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Full text of "Analog Computing Magazine Issue 46 (June CES Report)"

NO. 46 








U.S.A. S3.50 
CANADA $4.75 


SEPTEMBtR 1986 




THE #1 


MAGAZINE 


FOR ATARI® 


COMPUTER OWNERS 






COMPUTING 



report 
Magic $paM 



La Macmpi! 
Moonlord 









V^AaW-l-ij 



74470"! 2385' 



NEW for the ST ~ only from MichTron 



BBS 2.0 by Timothy Purves 



$79.95 



A Bulletin Board System that's full featured, easy to use, 
and affordable? Only from MichTron! BBS turns your 
computer and auto-answer modem into a full-blown 
electronic mail and message system! 

■ Easy to set up: Have it running within an hour! 

■ Versatile message base - Limited only by your disk 
space. Messages can be up to 99 hnes long. 

■ Up to 16 SIGs - Each of 16 access areas has its own 
messages, upload/download area, and user access! 

■ Multi-user capacity - The operator and one caller can 
both use the BBS at the same time, independently! 

■ Tracking Mode - You can see your callers actions, and 
can even assist them from your computer! 

■ Four Transfer Modes: XMODEM, XMODEM-CRC, 
DFT, and ASCII file protocols. 

■ Adjusts to callers - Automatically adapts to most 
users' modem and terminal set-ups! 

■ Practically self-maintaining - It takes just a few 
minutes to update user logs and files. 

■ System security - Users are isolated from the system so 
that tampering and accidental hang-ups have no effect. 

■ Call our BBS! For a test run, call 313-332-5452. 



MIGHTY MAIL by Timothy Purves 



$49.95 



If you sift endlessly through messy, out-dated customer 
lists, then spend hours typing mailing labels. Mighty Mail is 
a dream come true. It sorts and prints all your customer 
lists and labels. You'll save enough with your first 
zipcode-sorted bulk-mailing to pay for the program! 

■ Easy to use - OEM's pulldown menus make it simple. 

■ Mailing labels - Make labels of almost any size. 

■ Full-sized reports - Get up-to-date mailing hsts. You 
can even create your own personal phone book! 

■ 16 user-dennabie flags - Each entry has its own set of 
conditional flags. Use them lo mark mailing classes or 
a customer's special interests. 

■ Versatile sort and select - Use alphabetic ranges, flags, 
and the data itself to print any range of entries. 

■ Visual layout system - To design custom reports, just 
position data fields with the mouse, stretch them to the 
desired length, and print! It's all done graphically! 

■ Maintains any address base - Limited only by disk 
size. Mighty Mail stores up to 1,400 addresses on a 
single-sided disk, or over 65,000 on a hard-drive! 

■ And more - Deletes redundant entries, retrieves report 
layouts, prints to disk files, and even makes lest labels. 



MichTron Utilities by Timothy Purves $59.95 

What would a tool be worth that could turn back time and 
end frustration? Before you find out that such a tool would 
be priceless, prepare yourself with MichTron Utilities. This 
program lets you recover lost data, repair damaged disks, 
and change bytes on your disks or hard drive. 

Take complete control of your disk flies: 

■ Change file contents - Edit individual bytes of infor- 
mation to patch or debug programs and files. 

■ Change file names, volume names, and attributes 

■ Copy or verify individual sectors 

■ Restore deleted files - As long as they're not physi- 
cally overwritten, your file can be reconstructed. 

■ Recover data from damaged disks - Fhp through the 
disk data and click on the mouse to accept or reject it. 

■ Repair damaged disks - Reformat affected areas 
without harming the rest of the disk. 

■ 10-sector format utility - Add up to 80k to disk space. 



And other fine programs by Timothy Purves: 

DOS SHELL ($39.95) Replace the Desktop with a 
more effective system! DOS Shell mimics the MS-DOS 
command structure, known for speed and power. Supports 
full file handling, wildcards, batch files, and more! 

ECHO This wireless remote-control system takes control 
of lights and appliances. Unique schedule system even 
considers weekends & holidays. Software only: $39.95. 
With X-10 master controller (required): $99.95. 

DFT ($49.95) With this utility and a null-modem cable, 
you can transfer files between your Atari ST and IBM PC 
almost effortlessly. (Optional null-modem cable $19.95) 

M-DISK ($39.95) Our RAM-disk emulator gives you 
the equivalent of an exO-a disk drive! It's faster and tougher 
than a hard drive, at only a fraction of the cost! 

SOFT SPOOL ($39.95) Stop waiung for the printer 
to finish its task; this software print spooler lets your ST 
print and compute at the same lime! 




All reasonably priced, with more coming every day. Ask for our latest catalog! 

Dealer inquiries welcome • Visa and Mastercard accepted • Add $3.00 shipping and handling to each order. 



IHi€h¥ron 



576 S. Telegraph, Pontiac, MI 48053 
Orders AND Information (313) 334-5700 




CIRCLE #101 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



SEPTEMBER 1986 



THE #1 MAGAZINE FOR ATARI® COMPUTER OWNERS 



COMPUTING 



FEATURES 



Counting without fingers . . . .Paul R. Robinson 11 

A brief history lesson on the origin of computers. 

Magic Spell Angelo Giambra 15 

This machine language program locates spelling errors in 
DOS 2. OS format text. 

Soft Touch Jack Morrison 33 

Get the most out of Atari's Touch Tablet with this tutorial. 

Moonlord Clayton Walnum 39 

The solar system's been invaded . . . again! This time, you're 
in it alone, to defeat the evil aliens. 



ST-Log 49ST 

ANALOG Computing's ST magazine. See page 51ST 
for contents of this month's ST-Log. 



Launch Code David Schwener 100 

"Thirty-six hours" — that's all you've got to disable twelve 
ICBMs on launch alert. 

Bits & Pieces Lee S. Brilliant, M.D. 105 

Build an internal working clock that keeps the time — all the 
time! 

La Machine Stephen Alport 115 

This graphics utility will assist in the task of creating bit- 
mapped animated figures. 

June CES 

& the 8-bit Atari Matthew J.W. Ratcliff 127 

Our midwest editor cruised up to Chicago via Amtrak to 
check out the latest and greatest for the 8-bits. 



REVIEWS 

Blackhawk (Orion software) Andy Eddy 85 

A new arcade game reminiscent of Choplifter. 

Panak Strikes! Steve Panak 91 

Reviewed this month are: Fooblitzky (Infocom), Racing De- 
struction Set (Electronic Arts), Monday Morning Manager 
(TK Computer Products) and Computer Baseball (SSI). 

Micro League Baseball Bob Curtin 95 

(Micro League Sports Association) 

Is this the premier baseball simulator or just another arcade 

game? 

Page Designer David N. Plotkin 114 

(XLent Software) 

Design pages for ads, signs, or anything else requiring a cus- 
tom layout. 

COLUMNS 

Editorial Michael J. DesChenes 4 

Reader Comment 6 

M/L Editor Clayton Walnum 7 

Database Delphi Matthew J.W. Ratcliff 13 

Boot Camp Karl E. Wiegers 29 

The End User Arthur Leyenberger 97 

index to Advertisers 132 




ANALOG Computing (ISSN 0744-9917) is published monthly for $28 ($36 in Canada, $39 foreign) per year by ANALOG 400/800 Corp., 
565 Main St., Cherry Valley, MA 01611. Second class postage paid at Worcester, MA and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to ANALOG Computing, P.O. Box 625, Holmes, PA 19043. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced in any form 
without written permission of the publisher. Contents copyright © 1986 ANALOG 400/800 Corp. 



ANALOG 

COMPUTING 

STAFF 



Editors/Publishers 

MICHAEL J. DESCHENES 
LEE H. PAPPAS 

Managing Editor 

DIANE L. GAW 

Contributing Editors 

LAN CHADWICK 

BRADEN E. GRIFFIN, M.D. 

STEVE PANAK 

RUSS WETMORE 

KARL E. WIEGERS 

East Coast Editor 

ARTHUR LEYENBERGER 

Midwest Editor 

MATTHEW J.W. RATCLIFF 

Contributing Artists 

MARK ASTRELLA 
GARY LIPPINCOTT 
LINDA RICE 

Cover Artists 

DON DIXON 

ARNE STARR 

Technical Editors 

CHARLES BACHAND 
CLAYTON WALNUM 
DOUGLAS WEIR 

Production 

CONNIE MOORE 
EDYTHE STODDARD 
JANE SULLIVAN 

Advertising Manager 

MICHAEL J. DESCHENES 

Circulation Manager 

PATRICK J. KELLEY 

Accounting 

ROBIN LEVITSKY 

Production/Distribution 

LORELL PRESS, INC. 

Contributors 

STEPHEN ALPERT 

LEE S. BRILLIANT, M.D. 

BOB CURTIN 

BRLAN DUGGAN 

ANDY EDDY 

PHILIP S. GALLO, JR., Ph.D. 

ANGELO GIAMBRA 

JACK MORRISON 

DAVID N. PLOTKIN 

PAUL R. ROBINSON 

DA\TD SCHWENER 

U.S. newsstand distribution by 
Eastern News Distributors, Inc. , 
1130 Cleveland Rd., Sandusky, OH 44870 

ANALOG Computing magazine 
(ANALOG 400/800 Corp.) is in no 
way affiliated with Atari. Atari is a 
trademark of Atari Corp. 



WHERE TO WRITE 



All editorial material (programs, articles, letters and press releases] should 
be sent to: Editor, ANALOG Computing, P.O. Box 23, V\^orcester, MA 01603. 

Correspondence regarding subscriptions, including problems and changes 
of address, should be sent to: ANALOG Computing, 100 Pine Street, Holmes, 
PA 19043, or call 1-800-345-8112 (in Pennsylvania, call 1-800-662-2444). 

Correspondence concerning a regular column should be sent to our editori- 
al address, with the name of the column included in the address. 

We cannot reply to all letters in these pages, so if you would like an answer, 
please enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope. 

An incorrectly addressed letter can be delayed as long as two weeks before 
reaching the proper destination. 



ADVERTISING SALES 




ANALOG Computing 

Home Office 
Michael Des Chenes 
National Advertising 
(617) 892-9230 



F. Stweney & Assoc. 

NV 10113 
242tiS4n 



Address all 
advertising materials to: 

Michael Des Chenes — Advertising Production 

ANALOG Computing 

565 Main Street. Cherry Valley, MA 01611 



PERMISSIONS 

No portion of this magazine may 
be reproduced in any form, without 
written permission from the publisher. 
Many programs are copyrighted and 
not public domain. 

Due, however, to many requests 
from Atari club libraries and bulletin 
board systems, our new policy allows 
club libraries or individually-run BBSs 
to make certain programs from ANA- 
LOG Computing available during the 
month printed on that issue's cover 
For example, software from the July 
issue can be made available July 1. 

This does not apply to programs 
which specifically state that they are 
not public domain and, thus, are not 
for public distribution. 

In addition, any programs used 
must state that they are taken from 
ANALOG Computing magazine. For 
further information, contact ANA- 
LOG Computing at (617) 892-3488. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 

ANALOG Computing, P.O. Box 
625, Holmes, PA 19043; or call toll- 
free: 1-800-345-8112 (PA 1-800-662- 
2444). Payable in U.S. funds only. 
U.S.: $28-1 yr.; $52-2 yrs.; $79-3 yrs. 
Canada: $36-1 yr; $62-2 yrs.; $89-3 
yrs. Foreign: $39-1 yr; $72-2 yrs.; 
$99-3 yrs. For disk subscriptions, see 
the cards at the back of this issue. 



AUTHORS 

when submitting articles and pro- 
grams, both program listings and text 
should be provided in printed and 
magnetic form, if possible. Typed or 
printed text copy is mandatory, and 
should be in upper- and lowercase, 
with double spacing. If a submission 
is to be returned, please send a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope. 



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puters. A MUST READ FOR Aa ATARf® OWNERS. 
BOOK INCLUDES: " Duplicate seaoring • Custom disk formatting • 
Creating "BAD" sectors • Hardware data keys • Legal proteaion like 
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BOOK II + DISK II: Advanced Software Proteaion . This all new sequel 
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Book II: Tells you specifically what they copy what they won't, how 
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such topics as: • Transmitting protected programs • Copying disks with 
more than 19 sectors/track. Includes the newest proteaion methods by 
companies like Synapse* AND Elearohic Arts* • Data erKryption • 
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Sample BASIC + Assembler programs • On-line security • And much 
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DISK II INCLUDES: • Automatk: program proteaor • Custom format 
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CARTRIDGE TO DISK COPY SYSTEM Yes. for only S29.95, you 
can make working copies of all your Atari computer car- 
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your cartridges to ordinary disk files. They will run exactly 
like the originals when used with the Impersonator. Each 
disk holds up to 12 cartridge programs. Now you can put all 
your real cartridges away for safe keeping and use the 
Impersonator for everything YES, }T REALLY WORKS. The 
Impersonator does everything the high-pnced cartridge 
back-up systems do. -.and more ONLY $29.95 



COMPUTER EYES, capture software and 
MAGNIPRINT 11+ Only $114.95 

COMPUTER EYES/MAGNIPRINT Camera System 
A complete ready to run system for those without access to 
video equipment. This system includes Computer Eyes, Magni- 
print II + , a high quality B/W video camera, and a 10 ft coaxial 
cable with appropriate conneaors, Only 1299.95 
COMPUTER EYES alone (with capture and display software 
only) t99.9S 

Computer Eyes Gr.9 Acquisition Software- .12 

Computer Eyes lets you take any form of video input and 
saves It as a high-resolution graphics screen. >bu can use 
a video camera, VCR. TV output, video disk, other com- 
puters, etc. Now you can capture your piaure, your 
friends or any video image and show it on an Atari 
computer Computer Eyes is an innovative stow scan 
device that conneas t)etween any standard video source 
and your Atari computer (see the review in ANALOG 
magazine) - 

• Do a complete Hi-Res scan in under 6 seconds 

• Unique multi-scan mode provides realistic grey scale 
images in 24 seconds, and up for more detail scans. 

• Full one-year warranty on parts and labor 

• Plugs into your Atari joystick ports and uses a 
standard video phono plug 

Now anyone can create the kind of graphics seen in this 
ad. When Computer Eyes is combined with Magniprint 
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• Print piaures wrth full shading for a level of realism 
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• lake your Computer Eyes images and modify them 
with your Koala Pad, Atari Touch Tablet, Micro , 
Illustrator program, or Magniprfnt's special touch-up I 
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14 Graphics modes - works with everything from Graphics text 

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16 Levels of Shading for spectacular resolution and detail 
24 Compatible Graphics Programs = Print your own pictures or 

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+ HELP Instant Help Screen for easy use 

TOTAL= IMAGNIPRIIsmi+ 

Adds up to MORE POWER, MORE versatility, and MORE 
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By specially shading each printed pixel, MagniPrint II + 
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INCREDIBLE POWER AT AN AMAZING PRICE OF JUST $24.95 




All new sound digitalizer and synthesizer for your Atari. Tired of low-quality mechanical 
sounding voice output? Now you can make any Atari speak in your own voice. Tired of four 
tone sound? Now any Atari can play a whole orchestra complete with a singing choir. 
"The Parrot" digital sound synthesizer system lets you do all this and much more. 

How it works -"The Parrot" system plugs into yourjoystick port and lets you record 
pure digital sound from your stero, TV, microphone, or any other sound source. The special 
Parrot software lets you play back this high quality sound on any Atari system with no spe- 
cial hardware needed. It even lets you put this untielievable sound right into your own pro- 
grams, that will run on anyone's Atari. It also includes digital sequencer software that lets 
you turn your Atari into a synthesizer comparable to those costing thousands of dollars. 
Turn any natural sound into a musical instrument, or design your own custom sounds. 
Imagine playing a song with the sounds of a dog's bark, a Chinese gong, a car's honk, your 
own voice, or anything your imagination can come up with. It turns your keyt)oard into an 
organ and lets you instantly switch between up to nine different digital sounds, each with 
three full octaves of notes. Recording time varies depending on available memory and 
quality level desired. You've got to hear it to believe it! ! 

