan, Floyd - 26 Garfield PI. 

Joyce, Blanche May 215 Kinsey Ave. 

Kadisevitz, Isidor 925 W. Seventh St. 

Kasselberg, Ida 721 Richmond St. 

Kaufman, Antoinette Victoria 1042 Wesley Ave. 

Kemme, Louis Joseph 1819 Pleasant St. 

Kennedy, May C 81 E. Tenth St., Covington, Ky. 

Kindermann, F. M 3823 Spencer Ave. 

King, Robert Lee Lane Seminary 

Kinsburg, Max 1529 John St. 

Klahm, John Henry 1332 Ethan Ave., Camp Washington 

Klaus, Claire Marie 3532 Handman Ave. 

Klein, Julia Rose 2372 Stratford Ave. 

Kline, Jane Margaret 2215 Sinton Ave. 

Klusmeyer, Charles Anton 304 Warner St. 

Knapp, August Joseph 2523 Halstead St. 

Knorr, Arline J 2225 Ohio Ave. 

Kohler, Henry 706 W. Eighth St. 

Kohlmann, Jr., George Henry 528 Howell Ave. 

Kohlmann, Irwin L 528 Howell Ave. 

Kramer, Elmer Charles 3302 Monteith Ave. 

Krauss, Henry F 1376 Harrison Ave. 

Kunschik, Emilie Laura 3206 Madison Rd. 

Kuntz, Helen Margaret 4309 Haight Ave. 

Lackey, Margaret The Brittany, Ninth and Race Sts. 

Lahke, Charles Frederick 2829 Erie Ave. 

Laib, Pauline Louise 1239 Hopple St. 

Lampe, Mildred Louise 809 Overton St., Newport, Ky. 

Lantis, Vernon 238 McCormick PI. 

LeCount, Vera Adelia 835 Armory Ave. 

Lehnhoff, Raymond G 475 Riddle Rd. 

Leiser, Oscar 255 Gilman St. 

Leonard, Frank Louis 2366 Kemper Lane 

Levi, Nannett 736 E. Ridgeway Ave. 

Levy, Hattie 2623 Stanton Ave. 

Lewin, Sarah 723 Richmond St. 

Lewis, Anna Belle .2102 Fulton Ave. 

Liebenberg, Arthur J 230 Stetson St. 

Linch, Harry 1326 Locust St. 

Lindsley, Howard Ferris 5301 Church St., Madisonvilie 

Littlejohn, Christine 3070 Gilbert Ave. 

Livingston, Sadie 1609 Baymiller St. 

Lobitz, Carl H 2559 Fairview Ave. 

Lobitz, Elsie 2550 Fairview Ave. 

Lommel, Elizabeth 752 Clinton St. 

Loth, Robert 851 Rockdale Ave. 

Louis, Edith Alice 420 Elizabeth St. 

Lovett, Edward 3324 Spokane Ave. 

Lowe, Virgil College Hill 

Luessen, Henry 2539 Marsh Ave., S. Norwood, O. 



298 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Lyon, Flora 412 Fifth Ave., Dayton, Ky. 

Lyon, Henry 3416 Walworth Ave. 

Lyons, Helen 609 Overton St., Newport, Ky. 

Lyons, Mary 426 Greenup St., Covington, Ky. 

?»1cCafferty, Florence 2723 Woodburn Ave. 

McDonald, Margaret Helen 652 Lincoln Ave. 

McDonald, Mary C 652 Lincoln Ave. 

McIntire, Walter Alan 2318 Williams Ave., Norwood, O. 

McKenzie, Elizabeth 3274 Nash Ave. 

McMillan, Gertrude 2840 Observatory Ave. 

Maescher, John Victor 507 Terrace Ave. 

Magee, Margaret 3114 Ahrens St. 

Maish, Albert 1323 Laidlaw Ave. 

Majoewsky, Erna Margaret 2976 Gilbert Ave. 

Majoewsky, Leo Rudolph 121 Mason St. 

Majoewsky, Walter 121 Mason St. 

Malkin, Abraham 1822 Hewitt Ave. 

Manischewitz, Mrs. Bessie 28 The Park Flats 

Manischewitz, Rose 2211 Park Ave. 

Mannbeck, George F 1506 Dempsey St. 

Marcuson, Augusta 868 Lexington Ave. 

Marion, Edward Elliott 2417 Salutaris Ave. 

Markley, Carl Thompson 1807 Josephine St. 

Markward, Chester Saunders 2120 St. James Ave. 

Marquezado, John 322 W. Fourth St. 

Marshall, Robert Boyd 3068 Durrell Ave. 

Massa, Victor Simon 307 Yt Central Ave. 

Mattick, Clara Catherine 4223 Dane St. 

Mayhew, Genevieve Grace 1901 State Ave. 

Mears, Nellie Viola 1050 Flint St. 

Meiners, Edmund B , 1532 Race St. 

Meininger, Walter 1638 Pulte St. 

Melrose, Belle 810 Mann PI. 

Merland, Elise Frederica 2128 Ohio Ave. 

Michael, Maym 1521 Hapsburg Ave. 

Miller, Edward Elliott 2140 Auburn Ave. 

Miller, Mrs. Ethel Bloch 528 Ridgeway Ave. 

Miller, Rhea Gdulla 6 The Waldemar 

Minges, Michael 4 E. Ninth St. 

Minkovcky, Aaron 521 Richmond St. 

Minks, Floyd 232 Calhoun St. 

Mohring, Harry H 1116 Poplar St. 

Montague, Jr., Samuel Foster 116 E. McMillan St. 

Montgomery, Lucille Belle 1358 Ethan Ave. 

Moor, Lucille Doretta 345 Clifton Ave. 

Morrissey, Julia Josephine 3030 Gilbert Ave. 

Morrison, Edith 2634 Alms PI. 

Morrison, Emma Henrietta 2548 Kincaid St. 

Morrison, Robert 784 Ludlow Ave. 

Moyse, Ayleen 310 W. Rockdale Ave. 

Muething, Fred F 136 Trevor St., Covington, Ky. 

Munro, Mary Treasure 2143 Sinton Ave. 

Murphy, Mary Loretta 4163 Columbia Ave. 

Nenninger, Lester Frederick S327 Monteith Ave. 

Nicholson, Stanley Thomas 3538 Bevis Ave. 

Niedermeyer, Amelia Clara 920 Grand Ave., Price Hii 

Nieman, Herbert Anthony 930 Linn S' 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 209 

O'Connor, Margaret Eugene 1125 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Ockrant, Bessie 709 W. Ninth St. 

Oesterlein, Charles Daniel 862 Beecher St., Madisonville 

O'Neal, Charles Edward 2652 Stanton Ave. 

O'ISeal, Ella C 2652 Stanton Ave. 

Otten, Florence 3016 Scioto St. 

Otten, Freda 3016 Scioto St. 

Otterman, Christine Edmund 1821 Highland Ave. 

Paden, Russell Homer 2216 Ohio Ave. 

Parker, Gail 813 Maple Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Parry, James G 31 Sixteenth St., Newport, Ky. 

Paul, William C 2364 Victor St. 

Pelton, Mrs. Martha C 3 The Roanoke 

Pendleton, Charles Gould 822 Clark St. 

Perry, Arlington C 707 E. McMillan St. 

Peterson, Roger Wales 3132 McHenry Ave. 

Pfister, Mildred Marie 2231 Spring Grove Ave. 

Phillips, Virginia Lysle 703 York St., Newport, Ky. 

Picker, Adolph 25 E. McMillan St. 

Pidgeon, Bertha Mabel 3120 Gloss Ave., Pleasant Ridge 

Piesche, Elsie Caroline 245 Earnshaw Ave. 

Platz, Anna M 92 E. Mitchell Ave. 

Plimpton, Lois Elizabeth 2342 Auburn Ave. 

Plueddemann, R. Oscar R. R. No. 1, California 

Potrafke, Augusta Alma Louise 2517 Vine St. 

Pound, Mabel L Y. W. C. A., E. Eighth St. 

Powell, Carroll Arthur Hartwell 

Prince, A. Senior 765 N. Crescent Ave. 

Prince, Mrs. Emma H 765 N. Crescent Ave. 

Probst, Norma 311 Northern Ave. 

Pund, Philomena F .20 E. Eighth St. 

Quirk, William 2531 Moorman Ave. 

Rabenstein, Ruth 3429 Boudinot Ave. 

Rappoport, Jacob Ellsworth 2853 Winslow Ave. 

Rassell, Rose .928 Richmond St. 

Rawlings, Robert W 406 E. Fifth St., Newport, Ky. 

Reed, Eloise 844 Oak St. 

Reed, Samuel Richard Lane Seminary 

Reemelin, Isabelle 8471 Cheviot Ave. 

Rehn, Robert Bert 6036 Lantana Ave., College Hill 

Reinecke, Hilda M 9 The Parkside 

Reinecke, Mary Dudley 9 The Parkside 

Reinke, Carolyn Ellen Boudinot Ave. near Lischer St. 

Reinke, Louise Mary Boudinot Ave. near Lischer St. 

Reitzes, Bertha 3139 Markbreit Ave. 

Reszke, Felix 2230 Spring Grove Ave. 

Reuther, Sina 2120 Sinton Ave. 

Richards, James S 3541 Burch Ave. 

Ritchie, Edgar B Cliff PL, Price Hill 

Roberts, Edward Dodson 248 Hosea Ave. 

Robinson, Guy H .• 3483 Cornell Pi. 

Robinson, Iva Zaluma 2918 Fischer PI. 

Rood, Arthur 73 E. Sixth St., Covington, Ky. 

Rosenbaum, David N 1333 Locust St. 

Rothstein, Rose 2531 Park Ave. 

Royer, Earl Buford 744 Mt. Hope Rd. 

Runge, Clifford Herman 752 Dixmyth Ave. 



800 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Russell, Mildred Shaw and Wabash Aves. 

Rust, Richard Sutton 267 Greendale Ave. 

Sackhoff, Clarence Albert 3023 Paxton Rd. 

Sagmeister, Charles S22 Emming St. 

Sahlfeld, Robert 3434 Burch Ave. 

Samuels, Morris McMillan St. and Copeland Ave. 

Saxe, Samuel I .714 Hopkins Ave. 

Schaefer, Samuel Howard 721 Richmond Ave. 

Schear, Harvey 611 West Eighth St. 

Schick, Alfred C 2117 Hatmaker St. 

Schick, John Matthew 3269 Montana Ave. 

Schmalz, Dorothea Francis 2919 Glendora Ave. 

Schmid, Robert George 110 Peete St. 

Schmidt, Alvin Edward 3005 Scioto St. 

Schmidt, Irma Mary 3005 Scioto St 

Schmidt, John G 4 Crescent PI. 

Schmidt, Singue 4 Crescent PI. 

Schmogrow, Frederick Theodore 3706 Cass Ave. 

Schneider, Erma Lillian Robinson Rd., Pleasant Ridge 

Schook, Katherine 6601 E. Ledge St., Madisonville 

Schook, Mary Rose 6601 E. Ledge St., Madisonville 

Schrader, Louise K 2215 Ohio Ave. 

Schriefer, Verona Louise 2358 Wheeler St. 

Schroeder, Carl F 122 W. St. Clair St. 

Schuyler, Burt Tuttle 2619 Kemper Lane 

Schweikert, Mabel 725 York St., Newport, Ky. 

Schwein, Stella 6612 Poplar St., Madisonville 

See, Oscar Blue Ash, O. 

Seibert, Edward Adam 3527 Wabash Ave. 

Semler, Viola Marie McMillan St. and Upland PI. 

Shea, Daniel Lindsey 2757 Webster Ave. 

Shepherd, Sanford E 1759 Cedar Ave., College Hill 

Shoenthal, Martin 3563 Wilson Ave. 

Shook, Chester Rinehart The Euclid Apts. 

Shorter, Selmarita 706 Barr St. 

Sicking, May 102 E. Clifton Ave. 

Siebler, Salmen K 862 E. Rockdale Ave. 

Silverblatt, Louis 761 W. Eighth St. 

Silverblatt, Nathan 761 W. Eighth St. 

Silverblatt, Simon 761 W. Eighth St. 

Simlick, William Nelson 3766 Isabella Ave. 

Sinnige, Carl Elmor. 213 E. University Ave. 

Skillman, Ada Marie 224 William St., Lockland, O. 

Skillman, Elsa Corinne 3553 Edwards Rd. 

Smickler, Samuel 1326 Locust St. 

Smith, Albert Eugene 1111 Myrtle Ave. 

Smith, Clara Margaret 655 Linn St. 

Southgate, Virginia 124 Garrard St., Covington, Ky. 

Spears, J. Rankin 646 E. Ninth St. 

Spencer, William A 2916 Gilbert Ave. 

Spohr, Arthur August 434 W. McMicken Ave. 

Spreen, Ernst 4041 Runnymede Ave. 

Sprigg, Mary Louise 3027 Reading Rd. 

Stanley, William H 288 Ludlow Ave. 

Stein, John Harry 717 Weingartner PL, Newport, Ky. 

Steinharter, Blanche 1813 Fairfax Ave. 

Steinharter, Jacob Louis 1813 Fairfax Ave. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913.14 301 

Stemler, Emil W 3335 Bonaparte Ave. 

Steward, Harold Clark 1852 Columbia Ave. 

Strate, Jessie B 5744 Bramble Ave. 

Strauss, Godfrey Eyric 4422 Station Ave., Winton PI. 

Strauss, Mrs. Louise W 336 Northern Ave. 

Strauss, Morris 2 The Valencia 

Strauss, Mrs. Morris 2 The Valencia 

Strauss, Samuel 4422 Station Ave., Winton PI. 

Strobridge, Catherine Erwin 118 Malvern PI. 

Strong, James Albert 214 E. Center St., Carthage 

Strubbe, Eleanor 3000 Euclid Ave. 

Stuntz, Edna May 2981 Observatory Ave. 

Sturla, Harry L 3372 Hillside Ave. 

Suer, Werner 314 W. McMillan St. 

Swope, Josie 20 E. Eighth St. 

Tatgenhorst, Jr., Charles 117 Huntington PI. 

Tallmadge, Jr., Harry 3489 Leland Ave. 

Tapke, Marie Josephine 1532 Dixmont Ave. 

Taylor, Arthur Cullen 1928 Auburn Ave. 

Tedtman, Martha 414 Betts St. 

Telker, Minna J 220 Fosdick St 

Tennenbaum, Esther 712 Richmond St. 

Tennenbaum, Minnie 1356 Burdette Ave. 

Thiel, Walda 172 Bosley St. 

Thilly, Christel 3205 Bishop St. 

Thul, Nathan Wheeler 2631 Hemlock St. 

Topp, Bertha Marie 1203 E. McMillan St. 

Van Dusen, Gordon 924 Hawthorne Ave. 

Van Pelt, Charles 1607 Brewster Ave. 

Viehman, Bertha Anna 2358 Flora St. 

Vockell, William H 4322 34th St., Oakley 

Volpp, Marguerite Carolyn 6404 Kennedy Ave., Kennedy Heights 

Wagner, Harold H 1114 Draper St. 

Wahlke, Albert B. C 1054 Wilstach St. 

Wall, Leo 3059 Mathey St. 

Warnking, Laura Josephine 522 Rosemont Ave. 

Warnking, May 522 Rosemont Ave. 

Watson, Florence Grand Hotel 

Wehrung, Wesley William 1992 Harrison Ave. 

Weller, Arthur 1142 Putnam St., Newport, Ky. 

Weiskopf, Maurice Fox Reading Rd. and Dana Ave. 

Weiss, Rose Clara 271 W. McMillan St. 

Weist, Lillie 225 McCormick St. 

Weitler, Retta 2669 Dennis St., Corryville 

West, Sadie Wood 56 The South Warwick 

West, Susanna 56 The South Warwick 

Wheeler, Alfred 2391 Warsaw Ave. 

Whitcomb, Helen A 3539 St. Charles PI. 

Wicker, Edwin Arthur 243 Hosea Ave. 

Wilburn, Ballard Rufus 104 West Seventh St. 

Wilcox, Harriett Pauline 3617 Zumstein Ave. 

Wilkins, Walter 2514 Hackberry Ave. 

Williams, Jessie 4309 Haight Ave. 

Willis, Clara 1332 Lincoln Ave. 

Wilms, Antoinette Dorothy 2232 Shadwell Ave. 

Wilson, Leroy 932 E. McMillan St. 

Wilson, Raymond 915 Paradrome St. 



802 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Wilson, Warner C 728 Greenup St., Covington, Ky. 

Winkelmann, Albert T 460 Warner St. 

Wise, Isaac Meyer 3816 Dakota Ave. 

Woirol, George 2245 Stratford Ave. 

Wolff, Gabriel Herman 2245 Stratford Ave. 

Wolfrom, Gertrude 201 Main Ave., Elmwood PI. 

Wood, Marie Cecelia 18 Eastbourne Terrace 

Wright, Robert Emory 2902 McMillan St. 

Wuenker, Albert H 2609 Stanton Ave. 

Wuest, Edward J 8430 Cornell PI. 

Wulff, Adolph George 2475 Paris St. 

Wulff, Ida Elizabeth 2475 Paris St. 

Yocum, Gilbert Gaston 350 Terrace Ave. 

Youmans, Harold North 1118 Locust St. 

Zugelter, Jr., Frank Louis 913 Charlotte St. 

COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 
Graduates 

Allen, Helen Jeanette 2404 Auburn Ave. 

Andrew, Agnes Knox 3600 Shaw Ave. 

Aulick, Edwin C 18 E. Seventh St. 

Baker, Esther Mary 3510 Zinsle Ave., Kennedy 

Bingman, Carl Wilson 914 Hawthorne St 

Bogle, Elizabeth 2313 Wheeler St. 

Brown, Janet Beggs .183 Grand Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Cantor, Ethel 18 Landon Court 

Conner, Marjorie Miller 711 Woodbine Ave., Hartwell 

Davidson, Charles Lowell 3 Leroy Court 

Egartner, Zachaeus Thomas 1914 Harrison Ave. 

Embshoff, Hilda 802 Delhi Ave. 

Evans, William Anders .Newport, Ky. 

Furness, Mary Baker 26 The Barclay 

Gilbert, Mary Alice 4408 Erie Ave. 

Gosling, Thomas Warrington 559 Evanswood Ave. 

Heckler, Ruby May K 219 Bodman Ave. 

Heisel, Emma Elizabeth 308 Shillito St. 

Howe, Clayton Morgan 508 Riddle Rd. 

Hyndman, Elizabeth 324 Mills Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Hyndman, Ruth 324 Mills Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Kendall, Dorothy C 4 St. James PI. 

Kiel, Anna 2400 E. Montana Ave. 

Koehler, Katherine Louise 2S07 Bellevue Ave. 

Kohnky, Emma Cor. Crown St. and Essex PI. 

Kroger, Lucile Ida 768 N. Crescent Ave. 

Levi, Isabelle J 3469 Trimble Ave. 

Loebman, Elise Reis 524 Hickman St. 

Logan, Helen 3492 Cheviot Ave. 

London, Henriette 3579 Bogart Ave. 

Lorenz, Eleanor E. North Bend Rd. 

Lotter, Frederick D 2425 McMicken Ave. 

March, Cora Wyoming, O. 

Nute, Mary Louise 5 The Marguerite, Norwood, O. 

Plimpton, Margaret Beach 731 Grand Ave., Price Hill 

Rickel, Gilbert John 2185 Harrison Ave. 

Rounds, Charles Rufus 6108 Epworth St., Madisonville 

Sears, Isabel Glendale, O. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 303 

Stanley, Helen Abigail 3576 Zunistein Ave. 

Stevenson, Paul Raymond 3228 Wold Ave. 

Thorndyke, Elizabeth 533 Camden Ave. 

VanWinkle, Edwin C 2930 Carthage Ave., Pleasant Ridge 

Waite, Mary Gloyd 4 The Delmoor 

Walker, Alfred Marshall 577 Considine Ave. 

Wartcki, Sarah M 815 Oak St. 

Wiedemer, Lottie 4821 Linden St., Norwood, O. 

Woellner, Fredric 1617 Dudley St. 

Yancey, Robert Lee 36 W. Tenth St., Covington, Ky. 

Zeller, Elsie M 729 Considine Ave. 

Seniors 

Ackerson, Estelle 307 Grove Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Brumleve, Camille 123 Hosea Ave. 

Clark, Hazel June 3242 Epworth Ave., Westwood 

Cowell, Jane 3015 Woodburn Ave. 

Cummins, Mary Dorothy 3453 Cornell P3. 

D'Amour, Martha Paula 7 The Elstun 

D'Arcy, Frances Elizabeth 454 E. Fifth St. 

Davis, Marguerite 235 Albion PI. 

Dean, Adelaide 826 W. Liberty St. 

Dones, Elizabeth Jane 5915 Sierra St. 

Elhoff, Edna Amanda 3251 Vine St. 

Eppinger, Jeanette 2242 Vine St. 

Fay, Sarah Helen 325 Reilly Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Forthman, William 3033 Percy Ave. 

Geoghegan, Marguerite 2108 Fulton Ave. 

Gilbert. Grace M 328 Albany Ave. 

Goodhart, Sadie Isabel 506 Hale Ave. 

Inskeep, Harold Elwood 1328 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Jacobs, Frederick Rudolph 1266 Iliff Ave. 

Jenkins, Ruth Le Marian 839 Washington Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Jones, Arthur David Cleves, O., and 3143 Jefferson Ave. 

Jones, Grace Elizabeth 2215 Cameron Ave., Norwood, O. 

Kautz, Mary 1209 Walnut St. 

Keiser, Madeline 245 McCormick PI. 

Linnard, Elizabeth Charlotte 2550 N. Ingleside Ave. 

Loeb, Martha 829 Rockdale Ave. 

Louis, Irene Lucile 420 Elizabeth St. 

McKee, Florence Louise 2201 Nelson Ave. 

Miller, Grace Eva Highland and Beech Aves., Norwood, O. 

Mombach, Blanche Althof 70 Albany Ave. 

Montgomery, Charlotte F 2325 Maryland Ave. 

O'Hara, Etta Marie 3047 Hackberry St. 

Orth, Helen 1925 Crown Ave., Norwood, O. 

Page, Mary Katherine 1344 Locust St. 

Phillips, Annetta Bodman Ave. and Young St. 

Phillips, Katherine 2525 Gilbert Ave. 

Rabenstein, Ruth Margherita 8429 Boudinot Ave. 

Scheuer, Irma 1522 Blair Ave. 

See, Oscar Franklin Blue Ash, O. 

Silver, Maxwell New York City, and 1358 Burdette Ave. 

Simon, Mary Emma 457 Considine Ave. 

Stiess, Lillian E 2327 Burnet Ave. 

Struke, Norma Louise 3334 Jefferson Ave. 

Tedtmann, Martha Florence 414 Betts St. 



304 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Van Tyne, Elizabeth Lucy 212 Chelsea PI., Delhi 

Wagner, Earl William 1114 Draper St. 

Wilfert, Elsie 358 Bryant Ave. 

Wissel, Clara Anna Sta. K, Mt. Airy, O. 

Wolfrom, Gertrude M 201 Maine Ave., Elmwood PI., O. 

Juniors 

Bridge,. Agnes Hill 1325 Yarmouth Ave. 

Crozier, Helen Edith 8 The Glenwood, College Hill 

Dury, Florence 529 W. Ridgeway Ave. 

Foote, Helen Allee 1773 Humboldt Ave. 

Getzendanner, Jessie Tumy 4540 Erie Ave. 

Halben, Matilda von der 3145 Bishop St. 

Hoffmann, Clara Eva 2908 Urwiler Ave., Westwood 

Kyte, Marguerite Louise 3430 Berry Ave. 

Richardson, Ruth Katharine 2632 Kemper Lane 

Volkert, Esther Florence 3502 Stacey Ave. 

Wuest, Alma Marie 158 W. McMillan St. 

Specials 

Morton, Ruth Dunham 2015 Hudson Ave., Norwood, O. 

Pixley, Marie Louise 2027 Auburn Ave. 

Art Students 

Cook, Grace Helen 1546 Dudley St. 

Franke, Emma Dorothy 568 Mt. Hope Rd., Price Hill 

Haring, Lucy Aurora, Ind. 

Hindman, Penelope R 940 Morris St. 

Hohneck, Clara E 1369 Myrtle Ave. 

Humphreys, Susannah Hamlin 1553 Blair Ave. 

Hyde, Roselind Rowe 814 Lincoln Ave. 

Kinning, Norma Dorothy North Bend Rd., College Hill 

Nickles, Martha Evelyn 1406 John St. 

Rauch, Mildred Ruth 1924 State Ave. 

Schrader, Louise E 2215 Ohio Ave. 

Wagner, Edna A S. E. Cor. Ninth and Linn Sts. 

Kindergartners 

Abrams, Tracy Gertrude Urbana, O., and 3442 Hallwood PI. 

Brown, Esther Doris Franklin, O., and 813 Oak St. 

Buckner, Lucille 746 W. Eighth St. 

Butler, Agnes Marie 709 W. Fourth St. 

Egloffstein, Selma C. von 948 Grand Ave., Price Hill 

Evans, Sara Mildred 4009 Floral Ave., Norwood, O. 

Feid, Florence 2156 Staebler St. 

Harrison, Willa L 4259 Fergus St. 

Hawthorne, Viola E 1224 London Ave. 

Hellmuth, Marie Ann Chillicothe, O., and 6 Linton St. 

Hellmuth, Elizabeth Mary Chillicothe, O., and 6 Linton St. 

Hunt, Hazel 3350 Carthage Ave. 

Lewis, Lelia Jacksonville, Fla., and 813 Oak St. 

Meyer, Florence Ruth 216 Calhoun Ave. 

Mussman, Elsie Lillian 2033 Pine St., Covington, Ky. 

Ortman, Carrie Edith 2418 Shannon Ave., South Norwood, O. 

Reed, Lena Amelia 941 Grand Ave., Price Hill 

Richard, Virginia Davis 3541 Burch Ave. 

Richmond, J. Margaret Kings Mills, O., and 813 Oak St. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 305 

Ridd. Rose Ellen 834 York St., Newport, Ky. 

Shelley, Elizabeth Gertrude 239 Albion PI. 

Sorin, Marie C 2612 Eden Ave. 

Tudor, Margaret Blanche 660 Gholson Ave. 

Wilson, Eves Martha Kings Mills, O., and 813 Oak St. 

Wolter, Ethel A 933 York St. 

Home Economics 

Brosius, Ruth 511 Prospect PI. 

Brown, Lucy Atwater 183 Grand Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Brunhoff, Elsie 215 Forest Ave. 

Collins, Stella Lee 2 The Navarre 

Deitemeier, Wilhelmina 2519 Homestead PI. 

Fisher, Adelaide Peale 404 Crestiine Ave., Price Hill 

Gillham, Olive Louise 217 Sterritt Ave. 

Johnson, Della Martha 2343 Park St. 

Kroger, Lucille 768 N. Crescent Ave. 

Messersmith, Edna Myrtle 408 Highland PL, Elmwood, O. 

Sellew, Gladys 2515 Auburn Ave. 

Sheehy, Kathleen 928 York St., Newport, Ky. 

Skinner, Mrs. Julia 2626 May St. 

Smith, Ruth Lenore 227 Section Ave., Hartwell 

Snodcrass, Mary Blanche 334 McGregor Ave. 

Sowards, Garnet Wilson 838 Hutchins Ave. 

Spears, Julia Mae 1333 Russell Ave., Covington, Ky. 

Stockman, Louise May 2302 Norwood Ave., Norwood, O. 

Vickery, Helen Evansville, Ind., and 3749 Rosedale Ave. 

Weller, Mary Purdue 257 Hosea Ave. 

William, Francis Corinne 3415 Paxton Rd. 

Wilson, Gladys 4235 Forest Ave., Norwood, O. 

Wilson, Ruth Evelyn 287 McGregor Ave. 

Teachers 

Anderson, Jane Holmes 4811 Winton Rd. 

Appel, Louis Karl 264 Calhoun St. 

Austin, Jennie 1110 Lincoln Ave. 

Baldridge, Edward Holmes 4 Oak Ave., Hartwell 

Becht, Isabel N 3402 Clifton Ave. 

Beck, Marguerite Mt. Washington 

Becker, Lillie 416 Hawthorne Ave. 

Bell, Maggie Eloise 1357 Lincoln Ave. 

Bieler, Flora 240 E. University Ave. 

Billian, Augusta 308 W. McMillan St. 

Bolender, Edward L Monroe, O. 

Boyd, Emma 2876 Montana Ave. 

Burdge, Alice Virginia 1873 Kinney Ave. 

Gallon, Albert Milford, O. 

Chalker, Leonidas R 5715 Arnsby PI. 

Chidlaw, William M Cleves, O. 

Claassen, Clara M 4025 Elsmere Ave. 

Clephane, Ulysses David 1553 Dixmont Ave. 

Cragg, Elsie M 732 Sturgis Ave., Hartwell 

Dearness, Frederick William 2654 Harrison Ave. 

Deckebach, Ella M 1518 Fairfax Ave. 

Dunn, Jesse K 3458 Cheviot Ave. 

Flick, Catherine 721 W. Ninth St. 

Friason, Camille 1021 Foraker Ave. 



306 COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Fullman, Susie 7 S. Harrison Ave., Mt. Healthy, O. 

Gibson, Alice J 3222 Harrison St. 

Gould, Catherine May 9 Walnut Ave. 

Gregg, Nellie A 1930 Williams Ave. 

Grieser, Adolphus Louis 3039 Montana Ave. 

Haehnle, Elmer C 830 York St. 

Harting, Caroline 228 Wayne Ave., Lockland, O. 

Hauer, Frank J 3254 Montana Ave. 

Hayes, Irene 6780 Parkland Ave., Sayler Park 

Hayes, Royal Sayler Park 

Heckermann, Ruth 642 Monroe St., Newport, Ky. 

Herrle, Karl 3240 Bishop St. 

Hill. Edith Anna 3 The Roanoke 

Hoskinson, Elizabeth A 1355 Locust St. 

Hottendorf, Elizabeth 810 Richmond St. 

Housh, William K 238 Gilman Ave. 

Houston, Irene William Alexandria, Ky. 

Hughes, Allie Warsaw, Ky. 

Hugi, Elizabeth 505 Cooper Ave., Lockland, O. 

Hummel, Stella M 922 E. McMillan St. 

Johnson, Charles William 235 Williams Ave., Norwood, O. 

Johnson, Clifford V 4918 Roanoke Ave. 

Johnston, John B 1719 Hewitt Ave. 

Jones, Winifred 922 Nassau St. 

Kaefer, William 407 Ludlow Ave. 

Kiester, Muriel 3244 Gaff Ave., Walnut Hills 

Lackey, Margaret 6 The Brittany, Ninth and Race Sts. 

Lamarre, Louise 1436 Marlowe Ave., College Hill 

Lee, Charles Marston 2 Park PL 

Levy, Hattie Minnette 2623 Stanton Ave. 

Lindsey, Irene Batavia, O. 

Lyons, M. Ethel 426 Greenup St., Covington, Ky. 

McCormick, Claire A 806 Oak St. 

Meininger, Freda 1638 Pulte St. 

Minks, Floyd Grover 232 Calhoun St 

Myers, Callie 3200 Mozart Ave. 

Nagel, Amelia J Cherry Grove, O. 

Nagel, Charles F R. D. 2, Newtown, O. 

Oehler, Marie Elizabeth 717 Elberon Ave. 

O'Neal, Carrie 110 Foote Ave., Bellevue, Ky. 

Orr, Hazel C The New Westminster 

Osborn, Virginia A 3439 Whitfield Ave. 

Parks, Nettie M 405 E. McMillan St. 

Peace, Minnie E 1007 Rittenhouse St. 

Perin, Kate Pkesocia 4613 Central Ave. 

Powers, James P 205 Emma St., Covington, Ky. 

Reemelin, Isabelle 3417 Cheviot Ave. 

Regenstein, Anna Belle 24 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas, Ky. 

Reszke, Felix Eugene 2230 Spring Grove Ave. 

Richards, Daniel Smith 1036 Wesley Ave. 

Riesner, Anna 2358 Stratford Ave. 

Roetken, Emma L Ft. Mitchell, Ky. 

Rudolph, Harrison H 2664 Harrison Ave. 

Rush, Olive 4145 Hamilton Ave. 

Russell, Maude M 135 Mills Ave., Hartwell 

Savage, Emma A 512 Oak St., Wyoming, O. 

Schiel, Louis M 540 Terrace Ave. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 307 

Schlotman, R. C 3443 Pleasant View Ave. 

Schoepfel, Cora 832 Clinton St. 

Schriefer, Elsie 2358 Wheeler St. 

Schriefer, Verona Louise 2358 Wheeler St. 

Schroer, Catherine E 3022 Junietta Ave., Westwood 

Sears, Ruby Glendale, O. 

Seat, Elizabeth F 2303 Park Ave. 

Shaw, Agnes J 1550 St. Clair St., Covington, Ky. 

Siefert, Ella Station L 

Spooner, Beatrice Glendale, O. 

Stewart, W. B Silverton, O. 

Suter, Maud The New Westminster 

Swaim, Harriet Montgomery, O. 

Telker, Minna Johanna 220 Fosdick St. 

Thayer, Warren Nelson Spring St., Norwood, O. 

Trisler, Anna H Plainville, O. 

Trisler, Early Clinton Plainville, O. 

Warnking, May Rosemont and Andrews Aves. 

West, Florence Virginia 6123 Navarre PL, Madisonville 

Williams, Katherine Meredith 4425 Station Ave., Winton PI. 

Willis, Clara G 1332 Lincoln Ave. 

Wilson, Arthur Laurence Newtown, O. 

Wright, Florence M 3519 Beechmont Ave. 

Wuest, Edward J 3430 Cornell PI. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
Seniors 

Anderson, Yeatman, B. C. E Cleveland, O., and Riddle Rd. 

Andrew, James Peter, B. Ch. E 3600 Shaw Ave. 

Bloom, Charles Louis, B. Ch. E 1038 Wesley Ave. 

Fenker, Clement Meade, B. E. E 448 Considine Ave. 

Gerstle, John, B. Ch. E 20 The Crescent 

Hyndman, Jr., Robert, B. E. E 324 Mills Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Marks, Henry Albert, B. Ch. E 113 Garfield PI. 

Mitchell, Miron Allen, M. E 213 Worth Ave. 

Monaghan, Walter I., M. E 1908 Kinney Ave. 

Niermann, Theodore H., B. C. E 3552 Woodburn Ave. 

Raitt, Charles C, B. E. E 1875 Fairfax Ave. 

Salkover, Benedict, B. Ch. E 256 Ehrman Ave. 

Sive, Benjamin Elliott, B. Ch. E 1722 Fairfax Ave. 

Warrington, Charles Mitchell, B. E. E., Zanesville, O., and 3018 Woodside Ave. 

Sophomores 

Allen, Tom Morris, B. Ch. E 416 E. Eighth St., Newport, Ky. 

Goetz, Robert Alfred, B. M. E 151 W. McMillan St. 

Hake, Elmer Charles, B. M. E 4216 Sullivan Ave., St. Bernard 

Jones, Douglas Clyde, B. Ch. E 2320 Kemper Lane 

Krug, Jr., Frank Stanley, B. E. E 3352 Jefferson Ave. 

Langhammer, Anthony John, B. M. E 713 Crescent Ave., Covington, Ky. 

Mitchell, Robert Baker, B. E. E 6371 Rockway Ave. 

Kapetansky, Maurice, B. Ch. E 823 Richmond St. 

Freshmen 

Croake, William Thomas, B. E. E 928 Armory Ave. 

Divine, Laurence A., B. Ch. E 27 Worthington Ave., Wyoming, O. 

James, Davis Lawler, B. M. E 310 Oak St. 



308 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Krusling, J. Albert, B. E. E > 2561 Erie Ave. 

Lutz, Joseph Nixon, B. Ch. E 128 Wilmuth Ave., Wyoming, O. 

McHugh, Robert James, B. M. E 3444 Cornell PI. 

Miller, Leroy Robert, B. E. E 139 Washington Ave., Bellevue, Ky. 

Spills, John Herman, B. C. E 3439 Zumstein Ave. 

Fifth Year Co-operative Students 

Bishop, James Stanley, E. E 2345 Kemper Lane 

Chalkley, Curtis Rathbone, M. E 1712 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Chisholm, James Carpenter, E. E Glendale Ave., Madisonville 

Dartnall, Thomas William, C. E Lockland, O. 

Engdahl, Frederick William, C. E Ortonville, Minn., and 2558 Eden Ave. 

Graef, August Phillip, M. E 2911 Webster Ave., Hyde Park 

Harding, Edward Crittenden, C. E Milf ord, O. 

Hurxthal, Alphonse O., M. E Rouceverte, W. Va., and 127 Calhoun St. 

Kihn, William Johnson, Ch. E Hamilton, O., and 116 Parker St. 

Klein, Chester Thomas, C. E Hot Springs, Ark., and 2841 Melrose Ave. 

Lange, Charles Henry Louis, C. E Ortonville, Minn., and 116 Parker St 

Plueddemann, Edward Westley, M. E 2564 Euclid Ave. 

Race, Richard Mann, M. E Covington, Ky., and 2319 Stratford Ave. 

Reed, Robert Findley, Ch. E .844 Oak St. 

Sharkey, William Edward, M. E Middletown, O., and 845 Dayton St. 

Sheriff, John Waters, E. E Williamsport, Pa., and 2558 Eden Ave. 

Stewart, John Harold, E. E 2558 Eden Ave. 

Story, Edward, B. Met. E 4413 Eighth St. 

Strait, Clay Mortimer, E. E Homer, N. Y., and 213 Calhoun St. 

Tilden, Chauncey Morgan, C. E Vernon, Mich., and 2558 Eden Ave. 

Westenhoff, Alphonse Mueller, C. E 2621 Fenton Ave. 

Wiant, Paul Prince, C. E 238 McCormick PI. 

Wood, Charles Estes, Ch. E 634 Glenway Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Fourth Year Co-operative Students 

Alexander, Lowell Melville, E. E 3427 Middleton Ave. 

Ames, John Hubbard, Ch. E 2304 Madison Ave. 

Binns, H. Stanley, M. E Herndon, Ky., and 2407 Kenton St. 

Blackford, Ralph E., M. E Middletown, O., and 844 Oak St. 

Burns, Francis Ormsby, M. E 1804 Larch Ave., College Hill 

Burrhus, Harold Cloude, C. E Riverdale, Md., and 3231 Bishop St 

Carpenter, Harold D., M. E Bellevue, Ky., and 3427 Middleton Ave. 

Chace, Clyde Burgess, C. E 3231 Bishop St. 

Crissinger, Lloyd Charles, C. E 76 Linden St., Ludlow, Ky. 

Da Camara, Jr., William Harley, C. E., W. Palm Beach, Fla., and 3231 Bishop St. 

Dollman, John Willet, M. E 759 Richmond St. 

Erickson, Alvin John, M. E Winona, Minn., and 2304 Victor St 

Felton, Stephen Jacob, Ch. E Towanda, Pa., and 108 E. University Ave. 

Fillmore, Herbert Worth, E. E Terrace Park, O. 

Gilmore, Robert Willis, B. C. E 754 Epworth Ave. 

Halsey, George Dawson, C. E DeLand, Fla., and 2336 Wheeler St 

Harned, Mark LaFayette, E. E Chickasha, Okla., and 116 Parker St. 

Hartmann, Carl, M. E 3798 Liston Ave. 

Higgins, Chester Lyon, C E Bellevue, Mich., and 3425 Middleton Ave. 

Kohlhepp, Norman, Met. E Louisville, Ky., and 2210 Ohio Ave. 

Lehnhoff, Raymond S., E. E 475 Riddle Rd. 

Maish, Albert Frederick, C. E 1323 Laidlaw Ave., Bond Hill 

Metzger, George D., B. E. E 29 Section Ave., Hartwell 

Montgomery, Thaddeus James, C. E 2325 Maryland Ave. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1318-14 809 

Myers, Raymond Pendery, M. E 619 Burns Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Oster, Eugene Arthur, E. E 1065 Wade St. 

Otte, Jr., Charles William, M. E 2522 Hackberry St. 

Perry, Arlington Clyde, E. E Erie, Pa., and 707 E. McMillan St. 

Pyne, Roland Ralph, C. E 10 E. Front St., Newport, Ky. 

Schaeperklaus, Louis Henry A., C. E 1384 Harrison Ave. 

Scofield, F. Leslie, C. E Mason, O., and 2304 Victor St. 

Swinney, Stuart La Force, M. E Ottumwa, Iowa, and 4708 Eastern Ave. 

Sylvester, William Lapp, C. E Buffalo, N. Y., and 2614 Stratford Ave. 

Toms, Charles Lawson Wildey, Ch. E 223 Calhoun St. 

Vinnedge, Earle Walter, M. E 34 Walnut St., Wyoming, O. 

Vogelsang, Walter Andrew, C. E 1649 Clayton St. 

Voss, Raymond Frank, M. E 3447 Whitfield Ave. 

Wallace, Bruce Hinds, C. E 3576 St. Charles PI. 

Williams. Berkeley, M. E Middletown, Conn., and 272 McCormick PI. 

Woliung, William Edward, Ch. E 4346 Tower Ave., St. Bernard 

Wulfekoetter, Burt Henry, C. E 1317 Myrtle Ave. 

Yocum, Gilbert Gaston, E. E . Steubenville, O., and 350 Terrace Ave. 

Third Year Co-operative Students 

Baer, Bernard Edward, C. E 3465 Reading Rd. 

Biehl, John Fred, E. E 1510 Bremen St. 

Black, Ambrose Charles Luke, M. E 126 Main Ave., Elmwood PI. 

Clyde, Edgar Adam, B. C. E 523 Considine Ave. 

Fishburn, Charles Cyrus, C. E 108 Huntington PI. 

Foster, Ralph Firbank, M. E 36 Mills Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Franklin, Jacob, C. E 2702 Hackberry St. 

Goosman, Herbert John, M. E 730 Froome Ave., Winton PI. 

Hayes, William Leonard, M. E Medford. Mass., and 3646 Carthage Ave. 

Hecht, Vernon George, C. E Mt. Healthy, O. 

Howard, William Rappe, C. E Preston, Minn., and 3427 Middleton Ave. 

Jewett, Joseph Franklin, E. E 507 Springfield Pike, Wyoming, O. 

Johnston, Paul Kennedy, E. E 1719 Hewitt Ave. 

Kiefer, Abe, Met. E 511 Howell Ave. 

Kruse, Ralph Henry, B. E. E Sixth and Main Sts., Carthage 

Lee, Maynard De Wilton, C. E Lima, N. Y., and 127 Calhoun St. 

Leighton, Frank C, C. E 307 Ludlow Ave. 

Lineaweaver, Fernleigh Cyrus, M. E 3616 Eastern Ave. 

McKee, Charles Clinton, E. E Findlay, O., and 307 Ludlow Ave. 

McKinney, Earl Chapin, M. E 216 Woolper Ave. 

Messinger, Henry Calvert, M. E 267 Calhoun St. 

Mizner, Ralph Adam, C. E Wheatland, Pa., and 3427 Middleton Ave. 

Moffett, John Harrison, Met. E Rushville, Ind., and 2718 Wagner St. 

Mould, Alec Fowler, C. E Niagara Falls, N. Y., and 272 McCormick PI. 

Norton, Fay Arthur, E. E Piqua, O., and 3542 Trimble Ave. 

Oberschmidt, Fred Herman, E. E 2515 Addison St. 

O'Loughlin, Joseph J., C. E Naugatauk, Conn., and 127 Calhoun St. 

Pemberton, Harold Vernon, Ch. E Buffalo, N. Y., and 2614 Stratford Ave. 

Pepinsky, Bernard, C. E 1358 Lincoln Ave. 

Phares, Hugh Kinzel, C. E 3719 Terrace PI. 

Phelps, Stephen B., M. E Green Hill, Pa., and 707 E. McMillan St. 

Rettich, Paul Frederick, Ch. E 205 Oak St. 

Rickwood, Rowland Lee, M. E Evansville, Ind., and 2407 Kenton St. 

Robinson, William, C. E 3119 Imperial Ave. 

Rodgers, Thomas Franklin, C. E Lockland 

Russo, Prosper, C. E •. 2512 Chatham St. 



310 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Schneider, Ben Ross, C. E Summit Hill, Pa., and 2&58 Eden Ave. 

Schreiber, William August, C. E 626 June St. 

Schroth, Herbert Henry, C. E 2966 Henshaw Ave. 

Seamands, Earl Arnett, C. E Tucson, Ariz., and 3427 Middleton Ave. 

Shepard, Morton Bradley, C. E Beloit, Wis., and 2614 Stratford Ave. 

Stenger, Edwin Peter, Ch. E Harrison, O., and 2614 Stratford Ave. 

Stewart, Wilbur Albio, E. E 1852 Columbia Ave. 

Tangney, Thomas James, E. E Seattle, Wash., and 3427 Middleton Ave. 

Thompson, Guy, E. E Lebanon, O., and 2516 Ravine St. 

Valerio, Giacinto, C. E. E 907 Elberon Ave. 

Wilhelmy, Odin, B. Ch. E 3345 Woodburn Ave. 

Second Year Co-operative Students 

Allen, Jr., William Morris, E. E 3548 Wabash Ave. 

Auch, Ralph Henry, Ch. E Chillicothe, O., and 370 Howell Ave. 

Avery, Albert Rollins, E. E Alexandria, S. Dak., and 3231 Bishop St. 

Bailey, Addison Shaw, Ch. E Port Arthur, Tex., and 36 W. McMillan St. 

Baker, James Leopold, Ch. E .Pleasant Ridge 

Behle, Howard Franklin, Met. E 829 Betts St. 

Bower, Raymond Bernard, M. E. .. .Marine City, Mich., and 4708 Eastern Ave. 

Bryant, Leslie Edwin, M. E LaPorte, Ind., and 2614 Stratford Ave. 

Buckton, Robert Tomlinson, M. E 2312 Washington Ave., Norwood, O. 

Conway, Oliver Harold, C. E Mt. Healthy, O. 

Cowell, Warner Tuttle, M. E Westfield, N. Y., and 370 Howell Ave. 

Craddock, Alfred John, Ch. E 1038 Saratoga St., Newport, Ky. 

Curry, Chauncey James, M. E Milford, O. 

DeQuasie, Lacey Glenn, M. E Deepwater, W. Va., and 4224 Brownway Ave. 

Dougherty, Sidney Swain, M. E Liberty, Ind., and 2657 Dennis St. 

Ellis, Jr., William Hartshorne, C. E 2461 Grandin Rd. 

Elmore, Paul Williamson, E. E Chattanooga, Tenn., and 2330 Wheeler St. 

Ernst, Henry Samuel, M. E Tiffin, O., and 208 Calhoun St. 

Faran, Jr., James John, M. E 2920 Observatory Rd. 

Fehlmann, Alfred Otto Bernhard, M. E 1937 Harrison Ave. 

Feldman, Edmund Burke, C. E 3591 Wilson Ave. 

Fischer, Oswald, M. E Fitchburg, Mass., and 309 Ludlow Ave. 

Forde, Jr., Charles William, M. E Milford, O. 

Frey, Leslie L., E. E 2442 Kennilworth Ave., Norwood, O. 

Fuller, John Emory, M. E Senoia, Ga., and 2354 Flora Ave. 

Genzmer, Paul Ernest Raymond, C E. . . Pittsfield, Mass., and 2700 Park Ave. 

George, Herbert, M. E Fitchburg, Mass., and 2330 Wheeler St. 

Gerst, William Joseph, E. E 658 W. McMicken Ave. 

Giebel, Robert, E. E 526 Howell Ave. 

Gordon, Myron Boyd, E. E 309 Ludlow Ave. 

Gough, Arthur Charles, M. E Fitchburg, Mass., and S09 Ludlow Ave. 

Gowdy, Edwin Finley, E. E Lebanon, O., and 2115 Auburn Ave. 

Green, William Harrison, E. E 2231 Burnet Ave. 

Guest, Ward Earl, M. E Hoopeston, 111., and 127 Calhoun St. 

Hall, Joseph MacFarlane, E. E LaPorte, Tex., and 2363 Stratford Ave. 

Hamilton, Herbert North, E. E., Cumberland Gap, Tenn., and 2366 Stratford Ave. 

Harkness, Earl William, E. E East Lynn, 111., and 2210 Ohio Ave. 

Harrington, Earl Lawrence, C. E Westfield, N. Y., and 2432 Clifton Ave. 

Herlinger, Harold Van Cleve, Ch. E 607 Lexington Ave., Newport, Ky. 

Holz, Robert, C. E 3574 Edwards Rd. 

Horn, Silas H., E. E Richmond, Ind., and 208 Calhoun St. 

Huber, William Robert, M. E Richmond, Ind., and 3018 Woodside PI. 

Hunt, Lawrence Edwin, C. E *..5405 Central Ave., Madisonville 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 311 

Janneck, Frank George, M. E Northport, Wash., and 520 Riddle Rd. 

Johnston, Roswell Armstrong, M. E 1028 Considine Ave. 

Kinch, John Taylor, C. E Clarksburg, W. Va., and 2341 Stratford Ave. 

Krapp, Clarence George, M. E 6058 Oakwood Ave. 

Kuhlman, Leo George, E. E 819 Barr St. 

Kunker, Charles Eugene, C. E Morrow, O., and Wyoming, O. 

Laird, Glover Eugene, E. E Highland, O. 

Landis, George Herman, E. E Tokyo, Japan, and 2210 Ohio Ave. 

Langenheim, Ralph Louis, C. E 3543 Michigan Ave. 

Lawton, George Wilmot, E. E Lawton, Mich., and 374 Howell Ave. 

Lloyd, John C, M. E Van Wert, O., and 2350 Clifton Ave. 

Mahon, James Stephen, C. E 3370 Morrison Ave. 

Monce, Edwin Walton, C. E 3558 Monteith Ave. 