THE PARROT digital input hardware and playback/synthesizer software with sample 
sounds and demos. 



All for Only $39.95 




r^for ST Owners 



ATARI® ST GOES 
DIGITAL!!! 

HIPPO VIDEO DIGITIZER 

Use the full resolution and speed of your 
ST for incredible results. Capture a high or 
medium res picture in 1/60th of a second. 
Flip through 10 frames a second for Photo 
Quality animation. Use any standard video 
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your pictures in NEOCHROME or DEGAS 
format for easy touch-ups and adding color. 
Special Hardv/are and 
Software Ollty $119.95 

COMING SOON - POWERPRINT 

Capture any ST screen and print it out w/ith 
amazing versatility and styles. Select your 
own shading and print in hundreds of shapes 
and sizes. It makes the perfect companion for 
the video digitizer or your favorite graphics 
drawing program. 

HIPPO SOUND DIGITIZER 

Record and manipulate sounds in their 
pure digital form. Plug in the microphone 
(included) or hook it up to a radio, tape 
recorder, TV, etc. Comes with an audio out- 
put jack so you can play back through your 
stereo or PA system. Record, play, analyze, 
and manipulate pure digital sound using 
your ST's power and easy mouse control. 
Comes complete with everything you need 
for only $ll9.95 



mII tor your Atari Computers. Disk drive and 
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5Y5TEM! 



i CIRCLE #102 ON READER SERVICE CARD ' 




Editorial 



As an ANALOG Computing reader, 
you may have noticed — and, we hope, 
have used — our "reader service card." 
There's one in the back of every issue. 

If you've never used the card to re- 
quest information from one of our ad- 
vertisers, give it a try. Now, perhaps you 
don't need any materials from the adver- 
tisers. If that's the case, then I'd like to 
ask you to take the time to fill out the 
small survey section on the card. 

This information helps us determine 
what you readers like or dislike about 
any given issue. The survey results also 
help advertisers determine the responses 
their ads are getting. 

ATARI PERSONAL USAGE: 

(Some multiple ownerships) 

400/800 43% 

800XL 39% 

XE 21% 

ST 20% 

1200XL 2% 

600XL 1% 

INTEND TO PURCHASE A NEW ATARI: 

YES 53% 

NO 44% 

NO ANSWER 3% 

MODEL TO BE PURCHASED: 

ST 41% 

1040 23% 

520 18% 

XE 8% 

UNDECIDED 2% 



Naturally, we think it would be great if 
all our readers filled out this card, every 
month. But what I'm really asking is that 
those of you who don't normally use the 
reader service card take a few minutes and 
fill it out this month. The previous infor- 
mation was tabulated from the most recent 
batch of reader service cards received . It 
would be most interesting to see if these 
percentages change, should we get a larg- 
er number of cards returned. 

Our last two issues ran the ANALOG 
Computing on Delphi ad , and the response 
has been very good. As readers, I hope that 
most of you who are active in telecommu- 
nications will also join us on Delphi's Atari 
SIG. 

When you come into the Atari Users' 
Group, you'll be able to choose from over 
2,000 downloads. Best of all, you'll get to 
talk to most of the editorial staff. It's a good 
channel for you to let us know what's hap- 
pening out there in the Atari user's world. 
We want to stay in touch, and this seems 
to be the best way. 

And, speaking of telecommunications, 
take a look at the new column. Database 
Delphi, by Matthew Ratcliff. He'll keep 
you up to date on what's new with our Del- 
phi SIG and touch on other topics relat- 
ing to telecommunications. 

ST-Log has been getting easier to fill 
lately, what with more articles and adver- 
tisers. Many of our regular ST-Log readers 
have by now noticed that we're putting an 
additional "bonus" program on the disk 
version. 



Last month, it was an ST version of the 
ever-popular 8-bit Solid States. This issue, 
we have a very useful disk menu labeler, 
which is an extension of the Dx Lister pro- 
gram on page 57ST. 

Next month's bonus is going to be some- 
thing special (I love making people go nuts 
waiting for something). Don't miss it — it's 
unbelievable! 

One last thing: any ST owners who'd like 
to pocket an extra $5,000.00, become a 
household name and have their faces plas- 
tered all over these pages for the Atari 
world to gawk at . . . take a look at the de- 
tails of our ST programming contest in the 
ad on page 84ST. 

We hope you'll enter any programs you 
may be working on. Even if you don't win, 
you may still qualify for publication and 
reap the profits that way. 

Michael J. Des Chenes 

Publisher 

ANALOG Computing 



PAGE 4 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



ATARI DISK DRIVE OWNERS . . . 
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and enhanced density. PRICE INCLUDES WARP SPEED SOFTWARE BELOW, installation required. 

HAPPY WARP SPEED SOFTWARE REV 7 (not sold separately) 

includes the famous HAPPY BACKUP and COMPACTOR which are the most powerful disk backup utilities 
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130XE RAMDISK, plus the WARP SPEED DOS which improves ATARI DOS 2.0s to allow fastest speed, plus 
HAPPY'S DIAGNOSTIC which allows comprehensive disk drive testing. 

HAPPY 1050 CONTROLLER $64.95 order number HC2G 

For use with HAPPY ENHANCED lOSOdiskdrivesonly. Allows easy access to HAPPY 1 050 slow and fast speeds 
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disks. Printed circuit board has switches and write protect indicator LED, installation required. 

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Both of these disk operating systems support the fastest speed with both HAPPY 810* and 1050, and with HAPPY 
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under cartridge, under ROM and AXLON RAM disk version, and is order number HC4G at $29.95. TOP DOS 
version 1 .5 from ECLIPSE SOFTWARE has more menu driven features, operates in all three densities, supports the 
130XE RAMDISK, and is order number HC6G at $39.95. *Note: 810 requires upgrade below. 

810 VERSION 7 UPGRADE $49.95 order number HU3G -XXXX 

Allows older 81 HAPPIES to use newer software. Includes custom plug in IC and rev 7 WARP SPEED SOFTWARE. 
Same price for all HAPPY 810s registered or not. When ordering replace XXXX in part number with the serial 
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EPROM part number in your HAPPY 810 socket Al 02 of your side board modified HAPPY (not made by HAPPY 
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SUPER PACKAGE SPECIALS 

.Get a HAPPY 1050 ENHANCEMENT and CONTROLLER and WARP SPEED DOS XL for just $199.95 order 
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All prices include UPS shipping in USA, add $1 0.00 for shipment outside USA. California residents add sales tax. No extra charge for credit cards or COD, VISA or 
MASTERCARD accepted. Our toll free number is an order taking service, not our I ine. To ORDER ONLY call (800) 538-81 57 outside California, or (800) 672-3470 
inside California, ask for extension 81 7 and have your credit card, part number and quantities ready. Toll free hours 6 am to 1 2 pm Mon.-Fri., 8 am to 8 pm Sat. & 
Sun., Pacific Time. For answers to questions call HAPPY COMPUTERS at our number below. Office hours 9-5 Mon.-Fri. Pacific Time. 



HAPPY COMPUTERS, INC. * 



P.O. Box 1268 * Morgan Hill, CA 95037 

CIRCLE #103 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



* (408) 779-3830 



Reader Comment 



Words for the Home Shopper. 

I would like to submit the following up- 
date to the Home Shopper (issue 43). In 
the article, I stated that your store database 
could contain twenty-three aisles of infor- 
mation. True, but the browse screen will 
scroll if all twenty-three aisles are defined. 
Lines 500 and 540 should be updated as 
follows: 

500 FOR 1=0 TO 22 
540 ? " "; AISLES; :IF I 
<22 THEN ? 

Also, in the "Using the USR routines" 
section of the article, it was indicated that 
POKE 711,NEWCOLR2 would change the 
bottom half of the screen, to allow a new 
color when using my two-color DLI utili- 
ty. This should have been: 

POKE 1711,NEWC0LR2 

The editors thought I'd made a typo, 
since 711 is a common SETCOLOR loca- 
tion. It should be 1711, however, where my 
DLI routine stores the bottom half of the 
screen color. 

I gave you another goodie at the last 
minute, but forgot to update the article. I 
stated that you should "always execute a 
graphics command just before this USR 
call" for the double screen colors. 

In the first version of Shopper I did, this 
was true. But I updated , so it wasn't neces- 
sary. You can use this to your advantage 
in creating certain special effects. Quit the 
Shopper, then try this tricky one-liner: 
F.K=1 TO 99:F.Irl TO 22:fl= 
U5RCie20,I,255»RND(011 :N.I 
:F.I=22 TO 1 STEP -l:ft=USR 
C1620,I,255MRN[>C0n :N.I:N. 
X 



N. is the Atari BASIC abbreviation of 
NEXT, E is FOR (necessary to fit the one- 
liner into one Atari BASIC program line. 

You can create some less obnoxious spe- 
cial effects with this routine in your own 
programs. If you're working on a Shopper 
update, you may wish to try the following 
immediate mode command, to look at all 
the aisle topics (not aisle data) at once: 

FOR 1=8000 TO 8440 STEP 20 
:LIST I:? CHR$C28); :NEXT I 

I hope this helps you get even more use 
out of the Shopper and its USR routines. 
Sorry for the mix-up. 

Sincerely, 

Matthew J.W. Ratcliff 

St. Louis, MO 

I am using the Home Shopper from your 
June magazine. 

I think that the program is very good, 
but I ran into a little problem using it. I 
ran it and set up a shopping list, only to 
discover that I hadn't turned on the print- 
er I found it's not easy to leave the pro- 
gram to enter the printer codes. 

To avoid having a loyal ANALOG Com- 
puting subscriber kick his dog, I have ad- 
ded two lines to end this problem. 

20 ? "IS": DIM RETS (IJ : POSIT 
ION 2,2:? "DO YOU MflNT THE 

PRINTER OH CY/NJ"; :INPUT 
RETS:IF RETS<>"Y" THEN 50 
30 LPRINT CHRSt27);CHRS(24 

); 

40 REM UP TO 23 AISLES, 19 
ITEMS PER ftlSLE 

The printer codes in Line 30 are for an 
Olympia electronic compact NP, but I think 



that other printer codes can be substitut- 
ed, making that line compatible with most 
other printers. 

Ronald M. Green 

Roy, UT 

Switching the Flip Switch. 

I am writing in regard to your article 
The 810 Flip Switch, by Steve Schelb, in 
issue 44. Mr Schelb wrote a very detailed 
article, but he left out one very important 
fact. That is, which jack one is supposed 
to solder the wires to! 

The correct jack number is "JlOl," locat- 
ed on the side board near the rear of the 
drive. Connections can easily be made to 
the red and black wires on the lower part 
of the connector. 

Also, instead of a slide switch, I would 
reconmiend a subminiature toggle switch 
(Radio Shack No. 275-612). This switch 
will fit nicely on the front panel, about Vt 
inch to the left of the "BUSY" light. 

Sincerely, 

Robert C. Stoll 

Sawyer AFB, MI 

In ANALOG Computing issue 44, 
Steven Schelb authored The 810 Flip 
Switch — how to wire a switch into the 
Atari 810 disk drive so the back of disks 
can be written to without punching out the 
sides of the diskette. 

I have three 810 drives which I modified 
over a year ago, and was really surprised 
at Mr Schelb's choice of a switch. The slide 
switch which he uses would be very dif- 
ficult to moimt, since it requires a rectan- 
(continued on page 8J 



PAGE 6 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



32K Disk 



UTILITY 




M/L Editor 

For use in machine language entry 



by Clayton Walnum 



M/L Editor provides an easy method to en- 
ter GUI machine language listings. It won't al- 
low you to skip lines or enter bad data. For 
convenience, you may enter listings in mul- 
tiple sittings. When you're through typing a 
listing with M/L Editor, you'll have a com- 
plete, runnable object file on your disk. 

There is one hitch: it's for disk users only. 
My apologies to those with cassette systems. 

Listing 1 is M/L Editor's BASIC listing. 
Type it in and , when it's free of typos, save 
a copy to disk, then run it. 

On a first run, you'll be asked if you're 
starting a new listing or continuing from a 
previously saved point. Press S to start, or 
C to continue. 

You'll then be asked for a filename. If you're 
starting a new listing, type in the filename 
you want to save the program under, then 
press RETURN. If there's already a file by that 
name on the disk, you'll be asked if you wish 
to delete it. Press Y to delete the file, or N 
to enter a new filename. 

If you're continuing a file, type in the name 
you gave the file when you started it. If the 
program can't find the file, you'll get an er- 
ror message and be prompted for another file- 
name. Otherwise, M/L Editor will calculate 
where you left off, then go on to the data en- 
try screen. 

Each machine language program in ANA- 
LOG Computing is represented by a list of 
BASIC data statements. Every line contains 
16 bytes, plus a checksum. Only the numbers 
following the word DATA need be con- 
sidered. 

M/L Editor will display, at the top of the 
screen, the number of the line you're current- 
ly working on. As you go through the line, 
you'll be prompted for each entry. Simply 
type the number and press RETURN. If you 
press RETURN without a number, the default 
is the last value entered. 

This feature provides a quick way to type 
in lines with repetitions of the same number. 
As an added convenience, the editor will not 



respond to the letter keys (except Q, for 
"quit"). You must either enter a number or 
press RETURN. 

When you finish a line, M/L Editor will 
compare the entries' checksum with the 
magazine's checksum. If they match, the 
screen will clear, and you may go on to the 
next line. 

If the checksums don't match, you'll hear 
a buzzing sound. The screen will turn red, 
and the cursor will be placed back at the first 
byte of data. Compare the magazine listing 
byte by byte with your entries. If a number's 
correct, press RETURN. 

If you find an error, make the correction. 
When all data's valid, the screen will return 
to grey, and you'll be allowed begin the next 
line. 

Make sure you leave your disk in the drive 
while typing. The data is saved continuously. 

You may stop at any time (except when you 
have a red screen) by entering the letter Q for 
byte #1. The file will be closed, and the pro- 
gram will return you to BASIC. When you've 
completed a file, exit M/L Editor in the same 
way. 

When you've finished typing a program, 
the file you've created will be ready to run. 
In most cases, it should be loaded from DOS 
via the L option. Some programs may have 
special loading instructions; be sure to check 
the program's article. 

If you want the program to run automati- 
cally when you boot the disk, simply name 
the file AUTORUN.SYS (make sure you have 
DOS on the disk). 

That's M/L Editor Use it in good health. H 



The two-letter checksum code preced- 
ing the line numbers here is not a part 
of the BASIC program. For further in- 
formation, see the BASIC Editor (issue 
45) and its update on page 9. 



Listing 1. 
BASIC listing. 



AZ le DIH BFC16) ,IISI4] ,a$Cl) ,B$fl] ,F$C15} 
,F1S(1S> 



BN 28 LINE=ieee:l)ETRII=lSS:BaCK5P=126:CHK5 

UH=e:EDIT=« 
GO Z9 G05UB 45e:P05ITI0N IB.B:? "Start or 

Qontinue? ";:COSUB 588:? chrSia) 

Zt 48 POSITION 10 •>)■> "FILENAHE"; : INPUT F 

SlPOKE 7S2,1:? " ■■ 
FE 58 IF LENIF$]<3 THEN POSITION 28.18:? 

•• '^GOTO 48 
NF 68 IF FSC1,21<>"D:" THEN FlS="D:":FlS« 

31=FS:G0T0 88 
KL 78 F1S=FS 

TN 88 IF CHR$fA>="5" THEN 128 
FD 78 TRAP 438: OPEN l>2 , 4, 8 , Fl$ : TRAP 118 
HO lee FOR X=l TO 16: GET 112, A: NEXT X:LINE 

=LINE«ie;GOTO 188 
HH 118 C105E n2:0PEN n2 ,7,8, FIS :GOTO 178 
VT 128 TRAP 168: OPEN 112 ,4, 8, Fl$ : GOSUB 448 

:P05ITI0N 18,18:? "FILE ALREADY EXI5T5 

• !":POKE 752,8 
ZU 138 POSITION 18,12:? "ERA5E IT? ";:tOS 

UB 588: POKE 752,1:? CHR$ CAl 
VH 140 IF CHR$IA>="N" OR CHIlSCA>:"n" THEN 

CL05E tt2:G0T0 38 
OG ISO IF CHRSC0J<>"Y" AND CHRSCA1<>"<)" T 

HEN 138 

BH 160 CL05E l>Z:OPEN l>2,S, 8, Fl$ 

IE 178 G05UB 458 : POSITION 18,1:? " rlil'KilM 

laillg: ";LINE:CHK5UH=8 
GH 188 L1=3:F0R X=1 TO 16:P05ITI0N 13»IX< 

18)tl2»CX>91 ,X1^2:P0KE 752,8:? "BYTE U" 

;X;": "; :G05UB 318 
KH 1)8 IF EDIT AND L=8 THEN BYTE=BFCX> :G0 

TO 218 
FY 288 BYTE=VALCN$] 
BU 218 POSITION 22,Xt2:? BYTE;" " 
YZ 220 BFCX)=BYTE:CHKSUH=CHKSUmBYTE»X:IF 

CHKSUM>9999 THEN CHKSUM=CHKSUI1-18888 
HS 230 NEXT X : CHKSUH=CHKSUtt»LINE : IF CHKSU 

M>9797 THEN CHKSUn=CHKSUH-18888 
IG 248 POSITION 12,Xt2:P0KE 752,8:? "CHEC 

KSUM: ": :L1=4:G0SUB 318 
EH 258 IF EDIT AND L=e THEN 278 
QH 268 C=VALCN$1 

SY 278 POSITION 22,Xt2:? C;" " 
IL 288 IF C=CHKSUH THEN 308 
DI 298 GOSUB 44e:EDIT=l :CHKSUM=e:GaTe 188 
LH 388 FOR X=l TO 16:PUT n2 ,BF (XI : NEXT X: 

LINE=LINEtl8:EDIT=e:G0T0 178 
FV 318 L=8 
LG 328 GOSUB 588: IF A=ASCC"0") AND X=l AN 

D NOT EDIT THEN 428 
PO 338 IF AORETRN AND AOBACKSP AND (A<4 

S OR A>57] THEN 328 
TD 335 IF A=RETRN AND 1=0 AND X>1 THEN 35 

8 
JR 348 IF ((AORETRN AND NOT EDIT! OR A=B 

ACKSP) AND L=0 THEN 320 
DH 358 IF A=RETRN THEN POKE 752,1:? R 

ETURN 
£G 360 IF AOBACKSP THEN 488 
SA 378 IF L>1 THEN N$=N$ (1,L-1] : GOTO 3?0 
AS 388 NS="" 

RE 310 ? CHR$(BACKSP]; :L=L-1:G0T0 328 
B8 480 L=Ltl:IF L>L1 THEN A=RETRN:G0T0 35 


HX 410 N$CL)=CHRS(A):? CHR$(AJ ; :G0T0 328 
KN 428 GRAPHICS 8: END 
YT 438 GOSUB 448: POSITION 10,18:? "NO SUC 

H FILE!": FOR X=l TO 1888: NEXT X: CLOSE 

n2:G0T0 38 
FD 448 POKE 718,4S:S0UND 0,188,12,8 :FOR X 

=1 TO 50:NEXT X:SOUND e,e,8,e:RETURN 
HY 458 GRAPHICS 23 : PBKE 16, 112: POKE 53774 

,112:P0KE S5S,8:P0KE 710,4 
XR 460 DL=PEEK (560] t256«PEEK (5611 «4: POKE 

DL-1,70:P0KE DL«2,6 
HM 478 FOR X=3 TO 39 STEP 2: POKE DLtX,2:N 

EXT X:FOR X=4 TO 40 STEP 2:P0KE DL4X,8 

:NEXT X 
ZN 480 POKE DL«41,e5:P0KE DLt42,PEEK(568] 

:POKE DLt43,PEEK(561}:P0KE 87.0 

AC 490 POSITION 2,0:? "analog nl editor": 

POKE 559, 34: RETURN 
HZ 588 OPEN »1 , 4 .8 ,"K:" :GET ill,A:CLOSE 111 
: RETURN 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 7 






Reader Comment continued 



gular hole for the tab and two small screw 
holes. 

I used a miniature on/off toggle switch, 
which can be mounted on the front panel 
by drilling a hole through the Atari logo 
directly above the LEDs. A %-inch di- 
ameter hole is large enough for most minia- 
ture toggle switches. 

The heat generated by the drill bit may 
cause the Atari logo to come loose, since 
it's on a small piece of aluminum that is 
glued in place; however, it can be put back 
on and held in place by the switch's hold- 
ing nut. This location is much more con- 
venient than on the side, top, or back. 

Persons who open up their drive to make 
this modification may run into another 
problem — not all Atari 810 drives are the 
same. One of the drives I modified uses 
a microswitch to detect the presence of the 
write-protect notch, instead of the light 
source and detector. 

Drives of this type have only two wires 
connected to the side board, not five, as 
in the other model drives. After you mount 
the toggle switch, the wires can be rout- 
ed between the side board and drive 
mechanism. 

Charles A. Cole 

Sierra Vista, AZ 

Helper help. 

In his article Function Key Helper in the 
July issue of ANALOG Computing's ST- 

Log, Matthew Ratcliff described the "an- 
noying" way the screen fUps between out- 
put and command screens when using the 
a$=input$(1) command. 

If you run the BASIC program while the 
edit window is open, the windows don't 
open and close, and a key is grabbed ins- 
tantly. I run all my programs from the edit 
window now. 

You can use the mouse to run from the 
drop-down menu, or just type RUN on any 
empty line (as in no line number) in the 
edit window and hit RETURN. When you 
stop the program, it returns to the edit 
window. 

Sincerely, 

Gordon Billingsley 

Murphysboro, IL 

More on 
the 256K XL RAM upgrade. 

I would like to clear up a couple of 
points made in the review of the Newell 
Industries 256K memory upgrade for the 
Atari computers (issue 44). Although it 
■ Was not known to you at the time of the 
review, instructions for installing the mem- 
ory upgrade in the 1200XL are now includ- 
ed (by popular demand). 

You mistakenly had the price as $28.00. 
The prices are $39.95 without RAM, and 
$69.96 with RAM. Both of these include 
MYDOS, which supports the extra mem- 
ory and can be configured to a RAMdisk 
of up to 192K. 



You mentioned that total cost to install 
the upgrade approaches $150.00. In fact, 
this figure is much less. At retail, the cost 
would be $69.95 plus $30.00 for installa- 
tion, for a total of $99.95. Add $10.00 if you 
have the old ANTIC and want it replaced. 
If you look through the ads in ANALOG 
Computing, you can find it for less. 

For those who do not have an 800XL, we 
sell the whole computer, with the upgrade 
installed, for $149.95. 

I would also like to mention that the oth- 
er upgrade reviewed (ICD RAMBO XL) 
does not support memory protection or 
ANTTC control, which you pointed out can 
cause compatibiUty problems. It also does 
not include the DOS to support it. 

When you add the cost of $39.95 for the 
DOS and $49.95 for the kit without the 
RAM, it totals up to $89.90, as compared 
to $39.95 for the Newell upgrade — which 
has the additional support for the memo- 
ry protection and ANTIC control, and 
comes with the DOS. 

Thank you for the space to express my 
views. 

Wes Newell 

Newell Industries 

Wylie, TX 

Foreign subscriptions and 
BoulderDash for the 810. 

I have been an avid reader of ANALOG 
Computing for the past three years. . .1 
would Uke to subscribe, if only you did not 
demand an eleven-dollar surcharge for for- 
eign readers. . .You have to package the 
magazine whether its destination is inside 
the U.S. or abroad. Whatever your answer, 
it will not deter me from buying and en- 
joying ANALOG Computing for many 
years to come. 

I have recently purchased BoulderDash 
2 on disk and found that it would not load 
properly most of the time in my 810 drive. 
I wrote to Databyte in London, and they 
told me that the duplicating house that 
they use could not cure the problem of 
loading on an 810, even though it worked 
all right on a 1050. 

Databjfte also told me that they were do- 
ing their own duplicating for the 810. They 
said it was proving successful, and that 
they would replace my disk. I mention this 
in case anybody else has had a problem, 
either in the U.K. or the States. 

Yours faithfully, 

Vaughan Pitman 

South Humberside, U.K. 

Thanks for all your comments. We did, 
in fact, realize that we were penoJizing/or- 
eign readers and have changed our poli- 
cy. Starting with issue 45's subscription 
cards, you'll see that out foreign rates are 
now flat fees, which include all charges. 
We hope that the drop in price will en- 
courage U.K. and Continental readers to 
subscribe. — Ed. 



Art for arf^ sake. 

Without a doubt, ANALOG Computing 

pubUshes some of the highest quality soft- 
ware ever found in a magazine, but an of- 
ten overlooked fact is that ANALOG 
Computing is also a showcase for an ex- 
cellent artist — namely, Gary Lippincott. 

His high quality, and sometimes bizarre, 
fantasy art is a heck of a lot better than the 
simple line-drawings found in other maga- 
zines. All of Mr. Lippincott's work is ex- 
cellent, but the watercolor masterpieces 
included with the Fire Bug and Adven- 
turous Programming articles are my per- 
sonal favorites. 

I was pleasantly surprised to find one 
of his drawings accompanying my Elec- 
troids program, as well. Let's give credit 
where credit is due. To both ANALOG 
Computing and Gary Lippincott — keep up 
the incredible work! 

Sincerely, 

James Hague 

Richardson, TX 

Gary Lippincott lives and works in 
Spencer, Massachusetts, a quiet country 
town where his fantasies take shape. He 
studied at Maryland Institute College of 
Art as a painting major. 

He's been using his talents with water- 
colors and other media pro/essionally for 
eleven years now. For the past year and a 
half, he's been busy working on textbook 
illustrations for grade school materials. His 
ANALOG Computing work lets him live 
out the fairy tales he imagines — for all of 
us. He also does commissioned works for 
many varied individuals — Ed McMahon, 
for one. 

You can see his works at the Boskone 
science fiction convention every year. 

More Action!, please. 

ANALOG Computing is one of the high- 
Ughts of my computing reading, and I look 
forward to receiving the magazine each 
month. 

This month (issue 44), your article 
D:CHECK in Action! is a special treat. 
First, it will surely make typing in the Ac- 
tion! coding a great deal more fun, with 
less chance of error. Second, I hope that 
inclusion of this program means we'll see 
more space devoted to Action! articles and 
programs in the future. 

My conversion to Action! has been slow 
and, at times, a bit painful, mentally. I real- 
ize that the number of people program- 
ming in Action! is quite small when com- 
pared to those programming in BASIC, but 
I would appreciate your consideration of 
either some strong, comprehensive tutori- 
als, or some suggestions as to where one 
might find additional hard copy on Action! 
programming. 

I should also like to encourage you to 
provide more tutorials on programming. 
Some of your readers, if they're Uke me. 



PAGE 8 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



depend on your magazine as an education- 
al tool. Most of what I've learned about 
programming (BASIC, Logo, Action!) has 
been gleaned from the popular publica- 
tions that have supported Atari computers. 

Computers are not required in my pro- 
fession, they provide no financial rewards 
for me, but they are my escape from the 
world during the evening hours, provid- 
ing me with peace of mind. 

Thank you for pubUshing your fine mag- 
azine. Please consider my request for more 
tutorials, especially in Action! 

Sincerely, 

Donald Sexauer 

Greenville, NC 

We fry. You might check out our Special 
Issue, due out this fall. A separate publi- 
cation for 8-bit users, it will give you quite 
a few Action! programs. — Ed. 

Help keep the 8-bits strong. 

I have been the faithful owner of an 800 
for four years, and was sincerely looking 
forward to many more years, until recent- 
ly. The death of new software for the 8-bits 
has me worried. 

I use my 800 for games, word process- 
ing and some database work for my job. 
Many of the best new programs came out 
only for the Commodore 64 and Apple. 

I especially refer to The Newsroom by 
Springboard. They apparently have no in- 
tention of publishing this for our com- 
puters. I could really use it as an effective 
sales tool in my business. I urge all your 
readers to write Springboard (7808 Creek- 
ridge Circle, Minnapolis, MN 55435) — and 
other software houses not bringing out 
their best programs for Atari. Ask them to 
reconsider, or we'll all be buying new, non- 
Atari computers. The peripherals we buy 
won't be Atari's, and the magazine won't 
be ANALOG Computing. That would be 
a sad epitaph for the best home computers 
ever made. 

Sincerely, 

Joseph H. Bode 

Jupiter, FL 

At the risk o/ repeating ourselves again, 
we urge our readers to do something about 
piracy — it is what's killing the 8-bit so^- 
ware industry. Please take a look at Matt 
Ratcliffs report on the June CES (on page 
127). We hope you'll see the seriousness 
of this issue. 

Please do write to software developers. 
But remember, they won't publish pro- 
grams they can't sell. — Ed. 

Atari excitement. 

Okay, people, I think it's about time 
someone wrote who defends ANALOG 
Computing's opinion about Atari comput- 
ing! Except for Mr. Scratch (issue 41's ST- 
Log), which disturbed me because of my 
religion, I have fovmd ANALOG Comput- 



ing to be one of the "big three" magazines 
I currently buy, along with Antic and 
COMPUTE!. 

I'm sorry Mr Mosher, but I live, eat and 
breathe Atari. In fact, only God ranks 
higher in my life. And to those griping 
about "gee, you're abandoning us 8-bit- 
ters," I have something to say. Hey, people, 
I own a 600XL and a 130XE. I love them 
both. And soon I will have a 520ST. 

The people at Antic and ANALOG Com- 
puting have been using Atari 8-bits for 
years, so no wonder they're ready for reUv- 
ing Atari excitement. You all know the ex- 
citement of having a brand-new computer 
for the first time. 

I totally agree with the attitude the mag- 
azines have: "still support the 8-bits, but 
enlarge ST support." I'm sorry, Mr. Mosh- 
er, but I agree on letting people know about 
Atari computers in a positive way when I 
have the chance. 

Also, Atari isn't stupid. Jack Tramiel's 
move to put the 520ST in Toys 'R' Us, Sears 
and K-Mart is a smart idea. 

As for piracy. . .1 have to admit I own 
some (pirated programs). When I first got 
my 130XE, I didn't realize how badly we 
users could hurt the industry. We have to 
totally reject piracy, or it will spell the end 
of the Atari. 

One last thing: EOA is plarming to mar- 
ket Marble Madness for the STs, right? 
Please confirm this. 

Sincerely, 

Terry Miller 

Allen, TX 

In the words of a wine-cooler company, 
"Thank you for your support." As for Mar- 
ble Madness, EOA does have plans to get 
it out . . . when and for how much is uncer- 
tain at press time. — Ed. 

Home inventory fix. 

The following lines should be added to 
the Home Inventory program listing from 
our issue 43. 