Morris, Burton Clo, M. E 2629 Park Ave. 

Morris, Joseph Green, M. E Evanston, 111., and 429 Resor Ave. 

Morrison, Arthur Julius, C. E 3558 Beechmont Ave. 

Morrison, Garfield, M. E Bethel, Conn., and 2568 Euclid Ave. 

Mueller, Stephen King, M. E 1719 Central Ave. 

Noe, Oscar Perrine, M. E 4730 Winton Rd. 

Palmer, Roy, M. E 825 Chateau Ave. 

Patton, Laban Theodore, E. E Catlettsburg, Ky., and 2356 Auburn Ave. 

Pendery, Horace Findlay, M. E 3611 Zumstein Ave. 

Peterson, Henry Andrew, M. E Berkeley, Cal., and 1309 Wheeler St. 

Porter, Harold Mitchell, M. E Avery Lane, Hyde Park 

Reck, Kelson, M. E Rockford, 111., and 2616 May St. 

Reynolds, Clifford, C. E 6 Linton St. 

Rush, Thomas William, C. E Niagara Falls, N. Y., and 2300 Wheeler St. 

Scallan, Paul, Ch. E 2824 Price Ave. 

Schneider, Anton Wilhelm, M. E Summit Hill, Pa., and 2558 Eden Ave. 

Schoettle, George Paul, C. E 3941 Dickson Ave. 

Seitz, Arthur John, Ch. E 705 Delhi Ave. 

Soller, Walter, M. E Talbott Ave., Sta. B 

Spence, James Carl, M. E Milford, O. 

Taylor, James William, M. E Reedsville, Pa., and 526 Riddle Rd. 

Thompson, William Phipps, C. E 2233 Frances Lane 

Uihlein, Henry Calmer, M. E 2706 Cleinview Ave. 

Utley, Romeyn Lathrop, E. E Seneca Falls, N. Y., and 3014 Burnet Ave. 

Voorhes, Marion L, Ch. E Blue Ash, O. 

Weekes, Clifton L'Original, C. E New York City, and 2210 Ohio Ave. 

Walker, Samuel Washington Luccock, Met. E., Woodward, Okla., and 901 

Chateau Ave. 

; Webb, Edgar Morrison, M. E Reedsville, Pa., and 526 Riddle Rd. 

| Weil, Gordon, M. E 820 Hutchins Ave. 

Wilson, Lew E., E. E Indianapolis, Ind., and 2S33 Stanton Ave. 

Wuenker, Ralph Frederick, M. E 547 Ringgold St. 

First Year Co-operative Students 

Alexander, Don Fisk, E. E Dayton, O., and 2313 Stratford Ave. 

1 Altamer, Harold Miller, M. E 1511 Groesbeck Rd., College Hill 

Anderegg, Rupert Andrew, C. E Long Lake, Minn., and 2360 Clifton Ave. 

Anderson, Raymond Desmond, E. E Greensburg, Ind., and 57 Calhoun St. 

Andrew, William, M. E Fitchburg, Mass., and 40 E. McMillan St. 

Aug, George Christian, C. E 3740 Lueders Ave., Hyde Park 

Bagel, Walter Thomas, Ch. E 4237 Brookside Ave. 

Bernard, Byron Franklin, M. E Liberty, Ind., and 3231 Bishop St. 

Baude, Walter Andrew, Ch. E Louisville, Ky., and 3231 Bishop St. 



312 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Bauer, Edwin Francis, C. E Indianapolis, Ind., and 2363 Stratford Ave. 

Bishop, Russell Perne, E. E Ft. Duchesne, Utah, and 2360 Clifton Ave. 

Botts, Earl Albert, M. E.. Anderson, Ind., and 514 E. Third St., Newport, Ky. 

Braun, Ernst, C. E 2434 Ingelside Ave. 

Brett, James Arthur, E. E Lafayette Circle 

Britain, Glenn H., E. E El Douds, Kan., and 2711 Auburn Ave. 

Brown, Darwin Scott, E. E 228 Piedmont Ave. 

Brown, George Carlton, E. E Williamsport, Pa., and 2309 Wheeler St. 

Bruck, Albert George, M. E Hamilton, O., and 4224 Brownway Ave. 

Brumback, David La Doyt, M. E Van Wert, O., and 3554 Flora Ave. 

Burkett, Dillard, Ch. E R. F. D. 1, Madisonville 

Butterfield, Asa Van Wormer, M. E 5946 Belmont Ave. 

Carr, Lucien Stevens, C E 3534 Stettinius Ave., Hyde Park 

Chapman, Henry Gordon, C. E R. F. D. 1, Madisonville 

Clark, Carlton Cobb, E. E Koshkonong, Mo., and 2309 Wheeler St. 

Cranmer, Rodney Louis, C. E Sheohequin, Pa., and 2700 Park Ave. 

Davie, Robert, E. E Ozone Park, L. I., and 2210 Ohio Ave. 

Delehanty, Rudolph Daniel, C. E 3S39 Hopkins St., Norwood, O. 

Dell, George W., M. E 1820 Race St. 

Dicer, Clyde Gillford, E. E Griffith, Ind., and 58 E. McMillan St. 

Dikeman, Howard Wilbur, E. E Chickasha, Okla., and 3231 Bishop St. 

Doran, John Edward, E. E 3074 Sidney Ave. 

Du Mars, Charles Vincent, E. E Kennard, Pa., and 312 Straight St. 

Earley, Raymond Emmett, E. E 60 Mt. Claire Ave., Ludlow, Ky. 

Ehlers, William Donald, C. E 4208 Brookside Ave. 

Elhoff, Erwin John, E. E 3251 Vine St. 

Ely, Lawrence Sterling, E. E 955 Nassau St. 

Fialco, Harry, Ch. E 539 W. Eighth St. 

Fisher, Clinton George, Ch. E 2384 Rohs St. 

Fisher, John Howard, C. E 6212 Erie Ave., Madisonville 

Fortlage, Carl Ernst, C. E 838 Monroe St., Newport, Ky. 

Fries, Daniel Gustav, E. E 1826 Garrard St., Covington, Ky. 

Fuller, Robert Benjamin, C. E Senoia, Ga., and 3231 Bishop St. 

Gabriel, Louis Summers, C. E 4007 Elvin Ave., Norwood, O. 

Gaus, Elmer Edward, M. E.. Anderson, Ind., and 1132 Main St., Covington, Ky. 
Gardner, Greyson Curtis, E. E., Cottage Grove, Ind., and 2079 Lawrence Ave., 

Norwood, O. 

Garvin, Hugh, M. E Santiago, Chile, S. A., and 2354 Flora St. 

Geile, Wilfred George, C. E Seymour, Ind., and 306 Northern Ave. 

Gerstle, Joseph Peter, M. E 3558 Beechmont Ave. 

Glenn, Earl Clifford, C. E 4242 Chambers St. 

Grandin, John Jonas, E. E Lorenzo, Idaho, and 136 W. McMillan St. 

Greenleaf, Frank Mount, M. E Kingman, Kan., and 2519 Auburn Ave. 

Greenman, Ralph Griggs, C. E....Pond Creek, Okla., and 1764 Fairmount Ave. 

Greiwe, Hubert Bernard, C. E 1757 Williams Ave., Norwood, O. 

Grisard, John Keehlar, E. E 3870 Ivanhoe Ave., Norwood, O. 

Grossius, William Henry, C. E 2906 Woodburn Ave. 

Hall, Walter William, M. E La Porte, Tex., and 2363 Stratford Ave. 

Haller, Herbert Ludwig Jacob, E. E 2313 Victor St. 

Hamilton, William Walter, C. E 2429 Fairview Ave. 

Hand, Carl Annen, E. E Rockford, 111., and 127 Calhoun St. 

Harrell, Robert Jessup, C. E Cleves, O. 

Haslette, George Goodman, M. E Altoona, Pa., and 32 Hollister St. 

Hartman, Samuel Matthew, M. E. . .Indianapolis, Ind., and 2334 Kemper Lane 

Henlein, Herbert George, Ch. E 2941 Marshall Ave. 

Hill, John Howard, C. E 5023 Ward St., Madisonville 

Hodapp, George Henry, C. E 7100 Carthage Ave. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1918-14 313 

Hodtum, Joseph Bernhardt, E. E 505 Milton St. 

Hogue, Edmund Burke, E. E Altoona, Pa., and 32 Hollister St. 

Howland, Herman Chambers, C. E 2365 Kemper Lane 

Judkins, Robert Charles, C. E 130 Fairfield Ave., Bellevue, Ky. 

Kane, Herbert William, M. E New Orleans, La., and 2657 Dennis St. 

Katker, William Cortmun, C. E 3229 Glendora Ave. 

Kaufman, Benedict, Ch. E 541 Clinton St. 

Kemp, George Lawrence, M. E 26 N. Crescent Ave., Hartwell 

Kenyon, Samuel Albert, M. E Fitchburg, Mass., and 40 E. McMillan St. 

Kihn, Edgar Joseph, Ch. E Hamilton, O., and Woodside Ave. 

Kincaid, Earl Belmont, Ch. E Glenrose, O. 

King, Clinton Burton, E. E 1767 Chase St. 

Kinyon, Harold Alonzo, Ch. E 211 Bodman Ave. 

Kremis, Edward Henry, E. E Greenville, Pa., and 108 E. University Ave. 

Kreuzer, Charles Percival, M. E Schenectady, N. Y., and 312 Straight St. 

Kroeger, Gustav Henry, M. E 1837 Clarion Ave. 

Kysor, Karl Daniel, M. E Blytheville, Ark., and 3231 Bishop St. 

Lair, Jack Reynolds, E. E Dayton, O. 

Leary, John Francis, M. E Little Falls, N. Y., and 350 Terrace Ave. 

Lehrer, William Keyser, E. E Rushy Ivania, O., and Glendale, O. 

Lindsley, Allen Moore, M. E 4546 Edgewood Ave., Winton PI. 

Lynn, Harry William, M. E Grand Rapids, Wis., and 3231 Bishop St. 

McComas, Donald Richard, E. E 2152 Alpine PI. 

McCormick, Harold Vooriiees, E. E 3110 Woodburn Ave. 

McDonald, William John, Ch. E 3257 Southside Ave. 

McGill, Max Pittenger, C. E Albion, Neb., and 309' Ludlow Ave. 

McNeill, John Pehrson, C. E 5530 Covington Ave., Madisonville 

Mackay, Adam Macdonald, C. E Buffalo, N. Y., and 3231 Bishop St. 

Maddox, Harry Edward, E. E Mt. Carmel, O., and 2132 Colerain Ave. 

Markgraf, Carl Alexander, C. E 50 Graham St. 

Marlatt, Huston Reese, E. E., Richmond, Ind., and 130 Fairfield Ave., 

Bellevue, Ky. 
Marquis, Edv/ard Given, E. E. . .Marietta, O., and 4215 Smith Rd., Norwood, O. 

Maulen, Henry, Ch. E Vine and Rochelle Sts. 

Miller, Abe Jack, Ch. E 6 Waldamar Flats 

Mills, Pellham Eugene, M. E McCombs, Miss., and 2521 Auburn Ave. 

Mitchell, Esker Radford, C. E Dayton, O., and 2313 Stratford Ave. 

Moch, James Lowman, M. E 3704 Reading Rd. 

Montgomery, James William, E. E 2214 Highland Ave. 

Morse, Jr., Wellslake Demarest, C. E Pasadena, Cal., and 370 Howell Ave. 

Mourad, Oscar Andrews, M. E. Hartford, Conn., and 2207 Auburn Ave. 

Muenzenmaier, Albert George, Ch. E Lebanon, O., and 2444 Harrison Ave. 

Murphy, Don Carlos, C. E.. Lincoln, 111., and 85 W. Fourth St., Covington, Ky. 

Myers, Robert William, M. E 5024 Forest Ave. ? Norwood, O. 

Nelson, Oriel Benson, C. E 4712 Ward St., Madisonville 

Newbigging, Alfred Buckingham, E. E 3424 Stettinius Ave. 

Newton, Harold Wilson, M. E Elmira, N. Y., and 2521 Auburn Ave. 

Nycum, Homer Clarke, E. E Keota, Iowa, and 127 Calhoun St. 

O'Connell, John, E. E 627 Hawthorne Ave. 

Ogden, Chauncey McCall, C. E Franklin, N. Y., and 3231 Bishop St. 

Osterbrock, William Carl, E. E 119 West 15th St. 

Ottenjohn, Ralph Fetta, M. E 3552 Mooney Ave. 

Parsons, Tremaine, C. E Lenox, Mass., and 2141 Clifton Ave. 

Pease, William Page, E. E Rutland, Vt„ and 3231 Bishop St. 

Peck, Ferdinand, Ch. E 2341 Stratford Ave. 

Peterman, William Arthur, C. E 5725 Prentice Ave. 

Phillips, M. S., Ch. E 524 S. Main St., Middletown, O. 



314 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Pinchard, Frank, E. E Georgetown, O., and 723 Delta Ave. 

Porter, Charles Harold, C. E 2210 Ohio Ave. 

Proctor, Leland Manning, Ch. E Everett, Wash., and 2657 Dennis St. 

Quinlan, Joseph Alonzo, E. E Georgetown, O., and 723 Delta Ave. 

Richardson, Arthur Fox, M. E 2632 Kemper Lane 

Riehle, Arthur Phillip, E. E 2315 Victor St. 

Ritchie, Andrew Oscar, C. E 34 Elm St., Ludlow, Ky. 

Root, Emery Nelson, C. E Lenox, Mass., and 2700 Park Ave. 

Rybolt, Walter Lawrence, M. E 1965 Fairfax Ave 

Ruckstuhl, Edwin William, Ch. E 306S Wardell Ave. 

Sadler, Dudley Karkalitz, C. E New Orleans, La., and 317 Straight St. 

Schakel, Walter Charles, C. E Indianapolis, Ind., and 2148 Kindle Ave. 

Schneider, Arthur Henry, C E 4283 Hamilton Ave. 

Scholle, Clarence George, C. E 1563 W. Sixth St. 

Schroder, Frederick Frank, C. E 526 York St. 

Schuh, Lester Sieper, E. E Marietta, O., and 4215 Smith Rd., Norwood, 0. 

Segal, Harry, Ch. E 643 Cutter St. 

Sellors, Carl, E. E Greenville, Pa., and 108 E. University Ave. 

Shaw, Michael Gerald, E. E St. Claire, Mich., and 208 Calhoun St. 

Shephard, George Barney, E. E El Reno, Cal., and 312 Straight St. 

Shuler, Tom Crawford, C. E Arcanum, O., and 2863 Stratford Ave. 

Silva, Leroy Francis, C. E 316 Overton St., Newport, Ky. 

Sisson, Harry Elwood, E. E Marietta, O., and 58 E. Auburn Ave. 

Smith, George Holcombe, E. E 1 048 Pine St. 

Smith, John Edwin, E. E Dayton, O., and 2217 Clifton Ave. 

Sorenson, James Carlyle, C. E Omaha, Neb., and 2141 Clifton Ave. 

Stebbins, Sam Statham, M. E McComb, Mich., and 2521 Auburn Ave. 

Steck, Howard, Ch. E Rushville, Ind., and 3820 Linden Ave. 

Steen, John M., C. E., Memphis, Tenn., and N. E. Cor. Clifton and McMillan Aves. 

Stenger, Bernard Henry, Ch. E Harrison, O., and 2614 Stratford Ave. 

Stratmoen, Albert, E. E Boyd, Minn. 

Sullivan, John Thomas, C. E 1922 Greenup St., Covington, Ky. 

Summer, Tully H., C. E Springfield, 111., and 3427 Middleton Ave. 

Talcott, Harold Platt, C. E Lanesboro, Mass., and 2700 Park Ave. 

Taylor, Hall Acton, Ch. E 347 Sims Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Thomas, Sam Morgan, E. E Catlettsburg, Ky., and 2657 Dennis St 

Thum, Edwin John George, M. E Dayton, O., and 2217 Clifton Ave. 

Todd, Fred Charles, C. E 3920 Hazel Ave., Norwood, O. 

Tucker, Harold Scott, C. E 85 W. Fourth St., Covington, Ky. 

Tull, Lawrence Emerson, C. E 939 Chateau St. 

Van Eaton, John Wallace, M. E R. R. 4, Xenia, O. i 

Venosa, Phillip, C. E 860 Buena Vista PI. 

Waltamath, Alvah Henry, M. E Pittsfield, Mass., and 2700 Park Ave. 

Waters, Willard Singler, M. E Georgetown, O., and 2313 Stratford Ave. 

Weed, Stanley V., C. E Bellevue, Mich., and 3427 Middleton Ave. 

Weirich, John Leroy, E. E Rockford, 111., and 127 Calhoun St. 

Werfelman, Elmer Henry, E. E 3422 Liston Ave. 

Wiedemer, Maurice Becht, E. E 4821 Linden Ave., Norwood, O. 

Williams, Saul Augustus, M. E Cumberland, Md., and 2519 Auburn Ave. 

Wittenmyer, Paul Frederick, E. E Arcanum, O., and 2368 Stratford Ave. 

Wittich, William, C. E 523 McAlpin Ave. 

Wuest, Frank Wagner, M. E 3430 Cornell PL 

Zull, Charles Louis, C. E Portsmouth, O., and 350 Terrace Ave. 

Co-operative Engineers — Specials 

Backherms, Alvin Bernard 1026 W. Liberty St. ; 

Baker, Edgar Hubbard Pleasant Ridge, and 2210 Ohio Ave. 

Vail, Ralph W Canton. O., and 2304 Rohs St. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 815 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
Seniors 

Carr, Haviland Claysville, Ky. 

Coppock, Frank Marion 1350 Locust St. 

Foertmeyer, William Adolphus 401 Fairfield Ave., Bellevue, Ky. 

Gardner, Mabel E Middletown, O. 

Goldenberg, Frank 12 The Poinciana 

Hart, Robert Watson German Deaconess Hospital 

Hawley, Paul Ramsey College Corner, O. 

Johnston, Douglas Alexander 802 Barr St., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Kelly, Thomas Henshaw 1006 Madison Ave., Covington, Ky. 

McCarthy, Merrick Fiefield Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, O. 

McGowan, John Vincent 24 Section Ave., Hartwell, O. 

Ratterman, Helena Teresa 1532 Elm St. 

Scott, Murat Halstead Harrison, O. 

Stewart, Paul Morton Belle Center, O. 

Irregular Students 

Norman, John Warren St. Paris, O. 

Juniors 

Adamson, Elizabeth Ingram Maysville, Ky. 

Betzner, Clarence Wilford 2627 Vine St. 

Clark, Samuel Crawford West Union, O. 

Fisk, Harley B Falmouth, Ky. 

Freyhof, William Louis Glendale, O. 

Hofmann, Albert Peter 51 W. Corry St. 

Lamb, Benjamin H 3302 Eastside Ave. 

Lowe, Henry Huffman 709 McMakin Ave., Winton PI. 

Metzger, Frank Curry 29 Section Ave., Hartwell, O. 

Miller, Charles LaMont Middletown, O. 

Moore, Hazelfet Andrew 1188 California Ave. 

Norris, Jr., Benjamin 426 Stanley Ave. 

Oliver, Wade Wright 2233 Park Ave. 

Paden, Russell Homer 714 Juliens St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Weiss, Hiram Bertram 314 Perkins Ave. 

Sophomores 

Bieler, Henry George Milford, O. 

Carothers, Ralph Goldsmith 409 Broadway 

Cochran, Helen Finney 245 Oilman Ave. 

Geringer, Albert Connell 3485 Colerain Ave. 

Goldberg, Otto Leon St. Paris, O. 

Gordon, John Whitlock Fernbank, O. 

Hauser, Selmar Frederick 811 Main St., Covington, Ky. 

Heath, John F Hamilton, O. 

Hoffmann, John Neal Pesotum, 111. 

Huerkamp, Joseph Martin 866 Rockdale Ave., Avondale 

Lindenberger, Lauren Norton Troy, O. 

Stark, John Reis 1108 E. McMillan St. 

Freshmen 

Albers, Frank Joseph 1320 Broadway 

Blackford, Henrietta Virginia 1021 Windsor St. 

Coleman, John McFerren Loveland, O. 



316 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

Denser, Clarence Hugh 62 S. Warren Ave., Columbus, O. 

Ervin, Dwight M 709 Terrace Ave., Dayton, O. 

Hess, Beecher Earl Taylorsville, O. 

Jenkins, Walter Isaac St. Paris, O. 

Johnston, Alexander Robert Lore City, O. 

Matuska, Anthony 2129 Rice St. 

Mehan, George Tracy 322 W. Fourth St. 

Payne, Foy Clawson Dayton, O. 

Poggendick, Philip 2707 Van Kirk St. 

Poppe, John Frederick Rockford PI., Cincinnati 

Prugh, George Shipley 2115 Eastern Ave. 

Rousey, Schuyler Colfax 1037 Madison Ave., Covington. Ky. 

Scheland, Walter Charles 1017 Wells Ave., Price Hill 

Sharkey, John Thomas Excello, O. 

Smith, Park Gillespie Oxford, O. 

Wheeler, Alfred Guy 2391 Warsaw Ave. 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

Austin, Edgar C Cincinnati Hospital 

Baer, Sigmund 3465 Reading Rd. 

Baier, George Albert 2215 Nelson Ave. 

Baumgartner, Albert 32 W. Sixth St. 

Becker, Fred 4018 Taylor Ave. 

Becker, John 4136 Jerome Ave. 

Betts, Jr., Albert 2851 May St. 

Blackburn, Alexander J 1708 Brewster Ave. 

Bloch, Martin 528 Ridgeway Ave. 

Bolce, Edward L 3554 Michigan Ave. 

Braun, Robert Godfried 1829 Logan St. 

Brethauer, Gus 2248 Bogan St. 

Bronson, Charles Winslow 57 Hollister 

Burgoyne, Michael H 2842 St. Charles PI. 

Carr, Phillip David 3534 Stettinius Ave. 

Cassin, John William North Bend, O. 

Chambers, Eleanor 4445 Brazee St. 

Colter, Charles R 2311 Kemper Lane 

Cremins, Walter Edward 3251 Bishop St. 

DeCharms, Alice 4210 Brookside Ave. 

Dickens, Mervin 3770 Drake Ave. 

Dixon, Frank Eugene 127 Wilmuth Ave., Wyoming, O. 

Douglas, Freeman S 2229 Kemper Lane 

Dubell, Edward J 3620 Edwards Rd. 

Dubell, George 3562 Burch Ave. 

Echert, A. David 644 E. Third St. 

Farbach, Elmer 3434 Telford Ave. 

Ferger, Roger Henry 270 McGregor Ave. 

Fisher, Teasdale 1330 Chapel St. 

Frank, William 2540 Homestead PI. 

Fuller, Frederick William 2331 Clifton Ave. 

Fulner, Emilie A 925 Columbia St., Newport, Ky. 

Goldman, J. Albert Fourth and Elm Sts. 

Hardig, George P 2418 Miami Canal 

Harris, Leon J 021 Blair Ave. 

Helm, August Aurora, Ind., and 419 Plum St. 

Herbstreit, Earl D Sayler Park Sta. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS, 1913-14 817 

Hey, Anna Marie .1049 Rittenhouse St. 

Hiener, Harry Anthony 2958 Colerain Ave. 

Hittner, Stanley A 2518 Vine St. 

Hogan, James Clifford 3943 Spring Grove Ave. 

Hyer, J. Allen 25-7 W. Sixth St. 

Jordan, George M 4645 Edgewood Ave. 

Kemper, Gilbert L N. E. Cor. Dana and Dakota Sts. 

Kinderman, Frank M 3823 Spencer Ave. 

Knopf, William 3054 McHenry Ave., Westwood 

Koenig, Jr., Henry F 2846 May St. 

Koepke, John A 1914 Linn St. 

Kunkler, Max Adolph 2611 Essex Pi. 

Lahke, Charles Frederick 2829 Erie Ave. 

Lammers, Fred W 2823 Eden Ave. 

Lewin, Harry 2238 Loth Ave. 

Libbert, John C 1680 State Ave. 

Lobitz, Carl H 2559 Fairview Ave. 

Luessen, Henry 2539 Marsh Ave., Norwood, O. 

McCarty, L. F 633 Neave St. 

McChristie, Minor Everet 2322 Nelson Ave. 

McMillan, Olive G 2840 Observatory Ave. 

Mannbeck, George 1506 Dempsey St. 

Meiners, Edmund B 1532 Race St. 

Mersmann, Leo H 3568 Epworth Ave. 

Miller, Anna 627 June St. 

Miller, George W 2336 Clifton Ave. 

Naish, Charles A 723 Hopkins St. 

Oberhelman, Henry Bernard 2947 Colerain Ave. 

Peter, Carl A 1114 Poplar St. 

Pierle, Edwin F 3439 Middleton Ave. 

Pottenger, William T 1641 Larch Ave., College Hill 

Richards, James S 3541 Burch Ave. 

Richey, Carl 451 Strafer St. 

Rieckhoff, Herbert 1342 Broadway 

Roelker, Charles F 109 Corwin St. 

Rosenbaum, David Nathan 7.1333 Locust St. 

Samuels, Morris McMillan and Copeland Sts. 

Schmid, Robert George 110 Peete St. 

Schneider, Frederick J 2114 Freeman Ave. 

Schook, Katherine Henrietta .6601 E. Ledge, Madisonville 

Shreve, Albert Loree Second National Bank Bldg. 

Shreve, J. H 1534 Pullan Ave. 

Schwein, Stella 6612 Poplar St., Madisonville 

Simlick, William Nelson 3766 Isabella Ave.. Hyde Park 

Sleevys, Jennie Louise 1546 Jonathan St. 

Smickler, Samuel 1326 Locust St. 

Smith, Clara M 655 Linn St. 

Snow, James C 1324 Russell Ave., Covington, Ky. 

Spohr, Walter C 3841 Borden St. 

Staab, Albert 3120 Glendora Ave. 

Stanley, Jr., William Henry 288 Ludlow Ave. 

Sturla, Harry Lawson 3372 Hillside Ave. 

Todd, Delbert Montgomery, O., and 617 First National Bank Bldg. 

Van Dusen, Gordan 924 Hawthorne Ave. 

Von Bremen, Lillian Ruth 2613 Bevis Ave. 

Wagoner, Edith The Roanoke 

Weiler, Arthur 1142 Putnam St., Newport, Ky. 



818 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 



Weiss, Harry William 4915 Ash St., Norwood, O. 

Weiss, Willard Charles 4915 Ash St., Norwood, O. 

Willig, Lawrence H 3025 Murdock Ave. 

Wilson, Leroy 932 E. McMillan Ave. 

Wilson, Robert Bentley Stovall, N. C, and Cor. Fourth and Main Sts. 

Wilson, Warner Culbertson, 728 Greenup St., Covington, Ky. 

Wolf, Christine M 4235 Brookside Ave. 

Wolff, W. H 3915 Spencer Ave., Norwood, O. 

Wrede, Walter 1904 Hewitt Ave. 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 
End of Academic Year, 1912-1913 
The Graduate School 127 

The McMicken College of Liberal Arts: 

Seniors 100 

Juniors 104 

Sophomores 106 

Freshmen 228 

Irregulars 11 

Specials ' 64 

613 

Classes for Teachers 71 

Evening Academic Classes 555 

The College for Teachers: 

Graduates 28 

Seniors 65 

Juniors 17 

Sophomores 3 

Art Students 10 

Kindergartners 22 

Home Economics 25 

Teachers 127 

297 

The College of Engineering: 
Regular Students: 

Seniors 8 

Juniors 14 

Sophomores 6 

Freshmen 18 

Co-operative Students : 

Fifth Year 20 

Fourth Year 32 

Third Year 47 

Second Year 63 

First Year 122 

Specials 5 

335 



820 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

The College of Medicine: 

Seniors 26 

Juniors 9 

Sophomores 12 

Freshmen 16 

Specials 3 

Irregulars 14 

80 

College of Commerce 06 

Gross Total (Regular Departments) 2174 

Twice Counted 219 

Net Total (Regular Departments) 19£ 

Affiliated Department: 

Clinical and Pathological School of the Cincin- 
nati Hospital 44 

Twice Counted 26 

Net Total (Affiliated Department) IS 

* Net Total (All Departments) 1973 

* This does not include the group of auditors in the External Courses, 
numbering 342. 



REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS 
Beginning of Academic Year, 1913-1914 
The Graduate School 168 

The McMicken College of Liberal Arts: 

Seniors 87 

Juniors 100 

Sophomores 129 

Freshmen 229 

Irregulars 19 

Specials 54 

618 

Classes for Teachers 57 

Evening Academic Classes 492 

The College for Teachers: 

Graduates 49 

Seniors 49 

Juniors 11 

Sophomores 2 

Art Students 12 

Kindergartners 25 

Home Economics 23 

Teachers 105 

276 

The College of Engineering: 
Regular Students: 

Seniors 14 

Sophomores 8 

Freshmen 8 

Co-operative Students: 

Fifth Year 23 

Fourth Year 42 

Third Year 47 

Second Year 87 

First Year 174 

Specials 3 

400 



822 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

The College of Medicine: 

Seniors 14 

Juniors 15 

Sophomores 12 

Freshmen 19 

Irregular 1 

61 

College of Commerce , 103 

Gross Total (Regular Departments) 2181 

Twice Counted 252 

Net Total (Regular Departments) 1929 

Affiliated Department: 

Clinical and Pathological School of the Cin- 
cinnati Hospital 77 

Twice Counted 37 

Net Total (Affiliated Department) 40 

* Net Total (All Departments) 1969 

* This does not include the group of auditors in the External Courses, 
numbering 362. 






ALUMNAL ASSOCIATIONS OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

COLLEGES OF LIBERAL ARTS AND ENGINEERING, 
AND COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Alumni 

Stanley T. Henshaw, '97, President 

Samuel Iglauer, '95, Vice-President 

Walter Hyman, '01, Secretary-Treasurer 

Thomas K. Sckmuck, '08, . . . ) 

Alexander Hill, '06, ) Executive Committee 

Alumnae 

Mrs. G. Edward Smith, '08 (Viola Pfaff), President 

Luella Latta, '06', Vice-President 

Lydia M. Sammet, '09, Secretary-Treasurer 

Mrs. Daniel Laurence, '94. ^\ 

(Rebecca Rosenthal), ... [• . . . Executive Committee 
Elsa Raschig, '02, ) 



* COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
(Ohio-Miami Medical College) 

Walter R. Griess, M. D., President 

Thomas A. Dickey, M. D . First Vice-President 

Middletown, O. 
A. L. Light, M. D., Second Vice-President 

Dayton, O. 
Herschel Fischer, M. D Third Vice-President 

Lebanon, O. 
Alexander H. Bean, M. D., Fourth Vice-President 

Hillsboro, O. 

Martin H. Urner, M. D., Secretary 

Arthur C. Bauer, M. D., Treasurer 

Walter R. Griess, M. D., . 

Frank H. Lamb, M. D., . . I T , _ 

Martin H. Urner, M. D., . ( Executive Comm.ttee 

Arthur C. Bauer, M. D., . / 



* This Alumnal Association includes in its membership all graduates of the 
Medical College of Ohio, of the Miami Medical College, of the Laura Memorial 
Medical College, and of the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery. Upon 
receipt of the annual dues of one dollar and a half, the Treasurer will send the 
applicant a card of membership. 





SCHEDULE OF LECTURES, SECOND SEMESTER, 1913-14 ^ 






Courses which are starred are 


open to Freshmen 


— 1 




MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SAT 




Biol. 21 


Biol. 27b 


Biol. 21 


Biol. 27b 


•Chem. 3b 




' Eng. 




*Chem. 3b 


*Eng. 1-S. ii 


•Chem. 3b 


*Eng. 1-S. ii 


Chem. 18b 


Eng. 




Chem. 18b 


Eng. 8b 


Chem. 18b 


Eng. 8b 


Educ. 16 


♦Frem 




Educ. 14 


*French 1-S. ii 


Educ. 14 


•French 1-S. ii 


Eng. 6 


Geol. 


8.30 


Eng. 6 


French 26 


Eng. 6 


French 26 


•Geol. 1 


Geol. 


•Geol. 1 


Geol. 9 


•Geol. 1 


Geol. 9 


•Hist. 15 


*Ger. : 


A. M. 


Geol. 7 (9.00) 


*Ger. 1-S. i 


Geol. 7 


*Ger. 1-S. i 


•Math. 1-S. i 


•Lat. 1 




*Hist. 15 


*Hist. 29 


•Hist. 15 


•Hist. 29 


Phil. 6b 


Phil. 




•Math. 1-S. i 


*Lat. 1-S. i 


•Math. 1-S. i 


•Lat. 1-S. i 


Pol. Sc. lib 


Phys. 




Phil. 6b 


•Math. 1-S. i 


Phil. 6b 


•Math. 1-S. i 








Pol. Sc. lib 


*Phys. 22b-S. i 
Pol. Sc. 4b 


Pol. Sc. lib 


•Phys. 22b-S. i 
Pol. Sc. 4b 








*Biol. 3b 




•Biol. 3b 










Biol. 21 


*Biol. 4b-S. iii 


Biol. 21 


*Biol. 4b-S. iii 


•Biol. 3b 


'Fren j 




Chem. 14b 


Biol. 35 


Chem. 14b 


Biol. 35 


Econ. 13b 


Geol. 




Educ. 2 


Biol. 27b 


Econ. 13b 


Biol. 27b 


Educ. 2 


Geol. 




*Eng. 1-S. i 


Chem. 14b 


Educ. 2 


Chem. 14b 


•Eng. 1-S. i 


Ger. 1 




Eng. 5 


Econ. 11 


•Eng. 1-S. i 


Econ. 11 


Eng. 5 


Hist. 




Eng. 15 


•Eng. 3 


Eng. 5 


•Eng. 3 


Eng. 15 


Lat. : ■ 

Math 




•French 2-S. i 


Eng. 21 


Eng. 15 


Eng. 21 


•French 2-S. i 




•French 2-S. ii 


*French 2-S. iii 


•French 2-S. i 


•French 2-S. iii 


•French 2-S. ii 


Math 
Phil. 




Geol. 2 


French 4 


•French 2-S. ii 


French 4 


•Ger. 2-S. i 


930 


Geol. 7 


*Geol. 1-S. ii 


Geol. 2 


•Geol.l-S. H 


*Ger. 4-S. ii 


Phys 




*Ger. 2-S. i 


Geol. 2 


Geol. 7 


•Ger. 21 


Ger. 5 


■ 


A.M. 


*Ger. 4-S. ii 


*Ger. 21 


•Ger. 2-S. i 


Greek 20b 


•Greek 1 






Ger. 5 


Greek 20b 


•Ger. 4-S. ii 


Hist. 20 


•Greek 9 






*Greek 1 


Lat. 2-S. i 


Ger. 5 


Lat. 2-S. i 


•Hist. 1 






•Greek 9 


•Math. 1-S. ii 


•Greek 1 


•Math. 1-S. ii 


Lat. 2-S. ii 






*Hist. 1 


•Math. 1-S. iv 


•Greek 9 


•Math 1-S. iv 


•Math. 1-S. ii 






Lat. 2-S. ii 


*Phys. 22b-S. i 


•Hist. 1 


•Phys. 22b-S. i 


•Math. 1-S. iv 






*Math.l-S. ii 


*Soc. Sc. 5 


Lat.2-S. ii 


*Soc. Sc. 5 


Math 9b 






*Math. 1-S. iv 




•Math. 1-S. ii 




Phil. 2b 






Math. 9b 




•Math. 1-S. iv 










Phil. 2b 




Math. 9b 










*Soc. Sc. 15 




Phil. 2b 
*Soc. Sc. 15 




■ 






*Astron. lb 


•Biol. 4b-S. iii 


Biol. 7b 


•Biol. 4b-S. iii 


•Astron. lb 


Freti ■ 




Biol. 7b 


Biol. 35 


Biol. 21 


Biol. 35 


Biol. 7b 


Geol 14 




Biol. 21 


Biol. 26b 


Educ. 1 


Biol. 27b 


Educ. 1 


Geol % 




Educ. 1 


Biol. 27b 


•Eng. 1-S. iii 


Eng. 25-S. i 


*Eng. 1-S. iii 


Geol 




*Eng. 1-S. iii 


Eng. 25-S. i 


' ! Eng. 1-S. iv 


*Geol. 1-S. ii 


x Eng. 1-S. iv 


Ger. i 




*Eng. 1-S. iv 


•Gecl. 1-S. ii 


Eng. 4 


*Ger. 3 


Eng. 4 


1 1 ist 




Eng. 4 


•Ger. 3 


French 11 


Greek 12 


French 11 


Mafl 




French 11 


Greek 12 


Geol. 2 


Greek 8 


•Ger. 2-S. ii 


Phy; 




*Ger. 2-S. ii 


Greek 13 


Geol. 7 


Hist. 20 


•Ger. 4-S. i 




10.30 


*Ger. 4-S. i 


Hist. 25 


•Ger. 2-S. ii 


Hist. 25 


Greek 3 






* Greek 2 


Lat. 6 


•Ger. 4-S. i 


•Math. 1-S. iii 


•Hist. 3 




A.M. 


Greek 3 


•Math. 1-S. iii 


Greek 3 


Math. 5-S. i 


•Lat. 1-S. ii 






*Hist. 3 


Math. 5-S. i 


"Hist. 3 


•Phys. Ed. 1-S. i 


•Lat. 1-S. iii 






*Lat. 1-S. ii 


•Phys. Ed. 1-S. i 


*Lat. 1-S. ii 


(Men) 


•Math. 1-S. iii 






*Lat. 1-S. iii 


(Men) 


*Lat. 1-S. iii 


•Phys. 22b-S. i 


Math. 5-S. i 






•Math. 1-S. iii 


•Phys. 22b-S. i 


•Math. 1-S. iii 


Soc. Sc. 20 


Phil. 18b-S. i 






Math. 5-S. i 


Soc. Sc. 20 


Phil. 18b-S. i 


Span. 8 


Pol. Sc. 1 






Phil. 18b-S. i 


Span. 8 


Pol. Sc. 1 




•Span. 6 






Pol. Sc. 1 




Soc. Sc. 7 










Soc. Sc. 7 




•Span. 6 










*Span. 6 


















Chem. S2b 










Chem.32b 


Bib. Lit. 8b 


Chem. 22b 


Bib. Lit. 8b 


Chem. 32b 


Eng. 1 




Chem. 22b 


*BioI. 4b-S. iii 


•Econ. 1 


•Biol. 4b-S. iii 


Chem. 22b _ 


Geol ■ 




*Econ. 1-S. i 


Biol. 35 


Educ. 20 


Biol. 35 


*Econ. 1-S. ii 


Geo! I 




(Men) 


*Econ. 2 


Eng. 10 


•Econ. 2 


(Women) 


Gre< : 




Educ. 20 


Eng. 12 


•French 1-S. i 


Eng. 12 


Educ. 4 


Hist 




Eng. 10 


Eng. 25-S. ii 


Geol. 2 


Eng. 25-S. ii 


Eng. 10 


Phy ' 




* French 1-S. i 


French 3 


•Ger. 1-S. ii 


French 3 


•French 1-S. i 






*Ger. 1-S. it 


•Geol. 1-S. ii 


*Ger. 2-S. iii 


•Geol. 1-S. ii 


♦Ger. 1-S. ii 




11.30 


*Ger. 2-S. iii 


(12.00) 


Greek 15 


(12.00) 


•Ger. 2-S. iii 






Greek 15 


Ger. 20 


Hist. 21 


Ger. 20 


Greek 15 




A. M. 


Hist. 21 


Greek 17 


Ital. 7 


Greek 17 


Hist. 21 






Ital. 7 


Hist. 40 


Lat. 3 


Hist. 40 


Ital. 7 






Lat. 3 


Phys. Ed. 2-S. ii 


Phil. 10b 


Phys. Ed. 2-S. ii 


Lat. 3 






Phil. 10b 


(Men) 


Phil. 15b 


(Men) 


Phil. 10b 






Phil. 15b 


Phys. 18b 


•Phys. Ed. 1-S. ii 


Phys. 18b 


Phil. 15b 






*Phys. Ed.l-S. ii 


Soc. Sc. 21 


(Men) 


Soc. Sc. 21 


•Phys. 27b 






(Men) 




•Phys. 27b 




Pol. Sc. 2b 






*Phys. 27b 




Pol. Sc. 2b 




Psy. lb 






Pol. Sc. 2b 




Psy. lb 










Psv. lb 

























SCHEDULE OF LECTURES, SECOND SEMESTER, 


913-14— Continued 






Courses which are starred are open to Freshmen 




- . 


.. _ _ 


_ 









ON DAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


; THURSDAY 


FRIDAY | SATURDAY 




. 4b-S. i 


*Biol. 4b S. ii 


i 

*Biol. 4b-S. i 


•Biol. 4b-S. ii 


Chem. 7b 




10b 


*Biol. Sb 


Biol 10b 


!*Biol. 8b 


Chem. 17 




-n. 4b-S. ii 


Biol. 13b 


*Chem. 4b-S. ii 


i Biol. 13b 


Chem. 22b 




m. 7b 


*Chem. 4b-S. i 


i Chem. 7b 


|*Chem. 4b-S. i 


Chem. 33b 






m. 14b 


Chem. 6 


Chem. 22b 


Chem. 6 


•Eng. 1-S. v 






rn. 22b 


Chem. 17 


*Eng. 1-S. v 


1 Chem. 17 


*Eng. 1-S. vi 






. 1-S. v 


Eng. 13 


*Eng. 1-S. vi 


Chem. 33b 


French 5 




E 


. 1-S. vi 


Eng. 18 


French 5 


Eng. 18 


*G'er. 1-S. iii 




G 


1-S. iii 


•Geol. 1-S. iv 


*Ger. 1-S. iii 


•Geol. 1-S. iv 


•Hist. 13 




9 


.13 


Phil. 19(12.30) 


Phil. lSb-S. ii 


Phil. 21 


Phil. 18b-S. ii 




P 


. 18b-S. ii 


Phys. Ed. 2-S. i 


•Phys. Ed. 1-S. i 


Phys. Ed. 2-S. i 


Phys. Ed. (vol.) 




D l 


s. Ed. 1-S. i 


(Women) 


(Women) 


(Women) 


Span. 9 






Women) 


*Phys. 22b-S. ii 
Span. 18 


•Hist. 13 
Span. 9 


|*Phys. 22b-S. ii 

Span. 1 S 








. 4b-S. i 


*Biol. 4b-S. ii 


Astron. 3b 


•Biol. 4b-S. ii 


Chem. 7b 




B 


. 10b 


•Biol. 8b 


*Bioi. 4b-S. i 


•Biol. 8b 


Chem. 17 




:i 


m. 4b-S. ii 


Biol. 14b 


Biol. 10b 


Biol. 14b 


Chem. 22b 




:i 


tn. 7 b 


*"Cbem. 4b-S. i 


"Chem. 4b-S. ii 


•Chem. 4b-S. i 


Chem. 33b 




:i 


m. 14b 


Chem. 6 


Chem. 7b 


Chem. 6 


•Phys. Ed. Lec- 




:i 


m. 22b 


Chem. 17 


Chem. 22b 


Chem. 17 


ture (Men) 






. 1-S. i 


Eng. 13 


•Geol. 1-S. i 


Chem. 33b 


•Phys. Ed. Lec- 






. 9 (Lab.) 


Eng. 22 


Lat. 5 


Eng. 22 


ture (Women) 






s.Ed. 1-S. ii 


*Geol. 1-S. iii 


•Phys. Ed. 1-S. ii 


•Geol. 1-S. iii 


Psy. 2b 






Women) 


*Geoi. 1-S. iv 


(Women) 


•Geol. 1-S. iv 








2b 


Greek 18 
Math. 6 
Phil. 19 ('2.30) 
Phys. Ed. 2-S. ii 
(Women) 
*Phys. 22b-S. : : 


Psy. 2b 


Greek IS 
Phil. 21 
•Phys. 22b-S. ii 
Phys. Ed. 2-S. ii 
(Women) 








. 4b-S. i 


*Biol. 4b-S. ii 


•Biol. 4b-S. i 


•Biol. 4b-S. ii 


Chem. 7b 






.10b 


*Biol. 8b 


Biol. 10b 


•Biol. 8b 


Chem. 17 




z 


m. 4b-S. ii 


Biol. 14b 


*Chem. 4b-S. ii 


Biol. 141. 


Chem. 22b 




Z 


m. 7b 


*Chem. 4b-S. i 


Chem. 7b 


*Chem. 4b-S. i 


Chem. 33b 




" 


m. 14b 


Chem. 6 


Chem. 22b 


Chem. 6 


Greek 6 




z 


m. 22b 


Chem. 17 


•Geol. 1-S. i 


Chem. 17 


Psy. 2b 




j 


L 1-S. i 


Eng. 20 (3.30) 


Greek 5 


Chem. 33b 






j 


1.9 (Lab.) 


•Geol. 1-S. iii 


Psy. 2 


•Geol. 1-S. iii 








:k7 


•Geol. 1-S. iv 




•Geol. 1-S. iv 






P. 2b 


(3.30) 
Greek 18 
Math. 6 




(3.30) 
Phil. 14 
*Phys. 22b-S. ii 








' 


•Phys. 22b-S. ii 










. 1-S. i 


Biol. 141) 


Eng. 24 


Biol. 14b 


Greek 6 






Eng. 20 


•Geol. 1-S. i 


*Geol. 1-S. iii 


Psy. 2b (4.30) 




11. 9 (Lab.) 


French 1 


(4.30) 


(4.30) 






1.26 


French 24 


Geol. 16 


Ger. 6 






:ek7 


*Geol. 1-S. iii 


Phys. 17b 


Math. 34 






\:th. 34 


(4.30) 


Pol. Sc. 3 


Math, lib 






Is. 17b 


Ger. 12 


Psy. 2b (4.30) 


Phil. 14 






P. Sc. 25b 


Phys. Ed. 2-S. i 




Phvs. Ed. 2-S. 3 






P. 2b (4.30) 


(Men) 




' (Men) 










Phys. 10 










, 


» 


Eng. 20 (5.30) 


Eng. 24 


Ger. 6 






Vth. 34 


French 10 


Geol. 16 


Math. 34 






Vth. 26 


French 24 


Pol. Sc. 3 


Math, lib 






P. 


Sc.25b 


Ger. ] 2 




I 


1 



















HOURS TO BE ARRANGED 



'Ton. 5b 
ll. 12b 
ll. 23 
M.80 
ll. 31 
ll. 40 



Chem. 15b 
Chem. 20 
Chem. 21 
Chem. 24b 
Chem. 28b 
Chem. 30 
Chem. 35b 



Geol. 5b 
Geol. 13 
Greek 4 
Greek 10 



Latin 4 
Latin 9 
Latin 10 
Latin 12 



Math. 40 
Phys. 4 
Phys. 7 
Phys. 8 
Phys. 9 
Phys. 29b 



Soc. Sc. 
Psy. 3 
Psy. 9 



GENERAL INDEX 



Absences °^ 

Accounting ' 2f>0 i 

Accredited Schools »9, 90 | 

Addresses and Lectures, 1912-13 33 j 

Administration 260 \ 

Administrative Officers 14 

Admission, Requirements for 

College of Commerce 254 

College for Teachers 144 

Engineering l62 

Graduate School 59 

Liberal Arts 72 

Medicine 2i7 

Advanced Standing: 

Engineering "1 64 

Graduate School 62 

Liberal Arts 30 

Medicine - 18 

Advancement, Medical College 221 

Alliance Franchise 48 

Scholarship 46 

Alumnal Associations, Officers of 323 

American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, Library of 43 

Anatomy fi3 » 9S > 225 

Applied Mathematics 67, 199 

Appointments and Salaries of Teachers 

in Public Schools 149 

Appointment Committee, University 130 

Approved Schools 89 

Armstrong-Hunter Memorial Fund 46 

Arrangement (Special) with Art Aca- 
demy of Cincinnati 94 

College of Law 9?1 

College of Medicine 94 

College for Teachers 9 4 

Hebrew Union College 62, 94 

Lane Seminary 62, 94 

Art 
Academy, Special Arrangement with. . 94 

Greek. Course in 

Room at University 



Biblical Literature 

Biology 63, 96, 153, 

Biology, Requirements for a Major in.. 

Boarding Places I 

Board of Directors, University . . 

Board of Education 

Board. Ohio State, of 

Medical Examination and Regi 

tion 

Bond Issue 

Botany 

Brown Prize 

Brunning Bequest 

Buildings and Site 

Van Wormer Library 

Bureau of City Tests 

Calendar 

Carson Field 

Carving 

Certificate, Admission on, to 

Engineering College ->0, 

Graduate School 

Liberal Arts 

Medicine, College of 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemistry 64, S3, 101, 

"Cincinnatian," The 

Cincinnati Hospital 

Civics 

Civil Engineering 

Clinical Instruction 

Clinical Medicine. Department of. 
(Clinical and Pathological School of the 

Cincinnati Hospital ) 
Clinics 



120 

45 
175 



Assaying 

Astronomy 63, 87, 95, 141. 200 



? 



Athlet 



.48, 224 



177 



. .::•<. 1252 



Bacteriology 6 ' • " 9 

Benefactions, Forms of 41 

Benejfactors of the University 40 



Clubs (See Student Organizations) 

Collections, Museum 

College of Commerce History 

Colleges of University 

Commerce 

Engineering LW * 

Graduate School B 

Liberal Arts •*• 

Medicine "°* 

Teachers «•• 1 

g ys Scholarship 

Recipient, June, 1913 

Commercial Law. 