4880 GRAPHICS K8:P0KE K718 
,K4:P0KE K7e9,K255:P0KE Kl 
6,K64:P0KE K53774,K64:P0KE 

K752,K1:X=K0:I1=K8 
4890 POSITION K13,K19:? "R 
eading File" 

4900 FILEl5="D:INU.DflT":FI 
LE2$="D:IMU. IMP": CLOSE »K1 
:CLOSE »K2:0PEN ttKl,K4,K0, 
FILE1$:0PEN »K2,K8,K0,FILE 
25 

4910 INPUT ttKl,DESC$, DATES 
,ID$,COST 

4920 IF DATES="XXXXXK" THE 
N 5000 

4930 C0ST$=STRSIC0STJ 
4940 IF LENCCOSTSKKIO THE 
N COSTS CLENCC0STSJ+K1J=" " 
:G0T0 4940 

4950 REC$CK1,K20)=DESC$:RE 
C$CK21,26J=DATE$:REC$(27,4 
1) =IDS : REC$ C42, 511 =COST$ 

(continued on next page) 



BASIC Editor II 

UPDATE 

Yes, friends, you're absolutely correct. 
It is, of course, impossible to type in BA- 
SIC Editor II (issue 45) using tine old BA- 
SIC Editor (issues 43 and 44). Don't 
bother to asl< how these things happen— 
you wouldn't believe it, anyway 

You should use Unicheck (issue 39) 
to check your typing after entering BA- 
SIC Editor II. Checksums for the BASIC 
Editor 11 listings are given below. 
CHECKSUMS FOR LISTING 1. 
32600 DATA 6,665,923,757,8 
09,171,225,898,532,499,910 
,267,912,144,735,8453 
32638 DATA 97,358,230,693, 
706,878,317,127,36,597,238 
,258,182,430,168,5315 
32668 DATA 864,953,472,385 
,887,724,72,687,908,736,62 
5,612,672,184,891,9672 
32698 DATA 8,856,85,949 

Add :GOTO 60 to the end of Line 40 
of Listing 2. 

CHECKSUMS FOR LISTING 2. 

10 DATA 203,265,455,844,29 

4,973,652,270,978,797,278, 

275,835,209,301,7639 

160 DATA 355,94,254,420,93 

5,840,580,419,974,564,5435 

We hope to publish the full, corrected 
version in our next issue, for your con- 
venience. Sorry about that. 



INDEX 



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CIRCLE #106 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ANALOG COIVIPUTING 



SEPTEIWIBER 1986 / PAGE 9 




Reader Comment conunued 



4960 Il=Ii+Kl 
4970 K1=X1+K1 

4980 ftLL$CIl»51-50,Il»51J= 
REC$ 

4990 GOTO 4910 
5000 PRINT "H":GOSUB 5710: 
G05UB 5690 

5010 KX=64:G0SUB 2770 : G05U 
B 3380 

5020 POKE 708,196!PO5ITIOM 
K5,K2:? " 

SORT" 
5030 Il=Il+Kl:ftLLStIl»51-5 
0, 11*51) =PflD$ 

Double density demanded. 

I've been subscribing to ANALOG Com- 
puting since issue 13 and have always been 
impressed with the quality of your pro- 
grams. However, I have some complaints 
about type-in utilities, specifically Load* It 
and Formatter from issue 39. 

I spent approximately three hours typ- 
ing in these two programs, only to find 
they don't suit my needs. For instance, the 
object file loader portion of Load* It will 
only work with DOS 2.0. The Load*It ar- 
ticle did not stress strongly enough that the 
program makes a call to a portion of RAM 



where DOS 2.0 is assumed to be. The For- 
matter FMT.COM file was supposedly 
written for DOS XL, a double-density 
DOS. The file will not perform any of its 
functions in double-density format. 

It has been an unfortunate practice of 
many software authors to assume that all 
persons taking the time to type in the pro- 
gram would be using the antiquated DOS 
2.0 or the slightly upgraded DOS 2.5, nei- 
ther of which directly support double den- 
sity. There are many subscribers who own 
third-party drives or modified 1050 drives 
that support double density, and we are 
tired of spending time typing in programs 
that aren't compatible with our favorite 
hardware and software. 

I am of the opinion that additional test- 
ing should be done on type-in utility pro- 
grams. I would like to see tests under at 
least three entirely different versions of 
DOS and all possible density configura- 
tions. This may not always be possible, but 
I think the very least you could do would 
be to print the type of DOS utility was 
written for and the density configurations 
it was tested under. 

In summary, please do not assume that 



all Atari owners own an 810 or unmodi- 
fied 1050 drive, and use only DOS 2.0 or 
2 .5. And please put the term "double den- 
sity" in your vocabulary. There are thou- 
sands of readers and subscribers who 
would appreciate it. 

Sincerely, 

Kelly K. McMillin 

Oceanside, CA 

P.S.: I was able to get Load*It to work 
in double density in DOS 2.0, by writing 
DOS 2.0 to a disk formatted for double 
density. I believe that two drives are re- 
quired to accomplish this feat. The DUP. 
SYS for DOS 2.0 will also work this way 
Pretty neat, huh? 

An omission. 
ANALOG Computing inadvertently 
omitted mentioning that some of the pro- 
gram routines in the Calendar Printer by 
David Plotkin (issue 43) were first pub- 
lished by Allen Macroware. We apologize 
to Allen Macroware for any confusion. 



Reader Comment 

PO. Box 23, Worcester, MA 01603 



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800XLPCB $50 825 PCB $25 1200 XL PCB $35 

Power Paks 800/810 $15 ea 800 XL Power $25 ea 

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800 CPU 6502 800 ANTIC D 1771 

800 OS ROMS XL CPU 6502C POKEY 

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RAM 6810 810 ROM C VCS TIA 444 

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810 Drive Mechanisms Tandon or MP! $60 

Field Service Manuals 800/400, 800XL or 810 $25 ea 

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1050 DIAG. Disk (not for happy drives) 20.00 

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CIRCLE #104 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 10 /SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 




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"by Paul R. Robinson 



I It all began with fingers and toes. With 
.. their digits, cavepeople counted the bison 
.trampling their crops, the rapacious pil- 
, lagers waiting in line outside their caves, 
and the fang marks slashed across their 
' backs by friendly neighborhood saber- 
, toothed tigers. 

1 The first computing device was the aba- 

> cus, used by Oriental wise men to keep 

" track of dynasties, and to count the heads 

' : lopped off by insatiable warlords hungry 

' for conquest. To this day, an experienced 

abacus user can multiply faster than many 

electronic calculators — faster, even, than 

; Silicon Valley girls at a Jordache sale. 

', Dull-witted Occidentals, in contrast, 

i. couldn't count past ten without taking their 

shoes off until 1642, when Blaise Pascal, 

' lazy son of a French merchant, built an ad- 

' ding machine to figure his father's ac- 

'• counts. 

Mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leib- 
,; nitz was even lazier than Pascal. He daw- 
dled for twenty-three years — from 1671 to 
* 1694 — while building his calculator. And, 
. while it could multiply, divide and take 
' square roots, it was based upon binary, 
; rather than decimal, arithmetic. Binary 
"computers are especially useful to butch- 
; ers',-war protesters and other people with 
■ only two fingers. 

I Too lazy to build a calculator, George 
Boole instead wrote an 1859 treatise on 
' symbolic logic. His ideas about gate 
' switching provided the foundation for 
modern digital computing. They also be- 
came quite popular in affluent suburbs 
throughout America. 

Herman Hollerith, American statisti- 



cian, was perhaps the laziest man of all 
time. In 1886, he was still working on the 
1880 census! To give himself even more 
time to waste, he invented an electrical de- 
vice that read the holes punched in data 
cards. When the 1890 census rolled 
around, this machine helped Hollerith and 
his cohorts compile the results in less than 
one year. 

By 1911, Hollerith had so much free time 
that he helped establish a company with 
the unlikely name: Computing Tabulating 
Recording Company. Typically, Hollerith 
tired of writing out this pompous appel- 
lation time after time, so he eventually 
changed it to International Business Ma- 
chine — IBM for short. 

Conceptually, Boole and Hollerith owed 
much to Charles Babbage, inventor of the 
cow catcher. Babbage described mechan- 
ical "analytical engines" as early as 1834, 
but he never managed to finish building 
one. Despite his indolence, people still 
credit Babbage with several important 
ideas, including feedback loops, the stor- 
age of numbers on punched cards, and 
conditional transfers. A conditional trans- 
fer is, of course, one which depends upon 
whether the boss's son wants the job. 

It's remarkable that Babbage didn't even 
think of electronic microcomputers — or 
electronic mainframes, for that matter. His 
defenders excuse this blunder by pointing 
out that we didn't even have electric can 
openers back then. The fact remains that, 
in Babbage's time, electrical phenomena 
had been known for centuries. 

Modern electronics began when 12th- 
century English merchants devised mag- 
netic compasses to keep their ship cap- 
tains from getting lost every time the fog 
rolled in. 



Soon afterward the French crusader 
Petrus Peregrinus de Mariourt — who car- 
ried a compass with him — got lost anyway 
near Warsaw, while on his way from Ma- 
drid to Paris. During his aimless wander- 
ings, he noticed that samples of naturally 
magnetic lodestone had two poles, a North 
Pole and a South Pole. The abundance of 
pole-possessing lodestones around Warsaw 
eventually gave the region its modern 
name — Poland. .'.,", 

Meanwhile, back in England in 166ft,; 
William Gilbert published De Magnete 
Magneficisque Corporibus e( de Magno 
Magnete TelJure, a romance novel in which 
he coined the term "electric field." Inspired 
by Gilbert's racy prose, Steven Gray dis- 
covered electrical conductors in 1729. 

Back across the Channel, Charles Fran- 
cois de Cisternay Dufay, gardener for the 
King of France, announced the existence 
of "attractive" and "repulsive" electrical 
forces, after long years of observing the 
King's various concubines. 

Benjamin Franklin was one of the luck- 
iest of early key experimenters with elec- 
tricity. He was also one of the stupidest. 
After seeing (no doubt several times) how 
lightning bolts scorched trees, tall build- 
ings and unprotected livestock, he sallied 
forth to fly a kite in the midst of a fero- 
cious thunderstorm. Franklin's 1752 adven- 
ture confirmed that lightning is electrical 
in nature. It also set an example that leads 
to the electrocution of luckless imitators 
every year. 

In 1767, English chemist Joseph Priest- 
ly found that an electrostatic charge obeys 
an inverse square law: by doubling the 
distance between himself and Benjamin 
Franklin, he quadrupled his chances of 
staying alive. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



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Counting 



continued 



Italian scientists finally learned about 
electricity in 1791. In that year, Luigi Gal- 
vani, anatomy professor from Bologna, 
wrote his most famous harlequin thriller, 
De Viribus Electricitatus in Motu Muscu- 
lari Commentorius, in which he confessed 
to getting his kicks by making frog legs 
twitch with electrical sparks. (Twenty- 
seven years later this same theme made big 
bucks for Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, au- 
thor of Frankenstein.) 

In 1800, Count Alessandro Giuseppe 
Antonio Anastasio Volta constructed his 
voltaic pile, the first useful battery. He 
used it to give even bigger shocks to frogs 
and other unfortunate small creatures. 

Theoretical advances came from Andre- 
Marie Ampere, who showed in 1825 that 
electricity and magnetism could relate; 
and by Georg Ohm's irresistible wife, who 
on their wedding night coined the phrase, 
"Ohm, my!" 

Michael Faraday, yet another English- 
man, demonstrated the first electric mo- 
tor in 1831. It operated on the Principle of 
Magnetic Induction, a concept somewhat 
related to Interest on a Tax Deduction. 

When the Germans got into the act, 
things really started to roll. Wilhelm Edu- 
ard Weber, Rudolf Kohlrausch and Gustav 
Kirchhoff (who was really an American) 
showed in the 1850s that electricity and 
magnetism can relate not only to each oth- 
er, but to light as well. 

The English got the final say on this 
matter when James Clerk Maxwell (who 
was really a Scot) published equations 
which described this menage d trois math- 
ematically, and proved that coffee brewed 
in his house was good to the last drop. 
Maxwell's work completed classical elec- 
tromagnetic theory. 

Subsequent experiments with subatomic 
particles shed new light on electromag- 
netism. Sir Joseph John Thomson and Sir 
John Sealy Edward Townsend discovered 
electrons in 1896-1898. And, in 1911, Ro- 
bert Andrews Millikan measured the 
charge on electrons with his famous "oil 
drop" experiment. Recently, you'll recall, 
ARCO emulated Millikan by dropping its 
gasoline charge cards, and the Arabs of 
OPEC dropped what they charge for whole 
barrels of oil. 

In 1900, Max Planck excited the Catho- 
lic Church by proving that light had mass. 
In 1909, Hendrik Antoon Lorentz rewrote 
Maxwell's equations in nonclassical terms, 
leaving out the part about the coffee. Now 
the theoretical stages — both classical and 
pop — were set for the impending Age of 
Computers. 

So what? What good is theory if you 
can't sell it? Leave it to the Americans to 
ask that. They scoffed at Faraday, who 
started building electric motors in 1822, 
but never sold a single one of them. They 
scoffed at Volta, too. He told the world 
about his piles in 1800, but it wasn't until 



1836, when Daniell built the Daniell cell, 
that batteries went commercial. So, short 
on theory, perhaps, but long on greed, 
Americans proceeded to invent (and sell) 
the following electrical gadgets: 

Telephone A.G. Bell, 1876 

Phonograph T.A. Edison, 1877 

Microphone T.A. Edison, 1877 

Switchboard 

E.T. Holmes, at home, 1877 

Light bulb T.A. Edison, 1878-9 

Electric flat iron...H.W. Seely, 1882 
Dictating machine. .C.S. Taintor, 1885 

Transformer W. Stanley, 1885 

Gramophone E. Berliner, 1887 

AC motor N. Tesla, 1888 

Electric stove 

W.S. Hadaway, Jr., 1896 

Mercury vapor lamp 

P.C. "G-Spot" Hewitt, 1901 

Radiotelephone 

R.A. Fessenden, 1902 

Triode L. De Forest, 1906 

Vacuum cleaner 

J.M. Spangler, 1907 

Automatic toaster C. Strite, 1928 

Electric shaver J. Shick, 1928 

FM radio E.H. Armstrong. 1933 

LP records P.C. Goldmark, 1948 

And, of course. 

The zipper W.L. Judson, 1893 

By the mid-1930s, there existed both a 
theoretical basis and a compelling need for 
computers — the need for rich American 
inventors to keep track of all their money. 
During World War II, Harvard's Howard 
Aiken and Hollerith's IBM succeeded 
where Charles Babbage failed. They con- 
structed the Harvard Mark I computer. Fif- 
ty feet square and eight feet high, it was 
somewhat larger than today's wristwatch 
calculators. 

J. Presper Eckert and John W. Mauchley 
completed what some sources say was the 
first all-electric computer in 1946 at Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. They named their 
beast the Electronic Numerical Integrator 
and Calculator. But their greatest contri- 
bution came when they shortened the 
name to ENIAC, thereby inventing the 
acronym. Without acronyms, the computer 
industry as we know it today could not 
exist. 

Eckert and Mauchly then helped build 
UNIVAC I, the computer that rendered vot- 
ing obsolete by correctly predicting Eisen- 
hower's victory over Stevenson in 1952. 
But in 1945, long before UNIVAC, a sig- 
nificant event occurred in (of all places) 
New Jersey: Bell Telephone Laboratories 
hired a physicist named John Bardeen to 
study semiconductors. At Bell Labs, scien- 
tists would sit and think — left leg crossed 
over right, right elbow on left knee, right 
hand stroking beard. They'd thought about 
semiconductors for years, to no avail. But 
Bardeen thought differently — right leg 
crossed over left, left elbow on right knee, 
left hand dangling off to one side. This new 



way of thinking led him to invent the tran- 
sistor in 1947, for which he shared the 1956 
Nobel Prize in physics with Walter H. Brat- 
tain and William B. Shockley. (Bardeen has 
won only one Nobel since. He shared the 
1972 Prize for a theory of superconductors, 
through which — in contrast to semicon- 
ductors — electrons flow like quarters 
through a video arcade.) 

The first transistor gave birth to solid- 
state electronics. Transistors began replac- 
ing vacuum tubes in 1950 when Shockley 
unveiled the "p-n-p" junction transistor. 

Bell Labs built early transistors from ger- 
manium, a relatively rare element. In 1954, 
Gordon Teal and his group at Texas Instru- 
ments made the first silicon-based junc- 
tion transistor. Since siUcon is cheaper and 
more durable than germanium, this inno- 
vation greatly enhanced the practicality of 
solid state electronics. 