GENERAL INDEX 



M7 



mm it to - 

Board of Directors 

College for Teachers 

College of Liberal Arts 

College of Medicine 

General Faculty 

reachers' Appointment 

University Senate 

mparative Literature, Dept. of... 65, 
nditions. Entrance 

Engineering 

Liberal Arts 

-operative Engineering 165- 

-operative Course with the Board of 

Health 

j-ordination 

urses, .External 

urses of Study 

College of Commerce 260- 

College for Teachers. '. 150- 

Engineering 168 

External Courses 

Graduate School 6i 

Liberal Arts 95 

'Medicine 225 

i edit in Graduate School 

inningham Hall 

irrent Literature in the University 

Library 

irrent Literature in the Cincinnati 

hospital Library 

Irrent Literature in the Medical Col- 
ege Library 



13 

143 

16 

17 

16 

150 

15 

109 

163 



243 
10S 
141 

264 
100 
204 
141 
!-69 
140 
244 
62 
40 



215 
216 

217 



A. R. Fellowship 46 

Tolder, 1913-14 265 

finition of Units Required for Ad- 
mission 75-89 

Igrees in College of Engineering. .164, 165 
Igrees, Requirements for (See Gradua- 
tion) 

Conferred, 1913 270-274 

Ipartments of the University 12 

l;rmatology 236 

htetics 232 

bloma Fees 55 

vectors of University 13 

1 smissal 53 

hpensary, Medical College 212, 250 

Ijctor of Philosophy, Requirements for 

pegree of 60 

Imestic Science S9 

Ijawing 88 

awing, Modeling and Carving 140 



Economics 65, 106, 

Education (See College for Teachers) 

Education, Courses in, Counted for 
A. B 

Eichberg Chair of Physiology 

Election of Studies, Liberal Arts 

Electrical Engineering 181 

Electrotherapeutics 

Embryology 98, 

Emery, Mary M., Gift of 

Endowment Fund Association 

Engineering College, Origin of 

Engineering, College of, Courses in 

Chemical 168 

Civil 177 

Co-operative Course 165 

Co-ordination 

Electrical 1 81 

Loan Scholarships in Co-operative 

Course 

Mechanical 187 

Metallurgical 194 

Special Courses in 

English 65, 75, 109, 141, 

Brown Prize in 

Entrance from Other Colleges and 
Universities 

Entrance Requirements (See Admission) 

Ethics 

Evening Classes 

Examinations for Admission 

Engineering 

Liberal Arts 

Medicine 

Examinations to Practice Medicine.... 

Expenses 57, 

External Courses 



108 

38 

93 

187 

232 

225 

38 

41 

39 

176 
181 
168 
198 

187 

4K 
193 
198 
191 
201 

47 



129 

3ti 

163 
73 
218 
222 
167 
141 



Faculty 

College of Commerce 252 

College for Teachers 143 

Engineering 161 

Graduate School 58 

Liberal Arts 70 

Medicine 25, 205 

University 18-32 

Fees 

Breakage Deposits 56 

Course for Teachers of Art 56 

College of Commerce 256 

External Courses 54 

Graduation 55 

Graduate School 53 

Laboratory 55 

Miscellaneous 56 

Special and Irregular Students 54 



328 



GENERAL INDEX 



Special Courses for Teachers 55 

Tuition 53 

Fellowships 46-48 

Summary of 268 

Finance 263 

Fleischmann Scholarships 46 

Recipients, 1913-14 266 

Forms of Bequest 41 

Foundation 37 

French 78, 137, 202 

General Faculty, Committees of the.... 16 

General Information 37. 253 

Geography 142 

Geology and Geography .. .65, 114, 153, 202 

German 66, 79, 116, 202 

Gibson Bequest 38 

Glee Clubs 49 

Good Samaritan Hospital 249 

Gothic 118 

Grades 52 

Graduate School 39, 58-69 

Graduates, 1913 .270-274 

Graduation, Requirements for 

College for Teachers 144 

Engineering 165 

Graduate School 60-62 

Liberal Arts 91 

Medicine 220 

Greek 66, 77. 118 

Greek Room 45 

Gymnastics, Requirements in 129 

Gynecology 240 

Banna Fellowship in Physics 46 

Holder, 1913-14 265 

Hanna Hall 40 

Hebrew Union College and Lane Sem- 
inary, Special Arrangements with. ... 62 

Histology 99, 225 

Historical and Philosophical Society of 

Ohio, Library of 43 j 

Historical Statement 37 ' 

History 66, 87, 120, 142, 154 

Fellowship in 46, 265 

History and Principles of Education. . . 150 

Hochstetter Prize in Chemistry 47 

Holders of Fellowships since 1900 268 

Honorable Dismissal 53 

Hospital, The Cincinnati 245 

Hygiene 243 



Jones Prizes 

Recipients, 1913 5 

Joseph Eichberg Chair of Physiology... 
Julie Fries Levy Endowment 

Kindergarten Education (College for 
Teachers) 1 

Lane Seminary, Special Arrangement 

with 62, 

Laryngology i 

Latin 67, 77, ] 

Lecturers for 1913-14 

Lectures and Addresses, 1912-13 

Lectures, Schedule of, in Liberal Arts., j 
Liberal Arts, McMicken College of. 
Courses of Study in 

Astronomy j 

Biblical Literature 

Biology 

Chemistry 1 

Economics 1 

Education ] 

English 1 

Geology and Geography ] 

German ] 

Greek ] 

History 1 

Latin 1 

Mathematics 1 

Philosophy 1 

Physical Education I 

Physics ! 

Political and Social Science 

Psychology 

Romance Languages 

Libraries 

American Association for the Advance- 
ment of 

Science 

Historical and Philosophical Society 

of Ohio 

Medical 44, 

Municipal Reference Bureau 

Observatory 

Others of the City 

University 

Library Staff 

Lodge & Shipley Machine Tool Co. 

Loan Scholarships I 

Logic I 

Longview Hospital I 



Interneships 267 

Irregular Students 54 

ftalian 140 



McKibbin Memorial Prize 

McMicken, Charles, Bequest of. 
McMicken College of Liberal Arts... 






GENERAL INDEX 



«!>9 



cken Honorary Scholarships 46 

ipients, 1913 283 

in College of Liberal Arts 92 

Subject for Doctor's Degree.... 6l 

il Training 88 

52 

r of Arts Degree, Requirements 



ia Medica 231 

matics 67, 81, 125, 203 

lied 67 

filiation and Library Fee 57 

finical Engineering IS 7-193 

ial College 205-251 

3al Jurisprudence and Economics.. 244 

line 232 

:|urgical Engineering 194-198 

t>d Courses, Special 151-153 

jjscopy 233 

| Loan Collection 45 

jalogy 114 

I Subjects for Doctor's Degree. . . 61 

fling 140 

I Henrietta, Bequest of 39 

nipal Reference Bureau 24, 44 

am Staff, University 24 

Juris 45, 214 

153, 158 



tal History, University Museum of 45 

nlogy 236 

is, University Weekly" 45 

I, Old 118 

| Central Association of Colleges 

l Secondary Schools 91 



svatory, The. 
Mstants in. . . 



5 tries 
iirs 



.39, 



Vnmistrative 

^ mnal Association 

Bjird of Directors 

Elowment Fund Association 

^er University 

iMiami Medical College 205 

iState Board of Medical Examina- 

li and Registration 

halmology 

( list Club Scholarships 

uizations, Student 

| bology 

tipedic Surgery 

laryngology . . .• 



40 

23 

239 

14 
323 
13 
41 
24 
251 

222 
241 

46 
49 

98 



Paediatrics 234 

Paleontology 115 

Pathology and Bacteriology 67, 229 

Payments to the University (See Fees) 

Penmanship 153 

Petrology 115 

Pharmacology 231 

Plii Beta Kappa Society 

New Members, 1913 265 

Philosophy 68, 127, 142, 155 

Photography, Practical 103 

Physical Education 49, 129, 204 

Physical Geography 86 

Physics 68, 83, 130, 204 

Hanna Fellowship in 46 

Physiology 68, 227 

Political and Social Science 68, 133 

Preferred List, Board of 

Education 145 

Pie-Medical Course 223 

Prizes 46 

Summary, 1913 265 

Probation 52 

Programs of Study, College for Teach- 
ers 144-149 

Promotion, Medical College 221 

Psychiatry and Neurology , 236 

Psychology 69, 136, 155 

Publications 

Student 40 

University 44 

Public Schools, Appointment to 149 

Public Speaking Ill 

Radiology 232 

Recognized Schools 91 

"Record, University of Cincinnati".... 44 

Registration of Students, 1913-14 275 

Summary 319 

Registration, Instructions for HO 

Regulations for Students 

College for Teachers 52, 145 

Engineering 52 

Graduate School 59 

Liberal Arts 52 

Requirements of Board of Education of 

Prospective Teachers 14!) 

Requirements for Admission (See Ad- 
mission) 
Requirements for Graduation (See Grad- 
uation) 

Romance Languages 69, 1 37 

Alliance Franchise Scholarship in... 46 

Ropes Bequest 38 

Ropes Lectures) 1912-13 35 

"Rules for Guidance of Students" 53 



380 



GENERAL INDEX 



Sackett Bequest 38 

Schedules: 

Courses in College of Commerce. . . . 259 

Entrance Examinations 74 

Lectures' in Liberal Arts, Second 

Semester 324 

Scholarships 46-48 

Summary, 1913 265 

Secondary Education 151 

Senate, University 15 

Shop Work 167 

Sinton, David, Gift of 38 

Social Science, Political and 68, 133 

Societies (See Student Organizations) 

Sociology 135, 142 

Spanish 81 , 139, 202 

Special Arrangement with 

Art Academy of Cincinnati 140 

College of Law 93 

College of Medicine 94, 223 

Hebrew Union College 62, 94 

Lane Seminary 62, 94 

Special Courses for Teachers and Fees. 55 

Special Method Courses 131-153 

Special Students: 

College for Teachers 50 

Engineering 50 

Liberal Arts 50 

Medical College 220 

Special Subjects, College for Teachers.. L49 
Staff 

Cincinnati Hospital 246 

Municipal Reference Bureau 24 

Museum 24 

University Library 24 

State Board of Medical Registration 

and Examination 222 

Students, List of, in 

Graduate School 275-281 

College of Liberal Arts 

Regular Students 281 

Irregular " 291 

Special " 291 

Unclassified " 292 

Evening Classes 293 

College for Teachers 

Regular Students 302 

Art " 304 

Kindergartners 304 



Home Economics 

Teachers 

College of Engineering 

College of Medicine 

College of Commerce 

Students 

Organizations 

Publications 

Registration of, 1913-14 

Studies, Election of 

Liberal Arts 

"Studies, University of Cincinnati" 

Summer Term in Engineering 

Supervisors 

Surgery 

Suspension, Readmittance After. . . . 
Syphilology 












Tax Levy for the University If 

Teachers 

Appointment Committee ID 

College for 

Fees and Special Courses for 
Requirements of Board of Educati 
for Prospective . , 1 

Therapeutics 

Thesis 60, 

Thorns, Matthew, Bequest of 

Thorns Honorary Scholarship 
Recipients, 1913 

Three Arts Club 

Tuberculosis Hospital 

Tuition (See Fees) 



Union Bethel Scholarships in Social 

Science 

Cnits for Entrance, Definition of 75^ 

University Senate 



Van Wormer Library Building. 



40. i 



Wages, Co-operative Students 

"Weekly News, University" ( 

Whittaker Library 

Withdrawal 

Woman Student's League 

Zoological Gardens of Cincinnati ( 

Zoology 






jniversity of cincinnati 
Record 



RIKS I 



JANUARY, 1915 



Vol,. XI, No. 1 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

1914-1915 




'BUSHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Entered as Second-class Matter Mat 19. 1913, at the Post office 
at Cincinnati. Ohio Under the Act of August 24, 1912 



University of Cincinnati 
Record 

ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

1914-1915 






Mm 

. 45 




ISSUED QUARTERLY 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Entered as Second-Class Matter May 19, 1913, at the Post Office 
at Cincinnati, Ohio. Under the Act of August 24. 1912 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PART I 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Calendar, 10 

Departments of the University, 12 

Board of Directors, 13 

Administrative Officers, 14 

University Senate, 15 

Committees of the General Faculty, 16 

Committees of the Medical College Faculty, 17 

Officers of Instruction and Administration : 

Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering, and Commerce, 
College for Teachers, the Graduate School, and the 

School of Household Arts, 18 

Assistants in the Observatory, 23 

Library, Museum, and Municipal Reference Bureau Staffs 24 

College of Medicine, 25 

Addresses and Lectures, 1913-14, 33 

General Information : 

Foundation, 37 

Buildings and Site, 40 

Benefactors and Endowment Fund Association, .... 41 

Benefactions, 42 

University Library 43 

Municipal Reference Bureau, 44 

Publications and Museums, 45 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes, 46-48 

Alliance Franchise, 48 

Athletics and Carson Field, 49 

Physical Training for Women, 50 

Student Organizations, 50 

Admission : 

Special Students, 50 

Students Entering from Other Colleges and Universities, 51 

Admission to Advanced Standing, 51 

Registration, 51 

General Regulations, 53 

Fees : 

Tuition, 54 

Special and Irregular Students, 55 

External Courses and Special Courses for Teachers, . . 56 

Laboratory Fees, 56 

Graduation Fees and Breakage Deposits, 57 

Course for Teachers of Art, 57 

Miscellaneous Fees, 58 

Expenses, 59 



4 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PART II 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Faculty and Instructors, 60 

Admission, 61 

Instruction, 62 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts, .... 62 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, . . 63 

Admission to Advanced Standing, 64 

Special Arrangement for Graduate Students in Lane Semi- 
nary and in the Hebrew Union College, 64 

Fellowships and Scholarships, 64 

Courses of Instruction : 

Anatomy, Astronomy, Botany, 65 

Chemistry, 66 

Economics, Education, English, 67 

Geology and Geography, German, 67 

Greek, History, Latin, 68 

Mathematics, Mathematics (Applied), 69 

Pathology and Bacteriology, Philosophy, 69 

Physics, Physiology, 70 

Political and Social Science, Psychology, Romance Lan- 
guages, 70 

Zoology, 71 



PART III 
McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Faculty and Instructors, 72 

Requirements for Admission, 74-76 

Entrance Conditions and Entrance Examinations, ... 76 

Schedule of Entrance Examinations, 77 

Definitions of Units in Subjects Required for Entrance : 

English 78-80 

Latin, Greek, French, 81 

German 83 

Spanish, 84 

Mathematics, 85 

Physics, 86 

Chemistry, 87 

Zoology, Botany, 88 

Botany and Zoology, Physical Geography, 89 

Astronomy, History, Civics 90 

Economics, Commercial Geography, Bookkeeping, ... 91 

Stenography and Typewriting, Commercial Law, Drawing, 92 

Manual Training, Domestic Science, 93 

Admission on Certificate from Accredited Schools, .... 94 

List of Accredited Schools 94-95 

List of Recognized Schools, 96 

Accredited Schools of the North Central Association, . . 96 

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree, 96 

Outline of Studies in the College of Liberal Arts, ... 98 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 5 

Advisory System for the Election of Studies, 100 

Special Arrangements : 

Credit for Work Done in the College of Law, .... 101 

Six-Year Combined Collegiate and Medical Course, . . . 101 
Credit for Hebrew Taken in the Hebrew Union College 

and in Lane Theological Seminary, 101 

Credit for Work Done in the Art Academy of Cincinnati, . 101 

Credit for Work Done in the College for Teachers, . . 102 

Courses of Instruction: 

Astronomy, Biblical Literature, 103 

Botany, . 104 

Chemistry, 106 

Economics, - . . . . 112 

Education, . 113 

English, 115 

Geology and Geography, 119 

German, 121 

Greek 124 

History, 126 

Latin, 128 

Mathematics, 130 

Philosophy, 132 

Physical Education, 134 

Physics, 135 

Political and Social Science, 138 

Psychology, 141 

Romance Languages : 

French, 143 

Spanish, 144 

Italian, 145 

Zoology, . 146 

Drawing, Modeling, and Carving, 149 

External Courses, 150 



PART IV 
COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

Committee in Charge, Faculty and Instructors, 151 

General Statement, 152 

General Regulations : 

Program I, 153 

Programs II and III 154 

Program IV, 155 

Programs V, VI, VII, and VIII, 156 

Description of New Plan, 156 

Special Courses for Teachers, 158 

Requirements of the Cincinnati Board of Education, . . . 158 

Appointment Committee, 158 

Courses of Instruction : / 

Education, 159 

Botany, 162 

English, Geology and Geography, lw> 

History, Household Arts Education, and Philosophy, . . 164 

Psychology, I 65 



6 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Courses in Kindergarten Training, 165-167 

Courses for Teachers of Art, 168-170 



PART V 
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Faculty, 171 

Requirements for Admission, 172 

Entrance Conditions and Admission to Advanced Standing, 174 

Degrees, 175 

Co-operative Engineering System : 
Plan of Instruction : 

General Description, 175 

Length of Course, Conditions and Time of Entrance, . . 170 

Date to File Applications for Positions, 176 

Board and Lodging, 176 

Wages of Co-operative Students, 176 

Expenses, Shop Work, 177 

Courses Offered, The Summer Term, 178 

Courses of Instruction : 
Chemical Engineering : 

General Description, . 178 

Four-Year Course, Co-operative Course, 179 

Regular Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 179 

Courses in Detail, 182 

Co-operative Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 181 

Courses in Detail, 182 

Civil Engineering : 

General Description 186 

Co-operative Plan 187 

Regular Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 187 

Courses in Detail, 190 

Co-operative Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 188 

Courses in Detail, 190 

Electrical Engineering : 

General Description, Co-operative Plan, 192 

Regular Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 193 

Courses in Detail, 196 

Co-operative Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 195 

Courses in Detail, 196 

Mechanical Engineering : 

General Description, Co-operative Plan, 198 

Regular Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 199 

Courses in Detail, 201 

Co-operative Plan : 

Schedule of Studies, 200 

Courses in Detail, 201 

Metallurgical Engineering : 
General Description, 204 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 7 

Co-operative Plan : 

General Description, 205 

Schedule of Studies, 206 

Courses in Detail, 207 

Co-ordination, 209 

Special Courses in Engineering, 210 

General Courses : 

Applied Mathematics and Astronomy, 211 

Economics, English, 212 

Geology and Geography, 213 

German, French, or Spanish, Mathematics, 214 

Physical Education, Physics, 215 



PART VI 
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

Faculty, 217 

The College Dispensary, . . . 223 

Equipment : 

Buildings and Laboratories, 226 

Museums and Medical Libraries, 227 

Current Literature in the University Library, 228 

Requirements for Admission, 228 

Advanced Standing, Graduation, and Other Information : 

Credit for Courses in Colleges of Liberal Arts, 229 

Credit for Work in Medical Colleges, 230 

Graduates in Medicine, 230 

Special Students, 231 

Requirements for Completion of a Course, Promotions, . 231 

Requirements for Graduation, 232 

Ohio State Medical Board Examinations, 232 

Royal Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons of England, . 233 

Six-Year Combined Collegiate and Medical Course, . . 233 

Courses of Instruction: 

Anatomy, 235 

Physiology, 237 

Chemistry, 238 

Pathology and Bacteriology, 239 

Materia Medica, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics, . . . 241 

Medicine, 242 

Paediatrics, „ 244 

Psychiatry and Neurology, Dermatology and Syphilology, . 246 

Surgery, 247 

Orthopedic Surgery, Obstetrics, 249 

Gynecology 250 

Ophthalmology, 251 

Oto-Laryngology, 252 

Hygiene, Co-operative Course with the Board of Health, . 253 

Medical Jurisprudence and Economics, 254 

Clinical Instruction, 254 

The Cincinnati General Hospital : 

General Description, 254 

Medical Staff, Consulting Staff, Visiting Staff, 255 



8 TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Junior Visiting Staff, 256 

Clinical and Pathological School, 258 

The Good Samaritan Hospital, 258 

Cincinnati Tuberculosis Hospital, 259 

Other Hospitals of Cincinnati, 259 

Longview Hospital for the Insane, 259 

College Dispensary : 

General Description, 260 

Children's Clinic and Orthopedic Clinic, 260 

Obstetric Clinic, 261 



PART VII 
COLLEGE OF COMMERCE 

Faculty, l 262 

General Information, 263 

Admission and Pre-Commercial Course, 264 

Candidates for a Diploma and Special Students, .... 265 

Registration and Fees, 266 

Plan of Instruction, 267 

Graduation, Certified Public Accountant, 268 

Evening Academic Courses, 268 

Schedule of Courses, 269 

Courses of Instruction : 

Administration and Accountancy, 270 

Commerce, 271 

Commercial Law, 273 

Finance, German, French, Spanish, 275 



PART VIII 
SCHOOL OF HOUSEHOLD ARTS 

Faculty, General Statement and Admission, 276 

General Regulations and Plan of Instruction, 277 

Courses of Instruction : 

Elements of Cookery and of Sewing, Foods and Nutrition, 279 

Household Economics, Shelter and Textiles, 280 

Household Arts Education and Zoology 281 



PART IX 
FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, LIST OF STUDENTS, ETC. 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes, 1914-15 : 

Graduate School, McMicken College of Liberal Arts, . . 282 

College of Medicine 284 

Holders of Fellowships Since 1900, 284 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 9 

Degrees Conferred in June, 1914: 

Graduate School, McMicken College of Liberal Arts, . . 287 

College for Teachers, 289 

College of Engineering 290 

College of Medicine, 291 

Summary of Graduates, June, 1914, 291 

Registration of Students, 1914-15 : 

Graduate School 292-297 

McMicken College of Liberal Arts : 

Seniors, 297 

Juniors, 299 

Sophomores, « . . 301 

Freshmen, 304 

Irregular Students — Day, 309 

Irregular Students — Evening, 309 

Special Students — Day, 312 

Special Students — Evening, 313 

Unclassified Students, . 317 

College for Teachers : 

Graduates, Art Students, 318 

Kindergartners, Teachers, 318 

College of Engineering: 

Seniors, 321 

Juniors, 321 

Sophomores, 321 

Freshmen, 321 

Specials, 322 

Fifth Year Co-operative Students, 322 

Fourth Year Co-operative Students, 322 

Third Year Co-operative Students, 323 

Second Year Co-operative Students, 324 

First Year Co-operative Students, 327 

Special Co-operative Engineers, 330 

College of Medicine: 

Seniors, 330 

Juniors, 330 

Irregular Juniors, 331 

Sophomores, 331 

Irregular Sophomores, 331 

Freshmen, 331 

Irregular Freshmen, 331 

Specials, ....'. 332 

College of Commerce, 332 

Schopl of Household Arts : 

Seniors, 335 

Juniors, 335 

Candidates for a Diploma, 335 

Irregular Students, 336 

Special Students, 336 

Graduates 336 

Summary of Students at End of Academic Year, 1913-14, . 337 
Registration of Students at Beginning of Academic Year, 

1914-15, 339 

Alumnal Associations, University of Cincinnati, .... 341 

Schedule of Hours, 342 

General Index 344 



10 



UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
1914 



Sept. 14, Monday. 



Sept. 17, Thursday. 
Sept. 18, Friday. 
Sept. 19, Saturday. 

Sept. 19, Saturday. 



Sept. 21, Monday. 

Sept. 21, Monday. 

Sept. 24, Thursday. 
Sept. 25, Friday. 
Sept. 26, Saturday. 

Sept. 26, Saturday. 
Sept. 29, Tuesday. 
Oct. 5, Monday. 
Oct. 17, Saturday. 
Nov. 26, Thursday. 



Entrance examinations to all departments 
of the University began. 

f Registration days for the Colleges of 
J Liberal Arts, Engineering, Commerce, the 
j College for Teachers, and the School of 
^ Household Arts. 

Entrance examinations ended. 

( First semester began for the Colleges of 

j Liberal Arts, Engineering, Commerce, the 

] College for Teachers, and the School of 

^ Household Arts. 

( First registration day for the Graduate 
1 School. 



Registration days for the College of 
Medicine. 

Last registration day for the Graduate 
School. 

First semester began for the College of 
Medicine. 

First registration day for the External 
Courses. 

Last registration day for the External 
Courses. 

Thanksgiving Day: a holiday. Recess of 
three days. 



Recess, Monday, December 21, 1914, to Saturday, January 2, 
1915, Inclusive 



CALENDAR 



11 



f 
Jan. 4, Monday. J 

i 

Jan. 9, Saturday. 
Jan. 11, Monday. 
Jan. 25, Monday. 

Jan. 30, Saturday. J 

Feb. 1, Monday. -I 

Feb. 4, Thursday. 

Feb. 5, Friday. 
Feb. 6, Saturday. 
Feb. 8, Monday. 



Feb. 8, Monday. 
Feb. 9, Tuesday. 
Feb. 10, Wednesday. 

Feb. 22, Monday. 



1915 

Classes resumed in all departments of the 
University except in the College of Com- 
merce. 
Entrance examinations begin. 

Entrance examinations end. 

Classes resumed in the College of Commerce. 

First semester examinations begin. 

First semester ends for the College of 
Medicine. 

Second semester begins for the College of 
Medicine. 

First semester examinations end. 

Registration day for the second semester 
of the Colleges of Liberal Arts and 
Engineering, the College for Teachers, and 
the School of Household Arts. 

No classes. 

Second semester of the Colleges of Liberal 
Arts, Engineering, Commerce, the College 
for Teachers, and the School of House- 
hold Arts begins. 

Registration day for the second semester 
of the Graduate School. 

Washington's Birthday: a holiday. 



Easter Recess for 
to 

May 7, Friday. 
May 31, Monday. 
June 11, Friday. 
June 12, Saturday. 
June 14, Monday. 
June 19, Saturday. 



the College of Medicine, Monday, March 29, 
Saturday, April 3, Inclusive 

Oratorical contest for Jones Prizes. 
Second semester examinations begin. 
Second semester ends. 
University Commencement Day. 
Entrance examinations begin. 
Entrance examinations end. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The University comprises the following departments: 

GRADUATE SCHOOL, 

McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS, 

COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING: Departments of Chem- 
ical, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical, and Metallurgical 
Engineering, 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE (The Ohio-Miami Medical 
College and the Clinical and Pathological School of the 
Cincinnati Hospital), 

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE, 

SCHOOL OF HOUSEHOLD ARTS. 

For special announcements of the various departments, except 
the Medical College, and for further information, address : 

The Secretary of tee University 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

For special announcement of the Medical College, address : 

The Dean of the College of Medicine 

Clifton Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 13 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Appointed by the Mayor of Cincinnati 

Arthur R. Morgan, January, 1916 

Smith Hickenlooper, " 1916 

Emil Pollak, " 1916 

Otto J. Renner, " 1918 

Rufus B. Smith, " 1918 

David I. Wolfstein, M. D., " 1918 

Arthur M. Spiegel, " 1920 

Sanford Brown, " 1920 

Walter R. Griess, . . . . " 1920 

OFFICERS 

For the Fiscal Year 1914 

Rufus B. Smith, . Chairman 

Daniel Laurence, Clerk 

Christie Wilke, Assistant Clerk 

COMMITTEES 

Committee on Finance: Messrs. Renner, Spiegel, and Pollak. 
Committee on Real Estate : Messrs. Hickenlooper, Wolfstein, and 

Morgan. 
Committee on University Buildings and Grounds: Messrs. 

Pollak, Hickenlooper, and Brown. 
Committee on Law: Messrs. Brown, Spiegel, and Smith. 
Committee on Academic Affairs: Messrs. Spiegel, Wolfstein, and 

Renner. 
Committee on Observatory: Messrs. Griess, Brown, and Spiegel. 
Committee on Professional Schools : Messrs. Wolfstein, Griess, 

and Morgan. 
Committee on Engineering College: Messrs. Morgan, Griess, and 

Renner. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Charles William Dabney,P1i.D.,LL. D., President of the University. 

Office, 10 McMicken Hall. 

Frank W. Chandler, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. 
Office, 8 McMicken Hall. 

Joseph E. Harry, Ph. D., . . . . Dean of the Graduate School. 
Office, 4 McMicken Hall. 

Herman Schneider, Sc. D., . Dean of the College of Engineering. 

College of Engineering Building. 

William P. Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Dean of the College for Teachers. 

Office, 2 McMicken Hall. 

Christian R. Holmes, M. D., . Dean of the College of Medicine. 

Medical College Building, Clifton Ave. 

Frederick C. Hicks, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Commerce and 
Supervisor of the Evening Academic Courses. 

Office, 32 McMicken Hall. 

Emilie Watts McVea, A. M., Dean of Women. 

Office, 12 McMicken Hall. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D., Secretary of the Faculty, College of Medicine. 

Medical College Building, Clifton Ave. 

Jermain G. Porter, Ph. D., . . . . Director of the Observatory. 
The Observatory, Mt. Lookout. 

Henry S. West, Ph. D., Director of School Affiliation. 

Office, 2 McMicken Hall. 

Alfred Brodbeck, Director of Physical Education. 

Gymnasium Building. 

Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., Director of the Municipal Reference 

City Hall. Bureau. 

Daniel Laurence, B. S., Secretary of the University. 

Office, 5 McMicken Hall. 

Charles Albert Read, A. B., Librarian of the University Library. 

Van Wormer Library Building. 

Lelia Garvin Hartmann, B. L Registrar. 

Office, 7 McMicken Hall. 



UNIVERSITY SENATE 15 



UNIVERSITY SENATE, 1914-15 

Charles William DABNEY,Ph.D.,LL. D., President of the University. 
Christian R. Holmes, M. D., . Dean of the College of Medicine. 
Joseph E. Harry, Ph. D., . . . . Dean of the Graduate School. 
Frank W. Chandler, Ph. D., De?an of the McMicken College of 

Liberal Arts 

William P. Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Dean of the College for Teachers. 

Herman Schneider, Sc. D., . Dean of the College of Engineering. 

Frederick C. Hicks, Ph. D., Dean of the College of Commerce and 

Supervisor of the Evening Academic Courses. 

Emilie Watts McVea, A. M., Dean of Women. 

Jermain G. Porter, Ph. D., . . . . Director of the Observatory. 
B. K. Rachford, M. D., Representative of the Faculty of the College 

of Medicine. 
Max Poll, Ph. D., Representative of the Faculty of the McMicken 

College of Liberal Arts. 
John W. Hall, A. M., Representative of the Faculty of the College 

for Teachers. 
Curtis Clark Myers, M. M. E., Representative of the Faculty of 

the College of Engineering. 



COMMITTEES 

Committee on Athletics: Frank W. Chandler, Herman Schneider, 

Christian R. Holmes, M. D. 
Committee on Correlation of Courses : Max Poll, B. K. Rachford, 

M. D., Curtis C. Myers. 
Committee on Rules: Frederick C. Hicks, Herman Schneider, 

William P. Burris. 
Committee on Intercollegiate Debate: Joseph E. Harry, William 

P. Burris, Frank W. Chandler. 
Committee on Public Lectures: William P. Burris, Joseph E. 

Harry. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

COMMITTEES OF THE GENERAL FACULTY 

OF 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL, THE COLLEGES OF LIBERAL 

ARTS AND ENGINEERING, AND THE 

COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

1914—15 



Committee on Admission — 

For Liberal Arts: Frederick C. Hicks, Max Poll, Louis T. 

More, William P. Burris, Frank W. Chandler, Merrick Whit- 
comb. 

For Engineering: Herman Schneider, Stephen E. Slocum, John 

T. Faig. Dr. West, Secretary. 

Committee on Discipline: Frank W. Chandler, Herman Schneider, 

William P. Burris, Emilie W. McVea, Frederick C. Hicks. 
Committee on Library: Max Poll, Louis T. More, Selden G. 

Lowrie, A. M. Wilson, Henry S. West. 
Committee on Museums and Collections: Nevin M. Fenneman, 

Robert Chambers, Jr., Charles A. Read. 
Committee on Schedule of Hours: Harry S. Fry, John T. Faig, 

John W. Hall, Claude M. Lotspeich, Isaac J. Co^.. 
Committee on Social Functions: Emilie W. McVea, Phillip Ogden, 

Frank W. Chandler, John T. Faig, Lelia G. Hartmann. 
Committee on Convocation: Nevin M. Fenneman, Claude E. 

Lotspeich, Emilie W. McVea, A. M. Wilson, Cyrus D. Mead. 
Committee on Public Exercises : Phillip Ogden. 

COMMITTEES OF THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL 

ARTS 

Committee on Advanced Standing: Burtis B. Breese, John M. 

Burnam, Lauder W. Jones. 
Committee on External Courses: Nevin M. Fenneman, Frank W. 

Chandler. 
Committee on Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes: Joseph E. 

Harry, Harris Hancock, Phillip Ogden. 
Freshman Advisory Committee: S. J. M. Allen, Harry Wieman, 

Ralph E. Bassett, William T. Semple, Florence Lawler, Henry 

G. Hartmann, Bertha K. Young. 
Committee on Rules: Louis T. More, Emilie W. McVea, Burtis B. 

Breese. 



MEDICAL COLLEGE COMMITTEES 17 



♦FACULTY COMMITTEES 

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

1914—15 



Committee on Admission : Drs. Freiberg, Fischer, Mitchell. 

Committee on Advanced Standing: Drs. Caldwell, Woolley, Fried- 
lander. 

Committee on Buildings: Drs. Knower, Fischer, Eichberg. 
Committee on Course of Study: Drs. Oliver, Knower, Withrow. 

Committee on Clinics: Drs. Rachford, Bonifield, Tangeman. 
Committee on Publicity: Drs. Reed, Carothers, Brown. 



* The Dean is a member ex officio of all Committees. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND ADMINIS- 
TRATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 
OF CINCINNATI 

Charles William Dabney,P1i.D.,LL. D., President of the University. 

The Romaine, Clifton. 

COLLEGES OF LIBERAL ARTS, ENGINEERING, AND 

COMMERCE, COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS, THE 

GRADUATE SCHOOL, AND THE SCHOOL 

OF HOUSEHOLD ARTS 

Wayland Richardson Benedict, A. B., Professor of Philosophy, 

Cincinnati. Emeritus. 

Jermain Gildersleeve Porter, Ph. D., Director of the Observatory 

3314 Avery Lane, Mt. Lookout. and Professor of Astronomy. 

Frederick Charles Hicks, Ph. D., Sinton Professor of Economics 

and Commerce, Dean of the College of Commerce, and 

Supervisor of the Evening Academic Courses. 

The Alexandra, Walnut Hills. 

Harris Hancock, Ph. D., D. Sc, . . Professor of Mathematics. 

2365 Auburn Ave., Mt. Auburn. 

John Miller Burnam, Ph. D., Professor of Latin. 

315 Bryant Ave., Clifton. 

Max Poll, Ph. D., . . . Professor of the Germanic Languages. 

The Romaine, Clifton. 

Joseph Edward Harry, Ph. D., Professor of Greek and Dean of the 

840 Lincoln Ave., Walnut Hills. Graduate School. 

Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., Professor of History. 

3411 Clifton Ave., Clifton. 

Louis Trenchard More, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Physics. 

317 Pike St. 

Herman Schneider, Sc. D., William Thorns Professor of Civil 
Engineering and Dean of the College of Engineering. 

3343 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. 

Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Psychology. 

560 Evanswood, Clifton. 

William Paxton Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Professor of the History 
and Principles of Education and Dean of the College for 
Teachers. 
3523 Biddle St., Clifton. 

John William Hall, A. M., Professor of Elementary Education. 

The Romaine, Clifton. 

Stephen Elmer Slocum, B. E., Ph. D., Professor of Applied 

565 Evanswood PI., Clifton. Mathematics. 

John Theodore Faig, M. E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

3345 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. 






OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 19 

Nevin M. Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Geography. 

348 Shiloh St., Clifton. 

Lauder William Jones, Ph. D., ... Professor of Chemistry. 

3457 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. 

♦Guy Allan Tawney, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Philosophy. 

345 Thrall Ave., Clifton. 

Frank Wadleigh Chandler, Ph. D., Professor of English, Ropes 
Professor of Comparative Literature, and Dean of the 
College of Liberal Arts. 

222 Hosea Ave., Clifton. 

Phillip Ogden, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Romance Languages. 

257 Senator PL, Clifton. 

Curtis Clark Myers, M. M. E., Professor in Charge of Co- 

3432 Lyleburn PL, Clifton. ordination. 

Alexander Massey Wilson, M. E., Professor of Electrical En- 

The Roanoke, Clifton. gineering. 

Harris Miller Benedict, Ph. D., .... Professor of Botany. 

554 Evanswood PL, Clifton. 

Henry S. West, Ph. D., Professor of Secondary Education and 

3458 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. Director of School Affiliation. 
Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., Professor of Political Science and 

Director of the Municipal Reference Bureau. 

3411 Clifton Ave., Clifton. 

John C. Duncan, M. S., Ph. D., Professor of Administration and 

411 Ludlow Ave., Clifton. Accounting. 

Ann Gilchrist Strong, B. S., . . Professor of Household Arts. 

Haddon Hall, Avondale. 
Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

2269 Washington Ave., Norwood. 

Alexander Lewis Jenkins, M. E., Associate Professor of Mechan- 

265 Senator PL, Clifton. ical Engineering. 

Samuel James McIntosh Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

274 McGregor Ave., Mt. Auburn. Physics. 

Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., . . . Associate Professor of History. 

553 Evanswood PL, Clifton. 

Claude M. Lotspeich, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of German. 

416 Resor Ave., Clifton. 

Gustave Maurice Braune, C. E., Associate Professor of Civil 

248 Loraine Ave., Clifton. Engineering. 

Emilie Watts McVea, A. M., Assistant Professor of English and 

3 Hedgerow Lane, Clifton. Dean of Women. 

Charles Napoleon Moore, Ph. D., Assistant Professor or Mathe- 

3325 Burnet Ave. matics. 

Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 
3205 Bishop St. Chemistry. 



Absent on leave, 1914-15. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Benjamin Carlton Van Wye, A. M., Assistant Professor of Pub- 

2117 Auburn Ave. lie Speaking and English. 

Harry Lewis Wieman, Ph. D., . Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

4540 Glenway Ave., Price Hill. 

William Tunstall Semple, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Latin. 

3411 Clifton Ave., Clifton. 

Clarence Raymond Wylie, M. E., Assistant Professor of Elec- 

219 Woolper Ave., Clifton. trical Engineering. 

J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., Assistant Professor of Geology. 

The Rosson, Clifton. 

Louis Brand, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

14 W. Charlton St. 

Ralph Emerson Bassett, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance 

1937 Auburn Ave., Mt. Auburn. Languages. 

Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 
345 Thrall Ave. Comparative Anatomy. 

Bertha K. Young, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of English. 
The Maplewood, Clifton. 

Clyde William Park, A. M., . Assistant Professor of English. 

2817 Eden Ave. 

William Hammond Parker, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Eco- 

2 Glen Armand Ave. nomics and Social Science. 

James Aston, Ch. E., . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 

2522 Ritchie Ave., Hyde Park. 

Cyrus DeWitt Mead, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Elementary 
The Maplewood, Clifton. Education. 

Henry G. Hartmann, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
1200 Cypress St., Walnut Hills. 

Clarence Oran Gardner, Ph. D., 'Assistant Professor of Political 

340 Howell Ave., Clifton. Science. 

Clarence D. Stevens, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 

354 Shiloh St., Clifton. 

Eleanor Toaz, B. S., . . Assistant Professor of Domestic Arts. 

Haddon Hall, Avondale. 
Alfred Brodbeck, Director of Physical Education. 

Robinson Rd. f Pleasant Ridge. 
Florence Cameron Lawler, B. S., . Instructor in Mathematics. 

2516 Woodburn Ave. 

Arthur James Kinsella, A. M Instructor in Greek. 

2613 Ashland Ave. 

Joseph Henry Kindle, A. M., . . . Instructor in Mathematics. 

2706 Eden Ave. 

Platt Bishop Evens, Mechanician and Instructor in Laboratory Arts. 

203 W. Fifth St., Covington, Ky. 

Cora May Box, A. M., Instructor in Zoology. 

275 McGregor Ave., Mt. Auburn. 

Harold W. T. Collins, M. E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

2388 Mound Ave., Norwood. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 21 

Eleanor Catherine Nippert, A. B., . . . Instructor in German. 

The Laurel, Middleton Ave., Clifton. 

Martin Ludwich, M. K, M. A., Instructor in French, Spanish, and 

257 Gilman Ave., Mt. Auburn. German. 

Robert E. Clyde Gowdy, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Physics. 

2115 Auburn Ave., Mt. Auburn. 

Max B. Robinson, M. E., . . . . Instructor in Co-ordination. 

2650 Bellevue Ave., Mt. Auburn. 

Ellery K. Files, A. M., Chemist of the Bureau of City Tests, 

The Roanoke, Clifton. College of Engineering. 

Charles Watkins Brown, Mechanician and Instructor in Labora- 

228 Piedmont Ave. tory Arts. 

Abbie Louise Day, B. S., B. Di., Instructor in Elementary Education. 

315 Bryant Ave., Clifton. 

Thomas Lansing Porter, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Physics. 

The Roanoke, Clifton. 

George R. Moore, C. E., . . . . Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

429 Riddle Rd., Clifton. 

Edwin W. Esslinger, A. M., . Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 

2331 Wheeler St. 

Walter H. Bucher, Ph. D. Instructor in Geology. 

2624 Eden Ave. 

Edward S. Smith, M. E., M. S., . . Instructor in Mathematics. 

3826 Forest Ave., S. Norwood, Ohio. 
James Dysart Magee, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Economics. 

126 E. Auburn Ave. 
Charles Albert Joerger, M. £., Instructor in Mechanical En- 

3541^ Edwards Rd., Hyde Park. gineering. 

Russell Bennett Witte, B. C. E., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

2627 Moormann Ave., E. Walnut Hills. 

Charles B. Hoffmann, M. E., E. E., Instructor in Electrical En- 

2619 Vine St. gineering. 

Mary Young Allison, B. S., . . Instructor in Household Arts. 

Hotel Gibson, Cincinnati. 

Merton Jerome Hubert, A. M. f . Instructor in French and Italian. 

3411 Clifton Ave. 

Dexter Perkins, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in English History. 

3411 Clifton Ave. 
Levi Alexander Giddings, M. S., . . . . Instructor in Botany. 

370 Howell Ave., Clifton. 

Ernest Lynn Talbert, Ph. D., ... Instructor in Philosophy. 
339 Ludlow Ave., Clifton. 

Walter Wesley Plock, M. A Instructor in English. 

610 Linden Ave., Newport, Ky. 

John Joseph Long, Ph. B., M. S., Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

370 Howell Ave., Clifton. 

Howard Porter Warren, B. S., M. C. S., . Instructor in Finance. 

2415 Auburn Ave., Mt. Auburn. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Willard A. Kinne, A. B., . . Instructor in French and Spanish. 

3411 Clifton Ave. 
Ray Gould Knickerbocker, B. S., . . . Instructor in Metallurgy. 

2515 Auburn Ave. 

LECTURERS FOR 1914—15 
Nathan Isaacs, Ph. D., LL. B., . Lecturer on Commercial Law. 

No. 2, The Aragon, Avondale. 

Charles W. Dupuis, Lecturer on Banking. 

S. E. Cor. Ninth and Main Sts. 

Harvey M. Manss, A. B., Lecturer on Advertising. 

1408-10 First National Bank Building. 

Henry M. Brouse, .... Lecturer on Business Administration. 

Third and W. Front Sts. 
Ernest A. Roden, . . . Lecturer on Principles of Accounting. 

907 Mercantile Library Building. 

Edward A. Sisson, A. B., ...... . Lecturer on Banking. 

115 E. Fourth St. 

George R. Lamb, C. P. A., Lecturer on Accounting. 

First National Bank Building. 

Edward Mack, D. D., Lecturer on Biblical Literature. 

1 Lane Seminary PI., Walnut Hills. 

Guy M. Freer, Lecturer on Transportation. 

Chamber of Commerce. 

William S. Groom, Lecturer on Transportation. 

The Whitaker Paper Co. 

Other Appointments for 1914-15 

Schachne Isaacs, A. M., Assistant in Psychology. 

3552 Bogart Ave. 

Raphael Isaacs, A. M., . Assistant in Embryology and Zoology. 

3552 Bogart Ave. 

Annette Frances Braun, Ph. D., . . . . Assistant in Zoology. 

2702 May St. 

Leonora Neuffer, A. M Assistant in Chemistry. 

Lockland, Ohio. 
Harold H. Wagner, Assistant in Physical Education. 

1114 Draper St. 

Esther Godshaw, Ph. B., Assistant in History. 

3442 Reading Rd., Avondale. 

Teasdale Fisher, : Assistant in Accounting. 

1330 Chapel St. 

Madelaine Maury Wright, A. B., . . . . Assistant in English. 

870 Glenwood Ave., Avondale. 

Edward Joseph Lorenz, A. M., . . . Llanna Fellow in Physics. 

633 W. McMicken Ave. 

Miriam Urbansky, D. A. R. Fellow in American History and 

431 Forest Ave., Avondale. Student Assistant in European History. 

Emma Andriessen, A. M., . . . Graduate Assistant in German. 

116 Parker St. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 23 

Charles L. Bloom, B. Ch. E., . Graduate Assistant in Chemistry. 

1038 Wesley Ave. 

E. Lucy Braun, Ph. D., . . . . Graduate Assistant in Botany 

2702 May St. 

Hyman Bernard Cantor, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Philosophy. 

1637 Clayton St. 

John D. Ellis, A. B., LL. B., Graduate Assistant in Economics and 

1114 Union Trust Building. English. 

Martha Jane Gibson, A. M., . . Graduate Assistant in English. 

3222 Harrison St., Pleasant Ridge. 

Ella Davis Isaacs, A. M., . . Graduate Assistant in Economics. 

2, The Aragon, Avondale. 

Ralph Kreimer, A. B., . . . . Graduate Assistant in English. 

35-36 Blymyer Building. 

Lowell Hobart Ludwig, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Economics. 

1011 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

Samuel Speir Mayerberg, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Social 

The Wilhelm, Avondale. Science. 

Amy F. Mihalovitch, A. B., . Graduate Assistant in Economics. 

Kasota and Delaware Aves. 

Helen A. Stanley, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Latin and English. 

3576 Zumstein Ave. 

Mary Dunn Whitfield, A. B., . Graduate Assistant in English. 

The Glenwood, College Hill. 

Dorothy Anderson, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

4749 Winton Rd., Winton PI. 

Ralph E. Belsinger, Student Assistant in Physics. 

804 Grand Ave., Price Hill. 

Virginia Biddle, Student Assistant in English. 

2549 Fairview Ave. 

Lester Brand, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

14 W. Charlton St. 

Walter Brill, Student Assistant in Physics. 

3930 Huston Ave., Norwood, Ohio. 

Stanley Cook, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

116 Huntington PI. 

Otto C. F. Lippert, A. B., . . . Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

1601 Freeman Ave. 

Harold F. Richards, Student Assistant in Physics. 

413 Fifth Ave., Dayton, Ky. 

Edward Stevens Robinson, . . Student Assistant in Psychology. 

15 The Crescent, Avondale. 

Clifford J. Rolle, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

3803 Glenway Ave. 

Odin Wilhelmy. ...... Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

3345 Woodburn Ave. 

ASSISTANTS IN THE OBSERVATORY 
Everett Irving Yowell, Ph. D., First Astronomer and Instructor in 
Corbett and Griest Sts. the Observatory. 



24 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Elliott Smith, Ph. D., Second Astronomer and Instructor in the 

3441 Observatory Pi. Observatory. 

Fannie R. Gaston, Assistant in the Observatory. 

3441 Observatory PI. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY STAFF 
Charles Albert Read, A. B., Librarian. 

The Metamora, Clifton. 

Marguerite Burnet Resor, A. B., Cataloguer. 

254 Greendale Ave., Clifton. 

Florence Stimson, In Charge of Circulation. 

190 E. McMillan St. 
Reuben E. F. Ott, Assistant in the Library. 

820 York St. 

UNIVERSITY MUSEUM STAFF 

Donald F. Dearness, Laboratory and Museum Assistant in Geology. 
2654 Harrison Ave. 

MUNICIPAL REFERENCE BUREAU STAFF 
Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., Director. 

3411 Clifton Ave. 

Jessie P. Boswell, A. B., Librarian. 

The Somerset, Avondale. 

OTHER OFFICERS 
Daniel Laurence, B. S., Secretary of the University. 

6 McMicken Hall. 

Lelia Garvin Hartmann, B. L., Registrar. 

1200 Cypress St., Walnut Hills. 

Martha Gillespie Fain, Secretary to the President. 

The Roanoke, Clifton. 

Christie Wilke, Assistant Clerk, Board of Directors. 

6 McMicken Hall. 

Albert Masset, Voucher and Payroll Clerk. 

59 W. Corry St. 

George W. Burns, Secretary to the Faculty of the College of 
2382 Wheeler St. Engineering. 

Edith Wagoner, A. B., Secretary to the Dean of the College of 
The Roanoke, Clifton. Liberal Arts and Editorial Clerk. 

Anna Teasdale, Secretary to the Dean of the College of Engineering. 
Harvey and Ridgeway Aves. 

Helen H. Hissem, Secretary to the Dean of the College for 

The Parkside, Clifton. Teachers. 

Thomas L. McJoynt, .... Secretary, College of Commerce. 

2700 Park Ave. 

Estelle A. Hunt, A. B., Mailing Clerk. 

3344 Whitfield Ave. 
Alma Dieckman, Assistant Registrar. 

2243 Spring Grove Ave. 



COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Charles William Dabney, Ph. D.,LL. D., President of the University. 

Christian R. Holmes, M. D., Professor of Otology and Dean of the 
8 E. Eighth St. College of Medicine. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthal- 
mology and Secretary of the Faculty of the College of Medicine. 
4 W. Seventh St. 

J. C. Mackenzie, M. D., Clinical Professor of Medicine, Emeritus. 

624 W. Eighth St. 

Chauncey D. Palmer, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gyne- 

Reading Rd. and Forest Ave., Avondale. COlogy, Emeritus. 

Byron Stanton, M. D., Professor of Diseases of Women and 

Savannah Ave., College Hill. Children, Emeritus. 

Alexander Greer Drury, A. M., M. D., Professor of Hygiene, 

836 Lincoln Ave., Walnut Hills. Emeritus. 

Stephen Cooper Ayres, A. M., M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology, 

4 W. Seventh St. Emeritus. 

Philip Zenner, A. M., M. D., . Professor of Neurology, Emeritus. 

14 Glenn Building. 

E. W. Walker, M. D., . Professor of Clinical Surgery, Emeritus. 

30 W. Eighth St. 

The names of the teaching staff are arranged by departments: 
Henry McElderry Knower, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Anatomy. 

3438 Middleton Ave., Clifton. 

Edward F. Malone, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 

The Maplewood, Clifton. 

Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 
345 Thrall Ave., Clifton. Comparative Anatomy. 



Martin H. Fischer, M. D., Joseph Eichberg Professor of Physiology. 

The Maplewood, Clifton. 

Edmund M. Baehr, M. D., . Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Fourth and Sycamore Sts. 



Lauder W. Jones, Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry. 

3457 Whitfield Ave., Clifton. 

Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
2269 Washington Ave., Norwood. 

Edward B. Reemelin, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
3471 Cheviot Ave., Westwood. and of Physiological Chemistry. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Paul Gerhardt Woolley, B. S., M. D., Mary M. Emery Professor 
343 Bryant Ave., Clifton. of Pathology. 

William Buchanan Wherry, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor of 

759 E. Ridgeway Ave., Avondale. Bacteriology. 

Charles Goosmann, M. D., Instructor in Pathology. 

1203 Walnut St. 

Gilbert Mombach, M. D., Instructor in Pathology. 

22 W. Seventh St. 



Julius H. Eichberg, Ph. G., Ph. D., M. D., Professor of Materia 

55 Groton Building. Medica, Pharmacology, and Therapeutics. 

C. C. Fihe, M. D., Lecturer in Dietetics and Instructor in Thera- 

19 W. Seventh St. (32) peutics. 

Rufus Southworth, A. M., M. D., Assistant Professor of Thera- 

Fountain Ave., Glendale. peutics. 

William C. Herman, Ph. G., M. D., Instructor in Materia Medica 

19 W. Seventh St. and Pharmacology. 

Sidney Lange, A. B., M. D., Lecturer and Demonstrator of Radiology. 

5 Garfield PI. 
H. Kennon Dunham, M. D., Lecturer and Demonstrator of Elec- 
McMillan St. and Auburn Ave., Mt. Auburn. trotherapeutics. 

Louis G. Schrickel, Ph. G., M. D., Instructor in Pharmacy and 

1635 Walnut St. Pharmacist to Dispensary. 

David Andrew Tucker, Jr., A. M., Instructor in Pharmacology in 

Charge of the Laboratory. 

No. 11, The Westmoreland, Mt. Auburn. 



Edwin W. Mitchell, A. B., M. D., . . . Professor of Medicine. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

George A. Fackler, M. D., ... Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 
Oliver P. Holt, M. D., . . . . Clinical Professor of Medicine. 
134 W. Ninth St. 

John Ernest Greiwe, A. M., M. D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

32 Garfield PI. 

Mark A. Brown, M. D., . . . Associate Professor of Medicine. 

628 Elm St. 

Henry Wald Bettmann, B. L., M. D., Adjunct Professor of Medicine. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

Allan Ramsey, B. S., M. D., . Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Oscar Berghausen, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 
Charles Sumner Rockhill, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

Lancaster Building. 

C. C. Fihe, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

19 W. Seventh St. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 27 

Louis G. Heyn, M. D Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

22 W. Seventh St. 
Otto J. Seibert, M. D., .... Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

913 Dayton St. 

Charles P. Kennedy, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

3329 Gilbert Ave., Walnut Hills. 

J. D. Spelman, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

1828 Freeman Ave. 

Julius G. Stammel, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

3477 Montgomery Ave., Evanston. 

Marcus E. Wilson, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

248 Pike St. 

Henry Lynde Woodward, M. D., Demonstrator of Clinical 

No. 1, Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. Microscopy in Medicine. 

C. E. Shinkle, M. D., .... Clinical Instructor in Medicine. 

705 Livingston Building. 



B. K. Rachford, M. D., Professor of Paediatrics. 

323 Broadway. 

Alfred Friedlander, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor of Paediatrics. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

Frank H. Lamb, A. M., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 
940 E. McMillan St. Paediatrics. 

Max Dreyfoos, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

19 W. Seventh St. 
Edward A. Wagner, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

3104 Jefferson Ave., Clifton. 

Edward D. Allgaier, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

Epworth and Junietta Aves., Westwood. 
John T. Batte, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Charles K. Ervin, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

2 Klinckhamer Building. 

E. I. Fogel, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

723 W. Eighth St. 
William J. Graf, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

No. 1, Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. 

Georges Rasetti, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

16 Garfield PI. 

Ida M. Westlake, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

No. 1, Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. 

Iames M. Bentley, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

705 Livingston Building. 

Frank W. Case, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

2807 Erie Ave., Hyde Park. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Eric R. Twachtman, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

Union Central Building. 

Charles A. Stammel, Jr., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

113 W. McMillan. 

J. Victor Greenbaum, M. D., . Clinical Instructor in Paediatrics. 

4 W. Seventh St. 



Frank Warren Langdon, M. D., . . . Professor of Psychiatry. 

4003 Rose Hill Ave., Avondale. 

Herman Henry Hoppe, A. M., M. D., . Professor of Neurology. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

David I. Wolfstein, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Nervous 

22 W. Seventh St. Diseases. 

Edmund M. Baehr, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Nervous 

Fourth and Sycamore Sts. Diseases. 

Robert Ingram, M. D., . . . . Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry. 

20 Norfolk Building. 

Charles E. Kiely, A. B., M. D., Clinical Instructor in Neurology. 

City Hospital. 

William L. Shannon, A. B., M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in 
City Hospital. Neurology. 



Meyer L. Heidingsfeld, Ph. B., M. D., Professor of Dermatology 

19 W. Seventh St. and Syphilology. 

Augustus Ravogli, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Dermatology 

5 Garfield Pi. and Syphilology. 

Elmore B. Tauber, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

19 W. Seventh St. Syphilology. 

James W. Miller, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

Seventh and Race Sts. Syphilology. 

Moses Scholtz, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Dermatology and 

22 W. Seventh St. Syphilology. 



Joseph Ransohoff, M. D., F. R. C. S. (Eng.), Professor of Surgery. 

19 W. Seventh St. 
John Chadwick Oliver, M. D., . Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Berkshire Building. 

Charles Edward Caldwell, A. M., M. D., Associate Professor of 
Surgical Anatomy and Clinical Professor of Surgery. 
4 W. Seventh St. 

E. Otis Smith, M. D., Adjunct Professor of Genito-Urinary Dis- 

19 W. Seventh St. eases. 

Frank Fee, M. D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

22 W. Seventh St. 

Archibald I. Carson, M. D., . . Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

410 Broadway. 






OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 29 

Carl Hiller, M. D., . . Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Harry Hayes Hines, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

84 W. Eighth St. 
Goodrich Barbour Rhodes, A. B., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professoi 

4 W. Seventh St. of Surgery 

Dudley White Palmer, B. S., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 

4 W. Seventh St. Surgery 
Charles A. Langdale, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery 

5 Garfield PI. 

Casper F. Hegner, M. D., . . . Assistant Professor of Surgery 

Berkshire Building. 

John A. Caldwell, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

350 Ludlow Ave., Clifton. 

Dudley Webb, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

409 Broadway. 

J. Edward Pirrung, M. D., ... Clinical Instructor in Surgery 

1218 Walnut St. 

Carleton G. Crisler, M. D., . Assistant Demonstrator in Surgery 

Groton Building. 

Ralph Staley, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

421 Clark St. 

Charles T. Souther, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

Berkshire Building. 

Guy G. Giffen, M. D. Clinical Instructor in Surgery. 

5 Garfield PI. 



Simon Pendleton Kramer, M. D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

22 W Seventh St. 

Albert Henry Freiberg, M. D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Robert Carothers, M. D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

409 Broadway. 

Robert Daniel Maddox, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Orthopedic 
4 W. Seventh St. Surgery. 

R. B. Cofield, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 
19 W. Seventh St. 

Owen C. Fisk, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Orthopedic 

3444 Liston Ave., Riverside. Surgery. 



E. Gustav Zinke, M. D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

4 W. Seventh St. 

William D. Porter, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 

No. 1, Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. 

George M. Allen, M. D., . . . Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 

2404 Auburn Ave., Mt. Auburn. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

James William Rowe, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Ob- 

20 W. Ninth St. stetrics. 

Henry Lynde Woodward, M. D., . . . Instructor in Obstetrics. 

No. I, Melrose Building, Walnut Hills. 



Charles Lybrand Bonifield p M. D., . Professor of Gynecology. 

409 Broadway. 

Charles Alfred Lee Reed, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical 

60 Groton Building. Gynecology. 

John M. Withrow, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

22 W. Seventh St. 

Rufus Bartlett Hall, A. M., M. D., Professor of Clinical 

19 Berkshire Building. Gynecology. 

Sigmar Stark, M. D., . . . . Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
11 y 2 E. Eighth St. 

John D. Miller, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

Cor. Eighth and Elm Sts. 

Benjamin W. Gaines, M. D., . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

409 Broadway. 

John E. Stemler, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

103 W. McMillan St. 

Joseph S. Podesta, M. D., . . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

428 Broadway. 

George B. Topmoeller, M. D., . Clinical Instructor in Gynecology. 

30 Findlay St. 



Robert Sattler, M. D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

30 Groton Building. 

Derrick T. Vail, M. D., . Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

24 E. Eighth St. 

Walter Forchheimer, A. B., M. D., Clinical Professor of Ophthal- 

Fourth and Sycamore Sts. mology. 

Charles W. Tangeman, M. D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

20 W. Ninth St. 

Victor Ray, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

30 Groton Building. 

Wylie McLean Ayres, A. B., M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of 
4 W. Seventh St. Ophthalmology. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D., Assistant Clinical Professor of Ophthal- 
mology and Secretary of the Faculty of the College of Medicine. 
4 W. Seventh St. 

John Ranly, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

936 Clark St. 

Clarence J. King, M. D., . Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmolo 

Groton Building. 



" 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 31 

K. L. Stoll, M. D., . . . Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

19 W. Seventh St. 

Horace F. Tangeman, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in 

20 W. Ninth St. Ophthalmology. 
Frank U. Swing, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthal- 

705-06 Livingston Building. mology. 

Edward King, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

936 Clark St. 



Christian R. Holmes, M. D., Professor of Otology and Dean of the 

8 E. Eighth St. College of Medicine. 

John Albert Thompson, B. S., A. M., M. D., Professor of Laryn- 

Berkshire Building, 628 Elm St. gology. 

John Wesley Murphy, A. M., M. D., Clinical Professor of Laryn- 

4 W. Seventh St. gology and Otology. 

Samuel Iglauer, B. S., M. D., . Associate Professor of Otology. 

22 W. Seventh St. 

Walter E. Murphy, M. D., Associate Professor of Laryngology and 
Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, Laryngology, and Otology. 

Berkshire Building. 

William Mithoefer, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 
19 W. Seventh St. Laryngology, and Otology. 

W. J. Thomasson, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 
942 York St., Newport, Ky. Laryngology, and Otology. 

George L. Krieger, M. D., Clinical Instructor in Laryngology and 

4804 Central Ave., Madisonville. Otology. 

Charles Jones, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Rhinology, 

19 W. Seventh St. Laryngology, and Otology. 

Robert Stevenson, M. D., Assistant Clinical Instructor in Laryngology 

22 W. Seventh St and Otology. 

John Howard Landis, M. D., Professor of Hygiene. 

City Hall. 

LECTURER ON SPECIAL TOPICS 

Otis H. Fisk, Ph. D., Dr. Juris., LL. B., . Medical Jurisprudence. 

Mercantile Library Building. 

OTHER OFFICERS 
J. DeWitt Schonwald, M. D., . . . . Director of Dispensary. 

5654 Hamilton Ave., College Hill. 

L. M. Prince, Optician. 

108 W. Fourth St. 

Frank B. Cross, M. D., . . . . Secretary of the Medical Faculty. 

4 W. Seventh St. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Daniel Laurence, B. S., Secretary of the University. 

Office, 6 McMicken Hall, Burnet Woods. 

Frances Currie, . Secretary and Librarian of the Medical College. 

Ill E. Auburn Ave. 

Anna L. Hook, . . Secretary to the Dean of the Medical College 

2123 Sinton Ave. 

TECHNICAL ASSISTANTS 
Henry Louhier, Anatomy 

McMicken Cottage. 

Daisy Clark, Pathology 

40 E. McMillan St. 

Joseph Kupka, Physiology 

2221 Victor St. 



ADDRESSES AND LECTURES, 1913-14 

The speakers at Convocation during the year 1913-14 were 
as follows : 

Charles W. Dabney, Ph. D., LL. D., president of the Univer- 
sity; Frank W. Chandler, Ph. D., dean of the College of Liberal 
Arts ; A. M. Wilson, M. E., professor of Electrical Engineering ; 
Miss Dora Stevens, of Dayton, O. ; Benjamin C. Van Wye, A. M., 
assistant professor of Public Speaking and English; Emilie W. 
McVea, A. M., assistant professor of English and dean of women; 
Mr. Frank Garrett, of the University of Nanking, China; President 
Robert Chambers, Bithynia Collegiate, Turkey; Mr. Herbert 
Bigelow ; Joseph E. Harry, Ph. D., dean of the Graduate School ; 
Claude M. Lotspeich, Ph. D., assistant professor of German; Arthur 
Kinsella, A. M., instructor in Greek; Louis T. More, Ph. D., pro- 
fessor of Physics ; Miss May Robson, the actress ; Clarence D. 
Stevens, A. M., assistant professor of English ; S. J. M. Allen, 
Ph. D., associate professor of Physics. 

A series of public lectures was given at the University during 
the year 1913-14, the speakers being as follows : 

Mr. John C. Kennedy, lecturer and writer : "The Mission of 
Socialism." (Under the auspices of the Intercollegiate Socialist 
Society.) November 20, 1913. 

Mr. Frank Allaben, editor of The Journal of American History : 
"Perry's Flagship and Its Reconstruction." December 4, 1913. 

Benjamin C. Van Wye, A. M., assistant professor of Public 
Speaking and English, a reading of Dickens' "A Christmas Carol." 
December 20, 1913. 

Mr. A. Parker Nevin, of New York : "Some Problems in 
American Industry." February 19, 1914. 

Dr. Robert G. Boville, president of the Vacation Bible Asso- 
ciation of America : "The Work of Bible Schools." April 28, 1914. 

Mr. Ethan Viall, editor of The American Machinist : "Contri- 
butions to Publications." May 5, 1914. 

Other public addresses were given as follows: 
Dr. William H. Welch, Johns Hopkins University : "The Rela- 
tion of the University Medical College to the Hospital." (Delivered 
at the installation of Dr. Holmes as Dean of the Medical College.) 
January 6, 1914. 



34 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Edward L. Thorndyke, Ph. D., Columbia University : "Retarda- 
tion and Elimination in High Schools." (Delivered at the Tenth 
Annual Conference of the Secondary School Principals and Teach- 
ers of the Accredited Schools Affiliated with the University of 
Cincinnati.) February 21, 1914. 

The following public lectures were given under the auspices 
of the College of Commerce : 

Frederick L. Hoffman, statistician, Prudential Insurance Com- 
pany of America : "History of Life Insurance." September 30, 1913. 

Henry Moir, actuary, Home Life Insurance Company of New 
York: "Principles and Theory of Life Insurance." October 28,1913. 

Mr. J. A. Jackson, Literaiy Bureau, Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of New York: "Calculation of the Premium." Decem- 
ber 9, 1913. 

Dr. William Muhlberg, assistant medical director of the Union 
Central Life Insurance Co. : "Medical Selection." January 27, 1914. 

Mr. Edward A. Woods, president and manager of the Edward 
A. Woods Agency of the Equitable Life Assurance Society: (a) 
"State Laws;" (b) "Taxation." February 10, 1914. 

Mr. G. H. Noyes, general counsel of the Northwestern Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. : "Legal Phases of Life Insurance." March 
31, 1914. 

Dr. Lee Frankel, vice-president of the Metropolitan Life Insur- 
ance Co. : "Conservation as Applied to Life Insurance." April 
21, 1914. 

Mr. Ernest J. Clark, president of the National Association of 
Life Underwriters: "The Field and the Agent." May 12, 1914. 

The following lectures were delivered under the auspices of 
the Student Branch of the A. S. M. E. : 

Mr. H. M. Wood, of the Lodge & Shipley Machine Tool Co.: 
"Special Machine Operations." November 11, 1913. 

Mr. J. I. Lyle, of the Carrier Air Conditioning Co., New 
York : "Air Conditioning Machinery." February 12, 1914. 

The following lectures were delivered under the auspices of the 
Student Branch of the A. I. E. E. : 

Mr. C. A. Powell, district representative of the lamp division 
of the General Electric Co.: "Illumination." November 18, 1913. 

Mr. Parker H. Kemble : "The Public Utilities Commission and 
the Company." February 17, 1914. 

Mr. J. H. Hunt, research engineer of the Delco plant in 
Dayton, O. : "The Delco Starter." March 24, 1914. 






ADDRESSES AND LECTURES, 1913-14 35 

The following lecturers appeared at the University under the 
auspices of the Alliance Franchise : 

M. Paul Vitry, professeur d'histoire generale et d'histoire de 
Tart a l'ecole nationale des arts decoratif s : "La renaissance 
classique en France." November 19, 1913. 

M. Andre Bellessort : "Le cosmopolitisme et l'esprit Francais." 
February 12, 1914. 

The following papers were among those read at the University ■ 
during the sessions of the central division of the Modern Language 
Association on December 29, 30, and 31, 1913 : 

"Interdependence in English Fiction." Prof. Robert N. Whit- 
ford, Toledo University. 

"Scholarship and Public Spirit." Prof. Thomas A. Jenkins, 
University of Chicago. 

"Sens et Matiere in the Works of Crestien de Troyes." Prof. 
William Albert Nitze, University of Chicago. 

"Cultural Movements in Germanic Mythology." Prof. Paul H. 
Grummann, University of Nebraska. 

"The Present Crisis in the Science of Literature in Germany." 
Prof. Julius Goebel, University of Illinois. 

"The Early English Translations of Burger's Lenore." Prof. 
Oliver F. Emerson, Western Reserve University. 

"A Modification of the Theory of Prose Rhythm." Dean 
Joseph V. Denny, Ohio State University. 

"Shakespeare and Thomas Heywood." Prof. Daniel Ford, 
University of Minnesota. 

"Chretien de Troyes and Hue de Rotelande's Ipomedon." 
Prof. Lucy Maria Gay, University of Wisconsin. 

"Colonial Theatres in Charleston, South Carolina." Prof. 
Robert A. Law, University of Texas. 

"Dryden's Relation to the German Lyric in the Eighteenth 
Century." Prof. Milton D. Baumgartner, University of Nebraska. 

Under the auspices of the Cincinnati Section of the American 
Chemical Society and the Cincinnati Medical Research Society, Dr. 
Wolfgang Ostwald, of the University of Leipzig, gave the following 
lectures on January 5, 6, 7, 8 (two lectures), and 9, 1914: 

"What Are Colloids? Elements of Qualitative Colloid Analy- 
sis. Formation and Preparation of Colloids." 

"Mechanical, Optical, Electrical, Chemical Properties of Sub- 
stances in the Colloid State. Classification of the Colloids." 

"Changes in the Colloid State. Internal Changes of State, 
Swelling, Setting, Syneresis, Adsorption, Coagulation, Peptisation." 

"A General Survey of the Field of Colloid-Chemistry." 



36 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

"Scientific Applications of Colloid-Chemistry." 
"Technical Applications of Colloid-Chemistry." 

The following lectures were delivered in the auditorium of the 
University during the sessions of the American Chemical Society: 

"The Chemical Problems of an Active Volcano." Arthur L. 
Day. April 7, 1914. 

"The Chemical Fitness of the World for Life." L. J. Hender- 
son. April 7, 1914. 

"Flame Reactions." W. D. Bancroft. April 7, 1914. 

"Chemical Reactions at Low Pressures." Irving Langmuir. 
April 7, 1914. 

In addition to the above, about 150 papers were read at the 
meetings of divisions and sections held on April 8 and 9. 

The following speakers addressed the student body: 

Mr. Richard Bennett, the actor: "The Stage as a Teacher." 
November 6, 1914. 

Dr. Thomas Briggs, head of Secondary Education, Teachers 
College, Columbia University: "The Teaching of Reading and 
Literature." (Under the auspices of the Teachers College.) 

Mr. Norman Angell, lecturer : "The Economic Aspect of War." 
March 12, 1914. 

Mr. Frederick H. Rindge, Jr., New York: "The Industrial 
Service Movement among College Men." March 20, 1914. 

Dean Emil Rath, of the Normal College of the North American 
Gymnastic Union : "Physical Training : Why We Should Exer- 
cise." March 20, 1914. 

Miss Helen Bennett, director of the Intercollegiate Vocational 
Bureau of Chicago : "Vocations for College Women." (Under 
the auspices of the Woman's League.) April 17, 1914. 

The following lectures were delivered before the men of the 
University : 

"The Care of the Eyes." Dr. Walter Forchheimer. April 
17, 1914. 

"The Hygiene of the Ear, Nose, and Throat." Dr. Samuel 
Iglauer. April 24, 1914. 

"Sex Hygiene." Dr. M. L. Heidingsfeld. May 1, 1914. 

"Sex Hygiene." Dr. Martin Fischer. May 8, 1914. 

"Narcotics." Dr. Edmund M. Baehr. May 5, 1914. 

"Narcotics." President Charles W. Dabney. May 22, 1914. 






GENERAL INFORMATION 

FOUNDATION 

On his death, in 1858, Charles McMicken gave to the city of 
Cincinnati by will almost the whole of his estate, valued at about 
$1,000,000, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining "two 
colleges for the education of white boys and girls." 

He had "long cherished the desire to found an institution where 
white boys and girls might be taught not only a knowledge of their 
duties to their Creator and their fellow men, but also receive the 
benefit of a sound, thorough and practical English education, and 
such as might fit them for the active duties of life, as well as instruc- 
tion in the higher branches of knowledge, except denominational 
theology, to the extent that the same are now or may hereafter be 
taught in any of the secular colleges or universities of the highest 
grade in the country." 

Nearly half of the property devised by Mr. McMicken was sit- 
uated in the state of Louisiana. This was entirely lost, in 1860, by a 
decision of the Supreme Court of that state, annulling that part of 
the devise. The court refused to recognize the validity of bequests 
of real estate to institutions controlled by non-resident trustees upon 
perpetual, trusts. The remainder of the property, lying in Cincinnati 
and its vicinity, did not yield a sufficient income to warrant the estab- 
lishment of the proposed colleges. For ten years, therefore, the 
revenue derived from the estate was applied to its improvement. 

In 1869, the trustees provided for a School of Design, which they 
maintained, with aid from Joseph Longworth, until 1884, when they 
transferred it to the Cincinnati Museum Association. Meanwhile, an 
attempt was made to unite the various, educational trusts in Cincin- 
nati. To this end, in 1870, the General Assembly of Ohio passed an 
i act "to aid and promote education," under which, almost a year later, 
the University of Cincinnati was established. Bonds were soon issued 
by the city to provide funds for the erection of a suitable building, 
which was ready for use in the fall of 1875. But students were re- 
ceived in 1873, and instruction was given temporarily by the teachers 
of Woodward High School. In 1874, the Academic Department, now 
known as the McMicken College of Liberal Arts, was organized by 
the appointment of three professors and two instructors, who met 
classes during that year in a school building on Franklin street. 

The effort to unite other trust funds with those given by Charles 
McMicken having failed, the income remained long inadequate to 
the needs of such an institution as he had intended to found. At 



38 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

length the city undertook to support the University in part by public 
taxation, the tax for this purpose being limited at first to three-tenths 
of one mill. In 1906 the General Assembly of Ohio authorized the 
levying of an increased municipal tax for the University — five- 
tenths of a mill, instead of three-tenths as heretofore. 

In 1913 a law was passed providing that the levy for 
University and Observatory purposes shall not be "subject to any 
limitations of rates of taxation or maximum rates provided by law" 
except the maximum of five-tenths of a mill for the University and 
three-tenths of a mill for the Observatory, and the "further excep- 
tion that the combined maximum rate for all taxes levied in a year 
in any city or taxing district shall not exceed fifteen mills." This 
law further provides that the levy shall include the amount neces- 
sary to pay interest on and sinking fund for all bonds issued for 
the University subsequent to June 1, 1910. The situation produced 
by the Smith one per cent tax law, under the provisions of which 
the income of the University was limited to the amount received in 
the year 1910, made this law necessary. 

In the course of time additional funds for the maintenance 
of the institution were provided by individual citizens, the most 
important being the bequest of property, valued at $130,000, by 
Matthew Thorns in 1890, the gift of $100,000 by David Sinton in 
1899, and the recent bequest of Mary P. and Eliza O. Ropes, of 
Salem, Massachusetts, amounting to $100,000, for the endowment of 
a chair of Comparative Literature, as a memorial to their father, 
Nathaniel Ropes, for many years a citizen of Cincinnati. Then, in 
1910, the friends of Dr. Joseph Eichberg, for many years an eminent 
Professor of Physiology in the Miami Medical College, who lost his 
life through a lamentable accident in the summer of 1908, presented 
the University with the sum of $45,000, to establish in the University 
the Joseph Eichberg Chair of Physiology. In 1911, Dr. Francis Brun- 
ning bequeathed his entire estate, with the exception of a few minor 
bequests, to the Endowment Fund Association of the University of 
Cincinnati, for the College of Medicine. This estate has yielded 
about $80,000. In 1912, Mrs. Floris A. Sackett made a bequest to 
the University, which amounts to the income on $30,000. This 
money has been set aside to endow the "Floris Armstrong Sackett 
Chair of Domestic Arts." In the same year, Mrs. Frances W. 
Gibson bequeathed to the University the sum of $31,500. This 
money has been used to establish the "Thomas Gibson Medical 
Endowment Fund." 

In 1912, Mr. Harry Levy presented to the Board of Directors of 
the University of Cincinnati for the Endowment Fund of the College 
of Medicine, the sum of $50,000, to be known as "The Julie Fries 



FOUNDATION 39 

Levy Endowment." Mr. Levy made this gift in honor of his mother 
and wishes the income used in furthering and disseminating medical 
knowledge. 

In 1913, Mrs. Mary M. Emery presented to the Endowment 
Fund Association of the University of Cincinnati, the sum of 
$125,000, to be used to endow the Chair of Pathology in the College 
of Medicine. 

In 1913, Mrs. Henrietta Moos bequeathed $25,000 to the Endow- 
ment Fund of the University of Cincinnati for the College of 
Medicine, as a memorial to her husband, Herman M. Moos. This 
fund is called the "Herman M. Moos Memorial Fund," and has 
been used to establish the Moos scholarship for research in internal 
medicine, to support a technical laboratory assistant, and to provide 
laboratory equipment in the Department of Medicine. 

New departments were also added. In 1872, the Cincinnati Astro- 
nomical Society (founded in 1842) transferred its property on Mt. 
Adams to the city, which agreed, as a condition of the gift, to sustain, 
in connection with the University, on a new site provided by John 
Kilgour, an Observatory,* to be built with funds given by him. In 
1896, the Medical College of Ohio (founded in 1819) became the 
College of Medicine of the University, though still retaining its origi- 
nal title conjointly with its new one. In 1908, an invitation was 
extended to the Miami Medical College to become a department of 
the University. In accordance with this invitation the Miami Medical 
College and the Medical College of Ohio (the College of Medicine 
of the University) have recently been united into a single medical 
department, known as "The Ohio-Miami Medical College of the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati." 

Out of a professorship of Civil Engineering in the College of 
Liberal Arts has developed the College of Engineering. It was 
organized under that name in 1900, and became a distinct department 
in 1904. 

Since its organization, in 1887, the Clinical and Pathological 
School of the Cincinnati Hospital has been affiliated with the Uni- 
versity, being designated as the Medical Department, until 1896, and 
afterwards as the Department of Clinical Medicine. 

The College for Teachers was organized in 1905, in co-operation 
with the Board of Education of the City of Cincinnati. 

In 1906 the Graduate School was separated from the McMicken 
College of Liberal Arts and a distinct organization with a dean at 
its head effected. 

In 1912 the College of Commerce was organized for the purpose 
of providing opportunity for higher commercial education. 



* For this purpose the city levies annually a special tax of one-twentieth 
of one mill. 



40 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

Evening Classes in the College of Liberal Arts were opened in 
1912 in order that those persons whose occupations prevented them 
attending the day classes might have an opportunity to take college 
courses at night. 

In 1912 a Bureau of City Tests was established in the Engineer- 
ing College in connection with the Engineer's office of the Depart- 
ment of Public Service of the City. It will make all the tests of 
materials and supplies required by this and other city departments. 
A technical chemist has been employed to take direction of this 
work, and, as far as possible, it will be utilized to train students 
in the methods of such tests. It is hoped in this way to develop a 
course in municipal engineering. 

The School of Household Arts was established in 1908 under 
the auspices of the Cincinnati Kindergarten Association ; on July 1, 
1914, it became a part of the University of Cincinnati. The School 
aims to give scientific instruction in the fundamental principles and 
practices of activities growing out of private and institutional house- 
keeping, with a view to increasing the efficiency of those desiring 
to enter a vocation or engage in a business dependent upon a 
knowledge of such subjects. 

BUILDINGS AND SITE 

From 1875 to 1895, the Academic Department occupied the 
building erected on the grounds of the McMicken homestead, as 
required by the will of the founder. This site proving altogether 
unsatisfactory, application was made to the courts for permission to 
remove to a more suitable location in Burnet Woods Park. The 
desired permission having been granted by the court of last resort in 
March, 1893, steps were immediately taken for the construction of a 
main building, called McMicken Hall, which was completed in two 
years. This building stands on high ground at the southern end of 
the park, forty-three acres having been set apart as a site for the 
University. During 1895-96, the north wing, known as Hanna Hall, 
was built for the Departments of Chemistry and Engineering, with 
funds amounting to about $70,000, provided by Henry Hanna. The 
south wing, called Cunningham Hall, was built in 1898-99 by Briggs 
S. Cunningham, at a cost of $60,000. This wing is occupied by the 
Departments of Physics, Botany, and Zoology. The Van Wormer 
Library, costing about $60,000, the gift of Asa Van Wormer, was built 
during 1898-1900. The Observatory, built in 1873 with $10,000 given by 
John Kilgour, stands on Mt. Lookout, at a distance of several miles 
from the other University buildings. A smaller structure, the O. M. 
Mitchel Building, was added in 1904 to house the old telescope. 
In 1912 this building was enlarged by the addition of a lecture room, 



ENDOWMENT FUND ASSOCIATION 41 

a library, and another small dome. Since 1896, the building on the 
McMicken homestead site has been used by the College of Medicine. 
A Dispensary, erected in that year, is situated on the lower part of the 
grounds. A gymnasium, power plant, and engineering building, pro- 
vided by the city, at a cost of $550,000, were completed in Decem- 
ber, 1911. 

A bond issue of $550,000 has been authorized to provide for 
the construction of a chemical laboratory, a woman's building, a 
stadium, and for making extensive repairs in McMicken Hall. 
These bonds have been sold, and the plans for the new buildings 
will soon be ready. 

BENEFACTORS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Besides those whose names have already been mentioned, the 
following persons have contributed to the endowment or to the 
equipment of the University: William A. Proctor, Samuel J. 
Browne, William J. Odell, Julius Dexter, Frank J. Jones, Moses F. 
Wilson, Eugene F. Bliss, James T. Whittaker, Mrs. William E. 
Merrill, Theodore A. Bruehl, Andrew Hickenlooper, Christian 
Moerlein, Laura Seasongood, Lewis Seasongood, S. Lilienthal, Mrs. 
Nannie Fechheimer, A. G. Wetherby, Charles F. Windisch, C. T. 
Webber, P. Robertson, the Lane & Bodley Company, James E. 
Mooney, John Kilgour, Chas. Kilgour, C. H. Krippendorf, Julius 
Fleischmann, Lucien Wulsin, Samuel Pogue, Edward Miles Brown, 
Nathaniel Pendleton Dandridge, Mrs. Howard Breen, Robert 
William Hochstetter, Mrs. R. N. Hollingshed, Davis L. James, 
Catherine M. James, Ellen W. James, Annie A. James, Mr. and Mrs. 
O. J. Renner, Mrs. Antonia Wendte, Mary E. Dandridge, Mrs. Joseph 
Eichberg, the alumni of the University, Harry M. Levy, J. G. 
Schmidlapp, the Class of 1907, the estate of John B. Peaslee, Alice 
L. Kuhn, Dr. Louis Grossman, Mrs. A. A. Long, Mr. Max Senior, 
Mr. John Bowers, of New York City, and Mrs. A. Howard Hinkle. 

ENDOWMENT FUND ASSOCIATION 

The Endowment Fund Association of the University of Cincin- 
nati was incorporated on April 21, 1905, by a number of prominent 
citizens of the municipality. The purpose of the corporation, as 
stated in its Code of Regulations, is "to secure property, including 
money, or the income from the same, for the use of the University 
of Cincinnati, and for that purpose to solicit, collect, accept, hold, 
manage, invest, or pay over such property, money, or income, whether 
such property, money, or income arises by way of gift, devise, or pur- 
chase, for the benefit of said University." Its affairs are managed 



42 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

by a Board of Trustees consisting of nine members. The officers 
of the Endowment Fund Association are : 

Rufus B. Smith, President. 

Jacob G. Schmidlapp, Vice-President. 

Charles F. Windisch, Treasurer. 

Howard C. Hollister, Secretary. 

BENEFACTIONS 

For the guidance of those who may wish, during life or by bequest, 
to make benefactions to the University, the following information 
is given : 

Form of Bequest to the University of Cincinnati : — 

I bequeath and devise to the City of Cincinnati as Trustee for 
the University of Cincinnati, to hold in trust forever for said Uni- 
versity, the following property : 

Form of Bequest to the Endowment Fund Association : — 

I bequeath and devise to the Endowment Fund Association of the 
University of Cincinnati, for the use of the University of Cincinnati, 
the following property : 

The sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars would erect 
a section of a Natural History Museum. 

The sum of one hundred thousand dollars is the amount necessary 
to found a full professorship in any one of the departments. The 
donor has the privilege of naming the professorship. 

Fifty thousand dollars would be required for a dormitory, and 
the contributor of such a sum would be privileged to name the build- 
ing. There is nothing which the University needs more than a dormi- 
tory system. 

Twenty thousand dollars endows an instructorship in a depart- 
ment. The donor has the right to name it. 

Ten thousand dollars is the principal required to establish a 
fellowship in any one of the departments; the income being paid to 
the Fellow, who devotes his time to original research combined with 
a little teaching. 

Three thousand dollars endows a free scholarship, the income 
from this sum remitting all fees and giving the donor the right during 
life to nominate to the scholarship, subject to the rules of the Uni- 
versity. 

The President of the University would be glad to give full infor- 
mation upon any question relating to foundation to any person or 
persons who may desire more detailed knowledge. 






THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 43 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 
The Van Wormer Library Building is of stone, fire-proof through- 
out, and is built in accordance with the most approved modern plans 
of library construction. The library is open from 8 A. M. to 
9 :30 P. M., on Monday to Friday ; Saturday, 8 A. M. to 5 P. M. 

The University Library, in this building, contains about 72,000 
volumes and 10,000 pamphlets. In the Reference Room about 2,000 
volumes are arranged on open shelves, to which the students have 
free access. The Periodical Room contains the current numbers of 
400 periodicals. The library is provided with a card catalogue of its 
own books, and also with a card catalogue of the books (non-fiction) 
received since 1905, by the Public Library of Cincinnati. 

The Library contains some valuable special collections: 

The Robert Clarke Library, comprising 6,761 volumes, was given 
by William A. Procter. This collection is especially rich in Ameri- 
cana, and contains some rare first editions. 

The Enoch T. Carson Shakespeare Library, 1,420 volumes, was 
also given by William A. Procter. 

The Bruehl Library, of about 2,000 volumes, contains many rare 
and valuable works on the history, archaeology, and ethnology of 
Mexico and Central America. This collection was made by Dr. 
Gustav Bruehl, and presented to the Library by his son, Mr. 
Theodore A. Bruehl. 

The Wilson Library, consisting of works of English, French, and 
Italian literature, 810 volumes, was given by Judge Moses F. Wilson. 

The Merrill Library of engineering works, 876 volumes, 478 
pamphlets, and 185 maps, charts, and photo-lithographs, was given by 
Mrs. William E. Merrill. 

The Whittaker Medical Library, the bequest of Dr. James T. 
Whittaker to the Medical College of Ohio, comprises 1,547 volumes 
and 538 pamphlets. 

The Thorns Library, miscellaneous works, was part of the bequest 
of the late Matthew Thorns. 

The Brown Philological Library, containing the English philo- 
logical library of the late Professor Edward Miles Brown, was pre- 
sented to the University by Mrs. Edward Miles Brown. It consists 
of 318 bound volumes, 51 unbound volumes, and 83 pamphlets. 

The Charlotte Hillebrand Memorial Library consists of French 
and German books, at present about 1,500 volumes, purchased from 
the proceeds of an endowment recently established in memory of the 
late Charlotte Hillebrand. 

The library has many volumes on history and economics, pur- 
chased from the proceeds of an endowment provided in 1894 by the 
will of Laura Seasongood. 



44 



UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 



The Library of the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science has been placed under the charge of the University of 
Cincinnati, by the terms of an agreement with the Association, 
entered into on September 14, 1895. This collection consists at present 
of 6,000 volumes, for the most part periodical publications of foreign 
scientific societies. 

The Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio has space for 
its valuable collection of books, pamphlets, and other articles in the 
Van Wormer Library. This collection comprises over 25,400 volumes 
and 69,000 pamphlets, pertaining chiefly to the history of the Ohio 
Valley, and contains valuable collections of original letters and other 
manuscripts. Students of the University have access to this library 
and may withdraw books from it under certain conditions. 

The total number of books, including duplicates, in the Van 
Wormer Library Building is about 103,000 volumes and 79,000 pam- 
phlets. 

To these collections must be added the libraries of departments 
of the University, situated in other parts of the city. These are : 

The Library of the Observatory 4,000 volumes 

The Library of the College of Medicine 3,200 volumes 

The Library of the Municipal Reference Bureau 400 volumes 

and 5,000 pamphlets 

Total 7,600 volume 

and 5,000 pamphlets 

The libraries of the University, excluding those of the Historical 
and Philosophical Society of Ohio and the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, contain 79,600 volumes and 15,000 pamphlets 

The Public Library, 458,876 volumes ; the Mercantile Library, 
containing about 84,264 books ; and the Lloyd Library and Museum, 
consisting chiefly of scientific works, as well as those of the Lan< 
Theological Seminary, the Hebrew Union College, the Art Museur 
and the College of Music, are open to University students. 



MUNICIPAL REFERENCE BUREAU 

The Municipal Reference Bureau was organized in 1913 under 
the Department of Political Science of the College of Liberal Arts. 
Its quarters in the City Hall are adjacent to the Council Chamber 
and the rooms of the Board of Education. The library of this 
Bureau contains material relating to all phases of city government 
and municipal activities. This Bureau is primarily for the use of 
Council and the administrative officers of the city, but is available 
to the general public and students as well. Through this agency, 



PUBLICATIONS AND MUSEUMS 45 

students in political and social science are enabled to familiarize 
themselves more intimately with the actual operation of both the 
city government and the organizations and institutions working for 
political and social betterment. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The official publications of the University are as follows : 
The University Record. This publication is issued at intervals 
during the year and comprises the President's Annual Report, the 
Annual Catalogue, and Announcements of the Graduate School, 
College of Liberal Arts, College for Teachers, College of Engineer- 
ing, College of Medicine, College of Commerce, and School of 
Household Arts. 

The University Studies. This publication is issued in parts 
and contains the results of research by members of the faculty or 
by other persons connected with the University of Cincinnati. A 
price list of the different numbers of this publication may be 
obtained by addressing the office of the Press. 

Student publications of the University are as follows : 

The Cincinnatian. The Cincinnatian is the University Annual, 
and is edited and published by the members of the Junior Class. 

The University Weekly News. This paper is the official 
student bulletin, and is issued every week during the University year 
by a student board of editors. 

The Scribe. This magazine appears once a month and is 
literary in tone. The students of the University are the con- 
tributors. 

MUSEUMS 

The Museum of Natural History consists of a number of 
geological and biological collections. Among others are specimens 
donated from the Zoological Garden from time to time, the Balke 
natural history collections, chiefly of mammals, birds and insects, 
the Huntington collection of shells, the Fillmore and Schneider 
collection of Philippine relics; the Fechheimer collection of igneous 
rocks; the Wetherby collection of rocks and minerals; and lastly, a 
series of specimens illustrating the chemical industries. The De- 
partment of Geology and Geography has also on exhibition a part 
of its working collections of maps, models, minerals, rocks, and 
fossils. Other valuable collections are the U. P. James col- 
lection of fossils and minerals, the Carl Holmes collection of Green- 
land birds, permanently loaned by Dr. and Mrs. C. R. Holmes; 
donations by Mr. E. Meyer and Dr. Arch I. Carson; and several 
group mounts of large animals. 



46 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

In 1912 the heirs of the late Samuel A. Miller loaned to the 
University his large collection of fossils (more than 8,000 labels), 
gathered from various parts of America and Europe. In return for 
the use of this collection for educational purposes, the University has 
provided for its exhibition in specially adapted show-cases in a large 
well-lighted room devoted especially to that purpose. The collection 
is for sale and is open at all times for inspection by prospective 
buyers. Inquiries from prospective purchasers will be transmitted 
promptly to the owners. It is earnestly hoped that some friend may 
purchase it for this institution. The University has also on loan and 
similarly exhibited the H. M. Norris collection of Indian implements. 

The Greek Room contains reproductions of the most noted 
works of Greek art. There were added to this collection recently a 
cast of the "Winged Victory," "Aphrodite of Melos," "Faun Playing 
the Flute," "Esquiline Venus," "Capitoline Venus," and a pediment 
of the temple of Zeus at Olympia. Two additional statues (Minerva 
Giustiniani and the Lateran Sophocles) have been installed in the 
main corridor of McMicken Hall. These, together with the large 
carbon pictures of the Parthenon, Erechtheum. Acropolis, Corinth, 
and Paestum in the same hall, form a valuable adjunct to the collec- 
tion of casts in the Art room. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The D. A. R. Fellowship in American History. This fellow- 
ship was established in 1900 by the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, and yields an income of $100 per year. 

The Hanna Fellowship in Physics. This fellowship was 
established by Mrs. Henry Hanna and Miss Mary Hanna in 1906. 
Its value is $500 a year. 

The Alliance Francaise Scholarship, of $300, was estab- 
lished in 1904 by the Alliance Franchise of the City of Cincinnati. 
It is awarded to the student in the Department of Romance Lan- 
guages showing the greatest proficiency in French. The successful 
candidate is required to attend the summer course of instruction 
given by the Alliance Franchise in Paris. 

The Armstrong-Hunter Memorial Fund, valued at $1,000, was 
established in 1910 in memory of Miss Sarah J. Armstrong and Miss 
Clara Hunter, by eighty of their former pupils. This fund will be 
used to found a scholarship in the Department of English Literature 
in the Graduate School, for a woman who is a graduate of the 
University. 

In addition to the above, the University offers ten scholarships in 
several departments which exempt their holders from the payment of 
tuition fees. 



FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 47 

THE McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The Cornelius George Comegys Scholarship, with an income 
of fifty dollars, was founded in 1899 by the Old Endowment Fund 
Association, which was composed of the alumni of the University. 
This scholarship is awarded annually to a meritorious under- 
graduate. 

The McMicken Honorary Scholarships are awarded annuall> 
to the five Juniors who have the best scholastic standing, according 
to the records in the Registrar's office. 

The Thoms Honorary Scholarships are awarded annually to 
the six Sophomores and the six Freshmen who have the best 
scholastic records. 

The Julius Fleischmann Scholarships. Thirteen scholarships 
of $75 each, offered for the years 1909-10, 1910-11, 1911-12, 1912-13, 
1913-14, 1914-15, by ex-Mayor Julius Fleischmann. They cover the 
first year's tuition, in the College of Liberal Arts, of thirteen non- 
residents, who are members of the graduating classes of the 
accredited schools outside of Cincinnati. 

The Jones Prizes. The first Jones Prize of forty dollars was 
founded in 1892 by the Honorable Frank J. Jones, and is awarded 
annually to that member of the Senior class in the College of Liberal 
Arts who writes and pronounces the best English oration. The sub- 
jects are chosen by the Dean and the Chairman of the Board of Direc- 
tors. A committee consisting of three citizens of Cincinnati is ap- 
pointed by the Chairman of the Board of Directors to judge the con- 
test. The second Jones Prize of twenty dollars was founded by Mr. 
Jones in 1901. It is awarded to that member of the Senior class whose 
oration is judged by the committee to be second in merit. These 
prizes are permanently endowed. 

The Edward Miles Brown Prize for Excellence in English. 
This prize of fifty dollars was established in 1908, by a provision of 
the will of the late Professor Edward Miles Brown. It is awarded 
annually to that member of the Senior class who has attained the high- 
est excellence in English during his four years' undergraduate course. 

The Henry Hochstetter Prize in Chemistry. This prize was 
established in 1909 by Mr. Robert Hochstetter, of the Class of 
1895, in memory of his brother. Henry Hochstetter. It is to be 
awarded annually for the best graduating thesis in Chemistry, and 
is open to both students of Liberal Arts and Engineering. The suc- 
cessful candidate is nominated by a committee consisting of the head 
of the Department of Chemistry and two members of the Cincinnati 
Section of the American Chemical Society. 

The Robert Patterson McKibbin Memorial Prize, a gold 
medal of the value of twenty-five dollars, was established in 1911 by 



48 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

the Reverend William McKibbin and family, in memory of their son 
Robert Patterson McKibbin, who died in 1910, while a member of 
the Junior class of this University. This prize aims to hold up 
before the male students of the University the ideals of manhood. 
It will be awarded to that young man of the Senior class who, in 
the judgment of the faculty, is the best embodiment of these ideals. 

The Cincinnati Prize. This prize, of the value of $20, was 
established in 1912 by the National Municipal League. It is 
awarded to that student in the University who submits the best 
original essay dealing with the municipal government or the civic 
life of Cincinnati. 

The Union Bethel Scholarships in Social Science;. Four 
scholarships of $50 each, offered for the years 1913-14, 1914-15, by 
Mr. J. O. White, resident director of the Union Bethel Settlement. 
These scholarships are awarded to four advanced students in the 
Department of Social Science who carry on sociological investi- 
gations at the Union Bethel. 

The Cincinnati Law School Scholarship. A scholarship 
open to Seniors who intend to enter the Cincinnati Law School the 
year after graduation. 

The Taft Scholarship This scholarship of $75 was estab- 
lished in May, 1914, with the proceeds of the sale of the press 
equipment, which was originally donated by Mr. Charles P. Taft. 
It is awarded to a worthy student selected by the President of the 
University. 

For the fellowships, scholarships, and prizes of the various col- 
leges, consult their several announcements. 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
In the year 1906, the Lodge and Shipley Machine Tool Company 
donated two loan scholarships of the amount of one hundred dollars 
each to two students of the Co-operative Course in Engineering for 
the payment of their University fees. 

THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
Through the generosity of some of the professors of the 
Medical College, six scholarships, of the value of $150 a year 
each for four years, have been established. These scholarships, 
available in September, 1914, will be awarded to worthy students 
in the College of Medicine, who enter without conditions and need 
help. In order to retain one of the scholarships for successive 
years, a student must maintain a high scholastic record. 

THE ALLIANCE FRANCHISE 
The Alliance Francaise, a national association, officially recog- 
nized by a decree of the President of the French Republic, October 



ATHLETICS 49 

23, 1886, aims to promote the study of the French language and litera- 
ture in foreign lands. 

The Cincinnati branch of the Alliance Franchise, in co-operation 
with the University of Cincinnati, has arranged for a number of 
lectures to be given during the year by some of the most eminent 
French writers of the day. To these lectures students of the 
University of Cincinnati are admitted by season tickets free of 
charge. 

In 1904 the Alliance Franchise of Cincinnati established a Schol- 
arship of three hundred dollars in the University, to be awarded to 
the student showing the greatest proficiency in French. The suc- 
cessful candidate is required to attend the summer course of instruc- 
tion given by the Alliance Frangaise in Paris. 

ATHLETICS 

Athletics are so controlled in the University that they play an 
important part in the college life of the student without seriously 
interfering with his interest in class-room work. 

All students are required to take five hours per week in the 
Department of Physical Education. It is expected that these hours 
will be distributed as follows : three hours per week for all members 
of the Freshman class, and two hours per week for all members of 
the Sophomore class. Departures from this rule will be allowed only 
under exceptional conditions, for which special permission must be 
secured from the Dean in advance. 

A large part of the work is done out of doors during good 
weather, and such games as football, baseball, basket ball, tennis and 
track athletics are a part of the students' training. Lessons in box- 
ing, wrestling, and fencing are also given to students interested in this 
form of exercise. 

All athletics and gymnastics are in charge of the Director of 
Physical Education and his assistants, 

CARSON FIELD 

An Athletic Field has recently been provided, which is one of the 
best college athletic fields in the country. It contains a baseball 
diamond, a football gridiron, and a quarter-mile cinder track, with 
a one hundred and twenty-four straight-away extending in front of 
the new grand stand. The proximity of this field to the gymnasium 
makes it a particularly valuable addition to the athletic equipment of 
the University. Its location between three hilltops, which form a 
natural amphitheater, affords opportunity for thousands of people to 
view the games. 