Five years later, Jack Kilby of TI filed for 
a patent on integrated circuits, in which 
transistors and other electrical components 
of all races, colors and creeds live togeth- 
er in harmony on a single silicon chip. That 
same year, Robert Norton Noyce of Fair- 
child Semiconductor filed for a similar pat- 
ent. To this day, historians are still trying 
to decide who was really the first to file. 
Meanwhile, both companies continue to 
make millions from integrated circuits. 

Noyce, with Gordon Moore and Andrew 
Grove, established Intel Corporation in 
1968. And, by inventing the RAM chip and 
the microprocessor in 1970, Intel gave 
birth to pocket calculators, digital watches 
and Donkey Kong. The rest will be history. 

From fingers and toes to microchips, 
people from many cultures contributed to 
the Computer Revolution now sweeping 
the world. This revolution daily changes 
the way we play, the way we work and the 
way we make war. These people were mo- 
tivated by laziness, sadism, stupidity and 
greed. It's a tribute to the American way 
of life — as practiced by the Japanese 
— that, in the end, greed triumphed over 
all. fl 

Paul R. Robinson, with a Ph.D. in Chem- 
istry, has served as an Assistant Professor 
of Chemistry at the University of Illinois. 
Champaign-Urbana; as a staff scientist at 
Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and as a 
research chemist for Unocal Corporation 
(formerly Union Oil Company of Califor- 
nia}. In the past two years, he has earned 
almost $40 as a free-lance writer. 

An earlier version of this "history" ivas 
published in the February Chemtech. 



PAGE 12 /SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 




Database 
Delphi 



News and updates about 
the ANALOG Computing 
Atari Users' Group on Delphi 



by Matthew J.W. Ratcliff 

Welcome to Database Delphi. This is 
where you'll be hearing the latest from the 
world of telecommunications. ANALOG 
Computing (as most of you already know) 
has moved its TCS to Delphi, where it's 
known as the Atari Users' Group. 

Delphi's an on-line information service 
similar to CompuServe, but has much low- 
er rates — and no surcharge for 1200 or 
2400 baud. 

Most people will be able to connect via 
Uninet or Tymnet — a local call in most 
large cities. The hourly rates for Delphi are 
higher than they were for ANALOG Com- 
puting's TCS, but I'm sure that your phone 
company was hitting you up for more 
money in long distance fees. 

What^ in store. 

Once into Delphi, just enter GROUP 
ATARI to get into our SIG (Special Interest 
Group). Your next menu will be the main 
control center. 

You may look at Announcements on var- 
ious topics, posted by SYSOPs (System 
Operators) and other users. You may get 
into the Member Directory to post infor- 
mation about yoiKself, or find data on 
others with similar interests. Or, in Con- 
ference, you can page other members who 
are on-line at the same time and have a 
meeting of two or more. It's like having a 
"typo-phone" connection with people who 
share your interests — a great way to make 
new friends. 

You may enter the Poll section to read 
or participate in on-line surveys. We'll up- 
date this with new questions and topics 
of interest regularly. Poll results will be 



summarized here and used to improve the 
features of the SIG and of ANALOG Com- 
puting. You may even create your own 
polls. 

Databases offer many different programs 
and information files for your download- 
ing pleasure. Programs and documentation 
on the current issue will be available, along 
with information about upcoming issues, 
classic XE and ST programs, graphics, DE- 
GAS pictures, and much more. You'll even 
have yoiK own workspace — on-line disk 
storage space for your personal use. 

A Shopping Service is reserved and will 
probably be made available for renewing 
subscriptions, purchasing back issues of 
ANALOG Computing magazines and 
disks, and more. 

Delphi Mail is your electronic postal ser- 
vice, for sending and receiving private 
messages, to and from others on the sys- 
tem. Whenever you log in, you're alerted 
to any pending mail. 

Topics Available gives you a list of the 
subjects you can expect to see in different 
areas of the SIG. You can use the Entry Log 
to find when your friends were on last, or 
you can check to see Who's On right now, 
for possible conferencing. 

The Forum is where most of the action 
is. You can participate in ongoing discus- 
sions about Atari computers and software. 
For programming problems, you'll find 
help from experts. An almost direct line 
to ANALOG Computing editors and some 
Atari notables (like Neil Harris of Atari 
Corp.) is available through the Forum and 
Mail, so you can take your questions and 
ideas "right to the top." 

The Set Defaults function is used to tell 
the Delphi computer system how to talk to 



your particular computer, modem and ter- 
minal software combination. 

Nosy polls. 

LPl (a user on Delphi) wants to know 
the name of your favorite terminal soft- 
ware. 

Of almost 100 responses, there were 
three clear winners. AMODEM 7.1 (and 
variations on that theme) was the most 
popular, at 28%. There was no room in the 
selection list for AMODEM 7.2. It was pre- 
ferred for its autodial capabilities, superi- 
or to most any other terminal software. At 
27%, the runner up was "Your Own." 
Many users prefer to code their own ter- 
minal software to meet specific needs. 

HomeTerm came in third, with 24% of 
the vote. Some complain that HomeTerm 
has too small a captiu^e buffer, but others 
simply capture to RAM disk on their 130- 
XE. I like HomeTerm for its split-screen 
feature — great for conferencing on Delphi. 
There wasn't much mention of ST termi- 
nal software in the poll; we should prob- 
ably run a separate one for that, in the 
future. 

Another user, RAMBO, asks if we should 
not "consider both the ST and Amiga as 
progressive computers and quit bickering 
about which is best, so we can concentrate 
on the real 'enemies,' namely the Icime IBM 
and Macintosh computers." 

Well, most strongly agree, but I think the 
poll may have been a bit biased. The con- 
sensus is that we needn't consider any 
machine — or company — as an enemy. Let 
the price-to-performance ratio speak for it- 
self (as did that of the 1040ST, in the 
March 1985 issue of Byte). 

DGG wants to know what programming 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 13 




Database 

Delphi continued 



language (if you have but one to choose 
from) you would most prefer in develop- 
ing software for the ST. Almost 30% say 
Modula-2, with an even 14% split for 
OSS's Personal Pascal, Lattice C, and Meg- 
amax C. Only 9% would want to write in 
ST BASIC, and no one polled wants to de- 
velop software in ST Logo or Hippo C. 

GEMIGENE asks us which printers are 
most popular among the SIG members. It's 
no surprise to see Epson at the top of the 
list, with a 42 percent shcire of the vote. 
Gemini follows, with 28 percent, and third 
is Okidata, at 10 percent. 

One poll just started is a question about 
whether an ST SIG should break off from 
the Atari SIG. We'll leave this open for a 
while and give newcomers a chance to 
make their thoughts known. 

I would think most 8-bit users would 
like to keep up with the ST world. And 
ST owners may still learn or derive ideas 
from those with 8-bit machines. I hope this 
doesn't become a rivalry fbeyond a friendly 
one), to split the Atari SIG. 

The most valid comment I've heard thus 
(which works both ways) far is, "I'm pay- 
ing for connect time and am not interest- 



ed in 8-bit stuff, or paying to scan through 
it looking for ST-specific material." The 
problem with having two separate SIGs is 
that it may spread the resources of ANA- 
LOG Computing editors (who do double 
duty as SYSOPs) a bit thin, adversely af- 
fecting overall support of all members. 

SYSOP connections. 

If you'd like to leave comments or sug- 
gestions to editors of ANALOG Comput- 
ing or SYSOPs, you can send us EMAIL 
on Delphi. I'd welcome any ideas for polls, 
improvements to the SIG's features, or top- 
ics of discussion for the On-line Confer- 
ences we'll be holding in the future. 

Our first will probably be On-line with 
ANALOG Computing, where you can chat 
with any of the editorial staff. 

You can send mail to me by addressing 
it to MATRAT— what else? The main 
SYSOP, Charles Bachand, can be contact- 
ed via ANALOG2, and our prolific Clay- 
ton Walnum is ANALOG4. Art Leyen- 
berger is username NJANALOG. 

If you see us in the Who's On list, feel 
free to give us a Page. We'll be glad to chat 
with you if we aren't too busy. H 



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SOFTWARE CLUB 

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29.95 Three months 
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All programs (including 
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Bacl< issues starting with January, 
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TUTORIAL DISKS ALSO AVAILABLE: 

Basic $9.95 

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C programming language .. 9.95 
Pascal 9.95 



Send check or money order to: 

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SUBMISSIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED 



CIRCLE #106 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 14 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



32K Disk 



APPLICATION 




Magfic 
Spell 



Now you can create 

your own, specialized 

spelling checker in 32 or 48K of memory 



by Angelo Giambra 



Magic Spell is a machine language program to locate 
spelling errors in dociunents produced by word proces- 
sors (such as AtariWriter), which allows you to make im- 
mediate corrections. It can process files created by any 
word processor, provided they're in standard Atari 2 .OS 
DOS format. 

The design philosophy behind Magic SpeU is unlike that 
of other speller programs. The average person's working 
vocabulary is only several thousand words. Magic Spell 
capitalizes on this fact. Instead of a huge dictionary con- 
taining words you'll probably never use, Magic Spell lets 
you customize a dictionary to fit your personal needs. 
When the program begins, the entire dictionary is load- 
ed into memory. Since Magic Spell doesn't have to access 
the disk to look up words, the checking is incredibly fast. 

With 48K, Magic Spell can fit up to 6,500 words in 
memory; with 32K, about 3,900 words. As you continue 
to use the program, you'll discover that it will mold itself 
to your needs. 

Keying in lUlagic Spell. 

Listing 1 is the BASIC data used to create your copy of 
Magic Spell. Please refer to M/L Editor on page 7 for typ- 
ing instructions. You should call the file SPELLER. List- 
ing 2 should also be typed with M/L Editor, under the 
name SPMAINT. 

To run the program, remove all cartridges and boot your 
system from the disk containing the SPELLER file. When 
the DOS menu appears, use the L option to load the file. 
Press L, then RETURN. 

The system will ask LOAD FROM WHAT FILE? Key in 
SPELLER and hit RETURN. Magic Spell will load and be- 
gin executing. 



To load the SPMAINT program, use DOS's L option as 
above. When the system asks LOAD FROM WHAT FILE?, 
key in SPMAINT and RETURN. 

Instructions. 

After Magic Spell loads into your computer, a title 
screen will appear, displaying the program name. Press 
the START key to begin your spell-checking session. The 
first time you use the Magic Spell, there'll be no diction- 
ary on your disk. When the program discovers this, it will 
create a new dictionary of twenty-six words in memory. 

When a dictionary exists on the disk, the message 
LOADING DICTIONARY displays. Later, you'll see that it's 
possible to have many dictionaries, on different disks. Any 
disk containing a dictionary will be referred to as a "dic- 
tionary disk." 

When Magic SpeU finishes loading the dictionary, it dis- 
plays a message to show how many words there are in that 
dictionary You then see the prompt ENTER FILENAME. 
If you have only one disk drive, remove the dictionary disk 
and insert the disk containing the document whose spell- 
ing you wish to check. If you have two drives, insert the 
disk with the document in the drive designated as drive 
2. Do not remove the dictionary disk from drive 1. 

The document file must be in standard Ateiri 2. OS DOS 
format. Most word processors produce such files. At this 
writing, the only ones I know of which Magic Spell can't 
process are those from the Letter Perfect word processor, 
by LJK Enterprises. 

Key in the docimient name (including the file extension, 
if applicable) and press RETURN. Filenames can be en- 
tered in several ways. Here are some examples. 



SAMPLE 1 
D:SAMPLE 
D1:SAMPLE.DOC 
D2:SAMPLE 



(Defaults to Drive 1) 
(Defaults to Drive 1) 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 15 



^^ ^ ^^^^p^ ^ <5ll=/R^|g^ I I 130XE 
1 I 1 gl^^llll . COMPUTER PKG. 

_ ___ mg\^g\ I wicfiiKi- iwc • I30XE Computer "Paint 

130XE ATARI 1050 I KIV in DRIKITPI? • IOSO Obk onw •MuskPalnler 

: Programs Disk Drive with WA-IU rmm icre .io27Print»r -et. 

hOice D.O.S. 2.5 inciuded • Atartwrtter Plus -Tlmewtse 

a« $fl»E U-Print A Interface -^r^v^ 

39 , 135 j^Qo 395 



ATARI 130XE 

& 2 FREE Programs 
our clioice 

*139 

This is shipped price 
anywhere in Continental USA 



NX- 10 PRINTER 
& 

U-PrInt A Interface 

^299 

This is shipped price 
anywhere in Continental USA 



ATARI 850 

INTERFACE 

ONLY *1 09 



ATARI XJVi-301 
MODEM 

ONLY 39.95 






ATAR1 1027 Printer 
& ATARIWRITER PLUS 

*129 



MONrrons 

Gold Star Amber 79.95 

Commodore 1802 179 

NEC 1225 Color 139 

Amdek Call 

NAP Amber 8995 

Monitors Shpptng 510 

PRINTER BUFFERS 

U-Buff 16K 79.95 

U-Buff 64K 99.95 

MODEMS 

Prometheus 1200 299 

Maxwell 1200 229 

Supra 1200 AT 169 

Atari XM-301 39.95 

Supra 300 AT 44.95 



This is shipped price 
anywhere in Continental USA 



ciWT' 



PANASONIC 1091 & 
U-PRINT A INTERFACE 

*299 

This is Shipped price 
anywhere in Continental USA 



SyFEU 



One on One 
Music Construction Kit 
Seven Cities of Gold 
l?acing Destructions 
IVIuie 