50 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

The new gymnasium with its modern equipment — cork-covered 
running track, white-tiled swimming pool, and spacious locker 
rooms — is the most complete institution of its kind in the West. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR WOMEN 
A special instructor has charge of the work in Physical Training 
for young women, which is required during the Freshman and 
Sophomore years. The work in the gymnasium is supplemented 
during the fall and spring with outdoors games. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The following student organizations met regularly throughout 
the academic year, 1914-15. 

The Academic Club, composed of the men of the College oi 
Liberal Arts ; The Athletic Council ; Blue Hydra, a permanent organ- 
ization devoted to the study of Biology; The Chemical Engineer's 
Club; The Chemist's Club; The Co-op Club; The Debating Council: 
The Dramatic Club; The French Club; The Freshman Girl's Club; 
The German Club; The History Club; The Junior Girl's Club; Th< 
Literary Society; Menorah Society (a branch of the Intercollegiate 
Menorah Association); Men's Glee and Mandolin Clubs; Men' 
Pan Hellenic Association ; The Phrenecon Society ; The Senioi 
Girl's Club ; The Sophomore Girl's Club ; The Speaker's Club, 
oratorical and debating society composed entirely of young men 
The Student Section of the American Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers ; The Student Section of the American Institute of Elec- 
trical Engineers ; The University Club, composed of representative* 
from the student clubs, the fraternities, and the four classes 
Women's Glee Club ; Women's Pan Llellenic Association ; a chaptei 
of the Y. W. C. A. 

The Woman Student's League is an organization open to all 
women students of the University and to the women of the faculty. 
Regular meetings are held, at which lecturers of note address the 
members on subjects connected with the general and economic 
interests of women. 

A Student Tribunal for Self-Government exists in the College 
of Engineering. It consists of five members — three Seniors and 
two Juniors. 

Membership in the Three Arts Club of Cincinnati is open t( 
women students in the College of Liberal Arts. 

ADMISSION 

Special Students. — Persons at least twenty years of age anc 
qualified to do University work may be admitted as special students 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION 51 

to lectures and laboratory courses in the College of Liberal Arts, 
the College of Engineering, and in the College for Teachers. They 
will be required to furnish documentary evidence to the Director of 
School Affiliation and Dean of the College of Engineering, re- 
spectively, and to satisfy the heads of the departments concerned, 
of their ability to carry on successfully the courses which they 
desire to enter. 

Before any special student may become a candidate for a degree 
he must satisfy the entrance requirements. All special students are 
amenable to the same regulations as apply to regular students in mat- 
ters of examination, probation, discipline, etc. 

Students Entering from Other Colleges and Universities. — 
An undergraduate of a college or university desiring to enter the 
McMicken College of Liberal Arts, the College for Teachers, or 
the College of Engineering, must present to the Director of School 
Affiliation, or the Chairman of the Board of Admission of the 
College of Engineering, satisfactory evidence that he has done a 
sufficient amount of preparatory work to meet the regular entrance 
requirements, together with a certificate of honorable dismissal 
from the college or university last attended. He will be given credit 
for work of university grade in accordance with the provision for 
"Admission to Advanced Standing." 

Admission to Advanced Standing. — Students may be admitted 
to advanced standing upon presentation of a certificate from a col- 
lege of approved standing. All applications for advanced standing 
must be made within three weeks after matriculation to the Director 
of School Affiliation, and must be accompanied by a statement of 
the work done, signed by the proper officials of the college from 
which the applicant comes, and by a marked copy of the catalogue 
or by a written description in detail of the courses for which ad- 
vanced credits are desired. In courses where note books or drawings 
or both are required, these also must be presented. The students 
applying for advanced standing must first have satisfied the entrance 
requirements the same as regular students. 

REGISTRATION 

New students registered in 1914 on Thursday and Friday, 
September 17 and 18; upper classmen on Saturday, September 19. 
In 1915 they should register on Friday, February 5. Students regis- 
tering on any other days than those designated above will be 
required to pay a registration fee of one dollar. 

No person will be admitted to any course after the beginning 
of the semester, unless a good and sufficient excuse for not entering 



52 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

at the opening of the semester be presented to the Dean; and in no 
event zvill any person be permitted to enter the work of any semester 
after the close of the third week of that semester. In accordance 
with this regulation no person was admitted to the work of the 
first semester of 1914-15 after October 10, 1914; for the second 
semester, the last day of admission will be February 27, 1915. 

Directions for Registration 
Freshmen 

1. Take to the Advisory Committee for the Election of Studies 
the Certificate of Admission received from the Director of School 
Affiliation, and receive from the Committee a Course Card ; aftei 
consultation, fill out the Course Card in accordance with the rules 
and regulations of the Advisory Committee (see page 100) ; 

2. Take the Certificate of Admission, the Registration Blank 
and the Course Card to the Registrar; 

3. Pay the library fee (also tuition and laboratory fees when 
such are required) to the Clerk of the Board; 

4. Receive from the Clerk of the Board a receipt for matricu- 
lation ; 

5. File the Course Card received from the Advisory Committee 
in a box prepared for that purpose in the Registrar's office. 

Sophomores 

Every Sophomore must Register with his own Adviser it 
accordance with the rules and regulations of the Advisory Com- 
mittee (see page 100). He must then fill out the Registration Blank 
and present that and his Course Card to the Registrar, who will 
give in exchange a Card of Matriculation Fees, which must in tun 
be presented to the Clerk. 

Upper Classmen 

Every upper classman must fill out his Course Card under the 
direction of his Adviser (see page 101). He must then fill out the 
Registration Blank and present that and his Course Card to the 
Registrar, who will give in exchange a Card of Matriculation Fees 
which must in turn be presented to the Clerk. 

Special Regulations 
On the Course Card each course must be designated by the 
department and the number of the course, especial title, and the num- 
ber of hours' credit, e. g. : 

English 1: Rhetoric and Composition 3 

Mathematics 1 : Algebra, Trigonometry, and 

Analytical Geometry 4 

In filling out election blanks especial care should be taken to 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 53 

note the advertised hours of courses, in order that conflicts may be 
avoided. 

All students who expect to become teachers should confer with 
the Dean of the College for Teachers before filling out their 
Course Cards. 

No change will be permitted on the Course Card after the 
expiration of three days from the last day of registration. 

All Course and Schedule Cards must be filled out and deposited 
in the boxes provided for that purpose before four o'clock on the 
last registration day. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

Each student shall, at the beginning of the year, leave his local 
address at the / office of the Registrar and shall promptly report all 
subsequent changes of address. 

Unit of Instruction. — The unit of instruction is one hour per 
week for one semester. Two and one-half hours of actual work in 
the laboratory, shop, or drafting-room, are considered equivalent to 
one recitation hour and the preparation therefor. Credit will be given 
for the number of hours officially published with the course, and for 
no more. University work not regularly registered is forbidden. 

Absences in the College of Liberal Arts. — All absences of 
students, from any cause whatsoever, are recorded in the Registrar's 
office. If thirty or more absences are recorded against a student, two 
extra credits must be made in order to obtain the A. B. degree. No 
absences are excusable except those incurred by students representing 
the University in some public exercise outside of the city. Applica- 
tion for these excuses must be made to the Dean in advance. 

Absences in the College of Engineering. — All absences of 
regular students from class work must be accounted for to the head 
of the department concerned. A student who has been absent must 
report it within a week after returning to the University, or his ab- 
sence shall rank as unexcused. 

Probation. — A student in the College of Liberal Arts who 
receives a grade below "D" in one-half of his work at the mid-term, 
or at the end of any semester, shall be put upon probation with 
restricted work for the next half semester of college work. Such 
probation cannot be removed until the student has obtained a 
passing grade in all subjects that he is permitted to carry. If a 
student so probationed fails to secure this passing grade after two 
successive semestral periods, he shall cease to be a member of the 
University. 

Readmittance After Suspension. — Students in the College of 
Liberal Arts suspended for inefficient work during the Freshman 



64 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

year may not return to the University as Freshmen until they have 
passed the entrance examinations of that year. 

Grades. — The scale of marks for recording grades is as follows : 
A, 90-100; B, 80-89; C, 70-79; D, 60-69, passed; E, 50-59, condi- 
tioned; F, 0-49, failed. 

In case a student withdraws from the University during any 
semester, credit will not be given for any of the work elected for that 
semester. 

Honorable Dismissal. — It is required as a condition of honor- 
able dismissal, that every student who wishes to withdraw from the 
University shall submit to the Registrar a written request to that effect. 

A copy of the "Rules for the Guidance of Students" may be 
obtained at the Registrar's office. 

FEES 

Tuition in the Graduate School, the College of Liberal Arts, and 
the College for Teachers is free to regular students who are citizens 
of Cincinnati. 

All fees must be paid in advance to the Clerk of the Board of 
Directors during the days of registration. If fees are not paid 
promptly, the Deans are authorized to exclude students from 
attendance upon their classes. No University fees are refunded. 

Tuition Fees 

All regular non-resident students in the College of Liberal 
Arts and in the College for Teachers, and all regular students in 
the College of Engineering, are charged a tuition fee of $75.00 
per year, payable in installments of $37.50 per semester. If not 
paid during registration days, but if paid within the two weeks 
succeeding the last registration day, the fee is $45.00 per semester. 
If not paid as above, but if paid within the following two weeks, 
the fee is $50.00 per semester. If not paid within four weeks after 
the last registration day, further attendance upon classes will be 
refused. 

Students in the College of Liberal Arts who are residents of the 
city of Cincinnati, and elect any work whatsoever in the College of 
Engineering, are charged the full tuition fee of $37.50 per semester. 

All regular five-year co-operative students in the College of 
Engineering are charged a tuition fee of $50.00 per year, payable 
in installments of $25.00 per semester. If not paid during regis- 
tration days, but if paid within the two weeks succeeding the last 
registration day, the fee is $32.50 per semester. If not paid as above, 
but if paid within the following two weeks, the fee is $37.50 per 
semester. If not paid within four weeks after the last registration 
day, further attendance upon classes will be refused. 



FEES 55 

All regular students in the College of Medicine (except those 
who entered the College previous to September, 1913) are charged a 
tuition fee of $150.00 per year, payable in installments of $75.00 per 
semester. If not paid during registration days, but if paid within two 
weeks succeeding the last registration day, the fee is $82.50 per 
semester. If not paid as above, but if paid within the following two 
weeks, the fee is $87.50 per semester, and if not paid within four 
weeks after the last registration day, further attendance upon classes 
will be refused. This fee entitles students in the College of Medicine 
to attend all didactic and clinical lectures and recitations, except the 
clinics of the City Hospital, which the members of the advanced 
classes are required to attend, and for which they pay an additional 
fee of $10.00 to the Hospital. 

Students in the College of Commerce are charged a tuition fee 
of $50.00 for a full year's work of five courses. Those taking less 
than a full year's work are charged $6.00 per recitation hour per 
year. Thus the tuition for one two-hour course is $12.00 a year. 

Tuition in the University Evening Courses is free (a) to all 
citizens of Cincinnati; (b) to all teachers* who, although non- 
residents, are engaged in teaching in the public schools of the city. 
All other teachers are charged tuition at the rate of $3.00 per course, 
per year. Non-residents, other than teachers, are charged tuition at 
the rate of $3.00 per credit hour per semester. A credit hour is one 
hour's work a week carried through a semester or half year. Labora- 
tory fees will be charged for courses in the laboratory sciences. 

All regular students in the School of Household Arts are 
charged a tuition fee of $100.00 per year, payable in installments 
of $50.00 per semester. 

Fees for Special and Irregular Students. 

All special students, and irregular students (i. e., students who 
have satisfied the entrance requirements, but take less than twelve 
hours a week by special permission), in the College of Liberal Arts 
and Engineering, and in the College for Teachers, and all non- 
resident students in the Graduate School, are charged tuition at the 
rate of $3.00 per credit hour, per semester, in advance. A credit 
hour is one hour's work a week carried through a semester or half 
year. For instance, tuition for a three-hour course would amount 
to $9.00 a semester, or $18.00 a year. If not paid within one week 
after the last registration day, an additional fee of $1.00 will be 
charged. If not paid within four weeks after the last registration 
day, attendance upon classes will be refused. 



* Librarians or assistants in the Public Library are given the same rates as 
teachers in the public schools. 



56 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

All special and irregular students in the College of Medicine 
or the School of Household Arts are charged tuition at the rate of 
$5.00 per credit hour, per semester, in advance. A credit hour is 
one hour's work a week carried through a semester or half year. 
Three laboratory hours are the equivalent of one credit hour. If 
this tuition is not paid within one week after the last registration 
day, an additional fee of $1.00 will be charged, and if not paid 
within four weeks after registration, further attendance upon 
classes will be refused. 

External Courses 
A fee of five dollars will be charged for admission to each 
External Course. 

Special Courses for Teachers* 

Teachers enrolled in Special Courses for Teachers in the Univer- 
sity, pay the regular library fee of $5.00 per year. Tuition in these 
courses is free (a) to all teachers in public schools who are residents 
of the city; (b) to all teachers who, although non-residents, are en- 
gaged in teaching in the public schools of the city. All other teachers 
are charged tuition at the rate of $3.00 per course, per year, payable 
in advance. 

The laboratory fee in a teacher's course is $5.00 per year. 

Laboratory Fees 

All laboratory fees are payable strictly in advance. 

A student shall not be permitted to enter a laboratory course 
until he presents to the instructor in charge a receipt for the pay- 
ment of his laboratory fee. 

Art, $5.00 per semester. 

Biology, $10.00 per semester; $5.00 per semester for a course 
having but one laboratory period per week. 

Cement, $5.00 per semester. 

Chemistry, $15.00 per semester; breakage deposit, $10.00. 

Drawing, $1.00 per semester. 

Foods and Nutrition, $5.00 per semester. 

Geology, $5.00 per semester; $2.50 per semester for a course hav- 
ing but one laboratory period per week. 

Hygiene and Sanitation, $2.00 per semester. 

Metallurgy, $7.50 per semester. 

Physics, $10.00 per semester; $5.00 per semester for a course hav- 
ing but one laboratory period per week. 



* Librarians or assistants in the Public Library are given the same rates as 
teachers in the public schools. 



FEES 57 

Psychology, $5.00 per semester. 

Textiles and Clothing, $5.00 per semester. 

Cutting, Millinery, and Laundering, $2.00 per semester. 

Engineering Laboratory. — Regular students in the College of 
Engineering pay $5.00 per period per week per semester in advance. 
Co-operative students pay $2.50 per period per alternate week per 
semester in advance. 

College of Medicine Laboratories.— A student who entered 
the College of Medicine before September, 1913, will be charged a 
fee of $5.00 for each laboratory course. 

Graduation Fees 

All graduation fees must be paid at least two weeks before the 
day appointed for conferring the degree. 

A graduation fee of $5.00 is charged every candidate for the 
degree of bachelor of arts, for the degree of bachelor of arts in 
education, for an engineering degree, for the degree of bachelor of 
science, and for a diploma in household arts. A graduation fee of 
$10.00 is charged a candidate for the degree of master of arts, and 
a fee of $20.00 is charged for the degree of doctor of philosophy, 
and for the degree of doctor of medicine. 

Breakage Deposits 

At the beginning of the year, a breakage deposit of $10.00 will 
be required of each student who takes chemistry. Five dollars of 
this amount must be kept permanently upon deposit until all accounts 
with the Department of Chemistry have been settled. For the re- 
maining $5.00 a coupon ticket will be issued, with which supplies and 
apparatus may be obtained at the store-room. Should this coupon- 
ticket become exhausted, the student must purchase a new ticket 
($5.00) before supplies will be issued to him at the store-room. 

A deposit of $5.00 will be required of all engineering students 
except those taking chemistry. 

A deposit of $10.00 will be required of each student in the 
College of Medicine at the opening of each session as a guarantee 
against breakage of apparatus, instruments, furniture, etc., to be 
renewed by each student whenever the breakage or damage amounts 
to $10.00. This deposit will be returned at the end of the year after 
deductions for such damage have been made. 

Course for Teachers of Art 
The fees in the Special Course for Teachers of Art are as fol- 
lows: matriculation fee, $5.00; tuition fee for non-residents, $18.00 
(for one year's instruction in psychology and the history of educa- 



58 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

tion) ; laboratory fee, $25.00 per year ; tuition fee, payable at the Art 
Academy, $25.00 per year. 

Miscellaneous Fees 

Gymnasium Fee. — A gymnasium fee of $5.00 per annum ($2.50 
per semester) will be charged all men in the College of Liberal 
Arts, in the College for Teachers, and in the College of Engineering, 
taking six or more hours of work per week. The same fee will be 
charged all men in the Graduate School who elect twelve hours of 
work per week. 

A fee of $5.00 per annum ($2.50 per semester) will be charged 
all other men in the University who desire to avail themselves of 
the privileges of the gymnasium. 

During the temporary use of the men's gymnasium by the 
classes for women, a gymnasium fee of $1.00 per semester will be 
charged the women students. 

Library Fee. — All students in the Graduate School, in the 
Colleges of Liberal Arts and Engineering, except fifth year 
co-operative students, in the College for Teachers, in the College of 
Commerce, in the School of Household Arts, and in the Evening 
Academic Courses, must pay a library fee of $5.00 per year at the 
opening of the session. 

Late Registration. — Students who apply for registration or sub- 
mit schedules of study on days other than those designated will be 
required to pay a fee of $1.00. 

Matriculation and Library Fee. — All students in the College of 
Medicine must pay a University Matriculation and Library fee of 
$5.00 per year. This fee entitles the student to matriculation in any 
College of the University, and also to the use of all of the libraries 
of the University. 

Microscope Fee. — Each student in the College of Medicine must 
own a microscope approved by the professor of the department, or 
rent one from the College, at a cost of $2.50 per session. 

Special Examinations. — A fee of $1.00 will be charged for each 
supplemental examination for the removal of conditions, and this 
fee must be paid even though the condition is removed without a 
supplemental examination. A fee of $5.00 will be charged for en- 
trance examinations on days other than those specified in the 
calendar. Every candidate who applies for the removal of a condition 
must present to the head of the department in which the condition 
occurred a receipt showing that the candidate has paid the fee of 
$1.00, before the said head of department may report the removal of 
a condition to the Registrar. 



EXPENSES 59 

Summer Course. — A fee of $10.00 will be charged for the use of 
Instruments in the summer courses in the College of Engineering. 

EXPENSES 

Graduate School 
liberal Arts, _. . , . . 

or College Engineering Medicine 

for Teachers 

Tuition Fees $75 00 $75 00 $150 00 

Library Fees 5 00 5 00 

Library and Matriculation 

Fee, payable each year $5 00 

Gymnasium Fee 5 00 5 00 

Laboratory Fees * $35 to $45 

Books $20 to $25 $25 to $30 $45 to $60 

Board and Room, per week.. $5 to $8 $5 to $8 $5 to $8 

Total Expense per year $325 to $450 $350 to $450 $375 to $500 

The Secretary of the University will furnish informa- 
tion regarding suitable bearding places in the vicinity of 
the University. 

* Laboratory fees vary according to the courses taken. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 
Charles William Dabney, Ph.D.,LL.D., President of the University 
Jermain Gildersleeve Porter, Ph. D., Director of the Observatory 

and Professor of Astronomy 
Frederick Charles Hicks, Ph. D., Sinton Professor of Economic 

and Commerce 
Harris Hancock, Ph. D., D. Sc, . . . Professor of Mathematics 
John Miller Burnam, Ph. D., ..... . Professor of Latin 

Max Poll, Ph. D., ... Professor of the Germanic Languages 
Joseph Edward Harry, Ph. D., Professor of Greek and Dean of th< 

Graduate School 

Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., Professor of History 

Louis Trenchard More, Ph. D., Professor of Physics 

Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D., Professor of Psychology 

William Paxton Burris, A. M.-, L. H. D., Professor of the History 

and Principles of Education 
John William Hall. A. M., Professor of Elementary Education 
Stephen Elmer Slocum, B. E., Ph. D., Professor of Appliec 

Mathematics 
Nevin M. Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Geography 
Lauder William Jones, Ph. D„ .... Professor of Chemistry 

*Guy Allan Tawney, Ph. D. Professor of Philosophy 

Frank Wadleigh Chandler, Ph. D., Professor of English and Ropes 

Professor of Comparative Literature 
Phillip Ogden, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Romance Languages 
Paul Gerhardt Woolley, B. S., M. D., . Professor of Pathology 
Martin H. Fischer, M. D., Joseph Eichberg Professor of Physiology 
Henry McElderry Knower, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Anatomy 
Harris Miller Benedict, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Botany 
Henry S. West, Ph. D., . . Professor of Secondary Education 
Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., . . Professor of Political Science. 

, Professor of Zoology 

Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . . Associate Professor of Chemistry 
William Buchanan Wherry, A. B., M. D., Associate Professor of 

Bacteriology. 
Samuel James McIntosh Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

Physics. 

* Absent on leave, 1914-15. 



ADMISSION 61 

Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., . . . Associate Professor of History. 
Claude M. Lotspeich, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of German. 
Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Chemistry. 
Harry Lewis Wieman, Ph. D., . Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
Edward F. Malone, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy. 
J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., Assistant Professor of Geology. 
Ralph Emerson Bassett, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance 

Languages. 
Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 

Comparative Anatomy. 
Clyde William Park, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 

William Hammond Parker, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Social Science. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 

Cyrus DeWitt Mead, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education. 

Henry G. Hartmann, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 

Clarence Oran Gardner, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political 

Science. 
Clarence D. Stevens, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 

Walter H. Bucher, Ph. D., Instructor in Geology. 

James Dysart Magee, Ph. D., .... Instructor in Economics. 
Merton Jerome Hubert, A. M., Instructor in French and Italian. 

Dexter Perkins, Ph. D., Instructor in History. 

Ernest Lynn Talbert, Ph. D., . . . Instructor in Philosophy. 



INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS 
ADMISSION 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts conferred by the University of 
Cincinnati entitles its holder to admission to the Graduate School. 
The University also offers its degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy to graduates of other institutions of high standing 
who shall complete their work in conformity with the regulations of 
the Graduate School. Students will not be admitted to the Graduate 
School after the third week of the semester. 



62 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

INSTRUCTION 

The work of each candidate for a graduate degree shall be under 
the direction of an Advisory Committee, composed of the Dean of 
the Graduate School and the heads of the departments in which the 
ivork is taken. 

The unit of instruction in the Graduate School is one hour a 
week for one semester. 

The nature of the graduate student's work will vary with the 
subjects pursued, but it is intended that the student's work shall re- 
quire a regular attendance at class meetings or in the laboratory, and 
shall not be in any respect of that character of work known as "in 
absentia." No credit will be given toward a graduate degree for work 
done prior to the conferring of the degree of Bachelor of Arts or its 
equivalent. No course in which a student obtains a grade below "B" 
will count for credit in the Graduate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF ARTS 

The work for the Master's degree requires at least one full 
year's residence in the Graduate School. A candidate for this 
degree, at the time of his admission to the Graduate School, and 
with the approval of the head of the department in which he elects 
his major work, shall designate the subjects which he desires to 
pursue. The student must satisfy the Dean of the Graduate School 
that the courses offered have been approved by his Adviser (the 
head of the department in which he takes his major), as well as by 
the heads of the other departments in which he has elected courses. 
The courses offered for the Master's degree shall represent not 
less than twenty-four credit hours of graduate instruction, at least 
twelve of which shall be in the major study. In case the candidate 
elects a major in the same department in which he completed a 
major in fulfillment of the requirements for a degree in the College 
of Liberal Arts, he shall, under the direction of his Adviser, elect 
sufficient work in some allied department to complete the twelve 
credit hours. The requirement of a thesis shall be optional with 
the Adviser. Whenever a thesis for the Master's degree is required, 
it must be filed with the Registrar not less than six weeks before 
the close of the final semester of graduate study. Students taking 
work in courses open to graduates and undergraduates shall be 
required to complete an additional amount of work, estimated to be 
fifty per cent of the regular undergraduate requirements. Candi- 
dates for the degree of Master of Arts shall pass an oral examina- 
tion before a committee of the facultv. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR'S DEGREE 63 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF 
PHILOSOPHY 

For the Doctor's degree, three years of graduate study will 
ordinarily be required. Where the student's college training has been 
defective or he cannot devote his whole time to the work, the 
period of study will be longer than three years. At least the last 
year of study must be spent in residence at the University of Cincin- 
nati. Students may be permitted to count for the Doctor's degree 
work done for the Master's degree, provided that such work is of a 
satisfactory character. 

A candidate for the Doctor's degree shall designate at the time 
of his admission to the Graduate School three subjects which he 
desires to pursue. These shall be known as a major and two minor 
subjects, not more than two of which shall be selected in one depart- 
ment, and the candidate shall satisfy the Dean of the Graduate 
School that his selection has received the approval of the heads 
of the departments in which the courses have been selected. These 
heads of departments, together with the Dean of the Graduate 
School, shall constitute an Advisory Committee, under whose direc- 
tion the candidate shall pursue his graduate course. 

A candidate for the Doctor's degree is expected to be able to read 
French and German. In order to receive the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy, the candidate must have completed satisfactorily such 
courses as shall be prescribed by his Advisory Committee, represent- 
ing not less than forty-eight units of instruction embodied in a 
major and two minor subjects, thirty units of which must be given 
to the major subject, and to pass such written examinations on his 
major and minor subjects as the Advisory Committee may indicate. 
The statement of the number of units required for the Doctor's 
degree is to be taken as a minimum requirement. The degree is 
given, not as a result of the completion of a certain number of units 
of study, but on the basis of long study and scientific accomplishment. 

The candidate shall furthermore be required to present, in such 
form as the Advisory Committee may determine, a thesis which will 
give evidence of high attainment and power of independent research, 
and he shall pass satisfactorily an oral examination before the faculty. 

All theses offered for the Doctor's degree must be filed with the 
Registrar not later than six weeks before the close of the final semes- 
ter of graduate study. Moreover, each student upon whom the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy is conferred, is required to deposit in the 
University Library one hundred printed copies of his thesis. The 
candidate may receive his diploma before the thesis is printed, pro- 



64 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

vided a type-written copy is deposited with the Librarian and the 
sum of fifty dollars with the Registrar of the University. This sum 
will be returned upon presentation to the Library of the required 
number of printed copies of the thesis. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 
Work done at other universities may be accepted as an equivalent 
for part of the work required for a graduate degree. All claims for 
such credit, together with all claims for advanced standing, must 
be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School within three weeks 
after the student enters upon his work at the University or resumes 
his work after a leave of absence for the purpose of carrying on 
work at another university. 

At least twelve credits of the twenty-four required for the Master 
of Arts degree must be obtained through work done in residence at 
the University of Cincinnati. 

SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

IN LANE SEMINARY AND IN THE HEBREW 

UNION COLLEGE 

With the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School and 

their Advisers, candidates may submit courses taken in Lane 

Seminary and in the Hebrew Union College in partial fulfillment 

of the requirements for the Master of Arts degree. Not more 

than twelve units may be so counted. 

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

There are at present three fellowships, a traveling scholarship., 
and ten University scholarships open to students of the Graduate 
School. The fellowships and traveling scholarship carry a stipend 
of from one hundred to five hundred dollars. (For particulars see 
page 46). The emolument of the University scholarships is sufficient 
for the payment of tuition fees. Applications should be addressed 
to the Dean of the Graduate School. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 65 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For detailed description of the courses given in the Graduate 
School, see the Announcements of the College of Liberal Arts and 
the College for Teachers. 



ANATOMY 

7. Those interested in post-graduate work in anatomy, histology, 
or gross human anatomy, are requested to apply to the head of the 
department. 

Professor Knower, Assistant Professor Malone. 



ASTRONOMY 

For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 103. 



BOTANY 

To pursue advanced courses in botany the student should have 
some training in physics and chemistry, and should be able to read 
French and German. Special facilities are afforded students pur- 
suing courses of research. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES 
To enter upon work for the degree of Master of Arts in botany 
students must have completed Courses 5a, 6a, 7b, 8b, 35, 24a, 25a, 
26b, 27b, or their equivalents. (See Botany, College of Liberal 
Arts.) Courses for "Undergraduates and Graduates" may be 
counted as graduate subjects toward the degree of Master of Arts 
by students who have elected majors in other departments. When 
botany is chosen as a minor for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, 
the work required approximates that of the full course for the 
degree of Master of Arts in botany. The requirements for a higher 
degree, when botany is chosen as a major subject, are adequately 
stated under the general requirements for degrees (pages 62-63). 

Primarily for Graduates 

[40. Current Problems in Botany.] Professor Benedict. 
Omitted in 1914-15. 

31. Research. Hours to be arranged. Professor Benedict. 
For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 105. 



66 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

CHEMISTRY 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR HIGHER DEGREES 
The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

A. Chemistry as the Major Subject. — All candidates who 
make chemistry their major subject must offer the following courses 
or their equivalents (see Chemistry, Liberal Arts) : la, 2a, 3b, 4b, 5a, 
6, 7b, 8a, 9a, 12a, 13a. In addition to these requirements, students 
who specialize in a certain branch of chemistry must complete the 
advanced courses required in connection with the choice made. The 
completion of these courses, however, does not satisfy the require- 
ments made of the candidate for a higher degree; he must show a 
maturity acquired by personal intimacy with the literature and method 
of chemistry. 

B. Chemistry as the Minor Subject. — It is not possible to 
state precisely those courses which may be required in each particular 
case. The choice will be made after consultation with the heads of 
the departments in which the major work falls. The usual require- 
ments will be Courses la, 2a, 3b, 4b, 5a, 6, 7b. If the candidate has 
chosen one of the physical sciences as his major subject, Courses 12a 
and 13a (one semester) will be required; if one of the biological 
sciences has been made the major subject, Courses 8a and 9a will be 
taken. 

The Master's Degree 

A candidate for the Master's degree must present a thesis 
embodying the results of some experimental work, or a written 
account in some detail of a subject suggested by the instructor under 
whose direction the student has been placed. 

Primarily for Graduates 

30. Research. 

Professor Jones, Associate Professor Fry, 

Assistant Professor Goettsch, 

Assistant Professor Aston. 

35a. Some Special Problems and Theories of Organic Chem- 
istry. Professor Jones. 

40. Journal Club Meetings. Papers by instructors and advanced 
students. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 109. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 67 

ECONOMICS 

(The Sinton Professorship) 
For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 112. 



EDUCATION 

Education 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 12 are open to graduate students. 
Courses 1, 9, and 11 may be counted for credit towards a graduate 
degree, provided students do satisfactory pieces of independent 
work and embody the results of the same in acceptable written 
theses. For the number of credits allowed, the hours at which the 
courses are given, and the instructors having charge of the same, 
see Announcement of the College for Teachers. 



ENGLISH 
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

(The Nathaniel Ropes Foundation for the Comparative Study of 

Literature) 
For Graduates Only 

20. Seminary. — Elizabethan Literature in its Continental 
Relations. T., 4:00-6:00. Professor Chandler. 

For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 117. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 119. 



GERMAN 

Primarily for Graduates 
12. Interpretation of both parts of Faust and Study of the 
Legend.— T., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Poll. 

Course 12 is open to students who have passed in Course 5. 

[lib. German Literature from the Reformation to the Classic 
Period of the Eighteenth Century.] Second semester, T., 4:00-6:00. 

Professor Poll. 
Course lib is open to students who have passed in Course 5 or 6. 
Omitted in 1914-15. 
[7. Middle High German.] W., 4:00-6:00. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich. 
Omitted in 1914-15. 
8. Old High German.— M., 4:00-6:00. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich. 



68 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

[13. Gothic] W., 4 :00-6 :00. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 
Omitted in 1914-15. 

[26. Old Norse.] M., 4:00-6:00. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

[9b. German Seminary.] Second semester, T., 4:00-6:00. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Professor Poll. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 122. 



GREEK 

Primarily for Graduates 

5. Rapid Reading.— Th., 3 :00-4 :00. Professor Harry. 

6. Practical Exercises in Greek.— M., 3 :00-5 :00. 

Professor Harry. 

[7. Greek Seminary.] The Historians (1914-15) ; The Atti 
Orators (1915-16). M., 3 :00-5 :00. Professor Harry. 

Open to graduates and to those who have completed the under- 
graduate courses in Greek. 
Omitted in 1914-15. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 125. 



HISTORY 

For Courses Open to Graduates See Page 127. 



LATIN 

Primarily for Graduates 

(Hours in all cases to be arranged) 

9. Latin and Romance Palaeography. — Professor Burnam. 
Prerequisite : Four years of undergraduate work and ability tc 

read French and German. 

10. Latin Seminary. — Virgil. Professor Burnam. 

12. Graduate Study. — Credit according to the work elected and 
completed under the direction of the teaching staff of the Depart- 
ment. Professor Burnam. 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 69 

MATHEMATICS 

Primarily for Graduates 

20. Theory of Maxima and Minima Involving Several Var- 
iables. The Calculus of Variations.— M., Th., 4 :00-6 :00. 

Professor Hancock. 
For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 130. 



MATHEMATICS (APPLIED) 

Primarily for Graduates 

lib. Fourier's Series and Spherical Harmonics. — Second semes- 
ter, Th., 4:00-6:00; S., 9:30-10:30. Professor Slocum. 

10a. Theory of Errors and Method of Least Squares. — First 
semester, M., 4:00-5:00; W., 4:00-6:00. Professor Slocum. 

For Graduates Only 

40. Seminary.— Theoretical and experimental research in some 
special topic of the mechanics of rigid, elastic, fluid or gaseous bodies. 

Professor Slocum. 
For Other Courses in Mathematics See Page 130. 



PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

8. Research. — Open to any qualified person after consultation 
with the head of the department. 

Professor Woolley, Associate Professor Wherry. 



PHILOSOPHY 

Primarily for Graduates 

9. The Methods of Certain Ethical Systems.— Th., 1:00-3:00. 

Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

10. Plato and Aristotle.— T., 1 :00-3 :00. Dr. Talbert. 
For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 132. 



70 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI 

PHYSICS 

For Graduates Only 

7. Lectures on Theoretical Physics. Professor More. 

25a. Theoretical Mechanics. — See under Applied Mathematics 16a. 

Professor Slocum. 
9. Research. — Those electing this course are supplied with all 
the apparatus needed, and with the assistance of the Mechanician. 
Professor More and Associate Professor Allen. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 136. 



PHYSIOLOGY 



(The Joseph Eichberg Professorship) 

7. Research. — Open to any qualified person after consultation 
with the head of the department. Professor Fischer. 



POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

For Courses in Political and Social Science Open to 
Graduates See Pages 138, 140. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Primarily for Graduates 

3. Research. — Special investigation in the psychological labora- 
tory. Professor Breese. 

[4. Seminar.] A critical study of the most important problems 
in psychology. Th., 3 :00-5 :00. Professor Breese. 

[6a. Educational Psychology.] First semester. Hours to be 
arranged. Professor Breese. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 141. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

For Courses Open to Graduates See Pages 143, 145, 146. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 71 

ZOOLOGY 

To pursue advanced courses in zoology, the student should 
have some training in physics and chemistry, and should be able to 
read French and German. Special facilities are afforded students 
pursuing courses of research. 

Requirements for Degrees 

To enter upon work for the degree of Master of Arts in 
zoology, students must have completed Courses la, 2a, 3b, 4b, 15, 
17b, 18b, 19a, 13b, 14b, 20a, or their equivalents. (See Zoology, 
College of Liberal Arts.) Courses for "Undergraduates and Grad- 
uates" may be counted as graduate subjects toward the degree of 
Master of Arts by students who have elected majors in other 
departments. The requirements for a higher degree, when zoology 
is chosen as a major subject, are adequately stated under the 
general requirements for degrees (pages 62-63). 

Primarily for Graduates 
[30. Current Problems in Zoology.] 
Omitted in 1914-15. Assistant Professor Wieman. 

31. Research. Hours to be arranged. 

Assistant Professor Wieman and 
Assistant Professor Chambers. 

For Other Courses Open to Graduates See Page 147. 



McMICKEN COLLEGE OF 
LIBERAL ARTS 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Charles William Dabney, Ph.D.,LL. D., President of the University. 
Jermain Gildersleeve Porter, Ph. D., Director of the Observatory 

and Professor of Astronomy. 

Frederick Charles Hicks, Ph. D., Sinton Professor of Economics 

and Commerce and Supervisor of the Evening Academic Courses. 

Harris Hancock, Ph. D., D. Sc, . . . Professor of Mathematics. 

John Miller Burnam, Ph. D., Professor of Latin. 

Max Poll, Ph. D., . . . Professor of the Germanic Languages. 

Joseph Edward Harry, Ph. D., Professor of Greek. 

Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., Professor of History. 

Louis Trenchard More, Ph. D., .... Professor of Physics. 

Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D., Professor of Psychology. 

Stephen Elmer Slocum, B. E., Ph. D., Professor of Applied 

Mathematics. 
Nevin M. Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Geography. 
Lauder William Jones, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Chemistry. 
*Guy Allan Tawney, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Philosophy. 
Frank Wadleigh Chandler, Ph. D., Professor of English, Ropes 
Professor of Comparative Literature, and Dean of the 
College of Liberal Arts. 
Phillip Ogden, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Romance Languages. 
Harris Miller Benedict, Ph. D., .... Professor of Botany. 
Henry S. West, Ph. D., . . . . Director of School Affiliation. 
Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., . . Professor of Political Science. 

, Professor of Zoology. 

Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Samuel James McIntosh Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

Physics. 
Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., . . . Associate Professor of History. 
Claude M. Lotspeich, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of German. 
Emilie Watts McVea, A. M., Assistant Professor of English and 

Dean of Women. 
Charles Napoleon Moore, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 



Absent on leave, 1914-15. 






FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 73 

Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Chemistry. 
Benjamin Carlton Van Wye, A. M., Assistant Professor of Public 

Speaking and English, 
Harry Lewis Wieman, Ph. D., . Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
William Tunstall Semple, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Latin. 
J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., Assistant Professor of Geology. 
Ralph Emerson Bassett, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance 

Languages. 
Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 

Comparative Anatomy. 
Bertha K. Young, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of English. 
Clyde William Park, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 
William Hammond Parker, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of 

Economics and Social Science. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 
Henry G. Hartmann, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
Clarence Oran Gardner, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political 

Science. 
Clarence D. Stevens, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 

Alfred Brodbeck, Director of Physical Education. 

Florence Cameron Lawler, B. S., . . Instructor in Mathematics. 

Arthur James Kinsella, A. M., Instructor in Greek. 

Joseph Henry Kindle, A. M., .... Instructor in Mathematics. 
Platt Bishop Evens, Mechanician and Instructor in Laboratory Arts. 

Cora May Box, A. M., Instructor in Zoology. 

Eleanor Katherine Nippert, A. B., . . . Instructor in German. 

Martin Ludwich, A. M., Instructor in German. 

Robert E. Clyde Gowdy, Ph. D Instructor in Physics. 

Thomas Lansing Porter, Ph. D Instructor in Physics. 

Edwin W. Esslinger, A. M., . Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 

Walter H. Bucher, Ph. D., Instructor in Geology. 

James Dysart Magee, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Economics. 
Merton Jerome Hubert, A. M., Instructor in French and Italian. 

Dexter Perkins, Ph. D., Instructor in History. 

Levi Alexander Giddings, M. S., . . . . Instructor in Botany. 
Ernest Lynn Talbert, Ph. D., . . . Instructor in Philosophy: 

Walter Wesley Plock, Instructor in English. 

Willard A. Kinne, A. B., . . Instructor in French and Spanish. 
Ray Gould Knickerbocker, M. A., . . Instructor in Metallurgy. 

, Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 

■ , Instructor in Physical Education. 

Edward Mack, A. M., D. D., . . Lecturer on Biblical Literature. 

Anatole Le Braz, Professor in the University of Rennes, Lecturer 
on the Ropes Foundation for the Comparative Study of Literature. 



74 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Other Appointments for 1914-15 

Schachne Isaacs, A. M., Assistant in Psychology. 

Raphael Isaacs, A. M., . Assistant in Embryology and Zoology. 
Annette Frances Braun, Ph. D., . . . . Assistant in Zoology. 

Leonora Neuffer, A. M., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Harold H. Wagner, Assistant in Physical Education. 

Esther Godshaw, Ph. B., Assistant in History. 

Madelaine Maury Wright, A. B., . . . . Assistant in English. 
Edward Joseph Lorenz, A. M., . . . Hanna Fellow in Physics. 
Miriam Urbansky, D. A. R. Fellow in American History and 
Student Assistant in European History. 
Emma Andriessen, A. M., . . . Graduate Assistant in German. 
E. Lucy Braun, Ph. D., . . . . Graduate Assistant in Botany. 
Hyman Bernard Cantor, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Philosophy. 
John D. Ellis, A. B., LL. B., Graduate Assistant in Economics and 

English. 
Martha Jane Gibson, A. M., . . Graduate Assistant in English. 
Ella Davis Isaacs, A. M., . . Graduate Assistant in Economics. 
Ralph Kreimer, A. B., .... Graduate Assistant in English. 
Lowell Hobart Ludwig, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Economics. 
Samuel Speir Mayerberg, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Social 

Science. 
Amy F. Mihalovitch, A. B., . Graduate Assistant in Economics. 
Helen A. Stanley, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Latin and English. 
Mary Dunn Whitfield, A. B., . Graduate Assistant in English. 

Dorothy Anderson, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

Ralph E. Belsinger, Student Assistant in Physics. 

Virginia Biddle, Student Assistant in English. 

Lester Brand, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

Walter Brill, Student Assistant in Physics. 

Stanley Cook, Student Assistant in Chemistry. 

Harold F. Richards, Student Assistant in Physics. 

Edward Stevens Robinson, . . Student Assistant in Psychology. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE McMICKEN 
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
Candidates for admission as undergraduates must be at least 
sixteen years of age. To secure unconditional admission, they 
must give evidence of having completed satisfactorily an amount 
of preparatory study represented by sixteen units, a unit being the 
quantity of work represented by a full year's study of a subject, 
with recitation time devoted to it aggregating the equivalent of 
120 sixty-minute periods; laboratory, shop, drawing room, or field 
work to receive a double allowance of time when counted in the 
reckoning of units. Ordinarily, in order to fulfill this requirement, 






REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 75 

a study must be pursued for five periods per week throughout an 
academic year; but in schools where the school year is long, for 
example, 40 weeks, and the recitation periods are not less than 45 
minutes in length, four periods per week for a year may fulfill the 
time requirement for a unit. The sixteen units must be made up in 
subjects, selected according to directions, from those named below; 
and candidates must complete the assignment of work specified for 
each subject in the section headed "Definition of Units." Of these 
sixteen units every candidate for admission to the McMicken 
College of Liberal Arts must present the following : 

English — Three units, in which there can be no "condition." 

Mathematics — One unit in Algebra and one unit in Plane Geometry. 

History— One unit. 

Language — Three units, from the five languages: Latin, Greek, 
French, German, Spanish; two units must be in the same language. 
Candidates who intend to pursue the study of Latin in the University 
must present four units in Latin. 

In addition to these fixed requirements the candidate must offer 
a number of units selected from the list of subjects below, sufficient, 
with the units specified above, to amount to a total of sixteen. The 
number of units that may be offered in any subject is shown in the 
following table : 

Number of Units Accepted for Admission 
Minimum Maximum 

English 3 required 4 

Latin 11 f . .or 2 or 3 or 4 

Greek 1| Three units | . . G r 2 or 3 

*«<* J \ ^K-SLEaS \ -.or2or3or4 

German 1 | one language ..or 2 or 3 or 4 

Spanish 1) { 2 

General or Medieval and 1 f 

Modern History... 1 | | 1 

Ancient y 2 \ One unit J 1 

English y 2 j required j 1 

American y 2 | | 1 

American and Civics 1 J I 1 

Economics y> x / 2 

Algebra 1 required or... 1}^ or 2 

Geometry, Plane 1 required 1 

Geometry, Solid y 2 x / 2 

Trigonometry y 2 1 

Civics y 2 y? 

Physics 1 1 

Chemistry 1 1 

*Zoology 1 ] 

*Botany 1 1 

Physical Geography y 2 1 

Astronomy y 2 x / 2 

* One-half unit will be allowed in Zoology and one-half unit in Botany when 
these two subjects are presented together as one unit in the same year. 



76 McMlCKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Nu mber of Units Accepted fo r Admission 
Minimum Maximum 

Bookkeeping 1 2 

Stenography-Typewriting. ... 1 1 

Commercial Geography y 2 l / 2 

Commercial Law ]/ 2 y 2 

Drawing 1 1 

Manual Training 1 or 2 or 3 or 4 

Domestic Science 1 or 2 or 3 or i 

ENTRANCE CONDITIONS 
Students who are deficient in not more than two units of the 
sixteen required for admission, provided their credit includes three 
units of English, may be admitted conditionally to the College of 
Liberal Arts. All such entrance conditions must be removed before 
the student is allowed to register as a regular student for a second 
year of residence at the University. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations for admission in 1915 will be held on January 
5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ; on June 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 ; and on September 9, 1 
11, 13, 14, 15. 

Students who desire to take these examinations must obtai: 
permission beforehand from the Director of School Affiliation. A 
applications for permission to take the entrance examinations shoul 
be made at least two days before the first day of the examination 
period. Some of the examinations may be taken in the spring and 
the remainder in the fall if so desired. Students who apply for 
entrance examinations at times other than the days specified will be 
charged a fee of five dollars. Extra examinations, however, will 
not be furnished except for good and sufficient reasons. 

Examinations for candidates without graduation certificates.— 
A candidate for admission to the University, coming from one 
of the accredited schools, who is not a graduate of such school, will 
not be admitted to the entrance examinations within one year after 
leaving such preparatory school, unless recommended for examination 
by the principal of the school from which he comes. 

Students intending to take the entrance examinations should 
consult the statement of the entrance requirements, as printed on a 
preceding page, and arrange to take their examinations 

(a) in the fixed requirements, and 

(b) in enough additional subjects to make a total of sixteen 
units. 

The work covered by each unit or group of units in the various 
subjects may be found on the following pages. Specimen entrance 
examination questions will be furnished free of charge on applicatio 
to the Director of School Affiliation. 






ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS 11 

SCHEDULE OF ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS IN 1915 
January 4, June 14, and September 9 : 

8 :30-ll :00. . . .English First 3 units 

11 :00-12 :00 . . . . English Fourth unit 

1 :00- 3 :00 . . . . Physics 1 unit 

3:00- 4:00 Solid Geometry y 2 unit 

4:00- 5 :00 Physical Geography y 2 or 1 unit 

January 5, June 15, and September 10 : 

8 :30-10 :30 Latin First and second units 

10 :30-12 :00. . . .Latin Third and fourth units 

1 :00- 3 :00. . . .Chemistry 1 unit 

3:00^ 4:00 Astronomy ^ unit 

4:00- 5:00.... Civics y 2 unit 

Tanuary 6, June 16, and September 11: 

8 :30-10 :30 French First and second units 

10 :30-12 :00 . . . . French Third and fourth units 

1 :00- 2 :30. . . .Plane Geometry 1 unit 

2 :30- 4 :00. . . .Algebra First unit 

4:00- 5:00 Advanced Algebra y 2 or 1 unit additional 

January 7, June 17, and September 13: 

8 :30- 9 :30 Ancient History y 2 or 1 unit 

9:30-10 :30. . . .American History y 2 or 1 unit 

ia.qa 19. aa S General or Medieval and } + .. 

10.30-12.00....! Modern History> ._V 1 unit 

1 :00- 2 :00. . . .English History , y 2 or 1 unit 

2:00- 3:00 American History and Civics 1 unit 

3 :00- 5 :00 Spanish First and second units 

January 8, June 18, and September 14 : 

8 :30-10 :30 . . . . German First and second units 

10 :30-12 :00 . . . . German Third and fourth units 

1 :00- 3 :00. . . .Zoology y 2 or 1 unit 

3:00- 5:00 Botany y 2 or 1 unit 

January 9, June 19, and September 15 : 

o oa ia oa 5 Greek First and second units 

8 :cW-10:d0. . ^ Bookkeeping j or 2 units 

in qa 111 qa 3 Greek Third unit 

w .du-w :au. . i Stenography-Typewriting 1 unit 

11:30-12:00. .. .Economics x /i unit 

f Trigonometry y 2 or 1 unit 
Commercial Geography y 2 unit 
Commercial Law y 2 unit 

a c\c\ k t\c\ S Manual Training 1 to 4 units 

4.UU- 5:UU.. j Drawing 1 unit 

4 :00- 5 :00 . . . . Domestic Science 1 to 4 units 

DEFINITION OF UNITS 
Detailed statements showing the exact amount of work required 
for each unit or group of units in the various subjects are here 
presented : 



78 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

ENGLISH COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 

The examination in English will consist of two parts, one 
relating to composition and the other relating primarily to literature. 

(a) The candidate should possess such knowledge of English 
grammar and of the principles of rhetoric, including the con- 
struction of the paragraph and of the sentence, as will enable him 
to write simply and correctly on some subject familiar to him. 

(b) The candidate will be required to show his acquaintance 
with good literature and his knowledge of literary values. The 
books adopted by the National Conference on Uniform Entrance 
Requirements, as given below, are recommended in preparation for 
this part of the examination; but any course of equivalent amount 
and value will be received. The examination is intended to test 
rather the candidate's power to judge literary values so that he may 
read with intelligence and appreciation, than his knowledge of 
specific books. 

I. Three Units. — The preparation should include the following 
subjects : 

Composition. — There should be practice in writing at regular and 
frequent intervals throughout all the years of the preparatory course. 
Special attention should be given to the proper structure of sen- 
tences and paragraphs, and the method of planning or outlining an 
essay. 

Grammar. — It is expected that the applicant will be familiar with 
the essentials of English grammar, and will be able to explain the 
construction of sentences that occur in the classics he has read. 

English Classics. — The following books are recommended for 
reading and study: 

a. For Reading, 1915 to 1919 

I (two to be selected) : The Old Testament, comprising at least 
the chief narrative episodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, 
Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, together with the books of Ruth and 
Esther; the Odyssey, with the omission, if desired, of Books I, II, 
III, IV, V, XV, XVI, XVII ; the Iliad, with the omission, if desired, 
of Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, XVII, XXI; Virgil's Aeneid. The 
Odyssey, Iliad, and Aeneid should be read in English translations of 
recognized literary excellence. 

For any unit of this group a unit from any other group may 
be substituted. 

II (two to be selected) : Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; 
Midsummer Night's Dream; As You Like It; Tivelfth Night; The 
Tempest; Romeo and Juliet; King John; Richard III; Henry the 
Fifth; Coriolanus; and Julius Caesar, Macbeth, and Hamlet, if 
these have not been chosen in the group for intensive study. 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 79 

777. Prose Fiction.— Malory's Morte d' Arthur (about 100 
pages) ; Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Part I ; Swift's Gulliver's 
Travels (voyages to Lilliput and to Brobdingnag) ; DeFoe's Robin- 
son Crusoe, Part I; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Frances Bur- 
ney's Evelina; Scott's Novels (any one) ; Jane Austen's Novels 
(any one) ; Maria Edgeworth's Castle Rackrent, or The Absentee; 
Dickens' Novels (any one) ; Thackeray's Novels (any one) ; 
George Eliot's Novels (any one) ; Mrs. Gaskell's Cranford; Kings- 
ley's Westward Ho! or Hereward, the Wake; Reade's The Cloister 
and the Hearth; Blackmore's Lornu Doone; Hughes' Tom Brown's 
Schooldays; Stevenson's Treasure Island, or Kidnapped, or Master 
of Ballantrae ; Cooper's Novels (any one); Poe's Selected Tales; 
Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables, or Twice-Told Tales, 
or Moses from an Old Manse; a collection of Short Stories by 
various standard writers. 

IV. Essays, Biography, etc. — Addison and Steele's The Sir 
Roger de Coverley Papers, or Selections from the Tatler and 
Spectator (about 200 pages) ; Boswell's Selections from the Life of 
Johnson (about 200 pages) ; Franklin's Autobiography; Irving's 
Sketch Book (about 200 pages), or Life of Goldsmith; Southey's 
Life of Nelson; Lamb's Essays of Elia (about 100 pages) ; Lock- 
hart's Life of Scott (about 200 pages) ; Thackeray's Lectures on 
Swift, Addison, and Steele in the English Humourists; Macaulay's 
Lord Clive, Warren Hastings, Milton, Addison, Goldsmith, Frederic 
the Great, Madame d'Arblay (any one) ; Trevelyan's Life of 
Macaulay (about 200 pages) ; Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, or Selec- 
tions (about 150 pages) ; Dana's Two Years before the Mast; 
Selections from Lincoln, including at least the two Inaugurals, the 
Speeches in Independence Hall and at Gettysburg, the Last Public 
Address, and the Letter to Horace Greeley, together with a brief 
memoir or estimate; Parkman's The Oregon Trail; Thoreau's 
Walden; Lowell's Selected Essays (about 150 pages) ; Holmes's 
The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table; Stevenson's An Inland 
Voyage, and Travels with a Donkey ; Huxley's Autobiography, and 
selections from Lay Sermons, including the addresses on Improving 
Natural Knowledge, A Liberal Education, and A Piece of Chalk; 
a collection of Essays by Bacon, Lamb, DeQuincey, Hazlitt, Emer- 
son, and later writers ; a collection of Letters by various standard 
writers. 

V. Poetry. — Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Books 
II and III, with special attention to Dryden, Collins, Gray, Cowper, 
and Burns; Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series), Book IV, 
with special attention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley (if not 
chosen for study under b) ; Goldsmith's The Traveller, and The 
Deserted Village; Pope's The Rape of the Lock; a collection of 



80 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

English and Scottish Ballads, as, for example, some Robin Hood 
ballads, The Battle of Otterburn, King Estmere, Young Beichan, 
Bewick and Grahame, Sir Patrick Spens, and a selection from later 
ballads; Coleridge's The Ancient Mariner, Chris tab el, and Kubla 
Khan; Byron's Childe Harold, Canto III or IV, and The Prisoner 
of Chillon; Scott's The Lady of the Lake, or Marmion; Macaulay's 
The Lays of Ancient Rome, The Battle of Naseby, The Armada, 
Ivry; Tennyson's The Princess, or Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot 
and Elaine, and The Passing of Arthur; Browning's Cavalier 
Tunes, The Lost Leader, How They Brought the Good Nezvs from 
Ghent to Aix, Home Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts from 
the Sea, Incident of the French Camp, Herve Riel, Pheidippides, 
My Last Duchess, Up at a Villa-Down in the City, The Italian in 
England, The Patriot, The Pied Piper, "De Gustibus — ", Instans 
Tyrannus; Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum, and The Forsaken Mer- 
man; Selections from American Poetry, with special attention to 
Poe, Lowell, Longfellow, and Whittier. 

b. For Intensive Study, 1915 to 1919 
This part of the requirement is intended as a natural and 
logical continuation of the student's earlier reading, with greater 
stress laid upon form and style, the exact meaning of words and 
phrases, and the understanding of allusions. The books provided 
for study are arranged in four groups, from each of which one 
selection is to be made. 

I. Drama. — Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet. 

II. Poetry. — Milton's L'Allegro, II Penseroso, and either 
Comus or Lycidas ; Tennyson's The Coming of Arthur, The Holy 
Grail, and The Passing of Arthur; the selections from Wordsworth, 
Keats, and Shelley in Book IV of Palgrave's Golden Treasury 
(First Series). 

III. Oratory. — Burke's Speech on Conciliation with America, 
Macaulay's Two Speeches on Copyright, and Lincoln's Speech at 
Cooper Union; Washington's Farewell Address, and Webster's 
First Bunker Hill Oration. 

IV. Essays. — Carlyle's Essay on Burns, with a selection from 
Burns's Poems; Macaulay's Life of Johnson; Emerson's Essay on 
Manners. 

II. Fourth Unit. — For the fourth unit in English composition 
and literature, the preparation should include, during the appli- 
cant's fourth year of the high school course, a study of the outlines 
of English literary history, based upon one of the recent manuals 
of English literature, and accompanied by a considerable amount 
of reading of representative authors. 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 81 

LATIN 

I. First Unit. — The student should have digested some Begin- 
ner's Book like that of Coy, or Collar and Daniel. 

II. Second Unit. — Caesar's Gallic War, Books I-IV, or an equiv- 
alent amount selected from the remaining portions of that work. It 
is expected that in the first year's preparation the student has mastered 
the declensions, comparisons, and verbal inflections, knows the leading 
rules of syntax, and possesses some vocabulary. Along with Caesar 
there should be some exercise in Latin Composition, a wider and 
deeper acquaintance with grammatical principles of the language, and 
a good vocabulary. Sallust's Catiline or an equivalent amount of the 
Jugurtha may be substituted for two books of Caesar. It is further- 
more suggested that the teacher, if possible, vary the Caesar lessons 
by selections from Books V-VII. The Department of Latin is also 
willing to accept Miller and Beeson's second year Latin Book as a 
substitute for Caesar. 

III. Third Unit. — Cicero, In Catilinam, I-IV, and Pro Archia, 
with more practice in composition. It is also preferred that the 
student should study an additional oration or short treatise, e. g., 
de Amicitia, or selections from the Letters. He should also begin 
the practice of writing continuous prose. 

IV. Fourth Unit. — Vergil's Aeneid, I- VI, with scanning and 
prosody. An equivalent amount of verse from Aeneid, VII-XII, or 
Ovid will be accepted in place of Aeneid, III and V. If circumstances 
permit, it is very advantageous to let Ovid precede Vergil. It is 
preferable that the composition done during this year be based on 
Cicero. 

GREEK 

I. First Unit. — White's Beginner's Book or an equivalent. 
Grammar and composition work, 

II. Second Unit. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Books I and II. 
Grammar and composition work. 

III. Third Unit. — In addition to the work outlined in para- 
graphs I and II. the following: 

Xenophon, Anabasis, Books III and IV. 

Homer, Iliad, Books I-III. 

Composition. 

Grammar: Babbitt, Goodell, Goodwin, or Hadley- Allen / 

FRENCH 

I. One Unit. — 

(a) The translation at sight of very simple French prose. 

(b) The translation into French of easy sentences to test the 
candidate's familiarity with elementary grammar. 



82 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

(c) One full year of five periods a week is necessary to meet 
the requirements in one unit. The first one hundred and fifty pages 
in Fraser and Squair's French Grammar may be taken as a standard 
of the amount of grammar which should be covered during that 
period. 

II. Two Units.— 

(a) The translation at sight of ordinary prose. The passages 
set for translation must be rendered into clear and idiomatic English. 

(b) A test of the candidate's knowledge of the regular verbs ; 
the auxiliaries etre, avoir; the more frequent irregular verbs. 

(c) The translation into French of sentences to test the candi- 
date's familiarity with elementary grammar. 

Two full years of five periods a week are necessary to meet the 
requirements in two units. Fraser and Squair's French Grammar, 
complete, may be taken as a standard of the amount of grammar 
which should be covered during that period. Not less than three 
hundred duodecimo pages should be read from the works of at least 
three different authors. Suitable texts for these two units are : Le 
Siege de Berlin and La Dernier e Classe, Daudet ; La Mere Sauvage, 
Maupassant ; Le Tour de la France, Bruno ; Le Petit Chose, Daudet ; 
Sans Famille, Malot ; La Tache du Petit Pierre, Mairet ; La Poudre 
aux Yeux, Labiche et Martin; Le Voyage de M. Perrichon, Labiche 
et Martin ; La Cigale chez les Fourmis, Legouve et Labiche. 

III. Three Units. — A continuation for one year of work just 
outlined. The candidate should be able to read at sight ordinary 
French prose or poetry, to translate into French easy English prose, 
to answer questions involving a more thorough knowledge of the 
essentials of French syntax, especially the ordinary uses of tenses 
and modes. It is expected that the candidate for three units will 
have worked through a grammar and will have read five or six 
hundred pages of French during three years of five periods a week. 
Suitable texts for these three units are : The plays of Labiche, Scribe, 
etc. ; Gil Bias. Lesage ; Le Tour de la France, Bruno ; La Belle Niver- 
naise, Daudet; Les Fourberies de Scapin, Le Medicin Malgre Lux, 
Moliere ; Voltaire's historical writings ; Le Cid, Corneille ; Coppee's 
poems, etc. 

IV. Four Units.— 

(a) The translation at sight of standard French. The passages 
set for translation must be rendered into clear and idiomatic English. 

(b) A test of the candidate's knowledge of the irregular verbs 
and the essentials of French syntax, especially the uses of tenses, 
modes, prepositions, and conjunctions. 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 83 

(c) The translation into French of a connected passage of Eng- 
lish prose. 

(d) The writing of a theme in French on a given topic. 

Four full years in a good preparatory school are necessary to 
meet the requirements for four units. Not less than six hundred 
pages should be read from the works of at least five different authors. 
Suitable texts besides those given above are Colomba, Merimee; La 
Mare au Diable, Sand ; Pecheur d' Islande, Loti ; La Canne de lone, 
Vigny; Horace, Corneille; U Avare and Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, 
Moliere ; Athalie, Racine; Le Gendre de M. Poirier, Sandeau; 
Selections from Victor Hugo ; Le Monde ou Von s'ennuie, Pailleron. 

The student should have constant practice in giving paraphrases 
and abstracts. He should be trained to write French from dictation 
in order to enable him to understand lectures delivered in that lan- 
guage. 

GERMAN 

I. One Unit.— 

(a) The translation at sight of very simple German prose. 

(b) The translation into German of easy sentences, to test the 
candidate's familiarity with elementary grammar. 

The candidate ought to have read not less than one hundred 
pages of easy German, such as is found in Hewitt's or Harris' 
German Reader. 

II. Two Units.— 

(a) The translation at sight of simple German prose. 

(b) The translation into German of easy connected prose, to 
test the candidate's familiarity with elementary grammar. The 
requirement in elementary grammar includes the conjugation of the 
weak and strong verbs; the declination of articles, adjectives, pro- 
nouns, and such nouns as are readily classified; the prepositions; the 
simpler uses of the modal auxiliaries; the elements of syntax, espe- 
cially the rules governing the order of words. 

The candidate ought to have read not less than two hundred 
pages of easy German, such as is found in Hewett's or Harris's 
German Reader. 

In general, to obtain two units in German, two years' work in a 
good preparatory school is required. 

III. Three Units. — 

(a) The translation at sight of ordinary German. 

(b) The translation into German of a connected passage of 



84 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

English prose, to test the candidate's familiarity with grammar. 

The candidate ought to have read not less than four hundred 
pages of classical and contemporary prose and verse. It is recom- 
mended that the reading be selected from such works as Schiller's 
Wilhelm Tell; Lessing's Minna von Barnhehn; Goethe's Hermann unc 
Dorothea; Wildenbruch's Das edle Blut; Fontane's Vor dem Sturm, 
Moser's Kopnickerstrasse. 

Generally speaking, three years' work in a good preparatory 
school will be necessary in order to meet the requirements for three 
units. 

IV. Fotjr Units. — 

(a) The translation at sight of ordinary German. 

(b) The translation into German of a connected passage of 
English prose, to test the candidate's familiarity with grammar. 
The candidate will be expected to show a thorough knowledge of 
accidence, the principal uses of prepositions and conjunctions, and 
the essentials of syntax, especially the uses of the modal auxiliaries 
and of the subjunctive and infinitive modes. 

The candidate ought to have read not less than six hundred pages 
of classical and contemporary prose and verse. It is recommended 
that the reading be selected from such works as Schiller's Jungfrau 
von Orleans; Goethe's Iphigenie; Freytag's Die Journalisten, Soil 
und Haben, Bilder aus der deutschen Vergangenheit; Riehi's Cultur- 
geschichtliche Novellen. 

In general, to obtain four units in German, four years' work in a 
good preparatory school is required. 

SPANISH 

I. One Unit.— 

(a) The translation at sight of simple Spanish prose. 

(b) The essentials of grammar, including the conjugations of 
the regular and the most frequently used irregular verbs. The trans- 
lation into Spanish of short sentences, intended to test the candidate's 
knowledge of the essential points in grammar. Conversation and 
dictation. 

In general, one year's work in a preparatory school, or its equiva- 
lent, is necessary to meet the requirements for one unit. The candi- 
date will be expected to have worked through a short Spanish gram- 
mar, or the principal parts of a more complete one, and to have read 
at least one hundred pages of simple Spanish. Suitable texts for 
one unit are : Spanish Reader, Bransby ; Victoria y Otros Cucntos, 
Asensi ; Gil Bias, Padre Isla ; El Pdjaro Verde, Valera ; O Locura 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 85 

Santidad, Echegaray; Zaragiieta, Carrion y Vital Aza; El Clavo, 
Alarcon, etc. 

II. Two Units.— 

In general, two years' work in a preparatory school, or its equiva- 
lent, will be needed to meet the requirements for two units. In 
addition to the work outlined in Paragraph I, the candidate will be 
expected to have worked through an elementary composition book 
and to have read from two to three hundred pages of modern 
Spanish. Suitable texts for the second unit are: El Capitdn Veneno, 
Alarcon; El Si de las Ninas, Moratin; Dona Perfecta, Galdos; 
Guzman el Bueno, Gil y Zarate; Cuentos Alegres, Taboada; Legends, 
Tales, and Poems, Becquer; El Haz de Lena, Nunez de Arce; Jose, 
Valdes, etc. 

MATHEMATICS 

I. Algebra. One Unit. Definitions. — Integral numbers. Ra- 
tional numbers. Irrational numbers. The six fundamental operations 
of algebra. Algebraic expressions. Rational Algebraic expressions. 
Application of the four fundamental operations to Rational Algebraic 
expressions. The use of parentheses. Especial emphasis given to 
working within the parentheses. Factoring, determination of highest 
common factor and lowest common multiple by factoring. Fractions, 
simple and complex. Simple equations, both numerical and literal, 
containing one or more unknown quantities. Systems of equations. 
Problems depending on linear equations. Involution and evolution 
of monomials and polynomials. Radicals, including rationalization. 
Exponents, including the fractional and negative. Imaginary quanti- 
ties. Elementary treatment of quadratic equations. The solution of 
simple problems in quadratic equations* 

II. Algebra. One and one-half units. — In addition to Para- 
graph I, the following: The completion of quadratic equations, both 
numerical and literal. A standard form for the solutions of these 
equations. The discriminant condition for equal roots, real and 
imaginary roots. Relations among the roots and the co-efficients of 
the equation. The nature of the roots when the different co-efficients 



* It is assumed that the pupils will be required throughout the course to 
solve numerous problems which involve putting questions into equations. 
Familiarity with the metric system is pre-supposed. Some of these problems 
should be chosen from mensuration, from physics and from commercial life. 
The use of graphic methods and illustrations, particularly in connection with 
the solution of equations, is also expected. On the other hand, the student 
must be guarded against the tendency to become mechanical in his algebraic 
work. Algebra is not to be used as a T-square. Above all, the student should be 
thoroughly grounded in the fundamental principles, operations and definitions. 
It is recommended that Wells's Academic Algebra, Wentworth's Algebra, or 
an equivalent be used. 



86 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

approach zero. Simultaneous quadratic equations. Systems of equa- 
tions, simple and quadratic. Property of quadratic surds and solution 
of equations containing radicals. Problems leading to quadratic equa- 
tions. Ratio and proportion. The binomial theorem for positive 
integral exponents. 

III. Algebra. Two units. — In addition to the work outlined in 
Paragraphs I and II, the following: Convergence of infinite series. 
Binomial theorem with fractional negative exponents. Exponential 
and logarithmic series. Formation of logarithms to base e, to base 10. 
Properties and application of logarithms. The progressions. Con- 
tinued fractions. 

IV. Plane Geometry. One unit. — The work required in Plane 
Geometry is practically the equivalent of the first five books in 
Sanders', Wells', or Wentworth's Geometry. Emphasis should be 
given to the demonstration of original problems and the solution of 
original exercises, including loci problems. Application to the 
mensuration of lines and plane surfaces. 

V. Solid Geometry. One-half unit. — The usual theorems and 
constructions found in good text-books. Emphasis should be given 
to the demonstration of original problems and the solution of 
original exercises, including loci problems. Application to the 
mensuration of surfaces and solids. 

VI. Plane Trigonometry. One-half unit. — Definitions and 
relations of the six trigonometric functions as ratios, not as lines. 
Circular measurement of angles. Proofs of principal formulas, in 
particular those for the sine, cosine and tangent of the sum and the 
difference of two angles, of the double angle and the half angle, the 
product expression for the sum or the difference of two sines or of 
two cosines, etc. ; the transformation of trigonometric expressions by 
means of these formulas. 

VII. Trigonometry. One unit. — In addition to Paragraph VI. 
the following : Solutions of triangles, right-angled and oblique, requir- 
ing a knowledge of logarithms. Application to heights and distances. 
Demoivre's Theorem. Properties of spherical triangles. Formulas 
connecting the sides and angles of spherical triangles. Napier's 
Analogies. Gauss' Theorem. Solution of spherical triangles. 

PHYSICS 

One unit. — The candidate must be well prepared in the elemen- 
tary theory of the subject and must present a note-book showing the 
quantitative work done by him in the laboratory. One full year of 
four to five periods a week is necessary to meet the requirements 
for one unit. 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 87 

The instruction in the class-room should include qualitative 
lecture-room experiments, the solution of numerous problems, and 
the study of some one standard text-book. 

Every candidate for admission on examination is required to 
present a laboratory note-book, signed by the teacher, containing the 
results of quantitative experiments performed by him in the labora- 
tory. At least thirty quantitative experiments must have been per- 
formed, of which ten must be in mechanics, and which must also 
include three of the subjects, light, heat, electricity, and sound. The 
thirty experiments are to be selected from some standard list such as 
the list adopted by the National Education Association, which 
may be found in The Teaching of Chemistry and Physics, Smith and 
Hall, Chapter X. 

Laboratory note-books will be examined for neatness, language, 
accuracy, and proficiency in physics. They should be called for within 
one month after presentation. 

CHEMISTRY 

One unit. — The student's preparation should consist of an ele- 
mentary course in chemistry (one year)* of the character taught in 
the better class of high schools. It should include: 

(a) Individual laboratory work, to the extent of at least one- 
third of the time; 

(b) Instruction by lecture table demonstration, to be used when 
expensive apparatus or superior skill in manipulation is indispensable; 

(c) The study of at least one standard text-book, to the end 
that the pupil may gain a connected view of the subject. 

Either in the class-room or by experimental treatment in the 
laboratory, the course should take up for consideration the important, 
modes of occurrence, the principal methods of preparation, the essen- 
tial physical and chemical properties, and the recognition of the ele- 
mentary substances and their chief compounds, commonly considered 
in the standard text-books. More detailed study should be given to 
those of frequent occurrence, or of especial scientific importance. 

At the time of and as part of the examination in chemistry, every 
student must present a note-book, containing a description of at least 
forty experiments. The note-book should include drawings of essen- 
tial pieces of apparatus used, and an index of the experiments. The 
laboratory note-book should be called for within one month after 
presentation. 

Text-books recommended: McPherson and Henderson, Alex- 



* The course should cover from thirty-five to forty weeks, with four to 
five periods per week. Two hours of laboratory work count as one period of 
recitation. 



88 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

ander Smith, Hessler and Smith, and Remsen (Briefer Course). 
Other texts than the one prescribed should be available to the 
student for reference. Ostwald's Conversations on Chemistry will 
be found stimulating and suggestive for collateral reading. 

ZOOLOGY 

One unit. — The candidate will be required to present his original 
note-book of practical laboratory study, together with the dates and 
the endorsement of his teacher, certifying that the book is a true 
record of the pupil's own work. The note-book should contain care- 
fully labeled outline drawings of the chief structures studied in at 
least fifteen different animals, together with notes on the same. The 
note-book will be graded as one-third of the examination. The stu- 
dent will be expected to know the classification of animals into phyla 
and classes, and he must be able to state the chief characteristics and 
to compare the general life activities of examples of each of the 
principal classes. He must know the general plan of internal structure 
of one vertebrate (frog or fish) in general comparison with the human 
body; an arthropod (crustacean or insect) ; an annelid (earth-worm 
or Nereis) ; a coelenterate (hydroid, hydra or sea-anemone) ; a 
protozoan (a ciliate and amoeba when possible). A mollusk (clam 
or mussel), an echinoderm or a second vertebrate may be substituted 
for any of the above types. A knowledge of the very general features 
of cell division, of the cellular nature of germ-cells, and the essentials 
of embryological development will be expected, as well as some under- 
standing of the main facts involved in the struggle for existence, 
adaptation to environment and variation of individuals. 

One full year of at least five periods a week is necessary to 
meet the requirements for one unit. 

Such books as Colton's Descriptive and Practical Zoology, 
Harvey's Introduction to the Study of Zoology, or Kingsley's 
Comparative Zoology cover this ground adequately. At least half 
of the student's work must have been laboratory work, guided by 
definite directions. 

BOTANY 

One Unit. — At least half of the student's work must have been 
laboratory or field work, and a note-book containing careful records 
of personal observations, illustrated by accurate drawings, must 
be presented. 

Bergen, Atkinson, Bessey, Coulter, and Leavitt are representa- 
tives of the type of elementary texts accorded recognition. A full 
year's work is required for one unit of credit. 

Important requirements for recognition are as follows : a 
knowledge of the common plants of the student's locality, includ- 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 89 

ing their classification, structural adaptations for local conditions 
and any relation to human life which they possess, a general under- 
standing of the importance of bacteria and fungi as the cause of 
disease and the practical measures for their control, and some 
understanding of heredity, reproduction, and evolution in plants and 
living organisms. 

BOTANY AND ZOOLOGY 

One unit. — A unit will be accepted only when Botany and Zoology 
have each been studied for half a year in one continuous course 
which extends throughout the year. Such a course will be reckoned 
as a one-unit course in Biology. A half year of one, independent of 
the other, will not be accepted. It is strongly recommended that the 
student devote an entire year to Botany or to Zoology for one unit, 
instead of combining Botany and Zoology for a single unit. 

At least half of the work must have been laboratory work guided 
by definite directions. A laboratory note-book containing drawings 
and observations upon at least ten kinds of animals (both vertebrate 
and invertebrate) and ten kinds of plants (both flowering and non- 
flowering) must be presented with the certificate of the teacher that 
it is the student's own work. The student will be required to answer 
in writing general questions upon familiar animals, such as the frog, 
fish, earth-worm, paramoecium, crayfish, etc., and upon common 
plants, such as the fern, moss, mushroom, and simple flowering plants. 
In both Botany and Zoology a knowledge of the names and distin- 
guishing characteristics of the different phyla and their classes will be 
required. The note-book will count for one-third of the work. 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 

One-half unit. — The scope of the work required for one-half 
unit in Physical Geography is represented by the standard modern 
text-books, some of which are named below. This includes the earth 
as a whole, atmosphere, ocean and land, with special emphasis on the 
work of water on the land in making topographic features. Entrance 
examinations may include simple interpretations of topographic maps, 
weather maps, and such charts as are given in text-books, the pointing 
out of features of scientific importance in such pictures as are used 
in text-books, and simple demonstrations with globes. 

Among the high school text-books regarded as suitable are 
those by Dryer, Tarr, Gilbert and Brigham, Davis, and Arey Bryant 
Clendennin and Morey. 

No student will be admitted to the entrance examination in 
Physical Geography after he has received credit for any science 
work in the University. 



90 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

ASTRONOMY 

One-half unit.— The student should be familiar with: 

(a) Such fundamental notions and definitions as are necessary 
to locate celestial bodies. 

(b) The names and positions of the most conspicuous stars and 
constellations, and be able to trace the positions of the ecliptic across 
the sky at certain times during the year. 

(c) The most important facts concerning the form, dimensions, 
mass, density, rotation and orbital motion of the earth, including 
seasons, tides, eclipses, and other dependent phenomena; also methods 
for determining the mass of the earth. 

(d) The essentials concerning the sun, moon, and planets, includ- 
ing methods for determining their respective distances, motions, etc. 

(e) The different classes of objects found in the stellar 
universe — binaries, variable stars, nebulae ; also the principles of 
spectroscopic observation. 

Every student should visit a well-equipped observatory at least 
twice, once during the day to examine the apparatus, and once at 
night to view the heavens. 

HISTORY 

I. General History, or Medieval and Modern History. One 
Unit. — General History: Myers, Barnes, or G. B. Adams (complete) ; 
Medieval and Modern History: Munro and Whitcomb, Myers, 
Thatcher and Schwill, Harding's Essentials, or Robinson's History of 
Western Europe (complete). 

II. English History. One unit. — English History : Montgom- 
ery, Walker, Andrews, Cheyney, Larned or Wrong (complete). 
(Where half time is given to this subject a half unit may be offered.) 

III. Ancient History. One unit. — Ancient History: Myers, 
Seignobos, West, or Wolf son (complete). (Where half time is given 
to the subject a half unit may be offered.) 

IV. American History. One unit. — American History : Adams 
and Trent, Channing, Larned, McLaughlin, Montgomery (student's), 
McMaster, or Hart's Essentials (complete). 

V. American History and Civics. One unit. — See list in IV 
for American History. For Civics, Garner, J. W. : Government 
in the United States, or an equivalent text. 

CIVICS 

One-half unit. — Garner, J. W. : Government in the United 
States, or an equivalent text. 



DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 91 

ECONOMICS 

Economics. One-half Unit. — This course should consist, 
primarily, of a study of economic organization, with special refer- 
ence to the conditions existing in the United States ; and, sec- 
ondarily, to a concrete presentation of economic principles. The 
student should become familiar with market methods and the rules 
governing them ; the transportation system and the agencies for 
the public control thereof; the kinds of money in use, their main 
characteristics, and the conditions of issue ; the distinguishing 
features of the various kinds of banks and the functions performed 
by them ; and labor unions, labor laws, and the machinery for their 
enforcement. The best results can be obtained by following the 
topical method, and requiring the student to investigate personally 
the economic structure of the community in which he lives and its 
relation to other communities. 

COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY 

One-half unit. — The work of this half-unit should be based 
on a standard text such as Adams, Robinson, or Gannett, Garrison, 
and Houston. The course should include a discussion of (1) the 
physical and human factors that affect commerce, (2) the chief 
commodities of commerce, and (3) the resources, development, and 
trade of the leading commercial nations with emphasis upon the 
United States. As far as possible, the work should be illustrated 
by trips to local industries and by specimens of commercial products. 

BOOKKEEPING 

Bookkeeping. One Unit. — The unit of work in bookkeeping 
for college entrance should consist of a working knowledge of 
double entry bookkeeping for the usual lines of business. The 
student should be able to change his books from individual to 
partnership, and know the importance of the partnership agree- 
ment and its relation to bookkeeping. At least one set of trans- 
actions should be kept by single entry, and at least two sets by 
double entry, in which the uses of the ordinary bookkeeping books 
and commercial papers should be involved. The student should be 
drilled in the making of profit and loss statements and of balance 
sheets and should be able to explain the meanings of the items 
involved in both kinds of instruments. The work should be done 
under the immediate supervision of a teacher, and the student 
should devote an equivalent of at least ten periods (of not less than 
forty minutes full time) in class each week for one academic year. 



92 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Advanced Bookkeeping and Business Practice. One Unit. — 
The student should be taught the principles of single entry and its 
relation to double entry. He should be required to change single 
entry to double entry and be given a thorough drill on standard 
business forms, such as bills, receipts, checks, notes, etc., also on 
the use and meaning of business symbols and abbreviations. The 
student should become acquainted with the bill book and invoice 
book, and the loose leaf and voucher systems and bookkeeping. 
Each student should carry on a business of his own, first as an 
individual, then as a partnership, and finally as a corporation. 
Credit on this course should mean that the student lacks only age 
and actual business experience to become a competent bookkeeper. 
The work should be done under the immediate supervision of a 
teacher, and the student should devote an equivalent of at least 
eight periods (of not less than forty minutes full time) in class 
each week for one academic year. 

STENOGRAPHY AND TYPEWRITING 

Stenography and Typewriting. One Unit, Two Years. — 
This work is expected to occupy not less than two periods daily for 
two years. No credit should be given for either shorthand or type- 
writing if taken alone. Nothing but the touch method should be 
used in typewriting. The essentials are, first, accuracy and speed 
in taking dictation and transcribing notes ; secondly, correct spell- 
ing, capitalization, punctuation, and paragraphing. The minimum 
speed at the end of the first year should be 75 words per minute in 
dictation and 25 words per minute on the machine, and at the end 
of the second year, 100 words per minute in dictation and 35 words 
per minute in transcribing notes. 

COMMERCIAL LAW 

One-Half Unit. — The purpose of the law course is to give 
the students as clear an understanding as possible of their legal 
rights and limitations in the ordinary business relations of life; 
some attention is given to the fundamental concepts which underlie 
all law, rights, duties, wrongs, and remedies. The principal sub- 
jects included in the course are Contracts, Negotiable Paper, Agency, 
Partnership, Corporations, Real Property, Personal Property, Deeds, 
and Mortgages. Gano's Commercial Law is a suitable text. 

DRAWING 

One unit. — One unit for entrance will be allowed for Freehand 
Drawing or Mechanical Drawing, or both. The student must have 






DEFINITION OF REQUIREMENTS 93 

done the equivalent of at least two years' work of not less than four 
periods a week of forty-five minutes each. 

The work in Freehand Drawing should include outline drawing 
from models, principles of light and shade, application of conventional 
forms, ornaments, design, etc. 

The course in Mechanical Drawing should cover lettering, simple 
geometric problems, projections, solution of problems of helix, cycloid,, 
parabola, etc. 

The candidate for admission on examination must present at the 
time of, and as a part of, his examination a full set of drawings, with 
the teacher's certificate that they are the candidate's work. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Manual Training Including Shop Work and Mechanical Draw- 
ing. — Credit will be allowed in this subject to the extent of from one 
to four units according as one, two, three, or four years are devoted 
to the work; but it must be done in accordance with the regulations 
governing laboratory work ; that is, twice the time must be given to 
the subject each week as is given to a regular academic subject. 

The course must include carpentry, wood turning, pattern 
making, foundry work, forging, and machine work, and the proper 
courses in drawing must accompany such work. 

The candidate for admission on examination must present at 
the time of, and as part of his examination, a certified list of courses 
completed by him, the drawings for the same, and such statements 
of his work as will give an adequate idea of the efficiency of the course. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

One to four units of credit is allowed in this subject according 
as one, two, three, or four years are given to the work; but it 
must be done in accordance with the regulations governing 
laboratory work; that is, twice the time should be given to this 
work each week as is given to the academic studies which it dis- 
places. The course should include the drawing and art work which 
usually accompany a first-class course in this subject. The first two 
years should include a study of textiles, drafting of patterns, and the 
making of dresses, and the designing and construction of hats. The 
last two years of work should consist of the study of cooking, 
chemistry of foods, home construction and sanitation, dietetics, food 
adulteration, bacteriology, laundering, decorating, and home eco- 
nomics. 



94 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE FROM ACCREDITED 
SCHOOLS 

Work of satisfactory grade (not lower than 70 per cent) wil 
be accepted from graduates of the University's accredited schools 
in lieu of the entrance examinations upon the presentation of the 
proper certificate, signed by the principal of the school, certifying tc 
the work of the candidate. All certificates presented for admissior 
must specify the work actually done, the time devoted to ea< 
subject, and the grade received in each course. Blank forms wil 
be furnished upon application to the Director of School Affiliatior 

These certificates, properly made out, should be sent to the Direc- 
tor of School Affiliation, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohi( 
as soon as possible after graduation, and at least five days before the 
first day of registration. Upon receipt of the certificate, the Directoi 
of School Affiliation will pass upon the application, and if it is satis 
factory, will send a card of admission, which should be presented tc 
the Registrar at the opening of the session. If the certificate is n< 
satisfactory, the candidate will be informed, so that he may prepare 
himself for the entrance examinations. 

A candidate from an accredited school who is not a graduat 
of such school will not be admitted upon certificate at all, but mus 
enter by examination in accordance with the rule given above undei 
the heading "Entrance Examinations." 

*L1ST OF ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 

The following preparatory schools and high schools are on tl 
accredited list of the University of Cincinnati. This list is subje 
to change from year to year, and each school is visited from time t( 
time by a representative of the University: 



* Superintendents or principals who may desire to have their school 
accredited by the University, should address the Director of School Affiliation. 



ACCREDITED SCHOOLS 



95 



CITY 



Bellevuc, Ky. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O . 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 

Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 



Cincinnati, O 

Cincinnati, O 

Cincinnati, O 

Cincinnati, O 

Covington, Ky 

Danville, Ky 

Dayton, O 

Delhi, O 

Glendale, O 

Glendale, O 

Hamilton, O 

Jeffersonville, Ind. . . 
Lawrenceburg, Ind . . 

Lebanon, O 

Lockland, O 

Ludlow, Ky 

Maysville, Ky 

Middletown, O 

Milford, O 

Newport, Ky 

Norwood, O 

Oldenburg, Ind 

St. Bernard, O 

Wyoming, O 



NAME OF SCHOOL 



PRINCIPAL 



High School 

Oakhurst Collegiate School 

The Bartholomew Clifton School . . 

Franklin School 

The College Preparatory School for 
Girls 

The H. Thane Miller School 

Hughes High School 

Walnut Hills High School 

Woodward High School 

University School 



Ohio Military Institute 

Hartwell High School 

Madisonville High School 

Pleasant Ridge High School 

High School 

Kentucky College for Women 

Steele High School 

Mt. St. Joseph on the Ohio Academy 

High School 

Glendale College 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 



Academy of the Immaculate Con- 
ception • 

High School 



High School. 



*W. P. King 

MissH.F.Kendrick 

J Miss E. A. Ely 
Mary F. Smith 
i J. E. White 
' G. S. Sykes 

Mary Doherty 

S Mil. H. Miller 
I Emma L. Parry 

E. D. Lyon 
%%A. T. Henshaw 
Pliny A. Johnston 
Wm. E. Stilwell 

( *A. M. Henshaw 
< S. P. C. Roberts 
( §C. B. Wood 

Arthur Powell 
C. M. Merry 

T. L. Simmermon 

J H. S. Cox 
| »H. O. Sluss 

tjohn C. Acheson 

j C. L. Loos, Jr. 
I *E. J. Brown 
Sister Eveline 

•J. C. Chapin 

t Jane R. DeVore 

t C. H. Lake 
I *Darrel Joyce 
\ Emmett Taylor 
1 'C. M. Marble 
J Lydia A. Sembach 
} *J. W. Riddle 
i C. H. Bruner 
1 »C. H. Young 

*C. F. Sharp 
\ *W. D. Reynolds 
i C. O. Morgan 
i Earl F. Chase 
} *J. W. Bradner 
] Elsor Heater 
1 »N. D. O. Wilson 
] J. F. Hardin 
I *D. B. Clark 
J *J. A. Sharon 
I Wm. A. Evans 
J W. W. Mclntire 
i *W. S. Cadman 

Sister M. Clarissa 
Mr. Trisler 

i »C. S. Fay 

") Evelyn M. Prichard 



* Superintendent f Commandant t President tt Acting Principal. 



96 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

LIST OF RECOGNIZED SCHOOLS 

The work of the following schools is recognized 1 by the University. 
Graduates of these schools will be given entrance credit without 
examination for such work as they have completed in a satisfactory 

manner : 



CITY 



Cincinnati, O . . . 
Cincinnati, O. . . 
Cincinnati, O. . . . 

Dayton, Ky 

Highlands, Ky. . 

Loveland, O 

Terrace Park, O . 
Williamsburg, O 



NAME OF SCHOOL 



East Night High School 

West Night High School 

St. Mary's, Hyde Park, High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 

High School 



PRINCIPAL 



Albert Schwartz 

E. W. Wilkinson 

Rev. P. J. Hynes 
t J. M. McVey 
\ L. N. Taylor, Supt. 

F. A. Cosgrove 
John Morris, Supt. 
E. H. Foster 

R. C. Franz 



ACCREDITED SCHOOLS OF THE NORTH CENTRAL 
ASSOCIATION 

Graduates of the secondary schools approved by the North Cen- 
tral Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools will be admitted 
to the University of Cincinnati in accordance with the provision for 
"Admission on certificate from accredited schools." 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR 
OF ARTS* 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is the only degree conferred 
upon graduates of the College of Liberal Arts. 

One credit in the scale of University work is a subject taken 
for one period a week for one semester. In all laboratory courses, 
two and one-half hours in the laboratory are considered as equivale it 
to one recitation hour and the preparation therefor. Students who 
have satisfied the requirements for admission, but who take less than 
twelve hours per week, are called "irregular students," and they must 
pay a tuition fee in every instance. (See "Fees.") No student 



* The curriculum, as here described, wentinto effect September 17, 1914. 
Freshmen will follow this curriculum in its entirety. 

Sophomores will satisfy the requirements of the last two years, and as fa 
2S possible those of the first two years. 

Juniors will satisfy the requirements as announced in the catalogue o 
1913-14. and the requirements for the last two years as announced above. 

Seniors will satisfy the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
published in 1913-14. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE A. B. DEGREE 97 

is permitted to elect courses in more than five departments in any 
one semester. 

All students who are candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts must fulfill the following requirements : 

Each student must obtain 124 credits. Of these credits, 56 to 
60 must be taken in prescribed subjects, 4 in physical education, and 
30 to 34 under the direction of the student's Adviser in the major 
groups of studies. The remainder may be freely elected. No 
student, however, may count toward his 124 credits for graduation 
more than 6 credit hours of work marked "D," or poor, in any one 
semester. But this restriction shall not operate to prevent his 
counting courses so marked toward the completion of his pre- 
scribed work. 

Prescribed Subjects for Lower Classmen 
English 10 to 12 credits 

Foreign Languages 12 credits 

Laboratory Sciences 10 to 12 credits 

History, Economics, Political and Social Science 12 credits 

Mathematics, Philosophy, Psychology 12 credits 

The above subjects must be completed before the beginning of 
the Junior year, except that a Sophomore, with the permission of 
the Advisory Committee and the approval of the Dean, may post- 
pone the performance of not more than 12 credit hours of prescribed 
work (one-fifth of the total amount) to the Junior year, but only 
in so far as the prescribed work conflicts with the continuity of 
studies leading toward the fulfillment of a Major. 

Subjects in Major Groups for Upper Classmen 

I. Greek, Latin, English, German, French, Italian, Spanish 

II. Physics, Chemistry, Zoology, Botany, Geology, Physiology 

III. History, Economics, Political and Social Science 

IV. Mathematics, Philosophy, Psychology, Astronomy 

At the end of the Sophomore year, or at the beginning of the 
Junior year, each student shall designate one of the following 
groups from which he must select his major subject. Thereafter, 
the head of the department in which that subject lies shall act as 
his Adviser. For graduation, at least 18 credits must be secured in 
this major subject; and 12 additional credits must be secured in 
subjects in the same group or in allied subjects specified by the 
Adviser. 



98 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The requirements stated above are illustrated in detail in the 
following diagrams: 

OUTLINE OF STUDIES IN THE COLLEGE OF 

LIBERAL ARTS 

A. B. Degree 



120 Academic Credits -f- 4 Credits in Physical Education 



60 Required- 



Subjects 
in Groups 

1. Eng. Lang 

2. Modern & Clas- 

sical Lang. 

3. Natural Sci- 

ences 

4. Hist., Econ., 

Polit. and 
Soc. Sci. . . 

5. Math., Phil. & 

Psy 

Phil., Psy., Pol. 
and Soc. Sci. 
not open to 
Freshmen . . . 



30 Directed- 



Credit 
Hours 



10 to 12 

12 

10 to 12 

12 
12 



56 to 60 



When 

Completed 



1st and 2nd 
years, 
except as 
12 credits 
may be 
deferred to 
Junior year 
by permis- 
sion. 



60 Elective 

-30 Free 



From any subject of the 
4 years with whole or re- 
duced credits. 



Major Groups 



I. Language and Litera 
ture. 
II. Natural Sciences. 

III. Hist., Econ., Polit. and 
Soc. Sci. 

IV. Math., Phil., Psy., and 
Astron. 



When 
Taken 



3d and 
4th 
years 



Maj or Subject 



Major Dis tributed 
Credits 



18 credits in one depart- 
ment, with head of de- 
partment as student's 
Adviser. 



12 credits in same group 
as Major subject or in 
allied subjects as speci- 
fied by Adviser. 



Freshman Requirements 



Prescribed 
Subjects 



English 

Foreign Language.... 
Science or Mathematics 

History, Economics, or 

Mathematics 

Physical Education. . . . 
Total Prescribed Hours 



Credit 
Hours a 
Week per 

Sem. 



3 

1 
15 or 13 



Special Regulations 



Every Freshman must take English 1 

If a student elects mathematics in place 
of science, he must elect also either 
history or economics 



Maximum hours allowed per semester, V 



SOPHOMORE, JUNIOR AND SENIOR REQUIREMENTS 99 
Courses Open to Freshmen 



Subjects 


i Courses, Prescribed and Elective 


Credit 

Hours a 

Week per 

Sem. 






3 
2 




English 3 




Foreign Language 


Latin 1 (after 4 yrs. high school Latin) .... 


3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
8 
S 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 


Greek 15 (after 1 or 2 yrs. high school Greek) 
Greek 1 (after 3 yrs. high school Greek) 
Greek 2, 10 (after 3 yrs. high school Greek).. 


German 2, 3, 20 (after 2 yrs. high school Get..) 
German 4 (after 4 yrs. high school Ger.) . . . 
German 21 (after 4 yrs. high school Ger.).. 


French 2 (after 2 yrs. high school French) . . . 
French 11 (after 4 yrs. high school French) 


Spanish 9 (after 2 yrs. high school Spanish) 
Spanish 14 (after 4 yrs. high school Spanish) 


Natural Science 


Physics, 26a and 2a, 27b and 22b 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
2 






Zoology, la and 2a, 3b and 4b 

Geology 1 






Mathematics 1 


3 






History 1,13 

History 29 


3 
2 








3 






Physical Education.... 


Physical Education 1 


1 



Sophomore Requirements 
Completion of the Prescribed Work (including 2 credits in 
physical education), except in so far as such work may be de- 
ferred to the Junior year by special permission, as provided above. 

Maximum hours allowed, exclusive of physical education, 18 
a week. 

Junior Requirements 

Completion of such Prescribed Work as may have been deferred 
from the Sophomore year, and the election and pursuit of Majoi 
Work. 

Maximum hours allowed, 18 a week. 

Senior Requirements 
Completion of 124 credits, including the fulfillment of the 
requirement of 30 credits for a Major. 
Maximum hours allowed, 18 a week. 



100 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Free Electives 

At any time during his four years of residence a student may 
elect any courses then open to him, provided that such electives do 
not conflict with the performance either of his Prescribed Work 
or of his Major Work. 

A Senior electing courses designed primarily for Freshmen will 
receive for the same only half credit. 

ADVISORY SYSTEM FOR THE ELECTION OF STUDIES 
To the Advisory Committee for the Election of Studies is 
confided the duty of assisting Freshmen and Sophomores in regis- 
tering for the subjects best adapted to their aims and abilities and of 
counselling them in all matters affecting scholarship. 

Freshman and Sophomore students are required to conform 
to the following regulations: 

For Freshmen 

1. Each Freshman at the first semester registration days will 
be assigned by the Chairman to a member of the Committee, who 
will act as his temporary Adviser, and assist him in registering; 

2. Within one month from this registration, each Freshman 
must appear before the Chairman of the Committee and be assigned, 
after consultation, to some member of the Committee who will act 
as his permanent Adviser; 

3. At the second semester registration day, each Freshman 
will register with his own Adviser; 

4. On or before May 1 of the Freshman year, each student 
will go to his Adviser and, in consultation with him, choose his 
studies for the Sophomore year. The schedule of studies must then 
be taken to the Chairman for approval. 

For Sophomores 

1. In the Sophomore year, each student on the first semester 
registration days must go to his own Adviser and register in 
accordance with the schedule of studies chosen in the manner just 
outlined. If, in the meantime, any changes have been decided upon, 
he must consult his Adviser and obtain the approval of the Chair- 
man before registering; 

2. At the second semester registration day each Sophomore 
will register with his own Adviser; 

3. On or before May 1, each Sophomore must go to his 
Adviser and, after consultation with him, and with the representative 
of any department concerned, he must choose his major course of 
studies for the Junior year; 



SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS 101 

4. No Sophomore will be allowed to register for Major Work 
unless he has fulfilled at least four-fifths of the required work of the 
Freshman and Sophomore years, and has obtained from the Chair- 
man a certificate to that effect. 

Major Advisers 

Every student of the Junior and Senior years will register with 
the head of the department in which he elects his Major, and this 
person will act through his Junior and Senior years as his Adviser, 

SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS 

Credit for Work Done in the College of Law. — A student who 
has received credit for the work of the first two years in the College 
of Liberal Arts may, in the third year, elect from four to six hours 
per semester of the lectures of the first year of the law course, as a 
substitute for studies in the College of Liberal Arts, and in the fol- 
lowing year he may, in the same way, take the remainder of the 
thirteen hours of the first year's course in the College of Law. Or, if 
he so desires, he may elect, in his Senior year, the entire thirteen 
hours of the first year law course (equivalent to twenty-six credit 
hours in the College of Liberal Arts), provided he has fulfilled all the 
requirements for obtaining his B. A. degree. Thus a student may 
obtain both the academic and legal degrees in six years. In either of 
the above cases, the student will be classified as an irregular student 
in the College of Liberal Arts, and will be required to pay tuition at 
the regular rate of three dollars per credit hour per semester. 

Six-Year Combined Collegiate and Medical Course. — In this 
combined course the student takes the first two years of work in the 
College of Liberal Arts, and the last four in the College of Medicine. 
At the end of the fourth year, he is granted the degree of B. S., and 
at the end of the sixth year, the degree of M. D. 

Credit for Hebrew Taken in the Hebrew Union College and 
in Lane Theological Seminary. — Arrangements have been made 
with the Hebrew Union College and with Lane Theological Seminary, 
whereby students of these institutions who are pursuing a course in 
the University of Cincinnati may be allowed to count work in Hebrew 
taken in these institutions for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, to the 
amount of two hours a week throughout the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years, and three hours a week throughout the Junior and Senior 
years, for the Hebrew Union College, and three hours per week for 
three years in Lane Theological Seminary, provided such work is 
regularly entered upon the election schedules of the University. 

Credit for Work Done in the Art Academy of Cincinnati. — 
By an arrangement with the Art Academy of Cincinnati, students from 



102 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

the University may elect from the courses stated in the catalogue in 
drawing, modeling, and carving, not more than six hours' work 
in any one semester, and receive credit therefore on the books of 
the University, provided these courses have been duly entered on 
the election blank and the proper certificate from the Director of 
the School is presented on their satisfactory completion. Not more 
than twelve hours of work in the Art Academy will be credited 
for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Credit for Work Done in the College for Teachers. — Certain 
courses in Education, to the number of twenty-four credits, may be 
elected by undergraduates during the Senior year and be counted 
toward fulfilling requirements for the A. B. degree. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ASTRONOMY 

Jermain Gildersleeve Porter, Ph. D., Director of the Observatory 
and Professor of Astronomy 
For Undergraduates 
lb. Descriptive Astronomy. — Lectures and class work. No 
mathematical training is required beyond a geometrical conception of 
the sphere and its circles. The object of the course is to give a com- 
prehensive view of astronomy in its historic and practical relations, 
as well as a general resume of our knowledge concerning the heavenly 
bodies. Reference books : Popular Astronomy, Newcomb ; Manual of 
Astronomy, Young ; The Stars in Song and Legend, Porter. M., F., 
10 :30 — 11 :30, second semester. Professor Porter. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

3. Spherical and Practical Astronomy.— Text-books : Camp- 
bell's Elements of Practical Astronomy; Chauvenet's Spherical and 
Practical Astronomy. Once a week throughout the year. 

Professor Porter. 