Cut N' Paste 

Realm of Impossibility 

Super Boulderdash 

Archon 

Pinball Construct. Set 




— 3 Your Choice ^ 

=sss: I I each §3= 

*Prices effective now through September 30, 1986 



NX-10 ..Call SD-15.. 449 

NL-10 ..Call SR-10.. Call 

SG-15.. 369 SR-15.. Call 
SD-10 . . 339 

PRINTER 
INTERFACES 

U-Prlnt A 49.95 

MPP1150 54.95 

PR. Connection 59.95 



ATARI 800 • 800 XL • 1200 XL • 130 XE SOFTWARE 



ACTIVISION 

Designer Pencil 17.95 

Cross Country Race 17.95 

Hacker 17.95 

MJndshadow 17.95 

Music Studio 23.95 

Space Shuttle 179S 

BRODERBUND 

Karaleka 20.95 

Champ Loderunner .... 23.95 

Prim Shop 28.95 

Bahk Street Writer 34.95 

Print Shop Graphics 

I. II or III 19.95 

Print Shop Paper 16.95 

Prt Shop Companion . . 2795 

INFOCOM 

Deadline 29.95 

Enchanter 24.95 

Infidel 24.95 

Planetlall 24.95 

Sorcerer 24.95 

Slarcross 29.95 

Suspended 27.95 

Witness . . . . ; 2995 

Sea Stalker 24 95 

Cutthroats 24.95 

Suspect 27.95 

Hitchhiker 24.95 

Zork I 24.95 

Zork II or III 27.95 

Wishbringer 2795 

Spellbreaker 2995 

Ballyhoo 2795 

Fooblitsky 2795 



MICROPROSE 

Silent Service 23 95 

Gunship 23.95 

Accrojet 23.95 

F-15 Strike Eagle 23.95 

Decision in Desert 2795 

Kennedy Approach 23.95 

Crusade in Europe .... 2795 

Conflict/Vietnam 2795 

OPTIMIZED 
SYSTEMS 

Basic XE 4995 

MAC65XL 47 95 

Action 47.95 

Basic XL 3995 

All Tool Kits 19.95 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 

Arction 19.95 

Arction II 24.95 

Mule 19.95 

Realm/Impossibility 19.95 

Murder /Zinderneut ?9.95 

Music Construction 19.95 

Pinball Construction 19.95 

One on One 24.95 

Seven Cities ot Gold . . . 24 95 
Financial Cookbook . . . 29.95 

Racing Destruction 24.95 

Super Boulderdash 19.95 

Chessmaster 3000 27.95 

Age ot Adventure 19.95 

GAMESTAR 

Star League Baseball .. .1795 

Starboi«l Football 1795 

On Track Racing 17.95 



EPYX 

Rescue on Fractalus . . . 24.95 

The Eidolon 24.95 

Koronis Rift 24.95 

Ballblazer 24.95 

Summer Games 24.95 

World Karate 20.95 

XLENT SOFTWARE 

Megatontll 17.95 

Page Designer 21.95 

Typesetter 24.95 

Megaliler 21.95 

Rubber Stamp 21.95 

Print Shop Inter lace 19.95 

^ EST. 1982 



BATTERIES INCLUDED 

Home Pak 34.95 

Paper Clip/Spell 39.95 

B-Graph 34.95 

DATASOFT 

Alternate Reality 24.95 

Zorro 18.95 

Goonies 18.95 

Neverending Story 1895 

Conan The Barbarian . . . 18.95 

Bruce Lee 18.95 

Mind Pursuit 18.95 

Nibbler 18.95 



P.O. Box 17882, Milwaukee, Wl 53217 

ORDER LINES OPEN 

Mon-Fri. 11 a.m. - 7 p.m GST • Sat. 12 p.m. - 5 p.m. CST 

To Order Call Toll Free 

800-558-0003 

For Technical Info, Order 
Inquiries, or for Wise. Orders 

414-351-2007 



MISCELLANEOUS 

TAC III Joystick 14 95 

TAC II Joystick 12.95 

Starfighter Joystick 9.95 

Silk Stik Joystick 7.95 

Wico 3-Way Joystick . . .2'i.95 

Mastertype 2795 

Flight Simulator 34.95 

Home Accountant 4995 

Monkey Wrench-Cart . . 23.95 

Sargon III 34.95 

Spy vs Spy 23.95 

Odesta Chess 49.95 

Ramrod XL 69.95 

Universe 69.95 

Beachead 21.95 

Letter Perfect 39.95 

Data Perfect 39.95 

Data Perfect 39.95 

Fleet System II 4995 

Strip Poker 2395 

Halley Project 23.95 

Micro League Base. . . . 29.95 
Harcourt/BraceSAT .. 49.95 

Ultima II 37-95 

Ultima III 34.95 

Ultima IV 41.95 

Spy Hunter 29.95 

Omnimon 6995 

Island Caper 23.95 

General Magr. /MLB ... 29.95 

Fight Night 1995 

Hardball 19.95 

Raid Over Moscow .... 23.95 

Beachead II 23.95 

Star Fleet I 34.95 

Miniture Golf 23.95 



SSI 

Carrier Force 3795 

Combat Leader 24.95 

Cosmic Balance 24.95 

Cosmic Balance II 24.95 

Broadsides 24.95 

War in Russia 4995 

50 Mission Crush 24.9S 

Ouestron 32.95 

Rails West 24.95 

Computer Ambush .... 3795 

Computer Baseball 24 95 

Reforger 88 3795 

Breakthru/Aroennes. . . 3795 

Field of Fire 24.95 

Imperium Galatium 24.95 

Oper. Market Garden . . 329S 

Kampfgruppe 37.95 

Comp. Quarterback . . , 24.95 

Colonial Conquest 24.95 

Gemstone Warrior 21.95 

Six Gun Shootout 24.95 

Battle of Aniielam 3Z9S 

USAAF 37.95 

Nam 27.95 

Panzer Grenider 24 95 

Mech Brigade 39 95 

Wizard's Crown 27 95 

Gettysburg 27.95 

SYNAPSE 

Syncalc 32.95 

Syntile 32.95 

Loderunners Rescue . . . 20.95 

Syncalc Templates 16.95 

Essex 27.95 

Mindwheel 27.95 

Brimstone 2795 



No surcharge for MasterCard ^^^1 or Visa 



ORDERING INFORMATION: Please specify lystem. For fast delivery send cashier's check or money order Personal and company checks allow 14 business day«to clear School P Ds welcome C.0.0. chargn ir> S3.00i In Continental U.S.A. 
includeS3 00 lor software orders. 4% shipping lor hardware minimum S4.00 Master Card and Visa orders please include card ». expiration date and signature Wl residents please include 5% sales tax HI. AK. FPO, APO. Puerto Rico and 
Canadianorders.pleaseadd5%shipping. minimum $5.00. All other foreign onlersidd 1 5%sliipping. minimum S10.Q0. All orders shipped outside the ContinentalUS A areshippedfirstclassinsuredU.S mail. If foreign shipping charges exceed 
the minimum amount, you will be charged the additional amount to get your package to you quickly and safely All goods are new and include factory warranty. Due to our low prices all sales are final. All iMictlvfl nlurns mustlMW i return 
wthorizitlon numlw. Please call (4141 351-2007 to obtain an R A • or your return will not be accepted Prices and availability subject to change without notice 

CIRCLE #108 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




mvamnzoj 



ATARI 520 
SYSTEM PACKAGE* 

*lncluding RGB or Monochrome Monitor, 

Mouse, Disk Drive, Basic, Logo, Neochrome, | ^including RGB or Monoclirome Monitor, 

1st Word, TOS on ROM, and RF Modulator 

CALL CALL 

MONOCHROME RGB/COLOR 
SYSTEM SYSTEM 



i/ATARI1040ST 
SYSTEM PACKAGE* 



Mouse, Doubie-sided Disic Drive, Basic, 
Logo, Neochrome, 1st Word, TOS on ROM, 
and Buiit-in Power Suppiy 



CALL FOR CURRENT PRICE 



QMI ST 1200 
BAUD MODEM 

^159 



Direct connect 
with ST tail< 



520ST ONE 
MEGABYTE 
UPGRADE 

Computer must 

»175 



be sent In to 
service center 



ATAH i ST 

%mwmm specials^ 

Winter Games 24.95 

Rouge 24.95 

Temple of Apshai Trilogy. . . 24.95 

^"ctive now through September 30, 1986 



ATARI SF 314 
DISK DRIVE 

Double sided/ 

*209 



1 1Megabyte 
storage 



SUPRA 20 
MEG 3.5 INCH 
HARD DRIVE 

onfy $^59 



ATARI 520 ST • ATARI 1040 ST SOFTWARE 



INFOCOM ST 

Forever Voyaging 29.95 

Ballyhoo 27.95 

Cuthroats 27,95 

Deadline 34.95 

Enchanter 27.95 

Hitchiker 27.95 

Infidel 29.95 

Planettall 27 95 

Sea Stalker 27,95 

Sorcerer 29,95 

Spellbreaker 34,95 

Starcross 34,95 

Suspect 29 95 

Suspended 34,95 

Wishbringer 2795 

Witness 27,95 

Zork I 2795 

Zork II or III 29,95 

ST LANGUAGES 

Personal (^scal 49.95 

Personal Prolog 59.95 

Fast Basic 89 95 

Fast C Compiler 99.95 

Fast Fortran 199.95 

Fast Cobol 199.95 

ST BUSINESS 

VIP Professional 119.95 

Synsoft Gen. Ledger 44.95 

SBM (Point of Sales) . . 84 95 
Cash Disbursements . . . 6995 

Sierra Accts. Rec 6995 

Sierra Gen Ledger 6995 

Sierra Payroll 6995 

VIP Lite 6795 

Financial Cookbook . . . 34.95 
Swiftcalc ST 5995 

ATARI is a trademark 
of ATARI. INC. 



HIPPOPOTAMUS 

Almanac 

Disk Utilities 

Eprom Burner 

Jokes & Quotes 

Ramdisk 

Backgammon 

Hippoconcept 

Hippopixel 

Hipposimple 

Hippospell 

Hippoword 

X-10 Powerhouse 

Hippofonts 

MICHTRON 

Alt 

BBS 

Business Tools 

Calender 

Cornerman 

D.FT 

DOS Shell 

Echo 

Flipside 

Goldrunner 

Kissed 

Lands of Havoc 

M-Copy 

M-Oisk 

Major Motion 

Mi-Term 

Michtron Utilities 

Mudpies 

Softspool 

Solitaire 

The Animator 

Time Bandits 

Mighty Mail 

Missn Mouse (Mono) . . 

Easy Record 

Intro to 1 000 



23.95 
34.95 
9995 
2395 
2395 
2795 
6295 
27 95 
34 95 
2795 
6295 
..Can 
27 95 

34 95 
34 95 
34 95 
20.95 
34 95 
34 95 
2795 
2795 
2795 
2795 
34.95 
.1695 
54 95 
2795 
2795 
34 95 
3995 
27.95 
2795 
2795 
2795 
2795 
34 95 
27.95 
54.95 
34 95 



ST WORD 
PROCESSORS 

Final Vdord 

Paperclip Elite 

Regent Spell 

Habawriter 

Regent Word 11/ 

Gem-Based 

Wordwriter ST 

ST DATABASES 

DB Man 

H&D Base 

Zoomracks 

Regent Base 

(Gem-Based) 

Data Manager ST 



94 95 
..Call 
.31.95 
54.95 

64 95 
5995 

6995 
64.95 
5995 

64 95 
5995 



ST GRAPHICS 

Degas 2795 

N-Vision 2795 

Easy Draw 99.95 

PC Board Designer . . . 299.95 
Paintworks 49.95 

ST UTILITIES 

ST Toolbox 24.95 

Macrodesk 20.95 

Deskmaster 27.95 

ST Forth 31.95 

Music Studio 39.95 

Sound Wave 33 95 

Abacus Books Call 

Time Link 34.95 

ST Music Box 3195 



EST. 1982 



P.O. Box 17882. Milwaukee, Wl 53217 

ORDER LINES OPEN 

Mon-Fri. 11 a.m. -7 p.m. CST • Sat. 12 p.m. -5 p.m. CST 

To Order Call Toll Free 

800-558-0003 

For Technical Info, Order 
inquiries, or for Wise. Orders 

414-351-2007 



DISKETTES 

Call for our current low disk 
prices on Sony. Fuji & Maxell 
3.5 Diskettes 

ST ACCESSORIES 

Flip n' File ll-Micro 19.95 

Dustcovers cai 

3.5 Disk Drive Clean Kit . . Call 

Mouse Pad 895 

Mouse House 6.95 

ST ADVENTURES 

Ultima II 39.95 

Crimson Crown 2795 

Farenheit 451 3395 

Transylvania 27.95 

Treasure Island 27.95 

King's Quest II 33.95 

Perry Mason 33.95 

Word Invaders 22.95 

Borrowed Time 33.95 

Hacker 29.95 

9 Princes/Amber 33.95 

Sundog 24.95 

Mindshadow 33.95 

Winnie The Pooh 19.95 

Black Cauldron 27.95 

Amazon 33.95 

Spiderman 16.95 

Fantastic Four 16.95 

Sword of Kadash 27.95 

Apshai Trilogy 27.95 

Universe II 4795 

The Pawn 2995 

Ultima III 39.95 

We stocli tmsdieds of items for 
tlie ATARI ST. If 701 don't see it 
here, pleise doo't heattte to call. 



ST TELE- 
COMMUNICATION 

PC Intercom 84.95 

ST Talk 17.95 

ST PRINT 
UTILITIES 

Typesetter 24.95 

Rubber Stamp 24.95 

Printmaster 24.95 

Art Gallery I 1995 

Art Gallery II 19.95 

Fontwriter 27.95 

ST ARCADE GAMES 

Hex 27.95 

Minkey Business 16.95 

Telta Patrol 16.95 

Compubridge 19.95 

Bridge 4.0 20.95 

Winter Games 27 95 

Rogue 27.95 

Diablo 20.95 

Super Huey 27.95 

Pbantasie 27.95 

Mean 18 34.95 

Leader Board 27.95 

Brattacus 33.95 

Donald Duck 20.95 

Silent Service CM 

Flight Simulator II Call 

Champ Wrestling 2795 

World Games 2795 

Mastertype 27.95 

Video Vegas 23.95 

Blazing Paddles 2795 

Chessmaster 2000 32.95 

Computer Baseball 27.95 

Strip Poker 2795 

Super Huey 2795 



No surcharge for MasterCard |Sg| or Visa 



ORDERING INFORMATION: Please ipKlly lyitni. For fast delivery send cashier s check or money order Personal and company checks allow 14 business days to clear School PCs welcome CaD. dwja art SlOa In Continental USA 
include S3 00 for software orders. 4°d shipping for hardware, minimum S4.00. Master Card and Visa orders please include card «. expiration date and signature. Wl residents please include 5% sales tax. HI. AK. FPO. APO. Puerto Rico and 
Canadianorders pleaseadd5%shipping minlinurn SS.OaAII other lereigneiiltriidd 15% sMpplng.mlnlmumII0.0O.AII orders shipped outside the ContinentalUS A are shipped first class insured US mail Iff 

the minimum amount, you will be charged the additional amount to get your package to you quickly and safely. All goods are new and include factory warranty. Due to our low prices all sales are final. All diMIVf nturmiMisthavii rtlum 
wHNrteiliM nmilir. Please call (4141 351-2007 to obtain an R A * or your return will not be accepted Prices and availability subject to change without notice. 

CIRCLE #108 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Magic Spell 



continued 



If Magic Spell can't find the named file on the disk, it 
displays the message FILE NOT ON DISK. If this happens, 
key in the correct filename, or check to ensure that you've 
inserted the correct disk. 

Magic Spell then begins to read the document and check 
the words for correct spelling. As it does, it displays the 
current word count on the screen. This count is approxi- 
mate and increments by 5s. Only when Magic Spell com- 
pletely finishes checking the document does it give you 
the exact number of words found within. 

When the program encounters a word not in its diction- 
ary, a message like the following is displayed on-screen: 
NO MATCH: meticuJus. The word displayed, of course, 
is the one Magic Spell couldn't find. 

In addition, a 36-character context line appears at the 
bottom of the screen, to show you the context in which 
the word was used. Magic Spell now positions the cur- 
sor directly below the word and waits for a response from 
you. 

There are two possibilities at this point: (1) the word's 
correct, but isn't included in this Magic Spell dictionary; 
or (2) the word's incorrectly spelled. 

If the first is the case (the word's correct, but not in the 
dictionary), just hit RETURN at this point. Magic Spell 
will display the message ADD WORD TO DICTIONARY? 

To insert the word in the dictionary, key in a Y and press 
RETURN. If you don't wish to add this word, merely press 
RETURN. Magic Spell always interprets RETURN as a no. 
That way, it's edmost impossible to accidentally add a word 
to your dictionary. 

In the second instance (where the word was incorrect- 
ly spelled) , type in the correct spelling. Magic Spell will 
replace the incorrect word with the one you've keyed in, 
so enter it exactly as you wish it to appear. 

Magic Spell places the keyboard in lowercase mode at 
this point. If you want capitals, use the SHIFT CAPS- 
LOWR key. Remember, make sure the word you key in is 
spelled correctly. If it's shorter or longer than the word it's 
replacing. Magic Spell will adjust your document ac- 
cordingly. 

Keep in mind that the first few times you use Magic 
Spell, it will stop frequently on words — the dictionary's 
small. But you'll be surprised how quickly it builds up. 
Soon, Magic Spell's dictionary will reflect your personal 
writing style, and the program will become extremely ef- 
fective in spotting misspelled words. 

Be very careful when adding words to a dictionary. Mag- 
ic Spell is only as precise as its dictionary. If you insert 
words incorrectly. Magic Spell can no longer be relied on 
to keep your documents literate. 

After you key in a correct word and RETURN, Magic 
Spell checks to see if the word's already in its dictionary. 
If it is, spell checking resumes. If not, Magic Spell dis- 
plays the message ADD WORD TO DICTIONARY? Key in 
the letter Y and press RETURN to add the new word. 
Otherwise, just press RETURN. 

When Magic Spell finishes checking the document, the 
final exact word count displays on-screen. Then you'll see 
ANOTHER FILE? Y/N. If you wish to look over another 



document, hit Y and RETURN. In this way, multiple files 
can be checked during one session. 

If you're finished (N), replace the dictionary disk in 
drive 1 and press RETURN. If you didn't update the dic- 
tionary. Magic Spell returns you to the DOS menu. 

When you're using only one drive and have updated the 
dictionary. Magic Spell will ask you to INSERT DICTION- 
ARY DISK PLEASE THEN PRESS RETURN. Once you've 
done so, the program writes out a new copy of the dic- 
tionary to the disk. 

If you're using two disk drives. Magic Spell doesn't dis- 
play the above prompt. Instead, it immediately writes the 
update to the dictiouciry disk in drive 1. 

When Magic Spell finishes, there'll be two copies of the 
original document on your disk. Let's assume your word 
processing document vras called LETTER.DOC. After pro- 
cessing, you'll find the files LETTER.DOC and LET- 
TER. BAK on your diskette. LETTER.DOC is the updated 
version with corrected words. LETTER. BAK is your ori- 
ginal. 

If, for some reason, you decide to return to the original 
and discard the corrected document, simply delete LET- 
TER.DOC, then change the name of LETTER.BAK to LET- 
TER.DOC. Both functions can be performed using the 
DOS menu. 

Note: Magic Spell opens a temporary file, DOCU- 
MENT.TMP, on your disk during the spell-checking ses- 
sion. Your entire document's rewritten to this file. When 
Magic Spell ends, it changes your filename to < file- 
name >. BAK, then changes DOCUMENTTMP to the 
original filename. 

Because of this, there must be at least as many free sec- 
tors on your disk as there are in your document. If not. 
Magic Spell will abort, with the message DISK FULL 
ABORTING. In addition, the source document must not 
be locked, since Magic Spell changes its name. If it's 
locked, Magic Spell aborts with FILE LOCKED ABORT- 
ING. 

Creating a new dictionary. 

You may decide to build several custom dictionaries 
with specialized words, such as medical or computer 
terms. This is easy with Magic Spell. 

When you press START to begin a spell-checking ses- 
sion. Magic Spell looks for the file WORDS on the disk 
in drive 1. If it finds this file, it loads the dictionary into 
memory. 

If can't find the file, it creates a brand new dictionary 
in memory. This new dictionary contains only twenty-six 
words, each beginning with a different letter of the al- 
phabet. 

To create a new dictionary, follow this procedure. 

(1) Prepare a blank disk, by formatting it with op- 
tion I of the DOS menu. Use option H to write the 
DOS files to this disk. Next, remove the disk from the 
drive and label it Custom Dictionary. 

(2) Load the Magic Spell program in the usual 
manner. 

(3) Remove the Magic Spell disk and insert the 
blank, formatted disk from step 1. 



PAGE 18 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



(4) Press START. Magic Spell will create a new dic- 
tionary in memory. The disk in drive 1 now becomes 
your dictionary disk. 

(5) Remove the "custom dictionary" disk and insert 
the disk containing your document. Proceed as you 
normally would from this point. 

After you finish checking your document for spelling 
errors, be sure the drive 1 disk is your new custom dic- 
tionary disk. 

SPMAINT instructions. 

SPMAINT is a maintenance program, designed to let 
you view and delete words from the dictionary. You may 
see all the words, or selected portions of the dictionary. 

SPMAINT is loaded in much the same way as Magic 
Spell. Use the L (binary load) option from the DOS menu. 
When prompted to LOAD FROM WHAT FILE?, key in 
SPMAINT and press RETURN. SPMAINT will load into 
memory and begin execution. 

After it's loaded, the program displays PRESS START 
on-screen. Insert your dictionary disk in drive 1 and hit 
START. You'll see the message LOADING DICTIONARY. 

Once the dictionary's been loaded into memory, a menu 
screen appears. It contains: (1) List Dictionary; (2) Delete 
Word; (3) Free Memory; and (4) End. 

Listing the dictionary. 

To list words in the dictionary, choose option 1, by key- 
ing in the number 1 and pressing RETURN. SPMAINT 
displays LOW LIMIT. 

Key in the word (or portion of a word) where you wish 
to begin listing words. For instance, to view all words be- 
ginning with AL, key in AL and RETURN. 

Now SPMAINT will display HIGH LIMIT. Key in the 
upper limit. If you want SPMAINT to stop at words be- 
ginning with BA, key in BA and press RETURN. 

SPMAINT will then give the message PRESS ANY KEY 
TO START AND STOP LISTING, PRESS X TO CANCEL 
LISTING, PRESS RETURN WHEN READY. When you RE- 
TURN, SPMAINT can begin to list the words in the ranges 
specified, in alphabetical order. 

You may stop the screen from scrolling by pressing any 
key. Pressing any key again restarts scrolling. If, howev- 
er, you wish to abort the listing, press X. 

When SPMAINT finishes listing the words you want- 
ed, it displays PRESS RETURN WHEN READY. Hit RE- 
TURN to go back to the main menu. 

To view all the words in the dictionary, don't give a lower 
or upper limit. Press RETURN at these prompts. Here are 
some other examples: 

List all words beginning with B. 

LOW LIMIT = B 
HIGH LIMIT = C 

List all words in the dictionary, starting with words 
beginning with MAR. 

LOW LIMIT = MAR 

HIGH LIMIT = <press RETURN > 

List all words from beginning of dictionary up to 
words that start with GH. 

LOW LIMIT = <press RETURN > 
HIGH LIMIT = GH. 



Because of the method Magic Spell uses to efficiently 
utilize memory, all words will be in alphabetical order, 
except for the pronoun I, which will be treated as if it were 
spelled II. This isn't an error; it's just due to the way the 
dictionary's maintained by the programs. 

Deleting words. 

To delete words from the dictionary, key in option 2 and 
press RETURN. SPMAINT will display ENTER WORD TO 
DELETE. Do so, remembering that you must spell the word 
exactly as it appears in the dictionary. If it's misspelled 
in the dictionary, you must misspell it the same way. 

SPMAINT will then scan the dictionary for the word. 
If it can't be foimd, SPMAINT displays this message: 
WORD NOT IN DICTIONARY. PRESS RETURN WHEN 
READY. 

If this happens, hit RETURN. SPMAINT will take you 
to the menu again. Choose option 1 to list the dictionary. 
Perhaps you spelled the word wrong. 

If SPMAINT locates the word you're deleting, it displays 
WORD DELETED. Press RETURN to go back to the menu 
screen. 

Free memory. 

This option allows you to see how much RAM is still 
available. You can then calculate how many more words 
will fit into memory, before exceeding your computer's ca- 
pacity. Divide the RAM amount by 6 to get an approxi- 
mate count of the number of words which may be added. 
For instance, if there are 12,000 characters of free memo- 
ry available, you can get approximately 2 ,000 more words 
in your dictionary. 

Ending SPIUiAINT. 

To end your maintenance session, choose option 4 by 
typing 4 and pressing RETURN. If you haven't updated 
the dictionary, you'll immediately return to the DOS menu. 
If you deleted any words, SPMAINT writes the diction- 
ary to disk, then returns you to the DOS menu. 

Helpfui liints. 

If you write a lot of letters to friends, it's a good idea 
to add their names to the dictionary, to prevent Magic 
Spell from thinking they're spelling errors. You can add 
names of places or streets, too. 

Magic Spell recognizes hyphenated words and posses- 
sives, such as butler's. You can add these to your diction- 
ary, if you wish. 

Sometimes you may run two words together in your 
document — soonafter. Magic SpeU thinks this is one word 
and stops on it. Key in the correction: soon after. Your 
document will be corrected. When Magic Spell asks ADD 
WORD TO DICTIONARY?, make sure your response is not 
a Y. You'd be adding two words at once, which is a no-no. 

When deleting words from the dictionary with SP- 
MAINT, you may accidentally take out the wrong one. If 
this happens, you may abort the maintenance session by 
pressing SYSTEM RESET. You'll return immediately to the 
DOS menu, without having updated the dictionary. 

Remember, Magic Spell and SPMAINT work with a 
copy of the dictionary in memory. The actual file isn't up- 
dated until the dictionary gets rewritten to disk. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 19 




Magic Spell 



continued 



Table 1. 



MAGIC SPELL ERROR MESSAGES 

FILE NOT ON DISK — The requested file does not exist. 

DISK FULL. ABORTING — There isn't enough room on the 
disk to write out the temporary file. 

FILE LOCKED. ABORTING — Source document is locked; 
Magic Spell is aborting. 

I\/IEM0RY FULL. CANNOT ADD WORD — There's no more 
room left to add words to the dictionary. 

SPMAINT ERROR MESSAGES 

WORD NOT IN DICTIONARY — SPMAINT could not find the 
word in the dictionary. 

FILE NOT ON DISK. ABORTING — SPMAINT could not find 
the dictionary on the disk. 



Final note. 

Your dictionary is valuable. Always keep a backup copy. 
You don't want to lose it after building it up to 6,500 words. 

Magic Spell can be a great aid if you create a lot of docu- 
ments. You'll never again have to pore over each and ev- 
ery word, looking for misspellings. I hope you find it 
efficacious. H 

Angelo Giambra's been in data processing for eight 
years. He's been an avid Atari hobbyist since buying his 
computer three years ago. An incessant tinkerer, he en- 
joys writing machine language utilities and extensions to 
the OS and DOS. 



Listing 1. 



1000 DATA 255,255,139,0,285,0,68,79,67 
,85,77,69,78,84,46,84,1667 
1010 DATA 77,80,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
8,0,0,1247 

1020 DATA 0,8,8,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,8,8,0, 
0,0,1020 

1030 DATA 8,8,8,0,8,8,8,0,0,8,6,0,8,8, 
0,0,1030 

1040 DATA 0,8,8,0,0,0,8,8,8,287,0,209, 
0,1,0,0,5632 

1050 DATA 253,3,32,4,32,32,32,32,32,32 
,32,32,32,32,32,32,5453 

1060 DATA 32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,3 
2,32,32,32,32,32,32,5412 
1070 DATA 32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,27,5 
,28,5,0,0,30,5,3413 

1080 DATA 125,5,87,79,82,68,83,32,73,7 
8,32,68,73,67,84,73,367 

1090 DATA 79,78,65,82,89,58,32,32,32,3 
-2,32,155,73,78,83,69,331 
1100 DATA 82,84,32,68,73,67,84,73,79,7 
8,65,82,89,32,68,73,640 

1110 DATA 83,75,32,80,76,69,65,83,69,3 
2,32,32,155,87,79,82,1079 
1120 DATA 68,83,32,82,69,65,68,58,32,4 
8,32,32,32,32,32,32,6813 
1130 DATA 65,78,79,84,72,69,82,32,70,7 
3,76,69,63,32,89,47,9906 
1140 DATA 78,32,0,6,99,6,32,32,32,32,3 
2,32,32,32,32,32,5517 
1150 DATA 32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,3 