4. Celestial Mechanics. — Investigation of the fundamental equa- 
tions of motion and of the formulae for determining the positions 
of bodies revolving about the sun. Computation of orbits. Text- 
books : Watson's Theoretical Astronomy. Once a week throughout 
the year. Professor Porter. 

Courses 3 and 4 will ordinarily be given at the Observatory. 
Hours to be arranged. 



BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

Edward Mack, A. M., D. D., . . Lecturer on Biblical Literature. 
For Undergraduates and Graduates 

8a. The Literature of the Old Testament; with studies in the 
life and institutions of the ancient Hebrews, particularly in their 
social aspects. First semester, T., Th., 11 :30-12 :30. Dr. Mack. 

8b. The Literature of the New Testament; in its relation to 
the books of the Old Testament ; the historical setting and ante- 
cedents; the Acts and the Epistles studied comparatively. Second 
semester, T., Th., 11:30-12:30. 

Other hours will be arranged, if there is sufficient demand. 

9b. The Social Teachings of Jesus and the Apostles. — Their 
teachings with regard to the nature of man, his individuality and 
responsibility; the family, rights of children, divorce; society, the 
method of its improvement ; the state and our relations to it ; wealth, 



104 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

the rich and the poor, "the social question." Second semester, T., 
1 :00-3 :00. Dr. Mack. 



BOTANY 



Harris Miller Benedict, Ph. D., .... Professor of Botany. 

Levi Alexander Giddings, M. S. Instructor in Botany. 

E. Lucy Braun, Ph. D., . . . . Graduate Assistant in Botany. 

In the advanced courses training in physics and chemistry, as 
well as ability to read French and German, is expected. Special 
facilities are afforded students pursuing courses of research. 

Students who desire to be recommended as teachers of botany 
in secondary schools must complete as a minimum, Courses 5a to 
8b inclusive, and Course 35. It is very desirable that they also do at 
least one year of graduate work. 

For Undergraduates 

5a. Plant Biology. — A course of lectures on essential biological 
principles, the topics being as follows : the physical basis of life, its 
origin and evolution, sexual reproduction and heredity, plant breed- 
ing, storage and release of all living energy by plants, the conditions 
controlling the growth of wild and cultivated plants, and those 
involved in bacterial action and control. This course must be taken 
in conjunction with Course 6a. First semester, M. f W., F., 10 :30- 
11 :30. Professor Benedict. 

Courses 5a and Ga together constitute a five-hour course in 
biological principles, which can be completed in one semester. 

6a. Experimental Plant Biology. — Laboratory work on plant 
material for the purpose of investigating the evidence for the princi- 
ples advanced in the accompanying Course 5a, which must be taken 
in conjunction with Course 6a. Accurate records of all work are 
required. 

Sec. I, M., W., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Sec. II, T., Th., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Professor Benedict and Mr. Giddings. 

7b. General Botany. — Lectures on the structure, reproduction, 
and adaptation to environment of the plants of the various phyla of 
the plant kingdom. It must be taken in connection with Course 8b. 
Second semester, M., W., F., 10 :30-ll :30. Professor Benedict. 

8b. General Botany, Laboratory. — Thorough laboratory study 
of the structure of selected plants as examples of the different phyla 
of the plant kingdom, as well as carefully organized field trips for 









BOTANY 105 

the purpose of learning to identify the commoner plants in their own 
habitats. This course must be taken in connection with Course 7b. 

Sec. I, M., W, 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. II, T. Th., 1:00-4:00. 

Professor Benedict and Mr. Giddings. 

[9. Sanitary Biology.] Lectures on the biological principles in- 
volved in sanitary engineering, designed to enable the engineer to 
solve local problems in sanitation and to appreciate the significance of 
specialists' reports. M., 2:00-3:00, throughout the year. 

Course 9 is open to all students. Professor Benedict. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

12b. Field Ornithology.— A field study of the identification, 
classification, songs, and habits of our native birds. One laboratory 
period per week during the second semester. Hours to be arranged. 

Professor Benedict. 

[35. Systematic Botany.] A course designed to give a working 
knowledge of the flora of this vicinity, comprising field trips followed 
by laboratory work in classification and in the preservation of plants, 
discussions on plant relationships and the preparation of "keys." 
T., Th., 9 :30-12 :30. Professor Benedict. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

Course 35 is open to students who have taken Courses 5 and 7, 
and under certain conditions to all Seniors. It is required of all who 
desire to be recommended as teachers of Biology or Nature-Study in 
secondary schools. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

23. Field Work. — Practical directions for collecting, identifying, 
and preserving specimens will form a minor part of the work. Each 
student is assigned a special problem. The work may be taken as a 
two or a three-hour course. Hours to be arranged. 

Professor Benedict. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6a, 7b, and 8b. 

24a. Plant Histology. — Lectures on the general histology of the 
Spermatophytes, special attention being given to the physiological 
adaptations of the tissues to their functions. This course must be 
taken in connection with Course 25a. First semester, M., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Professor Benedict. 

Prerequisite: Courses 5a, 6a, 7b, and 8b. 

25a. Plant Histology Laboratory.— In this course the student 
will be given sufficient practice in microscopical botanical technique 
to enable him to prepare the slides which he will use in his laboratonr 
study of the tissues of selected plants. Accurate drawings and descrip- 



106 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

tions will be required. A few exercises on the identification of food 
adulterations will be given. This course must be taken in connection 
with Course 24a. First semester, M., 2 :00-4 :00 ; W., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Professor Benedict. 

26b. The Reproduction and Embryology of the Spermato- 
phytes. — Lectures on the origin and nature of sexual reproduction in 
the flowering plants and the general principles of Spermatophyte em- 
bryology. Thi9 course must be taken in connection with Course 27b. 
Second semester, M., 1 :00-2 :00. Professor Benedict. 

Prerequisite: Courses 24a and 25a. 

27b. Reproduction of the Angiosperms. — A laboratory investiga- 
tion of the origin of the sex cells and the formation of the seed in 
selected Angiosperms. While a few special slides will be supplied 
the student will be required to make his own preparations. This 
course must be taken in connection with Course 26b. Second semester, 
M., 2 :00-4 :00 ; W., 1 :00-4 :00. Professor Benedict. 

Primarily for Graduates 

[40. Current Problems in Botany.] Lectures, assigned readings, 
and discussions upon present problems in plant physiology and 
cytology. A reading knowledge of French or German is required. 
Two credit hours. Professor Benedict. 

Prerequisite: Courses 5a, 6a, 7b, 8b, 24a, 25a, 26b, 27b, and 35. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

31. Research. — Credit according to number of hours elected. 

Professor Benedict. 



CHEMISTRY 

Lauder William Jones, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Chemistry. 
Harry Shipley Fry, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of Chemistry. 
Henry Max Goettsch, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Chemistry. 
Edward B. Reemelin, A. B., M. D., Assistant Professor of Physio- 
logical Chemistry. 
James Aston, Ch. E., . . . . Assistant Professor of Metallurgy. 

, Instructor in Physical Chemistry. 

Edwin W. Esslinger, A. M., . Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 
Ray Gould Knickerbocker, B. S., . . . Instructor in Metallurgy. 

Leonora Neuffer, A. M., Assistant in Chemistry. 

Student Assistants: Dorothy Anderson, Lester Brand, Stan- 
ley Cook. 



CHEMISTRY 107 

For Undergraduates 

la. General Inorganic Chemistry. — The Non-metals. This 
course gives a definite idea of the fundamental laws of general 
chemistry, and furnishes a survey of the important facts concerning 
the chemistry of the non-metals and their compounds. Lectures, 
recitations, and quizzes illustrated by experiments, charts, and 
specimens. Course 2a forms an integral part of, and must accom- 
pany Course la. M., W., R, 8 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Fry and Assistants. 

2a. General Inorganic Chemistry, Laboratory.— Two laboratory 
exercises per week. First semester. Experiments complementary 
to the subject-matter of Course la. 

Sec I, T., Th., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. II, M., W., 1:00-4:00. 

Associate Professor Fry and Assistants. 

3b. General Inorganic Chemistry. — The Metals. A continua- 
tion of Course la. The properties of the metals and their com- 
pounds. Three hours per week. Second semester. Students who 
have completed Courses la and 2a are eligible for this course. It 
must be accompanied by Course 4b. M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Fry and Assistants. 

4b. General Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. — Two laboratory 
exercises per week. Second semester. Experiments complementary 
to the subject-matter of Course 3b. 

Sec. I, T., Th., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. II, M., W., 1:00-4:00. 

Associate Professor Fry and Assistants. 

5a. Qualitative Analysis. — Lectures and recitations on the prin- 
ciples and practice of qualitative analysis. Considerable emphasis 
will be laid upon the application of the laws of chemical equilibrium, 
and the theories of solutions and of electrolytic dissociation to the 
practical problems of the analyst. Three exercises a week. First 
semester. M., W., K, 8:30-9:30. Professor Jones. 

Prerequisite : Courses 3b and 4b. 

6. Qualitative Analysis Laboratory. — To accompany Course 
5a. During the first few weeks of the semester the student will perform 
important tests commonly used in the processes of analytical 
chemistry. The later work of the course will furnish abundant 
training in the qualitative examination of salts, minerals, alloys, etc. 
Two exercises a week, first semester; two laboratory periods and 
one quiz period, second semester. T., Th., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Professor Jones and Mr. Esslinger. 

7. Quantitative Analysis. — An introductory laboratory course 
in gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Occasional conferences are 



103 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

held, at which analytical methods and calculations are discussed, and 
at which reports are submitted covering assigned reading. Three 
exercises a week. First or second semester. M., W., F., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a and 6 (first semester) . Mr. Esslinger. 

8b. Elementary Organic Chemistry. — Three exercises a week. 
Second semester. Quizzes and lectures which are experimental, 
covering the chief classes of organic compounds of both the aliphatic 
and aromatic series. This course is arranged to meet the needs of 
those who intend to specialize in chemistry, in medicine, or in 
biology. It serves as a general introduction for those who intend to 
go deeper into the study of organic chemistry. M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Prerequisite : Courses 3b and 4b. Professor Jones. 

9b. Organic Reactions and Preparations. — Laboratory practice 
to accompany the lectures of Course 8b. Second semester. M., W. f 
1 :00-4 :00. Professor Jones, assisted by Dr. Reemelin. 

Prerequisite: Courses 3b and 4b. 

14b. Metallurgy. — Five credit hours per week. Second semester. 
A study of fuels, refractories, ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy, 
and practice in metallurgical calculations. Emphasis is laid upon 
foundry and steel works processes. Excursions will be made to 
metallurgical establishments in Cincinnati and vicinity. M., T., W., 
Th., 9 :30-10 :30 ; M., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Assistant Professor Aston and Mr. Knickerbocker. 

Prerequisite: Courses oa, 6, and Physics 1. 

15b. Assaying. — One afternoon a week. Second semester. 
Laboratory practice in the fire assay of ores and base metals for gold, 
silver, and lead. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Knickerbocker. 

Prerequisite : Course 7b. 

[16a. Technical Inorganic Chemistry.] Three periods a week. 
First semester. M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch. 

Prerequisite: Courses 5a and 6. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

17. Technical Analysis. — The course consists of analyses of typi- 
cal industrial products, involving the use of gravimetric, volumetric, 
gasometric, electrolytic, and colorimetric processes. T., Th., F., 
1 :00-4 :00. May be taken either semester, or both semesters. Two 
or three credit hours. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch, assisted by Mr. Esslinger. 

Prerequisite : Course 7b. 

18b. Technical Organic Chemistry.— M., W., F., 8:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professor Goettsch. 

Prerequisite : Courses 8a, 9a, and 16a. 






CHEMISTRY 109 

[29a. Practical Photography.] One lecture and one laboratory 
period a week. First semester. The course embraces a study of the 
exposure and development of photographic plates; the treatment of 
defective negatives; the preparation and use of various printing 
papers ; copying, enlarging, and lantern-slide making. W., 8 :30-9 :30 ; 
F., 1 :00-4 :00. Assistant Professor Goettsch. 

Prerequisites: la, 2a, 3b, and 4b. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

10a. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. — Two exercises a week 
during the first semester. Special topics and recent theories of 
inorganic chemistry, including colloids, reactions in non-aqueous 
solvents; inactive gases; radioactive elements and emanations; the 
electron; valence, structure, and co-ordination theories. T., Th., 
8 :30-9 :30. Associate Professor Fry. 

Prerequisite: Courses 5a, 6, and 7b. 

11a. Inorganic Preparations. — Two or three laboratory exer- 
cises a week. First semester. Experiments supplementary to the 
subject-matter of Course 10a. Hours to be arranged. 

Prerequisite: Course 7b. Associate Professor Fry. 

12a. Physical Chemistry. — Lectures and recitations. Three exer- 
cises a week. First semester. An introductory course which con- 
siders the general properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions, 
as well as the principles determining reaction velocity and the 
equilibria in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. M., W., F., 
11:30-12:30. . 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 5a, 6a, and 7b, Physics 26a and 27b, 
Mathematics 5. 

13b. Physical Chemistry Laboratory. — Two exercises a week. 
First semester. Designed to illustrate the principles developed in 
Course 12a, and to provide a knowledge of the common methods 
used in physical-chemical measurements. This course must accom- 
pany Course 12a. Th., F., 1 :00-4 :00. . 

32b. Electrochemistry. — Lectures and recitations. Three exer- 
cises a week. Second semester. A general consideration of the 
electrical properties of matter with special reference to the theory 
of aqueous solutions. T., Th., S., 11 :30-12 :30. . 

Prerequisite: Course 12a. 

33b. Electrochemistry Laboratory. — Two exercises a week. 
Second semester. Determination of conductivity with its application, 
transference numbers, electromotive force, dielectric constant, etc. 
Th., F., 1 :00-4 :00. This course accompanies Course 32b. 



110 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

[34a. Thermodynamics Applied to Chemistry.] Two exercises 
a week. First semester. Devoted to an elementary consideration of 
the principles of thermodynamics and their application to physical- 
chemical problems. The work will be illustrated by the solution of 
many numerical examples. Hours to be arranged. . 

Prerequisite: Courses 12a and 32b. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

41a. Phase Rule. — Lectures and recitations, A study of the 
phase rule and its applications. Two exercises a week. First 
semester. Hours to be arranged. . 

Prerequisite: Course 12a. 

20. Advanced Organic Chemistry. — Three lectures and confer- 
ences a week, embracing a systematic study of the principles and 
practices of organic chemistry, and treating of the modes of forma- 
tion, properties, reactions, and constitutional formulae of typical 
members of the most important classes of organic compounds. Hours 
to be arranged. Professor Jones. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6, 7, 8b, 9b, and a reading knowledge 
of German and French. 

21. Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory. — Practice in the 
preparation of a number of typical organic compounds. This course 
will require considerable reading in the journals of chemistry and in 
various hand-books and works of reference. Credit according to 
number of hours elected. May be taken either first or second 
semester, or both semesters. Professor Jones. 

Prerequisite : As in Course 20. 

22a. Bio-Chemistry. — Among other subjects, the course will 
take up for discussion the nature of carbohydrates, fats, and protein 
substances ; the processes of digestion and metabolism ; the chemical 
composition of the body tissues, secretions, and excretions, includ- 
ing the methods employed in their analysis. First semester, M., 
W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. Assistant Professor Reemelin. 

Prerequisite : Courses 8b and 9b. 

22a. Bio-Chemistry Laboratory. — Laboratory exercises arranged 
to accompany the lectures. Reactions of carbohydrates, fats, and 
protein substances applied to the qualitative detection of, and the 
quantitative estimation of, these substances in body tissues, secre- 
tions, and excretions. Digestion, the analysis of gastric and fecal 
matter and of urine will be considered from the chemical point of 
view. First semester, M., W., 8:30-11:30; F., 1:00-4:00. 

Assistant Professor Reemelin. 

Prerequisite : Courses 8a and 9a. 

24b. History of Chemistry.— Special attention is directed to the 
classical memoirs of the Greek philosophers, the tenets of the 



CHEMISTRY ill 

alchemists, and those researches of the past century that have 
developed the atomic and structure theories of modern chemistry. 
Lectures, collateral readings, and papers. Three exercises per week. 
Second semester. Hours to be arranged. 

Associate Professor Fry. 
Prerequisite: Courses 5a, 6, 8b and 9b, or 20b and 21. 

[28b. Elementary Spectrum Analysis (Qualitative).] The course 
consists largely of laboratory work. The emission (flame and elec- 
tric sparks) and absorption spectra of inorganic and some organic 
substances are studied from the chemist's point of view. Two labor- 
atory periods a week. Second semester; hours to be arranged. 

Professor Jones. 

Prerequisite : Courses 5a, 6, 8b, and 9b ; Physics, 1 year. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

Primarily for Graduates 

30. Research. — This course requires intensive laboratory work 
under the direction of some member of the department. Problems 
for investigation may be chosen from the following: organic 
chemistry (30a), inorganic chemistry (30b), physical chemistry 
(30c), or industrial chemistry (30d). 

Professor Jones, Associate Professor Fry, 
Assistant Professor Goettsch, Assistant Professor Aston. 
During the summer of 1915, students engaged in research may 
enroll in the Graduate School. 

35a. Some Special Problems and Theories of Organic Chem- 
istry. — A critical discussion of the working hypotheses and the 
theories of organic chemistry. With this end in view, their ap 1 
plication to the difficulties of certain complex cases are presented 
in detail. Topics for consideration will be chosen each year from 
the following: Optical and geometrical isomerism of compounds of 
carbon, nitrogen, and other elements; tautomerism; the electronic 
conception of valence; bivalent carbon derivatives; oxonium com- 
pounds; purine derivatives; the carbohydrates; the alkaloids; the 
terpenes ; the polypeptides, proteins ; the organic dyes, etc. Second 
semester. Two hours a week, to be arranged. Professor Jones. 

40. Journal Club Meetings. — Instructors and advanced students 
of the department present papers dealing with subjects under in- 
vestigation in the department, or critical reviews of papers of 
general interest to those engaged in advanced work or research. 
All students interested in chemistry are invited to attend. Meet- 
ings are held fortnightly, and last one hour. Subjects to be dis- 
cussed are announced one week in advance. 



112 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

ECONOMICS 

(The Sinton Professorship) 
Frederick Charles Hicks, Ph. D., Sinton Professor of Economics 

and Commerce. 
James Dysart Magee, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Economics. 
Graduate Assistants : Ella Davis Isaacs, A. M. ; Lowell Hobart 
Ludwig, A. B. ; Amy F. Mihalovitch, A. B. 

Students desiring a general knowledge of economics are recom- 
mended to take Course 1 or Courses 1 and 2. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Economics. — This course is intended to give the student 
a general view of the subject. It includes a study of (1) the ele- 
ments of economics : wealth, value, price, competition, monopoli- 
zation, production, and distribution; (2) the evolution of indus- 
try from local organization and control during the middle ages, 
through nationalism and the industrial revolution, to modern con- 
ditions ; and (3) the leading economic problems of today. M., W., 
F., 11 :30-12 :30. Professor Hicks. 

2. Economic History. — A study of industrial development 
since the tenth century, including the economic history of the 
United States. Subjects considered : the local industry of feudal- 
ism, the manorial and guild systems ; the rise of nationalism ; the 
colonial policy and national regulation of industry under the mer- 
cantile system; the industrial revolution, 1750-1850; and the dis- 
tinguishing features of the complex and highly developed economic 
organization of modern times. T., Th., S., 11:30-12:30. 

Dr. Magee. 
For Undergraduates and Graduates 
11. Elements of Economics. — An advanced course in the fun- 
damental principles of economics. The work will consist mainly 
of a comparison of the views of representative economists. 
Th., 1 :00-3 :00. Professor Hicks. 

Course 11 is open to students who have completed Course 1. 

15a. Railroads. — This course includes a study of the place of 
transportation in economic development; a brief description of the 
early technical development of the railroad ; a history of the rail- 
road development in the United States; and a discussion of the 
problem of governmental regulation of railroads. T., Th., 9 :30- 
10 :30. Dr. Magee. 

Prerequisite: Course 1. 

15b. Tariffs.— The course begins with a study of the theory of 
international trade. It considers in some detail the tariff history o/ 



EDUCATION 113 

the United States, including the actual course of the duties and the 
arguments urged at the various times in favor of the different 
oolicies. Also the present tariff situation in England, France, and 
Germany is treated. T., Th., 9 :30-l0 :30. Dr. Magee. 

Prerequisite : Course 1. 

[IGa. Money and Banking.] The elementary principles of 
money and banking are considered, together with the monetary 
history of the United States. In the discussion of banking, the 
history of the United States is treated in some detail. In the case 
of Germany, France, and England, the history is outlined briefly 
and the present situation discussed more fully. T., Th., 9:30-10:30. 

Prerequisite : Course 1. Dr. Magee. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

[16b. Labor.] The subjects treated in this course include: the 
development of the Trade Union ; the forms of organization and 
federation; the aim and policies of Trade Unions; the legal aspects 
of Unionism; governmental regulation of working conditions; 
employers' association ; and methods of industrial peace. T., Th., 
9:30-10:30. Dr. Magee. 

Prerequisite: Course 1. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

Evening Courses 

32. Economics (Similar to Course 1).— W., 7:30-9:30. 

Professor Hicks. 

33. Economic History (Similar to Course 2).— Th., 7:30-9:30. 

Dr. Magee. 

30. Commercial Geography. — A study of the leading articles of 
commerce, including both raw materials and manufactured products, 
their character and relative importance, the principal sources of 
supply, and their distribution in the world's markets. W., 4 :45-6 :45. 

Dr. Magee. 

31. Statistics. — The principles of the statistical method and their 
application to social and economic problems. M., 4 :45-6 :45. 

Dr. Magee. 



* EDUCATION 

William Paxton Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Professor of the History 

and Principles of Education, 
John William Hall, A.M., Professor of Elementary Education. 
Henry Skinner West, Ph. D., Professor of Secondary Education. 



* After 19I4-I5, those students who wish both an A. B. degree and a Teacher's 
Diploma, must earn the latter by not less tluin a year's resident work in the 
College for Teachers after completing the requirements for the A. B. degree. 
Those who wish to qualify in four years for teaching in elementary schools, will 



114 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Cyrus DeWitt Mead, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education. 
Abbie Louise Day, B. S., B. Di., Instructor in Elementary Education. 

The following courses may be elected by undergraduates dur- 
ing the Senior year, and be counted toward fulfilling requirements 
for the A. B. degree in the McMicken College of Liberal Arts. 

1. History and Principles of Education. — 6 credits. M., W., 
F., 10 :30-ll :30. Professor Burris. 

2. Theory and Practice of Teaching. — 8 credits. Three hours 
class-room work and fifteen hours of practice per semester. Hours 
for practice to be arranged before registration. M., W., F., 9:30- 
10:30. Professor Hall. 

4. School Economy.— 2 credits. F., 11 :30-12 :30. Miss Day. 

14. The Teaching of English.— 4 credits. M., W., 8:30-9:30. 

Miss Day. 

16. The Teaching of History.— 2 credits. F, 8:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professor Mead. 

20. The Teaching of Mathematics. — 2 credits. Second semes- 
ter, M.. W.. 11:30-12:30. Assistant Professor Mead. 

22. The Teaching of Geography. — 2 credits. First semester, 
M., W., 11 :30-12:30. Assistant Professor Mead. 

Prerequisite Courses: 

Psychology la and lb. 

Philosophy 5a. 

Geology and Geography 1. 

History 15. (For those who did not offer a year's work in 
American history for admission.) 

Education Courses 1, 2 and 4, and eight credits for work 
elected in Courses 14, 16, 20, and 22, making a total of twenty- 
four credits, entitle the graduate to a Teacher's Diploma, conferred 
by the College for Teachers, and a place on the preferred list of 
those eligible to appointment in the Cincinnati schools. 

Students may count Education as one of the two departments 
in each of which they are required to obtain at least sixteen credits 
for graduation. 



spend the -first two years in the College of Liberal Arts, and the last two years in 
the College for Teachers, receiving, at the end of the four year period, the degree 
of Bachelor of Science, conferred upon the recommendation of the Faculty of the 
College for Teachers. 

For further information, including statements in detail concerning the require- 
ments of professional programs for those who wish to prepare for various positions 
in educational work, see announcement of the College for Teachers. 



ENGLISH 115 

ENGLISH 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

(The Nathaniel Ropes Foundation for the Comparative Study of 

Literature*) 
Frank Wadleigh Chandler, Ph. D., Professor of English and 
Ropes Professor of Comparative Literature. 
Emilie Watts McVea, A. M., Assistant Professor of English. 
Benjamin Carlton Van Wye, A. M., Assistant Professor of Pub- 
lic Speaking and of English. 
Clyde William Park, A. M., . . Assistant Professor of English. 

Bertha K. Young, A. M Assistant Professor of English. 

Clarence Dimick Stevens, A. M., Assistant Professor of English. 

Walter Wesley Plock, A. M., Instructor in English. 

Madelaine Maury Wright, A. B. Assistant in English. 

Graduate Assistants : John D. Ellis, A. B., LL. B. ; Martha 
Jane Gibson, A. M. ; Ralph Kreimer, A. B. ; Helen A. Stanley, A. M. ; 
Mary Dunn Whitfield, A. B. 

Student Assistant: Virginia Biddle. 

All students in English, before making their election of courses, 
are advised to consult with some member of the department, and to 
read carefully the departmental bulletin of information as to the 
proper sequence in which such courses should be taken. 

No student should enter or withdraw from a two-semester 
course at the beginning of the second semester without first con- 
sulting both the instructor concerned and the head of the department. 

Students majoring in English are required to take as part of 
their course either 7 or 10. 

For Undergraduates 

1. English Composition. — This course presents a general sur- 
vey of the principles of English composition and endeavors to en- 
force them by practice in writing. A certain amount of reading 
in English literature is also required. 

Sec. I, M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. 

Sec. II, T., Th., S., 8:30-9:30. 

Sec. Ill, M, W., F., 10:30-11:30. 

Sec. IV, M, W., F., 10:30-11 :30. 

Sec. V, M., W., F., 1:00-2:00. 

Sec. VI, M., W., F., 1:00-2:00. 

* During the months of February, March and April, 1915, Professor 
Anatole LeBraz, of the University of Rennes, will lecture in French at the 
University under the auspices of the Ropes Foundation, his subject being "The 
Celtic Influence in Literature." 



116 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Sec. VII, T., Th., S., 8:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professors McVea, Van Wye, Park, 
Young, Stevens, and Mr. Plock. 

Course 1 is required for all students in the College of Liberal 
Arts in the Freshman year. 

A passing grade received in this course may at any time lapse 
into a "condition," upon recommendation of the Department of 
English, or upon the joint recommendation of the English Depart- 
ment and any other department of the College of Liberal Arts. A 
condition thus incurred may be removed only at the examination 
period next ensuing, and if not removed within one semester, it will 
lapse into a failure. The method of removing the condition will be 
determined by the English Department according to the individual 
case; but, in any event, it must include a written test. 

2a. Argumentation. — First semester, T., Th., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Van Wye. 

2b. The Forms of Public Address. — Second semester, T., Th., 
8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Van Wye. 

Courses 2a and 2b are intended to serve as preparation for 
debating and effective public speaking. They are recommended 
for Sophomores and for those who may become candidates for the 
Jones prizes. 

25. Public Speaking. — Control of the voice and body, correct 
enunciation, and practice in effective expression. 

Sec. I, T., Th., 10 :30-ll :30. 

Sec. II, T., Th., 11 :30-12 :30«. Assistant Professor Van Wye. 

Course 25 counts as only one University credit for each semester. 
It is recommended for students who expect to take Course 13a. 

13a. Debating. — First semester. T., 1 :00-3 :00. 

Assistant Professor Van Wye. 

Course 13a is open to students who have passed creditably in 
Courses 1 and 2a. Students interested in public speaking are advised 
to take Courses 2a and 2b one year, and Course 13 the next. 

15b. Descriptive and Narrative Writing.— T., Th., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor McVea. 

Course 15b is open to Sophomores and Juniors. Seniors will 
receive but half credit for it. 

3. Types of Literature.— An appreciative rather than an his- 
torical study of the principal literary kinds— lyric, narrative verse, 
drama, prose fiction, and essay— illustrated by readings in repre- 
sentative masterpieces, chiefly English. Lectures, class papers, 
discussions. T., Th., 9:30-10 :30. Professor Chandler. 

Course 3 is recommended for Freshmen and Sophomores onl 
Juniors and Seniors will receive but half credit for it. 



ENGLISH 117 

5. Shakespeare.— A study of the life and times of Shakes- 
peare, his dramatic methods, and the literary history of his plays. 
Some of the plays are examined in detail, and most of the others 
are assigned for reading. M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 

Course 5 is open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 

11. The English Novel. — A course which considers the origin 
and history of the English novel, and discusses its characteristics 
as a form of prose literature. M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Assistant Professor Stevens. 

Course 11 is recommended for Sophomores and Juniors. 

16. Wordsworth and His Contemporaries. — A study of the 
English romantic poets of the early nineteenth century— Words-> 
worth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats — involving a 
discussion of their technic, art, growth of mind, general interpre- 
tation of life, and relation to their time. M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor McVea. 

Course 16 is recommended for Juniors and Seniors. 

4. Nineteenth Century Prose. — Studies in the thought and 
style of the great prose writers, other than novelists, from Coleridge 
to Carlyle (during the first semester), and from Emerson to Pater 
(during the second semester). M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 

Course 4 is recommended for Juniors and Seniors. 

For Upper-Classmen and Graduates 

24. Recent European Drama. — A study of the new dramatic 
literature, its varieties, technic, aims, and problems, beginning with 
the later plays of Ibsen, and considering the art and thought of such 
other representative writers for the stage as Bjornson, Hauptmann, 
Sudermann, Schnitzler, Maeterlinck, Hervieu, Rostand, D'Annunzio, 
Echegaray, Strindberg, Tchekhov, Pinero, Jones, Phillips, Synge, and 
Shaw. T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00. Professor Chandler. 

26. The Essay. — A consideration of the origin and history of 
the English essay, involving a study of the rise of periodical liter- 
ature and some reading of foreign examples of the type. M., W., 
2:00-3:00. Assistant Professor Park. 

14. The English Drama from its Origins to 1642.— A survey of 
the English drama from its beginnings in the Middle Ages to the 
closing of the theaters. In 1914-15, the major part of the course 
will be devoted to an intensive study of the rise and development of 
English comedy. T., Th., S, 10 :30-ll :30. 

Assistant Professor Stevens. 



118 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

10. Chaucer. — The work and influence of Chaucer: his times, 
sources, contemporaries, and immediate successors, studied chiefly 
from the literary point of view. T., Th., S., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Assistant Professor Stevens. 

19. Main-Currents in Literary Criticism. — A survey of the 
principal theories of literature, — Greek, Roman, Italian, French, 
German, and English. The later portion of the course will be 
devoted to a study of special problems in literary criticism. W., 
4 :00-6 :00. Professor Chandler. 

For Graduates Only 

20. Seminary. — Elizabethan Literature in its Continental Rela- 
tions. — Studies in English literature of the Renaissance, with espe- 
cial reference to its foreign sources. Such forms as the lyric and 
the romantic epic; tragedy, comedy, and the history play; pastoral, 
picaresque, and Utopian fiction; the essay, voyages, and the books 
of court etiquette will be examined in the light of their European 
development. T., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Chandler. 

For Teachers 

For courses available for teachers see Courses 19 and 20, the 
evening courses, and Course 29 described below : 

29. Materials and Methods in Secondary English. — The organ- 
ization and adaptation of the work in composition and literature 
to meet the needs of pupils in the' secondary schools. A course 
designed for (1) seniors and graduates intending to teach English 
in secondary schools, (2) teachers in elementary schools preparing 
to teach secondary English, and (3) teachers in secondary schools 
already engaged in the teaching of English. S., 9:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 

Courses Regularly Given, But Omitted During 1914-15 
12. Literary Composition.— T., Th., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor McVea. 

6. Victorian Poetry.— M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Professor Chandler. 
18. American Literature.— T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professor McVea. 

21. English Poetry from Spenser to Burns.— T., Th., 9:30-10:30. 

Assistant Professor Stevens. 
27. English Drama Since the Restoration.— M., W., F., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professor Park. 

7. Old English.— T., Th., St, 8:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 

22. Foreign Backgrounds of English Literature.— T., Th 
2 :00-3 :00. Professor Chandler. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 119 

23. The Literary Movement of the Eighteenth Century.— W., 
4:00-6:00. Professor Chandler. 

Evening Courses 
30. English Composition. 

Sec. I, Th, 7 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Park. 

Sec. II, T., 4 :45-6 :45. Assistant Professor Stevens. 

[31. Nineteenth Century Prose.] 
Omitted in 1914-15. Assistant Professor Young. 

32. Nineteenth Century Poetry. M., 7:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professor Young. 

33. Public Speaking. T, 7 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Van Wye. 



GEOLOGY AND GEOGRAPHY 

Nevin M. Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology and Geography. 
J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., Assistant Professor of Geology. 
Walter H. Bucher, Ph. D., Instructor in Geology. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Introduction to the Earth Sciences. — Minerals and rocks, 
dynamic geology, origin and classification of topographic forms, 
atmosphere and ocean ; followed by a brief study of the physiography 
of the United States. Lectures, M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30 ; Laboratory, 
M., W., 2:00-5:00; T., Th., 9:30-12:30; T., Th, 2:00-5:00; T., Th, 
1 :00-4 :00. Professor Fenneman, Dr. Bucher, and Assistant. 

2. General Geology. — This course is primarily for co-operative 
engineering students, but Liberal Arts students will also be admitted. 
An introductory study of minerals and rocks, dynamic geology and 
topography, followed in the second semester by stratigraphic, struc- 
tural, and economic geology. T, Th., F, 9:30-10:30; M, W, 
9:30-11:30. Assistant Professor Carman. 

9. Historical Geology. — Chiefly the geology of North Amer- 
ica, its physical history, life development and structure; special 
attention given to the economic deposits of each period. Frequent 
local (half-day) excursions noting fossils, stratigraphy, physiog- 
raphy, and economic relations. Lectures, T, Th., 8:30-9:30; 
Laboratory, M, 2 :00-5 :00. Course 1 is prerequisite. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

Geology 9 is accepted as graduate work by agreement with 
the professor in charge. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

5b. Field Geology and Survey Methods. — The study and map- 
ping of assigned areas in the vicinity of Cincinnati. Students 



120 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

work singly or in parties of two, and submit typewritten re] 
with topographic and geologic maps. Second semester. Hours to 
be arranged by agreement with each party. Credit according to 
number of hours elected. Course 1 is prerequisite. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 

[*7. Mineralogy.] This course embraces (1) geometrical study 
of crystal forms illustrated by wooden models; (2) description 
and classification of minerals, about 400 species being used in lab- 
oratory study: (3) determinative mineralogy and blowpipe anal} 
sis. Two lectures and one laboratory. Hours to be arranged. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Dr. Bucher. 

8. Introductory Paleontology. — The work of this course is 
mainly with fossil invertebrates, their specific features, the age of 
the rocks which contain them, their migrations and association in 
societies. Recognition at sight is emphasized. T., Th., 8 :30-9 :30 ; 
R, 1 :00-4 :00. Dr. Bucher. 

[12. Petrology.] This course embraces (1) the optical prin- 
ciples of mineralogy; (2) the microscopic study of minerals in rocv 
sections; (3) a systematic study of rocks, their constitution, struc- 
ture, origin, and classification. Two or three hours, to be announced. 

Course 7 is prerequisite. . 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

13. Special Work in Geology. — Any student in this depart- 
ment may, by agreement with the instructors in charge, register 
for individual study or investigation not described in the list of 
courses. Such work must be regularly supervised and approved 
upon examination or by the preparation of a thesis. Credit 
according to number of hours elected. 

14. Course 14 is outlined under the heading "For Teachers." 
Open to college students only by special agreement with the professor 
in charge. 

16. Course 16 is outlined under the heading "For Teachers." 

For Teachers 
14. General Geology for Teachers. — Elements of dynamic, 
structural, and physiographic geology, being identical with the cor- 
responding parts of Course 1. Lecture, S., 8:30-10:30. Field or 
Laboratory, 10:30-12:30. Professor Fenneman. 

19. Historical Geology. — For teachers who have had Course 14. 
Lectures, S., 8 :30-10 :30 ; Field or Laboratory, 10 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor Carman. 



* Course 1 is not prerequisite to Course 7, but the latter is not accepted 
as a graduate course for students making Geology a major, unless Course 1 or 
its equivalent lias been taken. 






GERMAN 121 

16. Advanced Physiography of the United States. — Course 1 (or 
Course 14) and Course 9 or 19 are prerequisite. Lecture, W., 
4 :00-6 :00 ; S., 10 :30-ll :30. Professor Fenneman. 

Course 16 runs through more than one year, but may be entered 
at the beginning of any semester. 



GERMAN 

Max Poll, Ph. D., . . . Professor of the Germanic Languages. 
Claude M. Lotspeich, Ph. D., . Associate Professor of German. 

Eleanor Nippert, A. B., Instructor in German. 

Martin Ludwich, A. M., Instructor in German. 

Walter Bucher, Ph. D., Instructor in German. 

Assistant: Emma Andriessen, A. M. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Elementary German. — Grammar, translation from German 
into English, and elementary exercises in translating into German. 

Sec. I. T., Th.. S.. 8:30-9:30. 
Sec. II, M.. W., F., 11:30-12:30. 
Sec. Ill, M., W., F., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich and Miss Nippert. 
Course 1 is open to students who have had no German in the 
high school. 

2. German Prose and Poetry. — Reading at sight, grammar, 
composition, and dictation. 

Sec. I. M.. W.. F.. 9:30-10:30. 

Sec. II. M., W.. F.. 10 :30-ll :30. 

Sec. Ill, M., W., R, 11:30-12:30. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich and Miss Nippert. 

Course 2 is open to students who have passed in Course 1 or 
who have had two years of German in the high school. 

Course 2 does not count towards a major in German. 

20. German Scientific Prose. — Subjects in natural science. T., 
Th., 11:30-12:30. Dr. Bucher. 

Course 20 is open to students who have passed in Course 1 or 
its equivalent. Course 20 does not count towards a major in 
German. If taken after Course 2, Course 20 will count only as a 
half course. 

3. German Composition (Beginners' Course). — German gram- 
mar, conversation, and practice in writing German. T„ Th., 10:30- 
11 :30. Miss Nippert. 

Course 3 is open to students who have passed in Course 1. 
Courses 2 and 3 may be advantageously taken together. 



122 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



**4. Introduction to German Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. — Lessing's Emilia Galotti, Schiller's Jungfrau von Orleans 
and Maria Stuart, Goethe's Iphigenie, Egmont, Tasso and Goetz 
von Berlichingen. Translation and reading at sight. Practice in 
writing German, based on the reading. This course is conducted 
mainly in German. 

Sec. I, M., W., R, 10:30-11:30. 

Sec. II, M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. 

Professor Poll, Miss Nippert, and Assistant. 

Course 4 is open to students who have passed in Course 1 
Students in this course are urged to take a composition course in 
addition. 

21. German Composition (Intermediate Course). — Practice in 
composition, conversation and in writing German. T., Th., 9 :30- 
10 :30. Course 21 is open to students who have passed in Course 2. 

Miss Nippert. 

Courses 4 and 21 may be advantageously taken together. 

14b. Advanced German Prose. — The material for study will 
be selected from such works at Goethe's Dichtung und Wahrheit, 
Schiller's Geschichte des dreissigjdhrigen Krieges, Lessing's Laokoon 
and Hamburgische Dramaturgic, Biedermann's Deutsche Bildungs- 
zust'dnde in dcr zweiten Hdlfte des Achtzehnten Jahrhunderts. 
Second semester, T., Th., 11:30-12:30. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

Course 14b is open to students who have either completed or 
are taking Course 4 or Course 5. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

5. History of German Literature to the Nineteenth Century, 
with special study of the Classic Periods of the Twelfth and 
Eighteenth Centuries. Among other works the following are read 
in 1914-15: An Anthology of German Literature, by Calvin Thomas; 
the Nibelungenlied (translated into modern German by R. Woer- 
ner) ; Lessing's Nathan; Schiller's Wallenstein and Braut von Mes- 
sina, and Goethe's Faust. Lectures in German, collateral reading. 
M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. Professor Poll and Assistant. 

Course 5 is open to students who have passed in Course 4. 

6. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century. — The Ro- 
mantic School. The Novel. The Drama and Lyrics. Lectures, 
collateral reading and written reports by the class. Th., 4 :00-6 :00. 

Professor Poll. 
Course 6 is open to students who have passed in Course 5. 












** Students entering the University who have done advanced work 
German may anticipate this course by passing an examination on the work as 
outlined above, within three weeks after matriculation. 






GERMAN 123 

[10. German Composition (Advanced Course).] Advanced 
composition and practice in writing German. S., 9:30-11:30. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Professor Poll. 

30. Glimpses of German Life and Culture. — Papers and dis- 
cussions in German. Advanced composition. S., 10:30-12:30. 

Professor Poll. 
Primarily for Graduates 

12. Interpretation of both parts of Faust and Study of the 
Legend. — Collateral reading and written reports. T., 4:00-6:00. 

Professor Poll. 

Course 12 is open to students who have passed in Course 5. 

[lib. German Literature from the Reformation to the Classic 
Period of the Eighteenth Century.] Lectures in German and col- 
lateral reading. Second semester, T., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Poll. 

Course lib is open to students who have passed in Course 5 or 6. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

[7. Middle High German.] Wright's Middle High-German 
Primer. Bachmann's Mittelhochdeutsches Lesebuch. Translation 
into modern German. W., 4:00-6':00. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

8. Old High German. — Braune's Althochdeutsche Grammalik, 
and the same author's Althochdeutsche s Lesebuch are used as text- 
books. Translation into modern German. During a part of the 
second semester the Old Saxon phonology and morphology will be 
studied and selections from the Heliand will be read. M., 4 :00-6 :00. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

[13. Gothic] Braune's Gotische Grammatik ; reading of selec- 
tions from Ulfilas, lectures on Germanic philology. W., 4:00-6:00. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

[26. Old Norse.] Heusler's Altislaendisches Elementarbuch. 
Reading of selections from the Sagas. In the second semester 
selected poems of the Edda will be read. M., 4:00-6:00. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

[9b. German Seminary.] Willem's Van den vos Reinaerde. Sec- 
ond semester. T., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Poll. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

For Teachers 

Courses 10 and 30, outlined above, are intended primarily for 
teachers. 

Evening Courses 

33. Elementary German. — Grammar, translation from German 
into English, and elementary exercises in translating into German. 
W., 7 :30-9 :30. Mr. Ludwich. 



124 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

34. Intermediate German, Prose and Poetry. — Translation, 
sight reading, grammar, composition, dictation. T., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Lotspeich. 

35. Introduction to German Literature of the Eighteenth 
Century. — Translation and reading at sight. Practice in writing 
German, based on the reading. This course is conducted in German. 
W., 7 :30-9 :30. Professor Poll. 



GREEK 

Joseph Edward Harry, Ph. D Professor of Greek. 

Arthur James Kinsella, A. M., ..... Instructor in Greek. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Oratory — Epic Poetry — Philosophy. — Lysias, six orations; 
Herodotus, one book; Iliad, Books XIX-XXII. 

The Lyric Poets. — Selections. Plato: Protagoras; Lysis; 
Laches; Charmides. Collateral reading: two orations of Lysias; 
two books of the Iliad; Plato's Apology and Crito. M., W., F., 
9:30-10:30, throughout the year. Professor Harry. 

A collateral course is offered by Mr. Kinsella for those stu- 
dents who are unable to attend at this hour. 

Course 1 is open to students who have had three years of Greek 
in the high school. 

2. Greek Prose Composition. — Hours to be arranged. 

Mr. Kinsella. 

Course 2 should be taken in connection with Course 1. 

Course 2 is open to students who have had three years of Greek 
in the high school. 

3. The Drama. — Euripides, Hippolytus; Sophocles, Oedipus 
Tyrannus ; Aeschylus, Prometheus; Aristophanes, Nubes. Collateral 
reading— Euripides : Alcestis, Ion. M., W., F., 10:30-11:30, through- 
out the year. Professor Harry. 

Course 3 is open to students who have completed Course 1. 

4. The Odyssey. — Two hours weekly; to be arranged. 

Mr. Kinsella. 

8. The Life and the Literature of the Ancient Greeks. — Greek 
Life, -first semester. Drama, History, Oratory, Plato (1915) ; 
Homer (1916); second semester. Th., 10:30-11:30. 

Professor Harry. 

Students who are not acquainted with the Greek language ma| 
be admitted to Course 8. 



GREEK 125 

9. Elementary Greek.— First Greek book and grammar. Xeno- 
phon. M., W., R, 8 :30-9 :30. (See also Course 17.) 

Mr. Kinsella. 

Course 9 is open to students who have had no Greek in the 
high school. 

[10. The New Testament.] A course in grammar and transla- 
tion. Two hours; to be arranged with the instructor. 
Throughout the year. Mr. Kinsella. 

Course 10 alternates with Course 16. 

Course 10 is open to students who have had three years of Greek 
in the high school. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

[11. Advanced Course in the Greek Drama.] Iphigenia, An- 
tigone, Agamemnon, Aves, Ranae. M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 
Omitted in 1914-15. Professor Harry. 

12. Xenophon's Hellenica, first semester. Symposium, Mem- 
orabilia, second semester. T., Th., 10 :30-ll :30. Mr. Kinsella. 

15. Intermediate Greek. — Completion of Xenophon. Prose 
Composition. Homer, I-III. M., W., R, 11:30-12:30. 

Mr. Kinsella. 

Prerequisite : Course 9 or two years of Greek in the high 
school. 

16. Hellenistic Greek. — Philo and other writers of this period. 
Two hours throughout the year ; to be arranged with the instructor. 

Course 16 alternates with Course 10. Mr. Kinsella. 

17. First Year Greek.— T, Th., S., 11:30-12:30. This course 
is offered to give those who cannot take Course 9 an opportunity to 
begin the study of Greek in the University. Professor Harry. 

20b. Greek Mythology. — A lecture course with collateral read- 
ing. Second semester. T., Th., 9:30-10-30. Mr. Kinsella. 

Students who are not acquainted with the Greek language may 
be admitted to Course 20b. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

13. Greek Art. — A course in the grammar and history of Greek 
art, including architecture. Special attention is given to the spirit 
and principles of plastic art, to the influence of religion and ath- 
letics, to the temples and their decorations, and to the masterpieces 
of the great Greek sculptors. Pre-Hellenic archaeology, Greek 
architecture, and sculpture (1914-15) ; vase paintings, coins, gem 
engraving, wall paintings (1915-16). T., 10:30-11:30. 

This class is limited to forty students. Professor Harry. 



126 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Primarily for Graduates 

5. Rapid Reading.— Th., 3 :00-4 :00. Professor Harry. 

6. Practical Exercises in Greek.— M., 3:00-5:00. 

Professor Harry. 

[7. Greek Seminary.] The Attic Orators (1915-16). M., 
3:00-5:00. Professor Harry. 

Course 7 is open to graduates and to those who have com- 
pleted the undergraduate courses in Greek. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 



HISTORY 

Merrick Whitcomb, Ph. D., Professor of History. 

Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., . . . Associate Professor of History. 
Dexter Perkins, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in English History. 

Esther Godshaw, Ph. B., Assistant in History. 

Miriam Urbansky, . . . D. A. R. Fellow in American History. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Middle Ages — Renaissance. — Reformation. — This course in- 
cludes the main facts of European history from the fall of the 
Roman Empire to the end of the Reformation. Lectures and reci- 
tations. M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. Professor Whitcomb. 

3. The Revolution and Napoleon. — Beginning with the Bour- 
bon period this course includes a study of the Ancien Regime and 
the French Revolution, and follows the fortunes of Napoleon to 
1815. Lectures and recitations. M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 

Professor Whitcomb. 

13. General Course in English History. — This course is intro- 
ductory to the study of both European and American history. It 
traces the development of the English people from the earliest 
times to the present. Lectures and recitations. M., W., F., 1 :00- 
2:00. Dr. Perkins. 

29. Ancient History to 476, A. D. — This course comprises a 
brief survey of the development of the principal Oriental nations; 
and a more complete discussion of the civilizations of Greece and 
Rome. T., Th., 8 :30-9 :30. Dr. Perkins. 

15. General Course in American History. — This course is espe- 
cially recommended for those who have not had American history 
in the high school and for those who contemplate work in the 
College for Teachers. It should, if possible, be preceded by History 
1 or History 13. The work is based largely upon a text-book, 
supplemented by regular reports and lectures. M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Cox. 






HISTORY 127 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

25. European History Since 1814. — An advanced course deal- 
ing with the problems of European history in the nineteenth cen- 
tury. France since 1814; Germany since 1814; the Kingdom of 
Italy; the Eastern Question; Colonization, T., Th., 10:30-11:30. 

Professor Whitcomb. 

Open to Seniors ; to Juniors by permission. 

Prerequisite : History 3. 

[46. History of Germany.] Beginning with the early Germans 
this course will follow the history of the German peoples down to 
the present time. T., Th., 10 :30-ll :30. Professor Whitcomb. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

[20. Spain and Spanish America.] A brief view of the develop- 
ment of the Spanish nation and of the Spanish colonies ; the sub- 
sequent development of Latin America, and its relations with 
Europe and the United States. Lectures and special reports. Open 
to advanced students. Associate Professor Cox. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

[21. American Constitutional History.] The course treats of 
the development of governmental institutions during the Colonial 
era, and of the important constitutional questions occurring be- 
tween the Revolution and the Civil War. M.. W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Associate Professor Cox. 

Open to those who have had Course 15 or an equivalent. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

22. American Constitutional History (Continued). — A review 
of the Civil War and Reconstruction Periods, and the subsequent 
industrial and territorial expansion of the United States. Lectures 
and special reports. M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Associate Professor Cox. 

28. American Territorial History. — A general view of the 
territorial development of North America with the United States 
as its chief factor. Emphasis will be given to Spanish-American 
relations between 1803 and 1823. Lectures and special reports. 
T., Th., 11 :30-12 :30. Associate Professor Cox. 

39. Seminary in American History.— Politics and Political 
Leaders of the Ohio Valley. The course is devoted to an intensive 
study, from the original sources, of selected national political issues 



128 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

affecting this section, and the social and economic causes underlying 
them. Seniors may be admitted. S., 10:30-12:30. 

Associate Professor Cox. 
Open to properly qualified teachers. 

34. Seminary in European History. — First semester. The 
Eastern Question. Second semester. Colonization by European 
Powers. Students are expected to confer with instructors before 
electing course. M., W., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Professor Whitcomb and Dr. Perkins. 

[40. English Constitutional History.] The course traces the de- 
velopment of English political institutions from the Saxon period 
to the present times. Recommended for students who intend to 
enter upon the study of law, and for those who wish to specialize in 
American history. T., Th., 11:30-12:30. Dr. Perkins. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

Evening Courses 
56. The French Revolution and Napoleon (Similar in scope 
to History 3).— W., 7:30-9:30. Professor Whitcomb. 

47. General Course in American History. — The work of this 
course covers the Colonial and Revolutionary Periods and is based 
largely upon a text-book, supplemented by regular reports and lectures. 
Th., 7 :30-9 :30. Associate Professor Cox. 

[49. General Course in American History (Continued).] The 
work of this course covers the period from 1789 to the present 
time, and is conducted in the same manner as Course 47. Th., 
7 :30-9 :30. Associate Professor Cox. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 



LATIN 

John Miller Burnam, Ph. D., Professor of Latin. 

William Tunstall Semple, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Latin. 
Helen Abigail Stanley, A. M., . . Graduate Assistant in Latin. 

For Undergraduates 
1. Livy. — Horace. — Selections from Livy. Selected Odes and 
Epodes of Horace. Informal discussion of the life and thought of 
the times. 

Sec. I, T., Th., S., 8 :30-9 :30. 
Sec. II, M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 
Sec. Ill, M., W., F., 10 :30-ll :30. 

Professor Burnam, 
Assistant Professor Semple, and Miss Stanley. 



LATIN 129 

Course 1 is open to students who have had four years of Latin 
in the high school. 

2. Cicero, Tacitus, Horace. — Cicero's Laelius, Tacitus' Agricola 
and Germania, selections from Horace's Satires and Epistles. 

Sec. I, M., W., R, 9 :30-10 :30. Assistant Professor Semple. 
Course 2 is open to students who have completed Course 1. 

6. Prose Composition. — One hour per week throughout the 
year. T., 10:30-11:30. Assistant Professor Semple. 

Course 6 is required of all students who choose Latin as a 
major. It may be taken any year after the completion of Course I. 

3. Comedy. — Plautus and Terence, first semester; Lucretius' 
De Rcrum Natura, second semester. M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor Semple. 
Course 3 is open to students who have passed in Courses 1 and 2. 

4. Virgil's Bucolics and Georgics, first semester; Tacitus' 
annals or Quintilian, second semester. Three hours, to be arranged. 

Professor Burnam. 
Course 4 is open to students who have passed in Courses 1 
and 2. 

5. Latin Literature. — A general survey of the life and letters 
of the Roman people from the earliest times until the later Em- 
pire. W., 2:00-3:00. Assistant Professor Semple. 

Primarily for Graduates 
Hours in all cases to be arranged 

9. Latin and Romance Palaeography. — The history of the Latin 
alphabet in Western Europe, from A. D. 1 to the close of the fif- 
teenth century. Students are given abundant practice in reading 
facsimiles. Three hours. Professor Burnam. 

Course 9 must be preceded by at least four years of under- 
graduate work, and requires the ability to read French and German. 

10. Latin Seminary. — 

10a. Virgil. Three hours. 

10b. Caesar. Omitted in 1914-15. 

10c. Cicero. Omitted in 1914-15. 

The seminary considers Caesar, Cicero, and Virgil, in succes- 
sive years in the order mentioned. The author to be studied in 
1914-15 (Course 10a) is Virgil. Professor Burnam. 

12. Graduate Study. — Credit according to work elected and 
completed under the direction of the teaching staff of the de- 
partment. 



130 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

♦MATHEMATICS 

Harris Hancock, Ph. D m D. Sc, . . . Professor of Mathematics. 
Stephen Elmer Slocum, Ph. D., Professor of Applied Mathematics. 
Charles Napoleon Moore, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics. 
Louis Brand, A. M., . . . Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Florence Cameron Lawler, B. S., . . Instructor in Mathematics. 
Joseph Henry Kindle, A. M., ... Instructor in Mathematics. 
Edward Smith, M. S Instructor in Mathematics. 

For Undergraduates 

1. Algebra, Trigonometry. — Selected portions of Algebra and 
the elementary Theory of Equations. Rietz and Crathorne, College 
Algebra; Trigonometry, Crockett, Trigonometry. 

Sec. I, M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. Miss Lawler. 

Sec. II, T., Th., S., 8 :30-9 :30. Miss Lawler. 

Sec. Ill, M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. Miss Lawler. 

Sec. IV, T., Th, S., 9 :30-10 :30. Miss Lawler. 

Beginning September 15, 1914, students who matriculate with 
less than three units in Mathematics, and who elect Mathematics, 
must take Course 1. 

2. Algebra, Trigonometry (as above). — Analytical Geometry of 
Two Dimensions. M., W., F, 10 :30-ll :30. Miss Lawler. 

Beginning September 15, 1914, students who matriculate with 
three or more units in Mathematics, and who elect Mathematics, 
must take Course 2. 

3. Analytical Geometry of Two and Three Dimensions. M, 
W, F., 9:30-10:30. Assistant Professor Moore. 

Sophomores who have taken Course 1, and Freshmen, who 
enter with four units in Mathematics, may (by special permission) 
take Course 3. 

5. Calculus. Differential and Integral. — Osborne, Calculus; 
Davis, Calculus. 

Sec. I, M, T., Th., F., 10:30-11:30. Professor Hancock. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

15. Theory of Equations, Including Determinants. — Burnside 
and Panton, Theory of Equations. Lectures. M, W, F, 9 :30- 
10 :30. Professor Hancock. 



* See other courses in Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, College of 
Engineering. 






MATHEMATICS 131 

[8a. Advanced Integral Calculus.] Byerly, Integral Calculus. 
Lectures. M., W., R, 9 :30-10 :30, first semester. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Professor Hancock. 

[9b. Differential Equations.] Forsyth, Differential Equations. 
Lectures. M., W., R, 9 :30-10 :30, second semester. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Professor Hancock. 

Primarily for Graduates 

20. Theory of Maxima and Minima Involving Several Var- 
iables. The Calculus of Variations. M., Th., 4 :00-6 :00. 

Professor Hancock. 

lib. Fourier's Series and Spherical Harmonics. — Byerly, Four- 
ier's Series and Spherical Harmonics. This course is intended as 
an introduction to mathematical physics. After a preliminary 
study of certain trigonometric series, Fourier's theorem for the 
development of a function into a trigonometric series is derived, 
and the limitations of its validity investigated. This is followed 
by the study of Lagrange's, Laplace's, and Lame's functions, with 
applications to problems in heat, electricity, potential, elasticity, etc. 
Second semester, Th., 4:00-6:00; S., 9:30-10:30. 

Professor Slocum. 

10a. Theory of Errors and Method of Least Squares. — Wright 
and Hayford, Adjustment of Observations. The general theory of 
the adjustments of observations, with applications to triangulation 
and the derivation of empirical formulas from experimental data. 
First semester, M., 4 :00-5 :00 ; W., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Slocum. 

40. Seminary. — Theoretical and experimental research in some 
special topic of the mechanics of rigid, elastic, fluid, or gaseous 
bodies. Results to be summarized in a form suitable for publica- 
tion. Credit according to number of hours elected. Hours by special 
arrangement. Professor Slocum. 

The following courses which are given from time to time 
will be omitted in 1914-15: 

16a. Theoretical Mechanics. 

16b. The Mathematical Theory of Elasticity. 

26. The History and Teaching of Mathematics. 

30. Theory of Numbers, Part I. — Natural Numbers. 

31. Theory of Numbers, Part II.— Algebraic Numbers.— Dede- 
kind's Theory. 

32. Theory of Numbers, Part III.— Kronecker's Theory. 

24. Elliptic Functions, Part I. — Analysis. 

25. Application of Elliptic Functions, Part II. 
36. Vector Analysis. 



132 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

28. Theory of Functions. — Lectures on the Theory of Func- 
tions of a Complex Variable. 

29. Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. 

33. Advanced Algebra. — Part I. Lectures. 

34. Advanced Algebra. — Part II. 

35. Advanced Algebra.— Part III. 
18a. Theory of Minimal Surfaces. 

Evening Courses 

40. Algebra — Trigonometry. — Selected portions of algebra and 
the elementary Theory of Equations. Ashton and Marsh, College 
Algebra. Trigonometry: Rothrock, Trigonometry. F., 7:30-9:30. 

Mr. Kindle. 

42. Analytical Geometry and Elementary Calculus. W., 
7:30-9:30. \ Mr. Smith. 



PHILOSOPHY 



*Guy Allan Tawney, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Philosophy. 
Henry G. Hartmann, Ph. D., . Assistant Professor of Philosophy. 
Ernest Lynn Talbert, Ph. D., . . . Instructor in Philosophy. 
Hyman Bernard Cantor, A. B., Graduate Assistant in Philosophy. 

For Undergraduates 

la. Introduction to Philosophy. — Open to students who have 
completed one year of University work. First semester, M., W., F., 
11:30-12:30. Dr. Talbert. 

lb. Philosophical Idealism Historically and Critically Treated. — 
Second semester, M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. Dr. Talbert. 

2a. Introduction to Logic. — Open to students who have com- 
pleted at least one year of University work. First semester, M., 
W. f F., 9 :30-10 :30. Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

2b. Theory of Scientific Method. — Second semester, M., W., F., 
9:30-10:30. Dr. Talbert. 

Prerequisite : Course 2a. 

3a. History of Philosophy from the Italian Renaissance to the 
Time of Kant. — Open to students who have completed one year of 
University work. First semester, M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Hartmann. 



Absent on teave, 1914-15. 






PHILOSOPHY 133 

3b. History of Modern Philosophy from the Time of Kant — 
Courses 3a and 3b alternate biennially with Courses 4a and 4b. 
Second semester, M., W., R, 8 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

Prerequisite: Course 3a. 

[4a. History of Philosophy to the Beginning of the Christian 
Era.] First semester, M., W., R, 8:30-9:30. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

[4b. History of the Philosophy of the Middle Ages.] Second 
semester, 8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

5a. Ethics. — Open to students who have completed two years 
of University work. First semester. 
Sec. I, M., W., R, 10:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Hartmann. 
Sec. II, M., W., R, 1 :00-2 :00. Dr. Talbert. 

5b. Ethical Interpretations. — Second semester, M., W., F., 
10:30-11:30. Dr. Talbert. 

Prerequisite: Course 5a. 

6a. History of Ethics.— First semester, T., Th., 11:30-12:30. 
Prerequisite: Course 5a. Assistant Professor Hartmann 

6b. History of Moral Ideas. — Second semester, T., Th., 11:30- 
12 :30. Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

Prerequisite : Course 5a. 

8a. Social Psychology. — See Psychology 8a. This course counts 
toward a major in philosophy. Psychology la prerequisite. 

Dr. Talbert. 

8b. Aesthetics, the Science of the Beautiful. — Second semester, 
M., W, R, 9 :30-10 :30. Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

Prerequisite : Psychology la. 
11. Contemporary Philosophy.— S., 9:30-10:30. 
Prerequisite : Philosophy 3b. Dr. Talbert. 

Primarily for Graduates 

9. The Methods of Certain Ethical Systems.— Th., 1:00-3:00. 

Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

10. Plato and Aristotle.— T., 1 :00-3 :00. Dr. Talbert. 

For Teachers 

11. Contemporary Philosophy.— S., 9:30-10:30. 

Dr. Talbert. 



134 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Evening Courses 

22. Logic— Th., 4 :45-6 :45. Assistant Professor Hartmann. 

23. Ethics.— M., 7 :30-9 :30. Dr. Talbert. 

It should be remembered that work in the Department of 
Philosophy is facilitated by courses in psychology, sociology, political 
science, general history, economics, the history of education, aesthet- 
ics, and other allied subjects dealing with human life and the 
products of civilization. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Alfred Brodbeck, Director of Physical Education. 

, Instructor in Physical Education. 

Harold H. Wagner, Assistant in Physical Education. 

Physical Training for Men. — All students are required to take 
five hours per week in the Department of Physical Education. It 
is expected that these hours will be distributed as follows : Three 
hours per week for all members of the Freshman class (lectures 
on hygiene, one hour, work in the gymnasium, two hours), and two 
hours per week for all members of the Sophomore class. Depar- 
tures from this rule will be allowed only under exceptional con- 
ditions, for which special permission must be secured from the 
Dean in advance. 

A physical examination is required of each student of the two 
lower classes upon entrance and upon completion of the required 
work. Appointments for the examination must be made with the 
Physical Director at the beginning of the first semester. 

Credit : One credit will be given for each semester's work. 

Hours. — Phys. Ed. 1 (Freshmen). Gymnasium, T., Th., 10:30- 
11:30; M., W., 10:30-11:30; T., Th., 4:00-5:00 (voluntary); Lec- 
ture, F., 2 :00-3 :00. 

Phys. Ed. 2 (Sophomores). T., Th, 11:30-12:30; M., W, 
11 :30-12 :30 ; T., Th., 4 :00-5 :00 (voluntary). Mr. Brodbeck. 

Physical Training for Women. — The work is arranged with a 
view to obtaining the best hygienic, corrective and recreative re- 
sults. A physical examination will be made at the beginning of 
the Freshman and at the end of the Sophomore year. 

The course for Freshmen consists of three hours attendance 
per week throughout the year. Two hours each week are spent 
in exercising in the gymnasium; the other hour is devoted to lee- 






PHYSICS 135 

tures on hygiene. The lectures must be attended by every member 
of the Freshman class, irrespective of the fact that she may be 
excused from the gymnasium work. 

The course for Sophomores consists of two hours of exercise 
in the gymnasium, prescribed for all members unless excused by 
the Director of Physical Education or on a physician's certificate. 

Credit: One credit will be given for each semester's work. 

Hours— Phys. Ed. 1 (Freshmen), M., W., 1:00-2:00; T., Th., 
1:00-2:00; Lecture, F., 2:00-3:00. 

Phys. Ed. 2 (Sophomores). T., Th., 2:00-3:00; M., W., 2:00- 
3:00. 

Voluntary Class.— F., 1 :00-2 :00. . 



PHYSICS 



Louis Trenchard More, Ph. D., Professor of Physics. 

Samuel James McIntosh Allen, Ph. D., Associate Professor of 

Physics. 
Robert E. Clyde Gowdy, Ph. D., . . . . Instructor in Physics. 

Thomas Lansing Porter, Ph. D instructor in Physics. 

Assistants: Mr. Evens, Mr. Lorenz, A. M. 

For Undergraduates 

26a. General Physics. — Lectures and recitations on mechanics, 
sound, and heat, illustrated with lecture experiments. First semes- 
ter, M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. Professor More. 

27b. General Physics. — Lectures and recitations on light, elec- 
tricity and magnetism, illustrated with lecture experiments. Second 
semester, M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. Professor More. 

N. B. — The above courses are designed for students in the 
College of Liberal Arts only; they may be elected in the Fresh- 
man year. They will present the fundamental laws and phenomena 
of physics, and will be non-mathematical in treatment. Taken 
with Courses 2a and 22b, Experimental Physics, they satisfy the 
science iequirement. 



136 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

2a. Experimental Physics. — Laboratory work arranged to ac- 
company General Physics. First semester. 

Associate Professor Allen, Dr. Gowdy, Dr. Porter, 
and Assistants. 

Sec. I, T., Th., 8:30-11:30. 

Sec. II, T., Th., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. Ill, M., F., 1:00-4:00 (for Engineers only). 

Sec. IV, W., 1:00-4:00. 

22b. Experimental Physics. — Laboratory work arranged to ac- 
company General Physics. Second semester. 

Associate Professor Allen, Dr. Gowdy, Dr. Porter, 
and Assistants. 

Sec. I, T., Th., 8 :30-ll :30. 

Sec. II, T, Th., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. Ill, M., W., F., 1:00-4:00 (for Engineers only). 

28a. Advanced General Physics. — Lectures and recitations on 
Mechanics and Heat. First semester. T., Th., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Associate Professor Allen. 

29b. Advanced General Physics. — Lectures and recitations on 
Light, Electricity, and Magnetism. Second semester. T., Th., 
9 :30-10 :30. Associate Professor Allen. 

Prerequisites for Courses 28 and 29 are Courses 26 and 27, 
and Mathematics 1. 

4. Advanced Experimental Physics. — Experiments in photom- 
etry, spectrum analysis, calibration of weights and thermometers, 
etc., requiring exact measurement. Credit according to periods 
elected. T., Th., 1 :00-4 :00. Associate Professor Allen. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

[3a. Theoretical Mechanics.] A course of lectures on the mathe- 
matical laws of mechanics. First semester, T., Th., S., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Professor More. 

[18b. Theory of Electricity and Magnetism.] A course of lec- 
tures on the mathematical laws of electricity and magnetism. Sec- 
ond semester, T., Th., S., 11 :30-12 :30. Professor More. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

19a. Theory of Heat. — A course of lectures on the mathe- 
matical laws of heat. First semester, T., Th., S., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Professor More. 

15b. Theory of Light. — A course of lectures on the mathemat- 
ical laws of light. Second semester, T., Th., S., 11:30-12:30. 

Professor More. 

The above courses may be elected for a minor in Physics, the 
following courses for a major, in graduate work. 



PHYSICS 137 

8. Experimental Physics.— The exact determination of some 
of the standard and classical experiments. Credit according to 
number of hours elected. Associate Professor Allen. 

10. Seminary. — The reading and discussion of papers in phy- 
sical journals. T., 4 :00-5 :00. Associate Professor Allen. 

16. Physical Manipulations. — A series of exercises in scien- 
tific shop-work. Shop-work; soldering and metal-working, screw- 
cutting and elementary lathe-work. Glass-work and physical proc- 
esses; glass-blowing, cutting, grinding, polishing, silvering; fiber 
suspensions and preparations useful in the laboratory. Hours to 
be arranged. Without credit. Mr. Evens. 

For Graduates Only 

7. Lectures on Theoretical Physics. — This course is designed 
to include three years' work. In 1913-14 the lectures discuss the 
theory of heat and generalized co-ordinates; 1914-15, electricity and 
magnetism ; 1915-16, light. Twice weekly. Professor More. 

25a. Theoretical Mechanics. — See under Mathematics 16a. 

Professor Slocum. 

9. Research. — Those electing this course are supplied with 
all the apparatus needed, and with the assistance of the Mechanician. 
Daily. Professor More and Associate Professor Allen. 

For Teachers Only 

11. Laboratory Methods for Teachers. — This course comprises 
a set of experiments designed especially for teachers* The exer- 
cises will include those which are usually given in schools, and 
also those of a more difficult nature which illustrate the theoretical 
principles. S., 8:30-11 :30. Dr. Porter. 

Evening Courses 
30a. General Physics. — Lectures with demonstrations on 
mechanics, heat, and sound. First semester, M., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Allen. 
30b. General Physics. — Lectures with demonstrations on light, 
electricity, and magnetism. Second semester, M., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Associate Professor Allen. 
31a. Experimental Physics.— Laboratory work to accompany 
General Physics. First semester. Sec. V, W., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Dr. Porter. 
31b. Experimental Physics — Laboratory work to accompany 
General Physics. Second semester. Sec. V, W., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Dr. Porter. 



138 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Selden Gale Lowrie, Ph. D., . . Professor of Political Science. 
Clarence Oran Gardner, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Political 
i Science. 

William Hammond Parker, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Social Science. 

Dexter Perkins, Ph. D., Instructor in History. 

Samuel Speir Mayerberg, A. M., Graduate Assistant in Social 

Science. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

1. American Government. — The primary aim of this course is 
to prepare for the duties of citizenship and lay a foundation for the 
further study of political science. The nature and organization of 
our federal government will be studied the first semester, and 
state and local government will be studied the second semester. 
M., W., F., 10:30-11 :30. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

2a. European Governments. — A study of the nature and organ- 
ization of the principal governments of Europe. First semester, 
M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors and to those students taking 
Course 1. 

2b. International Law. — A study of the principles, rules, and 
customs controlling the states of the civilized world in their relation 
to each other. Second semester, M., W., F., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Professor Lowrie. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors and to those students taking 
Course 1. 

6a. Public Finance and Taxation. — An introductory course in 
the principles of taxation and the methods of levying and collecting 
taxes. Also a study of the budget systems of the countries of the 
world as well as of states and cities. First semester, T, Th., 
8 :30-9 :30. Professor Lowrie. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors and to those students who have taken 
Economics 1. 

9b. American Diplomacy. — This course will deal with certain 
selected questions from the history of American diplomacy with a 
view to the determination and elucidation of the principles of inter- 
national law. Among the topics touched on, will be the recognition 
of the South American states; the questions connected with the 
Panama Canal ; various phases of the Monroe Doctrine ; and the 
most netable boundary arbitrations. Second semester, T., Th., 
1 1 :30-12 :30. Dr. Perkins. 






POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 139 

11a. Municipal Government. — A comparative study of munici- 
pal organization and administration in the United States and in 
European countries. First semester, M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Gardner. 

lib. Municipal Functions. — A study of the activities of the 
modern city. Special attention will be given the problems involved 
in the contemporary development of Cincinnati. This course will 
be given in co-operation with the Municipal Reference Bureau. 
Second semester, M., W., F., 8 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Gardner. 

[4b. Political Parties and Party Methods.] A study of the 
theory and organization of political parties in the United States with 
particular reference to party methods and machinery. Second 
semester, T., Th., 8:30-9:30. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

17b. Constitutional Law. — A study of the American Constitu- 
tion, and its development through judicial interpretation. Second 
semester, T., Th., 8 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

Open to those who have had Course 1. 

25. Seminar in Municipal Government. — A study will be made 
of the function of a modern city with special reference to Cincin- 
nati. Given in co-operation with the Municipal Reference Bureau. 
M., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Lowrie. 

Open to those who have had Courses 11a and lib, and to others 
by permission. 

3. Political Theory. — The first semester of this course will be 
devoted to a study of the development of ancient, medieval, and 
modern political thought, including a brief survey of American 
theory. The work of the second semester will consist principally of 
an analysis and criticism of various political concepts, such as the 
origin, nature, and functions of the state ; sovereignty ; government ; 
liberty, etc. Either semester may be taken separately. Open to 
Seniors and graduate students. W., 4 :00-6 :00. 

Assistant Professor Gardner. 

Evening Course 

30. Municipal Government.— A study of the organization, 
power, and functions of American municipalities, together with a 
brief survey of the governments of modern English, French, and 
Prussian cities. Throughout the course special emphasis will be 



140 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

placed upon the operation of city government, with particular refer- 
ence to contemporary government in Cincinnati. M., 7 :30-9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Gardner. 

[31. American Government] The scope of this course is 
practically the same as that of Course 1 as described above. M., 
7 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Gardner. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 
For Undergraduates 
5. Elementary Sociology. — An introductory course designed to 
present a working theory of the nature of society, the prevailing 
types of social organizations, and the larger problems connected 
therewith. The nature of sociology, facts of social evolution, social 
control, social organization, social ideals, social pathology, methods 
of social investigation, and the history of sociology. T., Th., 9 :30- 
10:30. Assistant Professor Parker. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

7. Modern Social Theories. — Lectures and assigned readings on 
the social theories of Comte, Mill, Spencer, Gumplowicz, Tarde, 
Mackenzie, Ward, Giddings, Small, and others. Particular attention 
is given to the development of social theory and to the consequences 
of the theories of these writers in the field of practical social reform. 
M., W., 10 :30-ll :30. Assistant Professor Parker. 

15. Modern Philanthropy. — A study of the problems of charity. 
Treatment of the pauper, feeble-minded, insane, and of dependent 
children. Reform suggestions regarding the best methods of dealing 
with these classes. As an integral part of this course there will be 
a series of lectures on the scope and method of the work of the 
Associated Charities, the Department of Charities and Corrections 
of the City of Cincinnati, the House of Refuge, the Juvenile Court, 
the Juvenile Protective Association, the National Child Labor Or- 
ganization, and the Social Settlement. M., W., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Assistant Professor Parker. 

20. Criminals and Delinquents. — Problems of Crime. Criminal 
anthropology, physical and psychical. Criminal diagnostics, definition 
of crime, detection and identification of criminals, state control of 
criminals. Criminal therapeutics, penalties, punishment and reforma- 
tion of criminals, jails, prisons, and reformatories. Criminal 
hygienics, police prevention of crime, presumptive criminals. Princi- 
ples of scientific penology, lynch-law, and the trend of crime in 
modern times. T., Th., 10 :30-ll :30. 

Assistant Professor Parker. 



PSYCHOLOGY 141 

[21. Social Problems.] A study of current social problems and 
the influence of certain factors in social evolution. The function, 
origin, forms, development, and problems of the family. Problems 
of population, immigration, the negro, the city, poverty and pauper- 
ism, education, and social progress. T., Th., 11 :30-12 :30. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Assistant Professor Parker. 

22. Seminary. — Opportunity is here given for the detailed study 
of special problems in social science. Credit according to number of 
hours elected ; minimum, two hours ; maximum, four hours. 

Assistant Professor Parker. 

Evening Course 

5. Elementary Sociology. — A fundamental course dealing with 
the origin, composition, evolution, and functions of society. Special 
attention will be given to the study of the existing social organiza- 
tion and certain of the larger problems connected therewith. This 
course is designed to be introductory to all advanced work in the 
field of Social Science. Th, 7 :30~9 :30. 

Assistant Professor Parker. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Psychology. 

Schachne Isaacs, A. M, Assistant in Psychology. 

Student Assistant: Edward S. Robinson. 

For Undergraduates 

la. Introductory Psychology. — An analytical study of mental 
phenomena, with special attention to accurate observation and de- 
scription. A general account of the subject matter of psychology. 
First semester. Sec. I, M, W, F., 11:30-12:30; Sec. II, M., W., F, 
10 :30-ll :30. Professor Breese. 

lb. A continuation of la. — Second semester. Sec. I, M., W, 
F., 11:30-12:30; Sec. II, M., W., F, 10:30-11:30. 

Professor Breese. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 
2a. Experimental Psychology.— Laboratory course. First sem- 
ester, M, W., F., 2 :00-4 :30. Professor Breese and Mr. Isaacs. 

2b. Experimental Psychology.— A continuation of 2a. Second 
semester, M., W., F, 2 :00-4 :30. 

Professor Breese and Mr. Isaacs. 



142 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

8a. Social Psychology. — The aim of this course is to exhibit 
the human mind in its development within a social environment; to 
show how, under the influence of the social environment, the native 
tendencies of the mind become gradually organized into systems of 
increasing complexity, and the ways in which they co-operate in 
shaping and sustaining such institutions as come to exist among 
men in civilized societies. Open to students who have had Intro- 
ductory Psychology. First semester, M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. 

Dr. Talbert. 

9. Mental and Physical Tests. — Laboratory methods. Two 
credits per semester. Hours to be arranged. 

Professor Breese and Mr. Isaacs. 

Primarily for Graduates 

3. Research. — Special investigation in the psychological lab- 
oratory. Hours to be arranged. Professor Breese. 

[4. Seminar.] A critical study of the most important problems 
in psychology. Reports and discussions. Th.. 3 :00-5 :00. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Professor Breese. 

[6a. Educational Psychology.] The experimental and statistical 
methods in mental measurements. Intended for advanced students 
and teachers of experience. First semester. Two credit hours. 
Hours to be arranged. Professor Breese. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

For Teachers 

[5. Elements of Psychology.] A general account of the facts 
of mental life and their application to education. One credit per 
semester for A. B. S., 11:30-12:30. Professor Breese. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

Evening Course 

10. Introductory Psychology. — An analytical study of mental 
phenomena, with special attention to accurate observation and de- 
scription. A general account of the subject matter of psychology. 
T., 7 :30-9 :30. Professor Breese. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 143 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Phillip Ogden, Ph. D., . . . Professor of Romance Languages. 
Ralph Emerson Bassett, A. M., Assistant Professor of Romance 

Languages. 
Merton Jerome Hubert, A. M., Instructor in French and Italian. 
Willard A. Kinne, A. B., . . Instructor in French and Spanish. 

FRENCH 

For Undergraduates 

1. Elementary French. — Chardenal's Complete French Course ; 
Aldrich and Foster, A French Reader; Enault, Le Chien du Capi- 
taine; Coppee, On rend V argent. Composition. 

Sec. I, M., W, F., 11:30-12:30. Mr. Hubert. 

Sec. II, T, Th, S., 8:30-9:30. Mr. Kinne. 

Course 1 is open to students who have had no French in the 
high school. 

2. Intermediate French. — First semester, Fraser and Squair's 
French Grammar, Part II; Francois, French Prose Composition; 
dictation and modern texts. Second semester, nineteenth century 
prose writers, etc. Dictation and composition. 

Sec. I, M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. Mr. Hubert. 
Sec. II, T., Th., S., 9 :30-10 :30. Mr. Kinne. 

Sec. Ill, M., W., F., 9 :30-10 :30. Mr. Kinne. 

Course 2 is open to students who have taken Course 1 or who 
have had two years of French in the high school. 

11. French Literature in the Nineteenth Century. — A study of 
the principal authors, supplemented by lectures and collateral read- 
ing on the life and literature of the time. Daudet; Hugo; Zola; 
Loti. M., W., F., 10 :30-ll :30. Professor Ogden. 

Course 11 is open to students who have passed in Course 2. 

3. French Composition. — Review of the more difficult points 
in French Grammar and Syntax. Dictation. Reproduction of nar- 
rative and descriptive passages read by the instructor from French 
authors. Conversation. Original composition in French. T., Th., 
11 :30-12 :30. Professor Ogden. 

With the permission of the instructor. 

Course 3 is open to students who have taken Course 2. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

4. French Drama in the Seventeenth Century. — A study of the 
principal authors, supplemented by lectures and collateral reading 



144 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

on the life and literature of the time. Corneille, Racine. Moliere. 
T., Th., 9 .-30-10 :30. Professor Ogden. 

Course 4 is open to students who have passed in Course 11. 

5. French Drama in the Nineteenth Century. Rapid reading 
of modern plays. W., R, 1 :00-2 :00. Mr. Hubert. 

10. Old French Readings. — Constans, Chrestomathie de I'Ancien 
Frangais. Lectures on historical French grammar. M., 4:00-6:00. 

Mr. Hubert. 

Course 10 is open to students who have passed in Course 4 or 
its equivalent. 

24. The Letter and Memoir Writers of the Seventeenth Cen- 
tury.— T., 4 :00-6 :00. Professor Ogden. 

Course 24 is open to students who have passed in Course -i or 
Course 11. 

26, French Drama in the Nineteenth Century. — Lectures ; out- 
side reading; conversation in French. T., Th., 8:30-9:30. 

Professor Ogden. 
15. French Conversation.— M., W., F., 1 :00-2 :00. Two credits. 
Professor Ogden and Mr. Hubert. 

For Teachers 

30. Intermediate French. — Grammar, composition, conversa- 
tion. One credit per semester for A. B. S., 10:30-11:30. 

Mr. Hubert. 

24. Course 24, outlined above, is open to teachers, by permis- 
sion, as well as to regular students. 

Teachers who are pursuing graduate studies and are qualified 
to do advanced work in the Romance languages may elect courses 
from the above upon advice from the head of the department. 

Evening Course 

33. Elementary French. — Pronunciation, grammar, reading. T., 
7 :30-9 :30. Mr. Hubert. 

SPANISH 

For Undergraduates 

6. Elementary Spanish. — Pronunciation, grammar, composition, 
conversational drill. Text-books : Bassett, Handbook of Spanish 
Pronunciation and Spanish Grammar ; Hills, Spanish Talcs; Ramos- 
Aza, Zaragucta. M., W., F., 10:30-11:30. 

Assistant Professor Bassett and Mr. Kinne. 
Course 6 is open to students who have had no Spanish in the 
high school. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 145 

9. Intermediate Spanish.— Selected texts since 1850. Valera, 
Pepita Jimenez; Pereda, Pedro Sanchez; Perez Galdos, Dona Per- 
fecta; Hartzenbusch, La coja y el encogido. M., W., F., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 

18. Spanish Composition. — Systematic practice in speaking and 
writing. Review of syntax. Business forms. Bassett, Spanish 
Composition; Roman y Salamero, El castellano actual; Harrison, 
Spanish Correspondence. T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 

Courses 9 and 18 must be preceded by Course 6 or by two years 
of Spanish in the high school. 

14. The Nineteenth Century. — Representative works from 
leading Spanish authors of the past hundred years. Alarcon, 
Becquer, Fernan Caballero, Larra, Zorrilla, etc. M., W., F., 2 :00-3 :00. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 

Course 14 must be preceded by Course 9. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

8. Spanish Literature in the XVI and XVII Centuries. — Cer- 
vantes, Don Quijote; selected plays by Lope de Vega and Calderon. 
History of Spanish literature from the age of Juan II to the 
Bourbons. Th., 3 :00-5 :00. Assistant Professor Bassett. 

Course 8 alternates with Course 22. 

[22. The Picaroon Novel.] LazarUlo de Tormes; Aleman, Guz- 
man de Alfarache (Part I) ; Cervantes, Novelas ejemplares (selec- 
tions) ; Espinel, Marcos de Obregon. Two hours, to be arranged. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 

Course 22 alternates with Course 8. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

Evening Courses 

31. Elementary Spanish. — Pronunciation, grammar, oral prac- 
tice, and introductory reading. F., 7 :30-9 :30. Mr. Kinne. 

32. Intermediate Spanish. — Grammar review and written exer- 
sizes, selected prose texts, business and letter forms, practice in 
speaking. T., 7 :30-9 :30. Assistant Professor Bassett. 

34. Advanced Spanish.— Special exercises in grammar and 
composition. Reading of modern prose. W., 7:30-9:30. 

Assistant Professor Bassett. 

ITALIAN 
For Undergraduates 

[7. Elementary Italian.] Grandgent, Italian Grammar; De 



146 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Amicis, Cuore; Serao, All' Erta, Sentinella; Testa, L'oro e I'orpello: 
Giacosa, Come le foglie. M., W., R, 11 :30-12 :30. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Assistant Professor Bassett. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 
16. Italian Prose in the XIX Century. — Fogazzaro, Amicis, 
D'Annunzio, Verga. Two hours, to be arranged. Mr. Hubert. 

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
Professor Anatole Le Braz, of the University of Rennes, during 
the months of February, March, and April, 1915, will deliver a 
series of lectures in French under the joint auspices of the Ropes 
Foundation and the Alliance Franchise. The general subject of the 
course will be "The Celtic Influence in Literature." Certain of these 
lectures will be open to the public. 

ZOOLOGY 

Harry Lewis Wieman, Ph. D., . Assistant Professor of Zoology. 
Robert Chambers, Jr., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Histology and 

Comparative Anatomy. 

Cora May Box, A. M., Instructor in Zoology. 

Raphael Isaacs, A. M., . Assistant in Embryology and Zoology. 
Annette F. Braun, Ph. D., Assistant in Zoology. 

In the advanced courses training in physics and chemistry, as 
well as ability to read French and German, is expected. Special 
facilities are afforded students pursuing courses of research. 

Students who desire to be recommended as teachers of zoology 
in secondary schools must complete as a minimum, Courses la to 8b 
inclusive, and Courses 19a and 20a. It is very desirable that they 
also do at least one year of graduate work. 

For Undergraduates 

la. Animal Biology. — Lectures dealing with topics of a general 
biological nature, such as animal activities and adaptations, protoplasm, 
the cell, sex, development, etc. The course is intended to provide a 
thorough foundation for further work in zoology. This course must 
be accompanied by Course 2a. First semester, M., W., F., 9:30-10:30. 

Assistant Professor Wieman. 

2a. Animal Biology, Laboratory. — This course consists of the 
practical laboratory and field work which must accompany Course la. 
Certain animals, selected as types to illustrate general principles, are 






ZOOLOGY 147 

dissected and compared. Careful notes and drawings of all dissec- 
tions are required. First semester. 

Sec. 1, M., W., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. II, T., Th., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. III. T„ Th., 9 :30-12 :30. 

Assistant Professor Wieman and Miss Box. 

3b. General Zoology. — Lectures dealing in a comparative way 
with the various groups of animals, including life-histories, evolu- 
tion, heredity, and classification. This course must be accompanied 
by Course 4b. Second semester, M, W., R, 9 :30-10 :30. 

Assistant Professor Wieman. 

Course 3b is open to students who have passed in Course la. 

4b. General Zoology, Laboratory. — This course consists of the 
practical work which must accompany Course 3b. Careful dissections, 
drawings, and comparisons are required. Second semester. 

Sec. I, M., W., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Sec. II, T., Th., 1:00-4:00. 

Sec. Ill, T., Th, 9:30-12:30. 

Assistant Professor Wieman and Miss Box. 

[15. Invertebrate Zoology.] An advanced laboratory course 
dealing with selected forms of Invertebrates. Credit according to 
number of hours elected. Miss Box. 

Prerequisite : Courses la, 2a, 3b, and 4b. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates 

19a. Embryology of Vertebrates. — The work consists of lectures 
and demonstrations dealing with the history of the germ cells, cleav- 
age of the ovum, embryo formation, and the development of the 
principal organs of the body. This course must be accompanied by 
Course 20. T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00. Assistant Professor Chambers. 

Prerequisite: Courses la, 2a, 3b, and 4b. 

20a. Embryology of Vertebrates, Laboratory.— -Laboratory work 
to accompany Course 19a. The work is based largely on the chick and 
pig. T., Th., 2 :00-5 :00. 

Assistant Professor Chambers and Mr. Isaacs. 

17b. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. — Lectures on the 
anatomy, classification, habits, and distribution of vertebrates. The 
anatomy is studied in a comparative way, with special reference to the 
evolution of the various organs. This course must be accompanied 
by Course 18b. Second semester, T., Th, 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professor Chambers. 

Prerequisite: Courses 19a and 20a. 



148 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

18b. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates, Laboratory. — The 
work consists in the careful dissection and study of selected forms 
to accompany Course 17b. Second semester, T., Th., 2 :00-5 :00. 

Assistant Professor Chambers. 

[13b. Animal Physiology.] Lectures dealing with fundamental 
physiological phenomena of animal life. This course must be accom- 
panied by Course 14b. Second semester, T., Th., 1 :00-2 :00. 

Assistant Professor Chambers. 

Prerequisite : Courses la, 2a, 3b, and 4b. 

Omitted in 1914-15. 

[14b. Animal Physiology Laboratory.] Experiments on different, 
organisms selected for the study of physiological activities, such as 
irritability, conductivity, reproduction, tropisms, etc., to accompany 
Course 13b. Second semester, T., Th., 2 :00-5 :00. 

Assistant Professor Chambers. 

Courses 13b and 14b alternate with Courses 17b and 18b. 
Courses 13b and 14b are omitted in 1914-15. 

10a. Microscopical Technique.— The course includes the prepa- 
ration and use of standard fixing and staining agents, and drill in 
the manipulative processes incident to general microscopy and 
cytology. Two or three credits. First semester, M., W., F., 
1 :00-4 :00. Assistant Professor Wieman. 

Prerequisite: Courses 19a and 20a. 

10b. Cytology. — A laboratory course intended to serve as an 
introduction to cytology and the general field of cellular biology. 
Two or three credits. Second semester, M., W., F., 1 :00-4 :00. 

Prerequisite: Course 10a. Assistant Professor Wieman. 

Primarily for Graduates 

[30. Current Problems in Zoology.] Assigned readings and dis- 
cussions to accompany courses of research. A reading knowledge 
of French and German is required. Two credit hours. 

Omitted in 1914-15. Assistant Professor Wieman. 

31. Research. — Credit according to number of hours elected. 
Assistant Professor Wieman and Assistant 
Professor Chambers. 

Evening Course 

50. Principles of Animal Biology. — A lecture and laboratory 
course. The lectures deal with general biological topics, such as 






DRAWING, MODELING, AND CARVING 149 

animal morphology, physiology, adaptation, heredity, and evolution. 
In the laboratory certain animals selected as types are dissected 
and compared. Lecture, F., 7:30-9:30; Laboratory, Th., 7:30-9:30. 
Assistant Professor Wieman and Mr. Isaacs. 



*DRAWING, MODELING, AND CARVING 

By an arrangement with the Art Academy of Cincinnati (orig- 
inally established as the McMicken School of Design in 1869, and 
a department of the University of Cincinnati from 1871 to 1884, 
when it was transferred to the Cincinnati Museum Association) 
students of the University may elect courses in Drawing, Model- 
ing, and Carving at the Art Academy in 1914-15, and, upon pre- 
sentation of the proper certificate from the Director of the School, 
may receive credit in the Registrar's office lor such courses as 
part of the total number of "credits" required for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. On the payment of a fee of twenty-five dollars 
at the office of the Art Academy, the student is admitted to the 
several day classes (drawing, modeling, carving, and design). For 
the night classes the fee is five dollars. In the Summer Term of ten 
weeks no instruction is given at night. The Winter Term extends 
from September 28, 1914, to May 28, 1915, the Summer Term from 
the middle of June to the end of August. 

The following courses of instruction are offered: 

1. Free-hand Drawing. — From objects and casts. Day classes, 
M., W., F., 8:45-12:45, or M., T., W., Th., F., 1:00-4:00, and S. f 
8:45-12:45. Night classes, T., Th., F., 7:15-9:15. 

Miss Young, Miss Miller, Miss Lord, 

Miss Wilson, and Mr. Reisz. 
Color work in oils, water colors, or pastels is also taught in the 
day classes, but not at night. 

2. Drawing and Painting from Life.— Figure or head. Day 
classes, M., T., W., Th., F., S., 8:45-12:45, and M., T., W., Th., 
F., 2:00-4:00, 1:30-4:30. Night classes, M., T., W., Th., F, 7:15- 
9 :15. Mr. Duveneck, Mr. Meakin, Mr. Wessel, and Mr. Hopkins. 

Artistic Anatomy is a part of this course. The night classes 
draw the head or figure from life. 

3. Illustration.— M., T„ W., Th, F., 1 :30-4 :30. 

Mr. Eschenbach. 

4. Modeling.— From casts. Day classes, T., Th., S., 8:45- 
12:45. Night classes, M., W., 7:15-9:15. Mr. Barnhorn. 



* For the teachers' training course in art, see announcement of the College 
for Teachers. 



150 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 



5. Modeling. Advanced Course. — From life. Day classes, M 
T., W., Th., F., S., 8 :45-12 :45. Night classes, M„ T., W., Th., FJ 
7:15-9:15. Mr. Barnhorn. 

6. Wood Carving.— M., W., F., 12 :30-4 :30, and S, 8 :45-12 :45. 

Mr. Fry. 

7. Decorative Design. — The principles of design, preparation 
of decorative motives, and their application to metals, enamels, 
leather, porcelain, etc.. T., W., Th., F., 1:30-4:30. Miss Riis. 

From the courses above offered a student may elect not more 
than six hours in any one semester. Not more than twelve hours 
of work in the Art Academy will be credited for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. 






EXTERNAL COURSES 

ASTRONOMY 

152. A critical study of the historical development of astronomy 
f rom the earliest period to modern times. — M., 7 :30-8 :30, at the 
Hyde Park Branch Library. Professor Porter. 

ENGLISH 

161. Shakespeare.— M., 4:00-5:00, at the Avondale Public 
School. Professor Chandler. 

34. Nineteenth Century Poetry.— T., 7:30-8:30, at the Madi- 
sonville School. Assistant Professor Young. 

162. The Development of the English Novel.— W., 3:30-4:30, 
at the College Hill School; Th., 4:00-5:00, at the Norwood South 
School. Assistant Professor Stevens. 

GEOGRAPHY 

155. General Principles of Physical Geography. — T., 4:00-5:00, 
at the Ninth Street School, Newport, Ky. Professor Fenneman. 

HISTORY 

150. Territorial History of North America.— T., 4:00-5:00, at 
the Washington School. Associate Professor Cox. 

153. Civil War, Reconstruction, and the Modern Period. — M., 
4:00-5:00, at the Covington Public Library. 

Associate Professor Cox. 

163. Europe in the Nineteenth Century.— M., 4:00-5:00, at the 
Washburn School. Professor Whitcomb. 



SOCIOLOGY 

160. Elementary Sociology.— M., 4:00-5:00, at the Avondale 
Public School. Assistant Professor Parker. 



: 



COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS 

The College for Teachers is organized under the joint man- 
agement of the Board of Directors of the LTniversity and the Board 
of Education of the city of Cincinnati. 

COMMITTEE IN CHARGE 
Charles William Dabney, Ph. D.,LL. D., President of the University. 
Arthur M. Spiegel, Member of the Board of Directors of the 

University. 
Randall Judson Condon, A. M., Superintendent of Cincinnati 

Schools. 
Albert D. Shockley, . . . Member of the Board of Education. 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 
Charles William Dabney, Ph. D„LL.D., President of the University. 
Randall Judson Condon, A. M., Superintendent of Cincinnati 

Schools. 

William Paxton Burris, A. M., L. H. D., Professor of the History 

and Principles of Education, and Dean of the College for Teachers. 

John William Hall, A. M., Professor of Elementary Education. 

Henry Skinner West, Ph. D., Professor of Secondary Education. 

Burtis Burr Breese, Ph. D Professor of Psychology. 

Nevin Melancthon Fenneman, Ph. D., Professor of Geology 

and Geography. 
*Guy Allen Tawney, Ph. D., . . . . Professor of Philosophy. 
Harris Miller Benedict, Ph. D., .... Professor of Botany. 
Isaac Joslin Cox, Ph. D., . . . Associate Professor of History. 
Cyrus De Witt Mead, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education. 
J. Ernest Carman, B. S., M. Di., . Assistant Professor of Geology. 
Henry Gottlieb Hartmann, Ph. D., Assistant Professor of Phil- 
osophy. 
Abbie Louise Day, B. S., B. Di., Instructor in Elementary Education. 

Levi A. Giddincs, M. S. Instructor in Botany. 

Walter Bucher, Ph. D., . . Instructor in Geology and Geography. 
Schachne Isaacs, A. M., Assistant in Psychology. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 
Courses in the teaching of household arts are given by the fol- 
lowing persons in the School of Household Arts : 

* Absent on leave, 1*14-15. 



152 McMICKEN COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Ann Gilchrist Strong, B. S., . . Professor of Household Arts. 
Eleanor Toaz, B. S., . . Assistant Professor of Household Arts. 

Courses in special subjects are given by the following persons 
connected with the Cincinnati public schools: 

Walter H. Aiken Music. 

William H. Vogel Art and Hand Work. 

Carl Ziegler, M. D Physical Training and Hygiene. 

A. H. Steadman Penmanship. 

H. H. Fick, Ph. D German. 

Julia S. Bothwell Kindergarten. 

Grace Anna Fry Kindergarten. 

Mary Elizabeth Hyde Art. 

William P. Teal Art. 

1 Art. 

Emma Kohnky, A. M Teaching of Defectives. 

The technical instruction and training in kindergarten courses 
is given by the following persons on the teaching staff of the Cin- 
cinnati Kindergarten Training School: 

Lillian H. Stone Principal. 

Elsie Hobart Instructor. 

John Jerome Thompson Art. 

Mrs. W. E. Lewis Physical Training. 

Marie Curtis Rains Instructor. 

Frances A. Le Voy Instructor. 

At the Art Academy of Cincinnati: 
Elizabeth Kellogg History of Art. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 
The College for Teachers is the department of education of 
the University. It is organized under the joint management of 
the Board of Directors of the University and the Board of Edu- 
cation of the city of Cincinnati. It is primarily a professional 
school for the training of teachers under University auspices, in 
close touch with a cosmopolitan public school system which serves 
as a working laboratory for teachers and students of education. 
Affiliated with the college are the Cincinnati Kindergarten Train- 
ing School, the Art Academy of Cincinnati, and the Cincinnati 
Public Schools. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 
(Old plan, in effect with classes graduating in 1915 and 1910 
only.) 

The conditions governing admission, graduation, prerequisite*!, 



OUTLINE OF PROGRAMS 153 

privileges, etc., vary with the different professional programs offered, 
and are best indicated in connection therewith, as follows: 

PROGRAM I. For those fitting, primarily, for positions in 
elementary schools. 

Admission. — This program is open to Seniors and graduates, 
and may be pursued during a single year. 

Seniors must be prepared to fulfill all the requirements for 
graduation in the College of Liberal Arts without being compelled 
to carry more than three hours work per semester in addition to 
the courses in education indicated below. 

Prerequisite Courses. — Before entering upon this program 
students must have had, as a part of their college courses, and 
as suitable prerequisites to the courses in education, the equivalent 
of the following: 

Psychology, three hours per week for one year. 
Ethics, three hours per week for one-half year. 
Physiography, five hours per week for one year. 
American history, three hours per week for one year. 

Those who have had a year's study in American history in 
high school shall be exempt from the requirement in this subject. 

Courses Required. — 

Education 1 6 credits. 

Education 2 8 " 

Laboratory work (30 hours practice teach- 
ing in connection with Education 2) 2 " 

Education 4 2 

Elected from the following 8 " 

Education 14 4 credits. 

Education 16 2 " 

Education 20 2 

Education 22 2 " 

Total 24 credits. 

Graduation and Privileges. — Seniors who complete the above 
courses in education may count the same toward the A. B. degree 
in the McMicken College of Liberal Arts and receive a Teacher's 
Diploma