2,32,32,32,32,32,32,5502 

1160 DATA 32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,3 

2,155,84,72,69,78,32,9217 

1170 DATA 80,82,69,83,83,32,82,69,84,8 

5,82,78,32,32,32,32,8986 

1180 DATA 32,85,80,68,65,84,73,78,71,3 

2,68,73,67,84,73,79,847 

1190 DATA 78,65,82,89,32,32,32,32,32,1 

55,68,49,58,68,79,67,9969 

1200 DATA 85,77,69,78,84,46,84,77,80,1 

55,162,6,241,6,32,32,2191 

1210 DATA 32,69,110,116,101,114,32,70, 

105,108,101,32,78,97,109,101,3290 

1220 DATA 32,32,32,155,155,127,32,32,3 

2,32,32,32,78,79,32,77,9225 

1230 DATA 65,84,67,72,58,32,29,65,100, 

100,32,116,111,32,68,105,1392 

1240 DATA 99,116,105,111,110,97,114,12 

1,63,32,32,32,32,70,105,108,1550 

1250 DATA 101,32,110,111,116,32,111,11 

0,32,100,105,115,107,155,247,6,5803 

1260 DATA 254,6,0,0,0,66,65,75,8,0,0,6 

4,251,64,169,0,439 

1270 DATA 133,130,133,129,133,135,169, 

125,133,128,159,252,133,136,169,28,212 

1280 DATA 133,137,169,146,133,131,169, 

65,133,132,160,0,177,131,145,136,8695 

1290 DATA 200,208,249,230,137,230,132, 

165,137,201,43,144,239,240,237,162,594 



1300 DATA 16,169,3,157,66,3,169,133,15 

7,68,3,169,43,157,69,3,2880 

1310 DATA 169,0,157,72,3,169,8,157,73, 

3,169,12,157,74,3,169,3039 

1320 DATA 0,157,75,3,32,86,228,165,16, 

41,127,133,16,141,14,210,4762 

1338 DATA 169,146,141,198,2,141,200,2, 

169,1,141,240,2,169,0,133,5760 

1340 DATA 85,133,86,169,21,133,84,169, 

11,157,66,3,169,193,157,68,6241 

1350 DATA 3,169,43,157,69,3,169,31,157 

,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,1777 

1360 DATA 32,86,228,169,0,133,84,133,8 

5,133,86,32,165,41,169,11,4229 

1370 DATA 157,66,3,169,135,157,68,3,16 

9,43,157,69,3,169,32,157,4364 

1380 DATA 72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,86,22 

8,173,31,208,201,6,208,7730 

1390 DATA 249,162,32,169,3,157,66,3,16 

9,195,157,68,3,169,42,157,5739 

1400 DATA 69,3,169,0,157,72,3,169,8,15 

7,73,3,169,4,157,74,2773 

1410 DATA 3,169,0,157,75,3,32,86,228,4 

8,3,76,75,65,169,12,1773 

1420 DATA 157,66,3,169,0,157,68,3,169, 

0,252,64,247,65,157,69,6477 

1430 DATA 3,169,0,157,72,3,169,8,157,7 

3,3,32,86,228,160,0,3230 

1440 DATA 169,77,133,136,169,43,133,13 

7,165,136,153,151,0,165,137,153,8989 

1450 DATA 152,0,200,200,192,54,240,24, 

152,72,160,0,177,136,201,128,9274 

1468 DATA 176,6,32,118,40,76,42,65,32, 

118,48,104,168,76,22,65,1460 

1470 DATA 169,26,141,27,5,169,1,141,24 

7,6,76,11,30,162,16,169,3249 

1480 DATA 11,157,66,3,169,167,157,68,3 

,169,43,157,69,3,169,26,3469 

1490 DATA 157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,8 

6,228,169,77,133,136,169,7244 

1500 DATA 43,133,137,162,32,169,7,157, 

66,3,169,151,157,68,3,169,5384 

1510 DATA 0,157,69,3,169,54,157,72,3,1 

69,0,157,73,3,32,86,1335 

1520 DATA 228,76,145,29,169,9,133,85,1 

33,84,169,0,133,86,162,16,4476 

1530 DATA 169,11,157,66,3,169,222,157, 

68,3,169,6,157,69,3,169,4624 



PAGE 20 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



1540 DATA 20,157,72,3,169,6,157,73,3,3 

2,86,228,96,169,18,133,4551 

1558 DATA 85,169,8,133,86,169,28,133,8 

4,162,16,169,11,157,66,3,3112 

1568 DATA 169,48,157,68,3,169,43,157,6 

9,3,169,28,157,72,3,169,3798 

1578 DATA 8,157,73,3,32,86,228,169,2,1 

33,135,76,28,32,169,10,2887 

1588 DATA 133,85,169,8,133,86,169,28,1 

33,84,248,65,243,66,162,16,7228 

1598 DATA 169,11,157,66,3,169,20,157,6 

8,3,169,43,157,69,3,169,3714 

1608 DATA 28,157,72,3,169,8,157,73,3,3 

2,86,228,169,8,133,28,3239 

1618 DATA 165,28,281,158,144,258,169,2 

,133,135,76,28,32,169,7,157,5459 

1620 DATA 66,3,169,76,157,68,3,169,43, 

157,69,3,169,64,157,72,4421 

1538 DATA 3,169,156,157,73,3,32,86,228 

,168,8,177,136,281,129,144,8959 

1648 DATA 3,32,248,41,32,118,48,165,13 

7,197,204,144,238,240,3,76,9973 

1658 DATA 206,29,165,136,197,283,144,2 

27,248,225,162,32,169,12,157,66,332 

1668 DATA 3,169,0,157,68,3,169,0,157,6 

9,3,169,0,157,72,3,1660 

1670 DATA 169,0,157,73,3,32,86,228,160 

,0,56,173,248,6,233,1,6186 

1680 DATA 141,248,6,176,3,206,249,6,32 

,7,42,173,248,6,141,27,4832 

1690 DATA 5,173,249,6,141,28,5,169,0,1 

41,248,6,141,249,6,159,7395 

1700 DATA 0,133,209,141,240,2,169,10,1 

33,85,169,0,133,86,169,6,5102 

1718 DATA 133,84,162,16,169,11,157,66, 

3,169,162,157,68,3,169,6,4039 

1728 DATA 157,69,3,169,38,157,72,3,169 

,0,157,73,3,32,86,228,3869 

1730 DATA 169,5,157,66,3,169,206,157,6 

8,3,169,42,157,69,3,169,5132 

1740 DATA 20,157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,3 

2,244,66,239,67,86,228,7636 

1750 DATA 160,1,185,286,42,281,58,248, 

33,288,185,206,42,281,58,240,1907 

1768 DATA 3,76,155,30,136,185,206,42,1 

53,203,42,153,84,6,153,232,8956 

1770 DATA 42,201,49,240,4,169,1,133,20 

9,200,162,0,200,185,286,42,41 

1788 DATA 157,286,42,281,155,248,4,232 

,200,208,242,162,32,169,13,157,1353 

1798 DATA 66,3,169,283,157,68,3,169,42 

,157,69,3,169,0,157,72,4194 

1808 DATA 3,169,8,157,73,3,32,86,228,1 

6,43,192,167,288,3,76,5397 

1818 DATA 86,29,32,252,28,162,32,169,1 

2,157,66,3,169,8,157,68,3826 

1828 DATA 3,169,8,157,69,3,169,8,157,7 

2,3,169,8,157,73,3,1870 

1830 DATA 32,86,228,76,19,30,169,3,157 

,66,3,169,203,157,68,3,4543 

1848 DATA 169,42,157,69,3,169,8,157,72 

,3,169,8,157,73,3,169,3474 

1858 DATA 4,157,74,3,169,8,157,75,3,32 

,86,228,169,9,133,84,4637 

1860 DATA 169,0,133,86,32,165,41,169,1 

,141,240,2,169,8,133,85,5308 

1870 DATA 169,0,133,86,169,6,133,84,16 

2,16,169,11,157,66,3,169,4589 

1888 DATA 173,157,68,3,169,42,157,69,3 

,169,22,157,72,3,169,8,2687 

1898 DATA 157,73,3,32,86,228,32,165,41 

,32,165,41,169,14,133,85,4416 

1980 DATA 169,0,133,86,169,12,133,84,1 

69,11,240,67,235,68,157,66,7825 

1918 DATA 3,169,89,157,68,3,169,5,157, 

69,3,169,12,157,72,3,2373 

1928 DATA 169,8,157,73,3,32,86,228,162 

,48,169,3,157,66,3,169,5832 



1938 DATA 84,157,68,3,169,6,157,69,3,1 

69,8,157,72,3,169,8,2190 

1940 DATA 157,73,3,169,8,157,74,3,169, 

0,157,75,3,32,86,228,4025 

1950 DATA 169,125,133,128,169,0,133,13 

0,133,135,32,95,41,165,130,288,8256 

1960 DATA 2,248,3,76,28,32,168,8,173,1 

68,6,281,32,144,67,281,6455 

1970 DATA 155,240,12,32,245,48,173,160 

,6,141,10,4,76,214,31,32,3308 

1980 DATA 245,40,169,32,141,10,4,173,1 

60,6,281,65,144,28,281,91,6343 

1998 DATA 144,11,281,97,144,28,201,123 

,144,3,76,254,31,165,135,288,9782 

2088 DATA 24,32,124,35,32,73,42,76,254 

,31,281,48,144,4,281,58,5354 

2818 DATA 144,5,169,0,76,5,32,169,1,13 

3,135,32,43,41,192,128,3926 

2020 DATA 144,3,76,37,29,76,166,31,32, 

217,41,32,84,42,162,32,2472 

2030 DATA 169,12,157,66,3,169,0,157,68 

,3,169,0,157,69,3,169,3500 

2040 DATA 0,157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32 

,86,228,162,48,169,12,4644 

2050 DATA 157,66,3,169,0,157,68,3,169, 

8,157,69,3,169,8,157,3459 

2868 DATA 72,3,169,8,157,73,3,32,86,22 

8,236,68,231,69,165,135,9215 

2870 DATA 201,2,288,3,76,45,35,169,8,1 

33,135,168,8,185,286,42,6245 

2888 DATA 281,155,248,16,281,46,288,6, 

72,169,1,133,135,104,153,87,7883 

2898 DATA 6,288,288,233,153,87,6,169,4 

4,153,286,42,132,286,165,135,664 

2188 DATA 248,7,56,165,286,233,4,133,2 

86,162,8,288,189,286,42,153,995 

2118 DATA 286,42,157,235,42,288,232,22 

8,206,288,241,169,46,153,206,42,3784 

2128 DATA 157,235,42,232,152,72,168,6, 

185,258,6,157,235,42,286,232,2583 

2138 DATA 192,3,288,244,184,168,266,16 

2,8,189,258,6,153,286,42,232,2879 

2148 DATA 286,224,3,288,244,169,155,15 

3,286,42,162,32,169,33,157,66,8682 

2158 DATA 3,169,232,157,68,3,169,42,15 

7,69,3,169,8,157,72,3,3182 

2168 DATA 169,6,157,73,3,32,86,228,192 

,170,240,4,192,128,176,98,337 

2170 DATA 169,32,157,66,3,169,203,157, 

68,3,169,42,157,69,3,169,5685 

2188 DATA 6,157,72,3,169,8,157,73,3,32 

,86,228,48,68,168,8,3255 

2198 DATA 185,139,8,153,266,42,200,192 

,12,208,245,169,44,153,206,42,870 

2208 DATA 162,8,200,189,87,6,201,155,2 

40,7,153,206,42,288,232,288,3375 

2218 DATA 242,153,286,42,162,32,169,32 

,157,65,3,169,203,157,68,3,6024 

2228 DATA 169,42,157,69,3,169,8,157,72 

,3,232,69,227,76,169,6,6629 

2238 DATA 157,73,3,32,86,228,169,6,133 

,85,169,8,133,86,169,6,5121 

2248 DATA 133,84,32,165,41,32,111,35,1 

69,18,133,85,169,6,141,246,7667 

2256 DATA 2,162,16,169,11,157,66,3,169 

,188,157,68,3,169,5,157,4919 

2268 DATA 69,3,169,18,157,72,3,169,8,1 

57,73,3,32,86,228,169,5657 

2270 DATA 5,157,66,3,169,160,157,68,3, 

169,6,157,69,3,169,1,3404 

2280 DATA 157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,8 

6,228,173,160,6,201,89,7078 

2290 DATA 208,77,32,111,35,32,165,41,1 

69,0,133,138,133,129,133,135,7276 

2300 DATA 169,125,133,128,160,0,185,13 

9,0,153,87,6,200,192,12,144,7168 

2310 DATA 245,160,0,169,32,141,160,6,1 

53,253,3,200,192,36,208,248,2153 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 21 




Magic Spell 



continued 



2320 DATA 166,0,169,26,133,85,169,8,13 

3,86,169,12,133,84,32,8,3022 

2330 DATA 41,173,160,6,153,101,5,200,1 

92,7,208,242,76,11,30,173,7577 

2340 DATA 247,6,208,3,76,78,35,169,1,1 

41,240,2,165,209,208,92,9426 

2350 DATA 32,111,35,162,16,169,11,157, 

66,3,169,56,157,68,3,169,4681 

2360 DATA 5,157,69,3,169,33,157,72,3,1 

69,0,157,73,3,32,86,2064 

2370 DATA 228,169,12,133,85,169,0,133, 

86,169,37,157,68,3,169,6,4319 

2380 DATA 157,69,3,169,17,157,72,3,169 

,0,228,70,223,71,157,73,7200 

2390 DATA 3,32,86,228,169,7,157,66,3,1 

69,160,157,68,3,169,6,5059 

2400 DATA 157,69,3,169,1,157,72,3,169, 

0,157,73,3,32,86,228,4404 

2410 DATA 32,111,35,162,16,169,11,157, 

66,3,169,54,157,68,3,169,4717 

2420 DATA 6,157,69,3,169,38,157,72,3,1 

69,0,157,73,3,32,86,2107 

2430 DATA 228,32,165,41,169,12,157,66, 

3,169,0,157,68,3,169,0,2987 

2440 DATA 157,69,3,169,0,157,72,3,169, 

0,157,73,3,32,86,228,4439 

2450 DATA 162,48,169,3,157,66,3,169,19 

5,157,68,3,169,42,157,69,6134 

2460 DATA 3,169,0,157,72,3,169,0,157,7 

3,3,169,8,157,74,3,2654 

2470 DATA 169,0,157,75,3,32,86,228,169 



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The $5 Talking Disk is available for Commodore 64, 1 28, 
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>^^^ Telephone (503) 342-1271 



,11,157,66,3,169,151,157,7375 

2480 DATA 68,3,169,0,157,69,3,169,54,1 

57,72,3,169,0,157,73,4237 

2490 DATA 3,32,86,228,56,165,203,229,1 

51, 133, 136, 165, 204 , 229 , 152, 133, 4681 

2500 DATA 137,24,165,136,105,2,133,136 

,144,2,230,137,162,48,169,11,7259 

2518 DATA 157,66,3,169,76,157,68,3,169 

,43,157,69,3,165,136,157,6713 

2520 DATA 72,3,165,137,157,73,3,32,86, 

228,76,78,35,162,32,169,5874 

2530 DATA 33,157,66,3,169,84,157,68,3, 

169,6,157,69,3,169,0,3220 

2540 DATA 157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,8 

6,224,71,219,72,228,76,7958 

2550 DATA 90,33,162,48,169,12,157,66,3 

,169,0,157,68,3,169,0,2990 

2560 DATA 157,69,3,169,0,157,72,3,169, 

8,157,73,3,32,86,228,4559 

2570 DATA 108,10,0,169,6,133,85,169,0, 

133,86,169,20,133,84,96,5371 

2580 DATA 173,160,6,141,29,5,32,202,35 

,173,10,4,73,128,141,18,2889 

2598 DATA 4,168,255,76,157,35,173,168, 

6,153,100,6,73,128,153,11,5437 

2600 DATA 4,152,72,32,95,41,104,168,20 

0,165,130,208,14,173,160,6,8521 

2610 DATA 32,206,40,173,254,6,240,222, 

173,160,6,141,161,6,153,11,8191 

2620 DATA 4,32,31,36,32,130,40,173,161 

,6,141,160,6,96,201,97,6498 

2630 DATA 144,3,56,233,32,56,233,65,10 

,168,185,151,8,141,242,6,7844 

2640 DATA 185,152,0,141,243,6,185,153, 

0,133,136,185,154,0,133,137,8698 

2650 DATA 56,165,136,233,2,133,136,176 

,2,198,137,160,0,177,136,201,703 

2660 DATA 128,176,6,32,19,36,76,249,35 

,32,118,40,165,136,141,244,8602 

2670 DATA 6,165,137,141,245,6,96,56,16 

5,136,233,1,133,136,176,2,8087 

2680 DATA 198,137,96,132,206,192,0,208 

,13,173,29,5,141,100,6,230,7043 

2690 DATA 206,169,1,141,253,6,32,196,4 

1,32,119,36,160,0,152,72,4836 

2700 DATA 185,10,4,201,128,144,2,73,12 

8,141,220,72,215,73,10,4,5700 

2710 DATA 32,206,40,173,254,6,288,8,32 

,245,40,104,168,200,208,226,2938 

2720 DATA 104,173,10,4,201,27,288,5,16 

9,32,141,10,4,168,1,169,4482 

2730 DATA 32,153,10,4,200,192,23,208,2 

48,169,0,141,253,6,96,173,286 

2740 DATA 242,6,133,131,173,243,6,133, 

132,173,244,6,133,133,173,245,3126 

2750 DATA 6,133,134,160,0,169,8,133,13 

5 , 24,165, 131 , 101, 133, 133, 136, 8338 

2768 DATA 165,132,181,134,133,137,169, 

8,185,8,133,138,78,138,182,137,7326 

2778 DATA 102,136,32,19,36,177,136,201 

,128,176,6,32,118,40,76,173,6482 

2780 DATA 36,32,118,40,177,136,201,128 

,144,8,169,1,133,135,177,136,9223 

2790 DATA 73,128,217,130,6,144,67,240, 

2,176,24,200,165,135,208,7,9282 

2800 DATA 196,206,240,15,76,188,36,196 

,206,240,3,76,18,37,169,0,6002 

2810 DATA 133,207,96,56,165,136,233,2, 

133,136,176,2,198,137,160,0,8566 

2820 DATA 177,136,201,128,176,6,32,19, 

36,76,248,36,32,118,40,165,5228 

2830 DATA 136,133,133,165,137,133,134, 

76,43,37,160,0,177,136,281,128,9105 

2848 DATA 176,6,32,118,40,76,20,37,32, 

118,40,165,136,133,131,165,6811 

2858 DATA 137,133,132,165,132,197,134, 

248,5,144,9,76,67,37,165,133,7497 

2868 DATA 197,131,144,7,169,1,133,287, 



PAGE 22 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



76,139,216,73,211,74,36,169,9566 

2870 DATA 1,133,207,165,208,248,3,76,2 

1,39,169,1,133,208,166,128,9156 

2880 DATA 202,164,206,173,253,6,208,1, 

200,189,33,4,201,32,144,18,7095 

2890 DATA 201,123,144,6,201,155,208,10 

,169,32,153,10,4,200,192,23,7008 

2900 DATA 176,12,232,224,125,176,7,236 

,104,3,176,2,144,219,169,2,8741 

2910 DATA 133,85,169,0,133,86,169,22,1 

33,84,162,16,169,11,157,66,6033 

2920 DATA 3,169,253,157,68,3,169,3,157 

,69,3,169,36,157,72,3,4171 

2930 DATA 169,0,157,73,3,32,86,228,169 

,10,133,85,169,0,133,86,6167 

2940 DATA 169,15,133,84,169,0,141,240, 

2,169,11,157,66,3,169,192,7846 

2950 DATA 157,68,3,169,6,157,69,3,169, 

10,157,72,3,169,0,157,4536 

2960 DATA 73,3,32,86,228,160,0,173,29, 

5,141,160,6,32,8,41,2047 

2970 DATA 165,206,201,1,208,8,173,29,5 

,205,100,6,240,14,185,100,7643 

2980 DATA 6,141,160,6,32,8,41,200,196, 

206,208,242,169,17,56,229,1822 

2990 DATA 206,168,169,32,141,160,6,32, 

8,41,136,208,250,169,155,141,801 

3000 DATA 160,6,32,8,41,169,32,141,160 

,6,169,9,133,85,169,0,4792 

3010 DATA 133,86,169,17,133,84,32,8,41 

,169,0,141,190,2,173,100,5791 

3020 DATA 6,141,246,6,169,5,157,66,3,1 

69 , 212, 74, 207, 75, 100, 157, 9262 

3030 DATA 68,3,169,6,157,69,3,169,30,1 

57,72,3,169,0,157,73,4595 

3040 DATA 3,32,86,228,169,64,141,190,2 

,173,100,6,201,155,240,50,116 

3050 DATA 141,29,5,160,0,185,101,6,201 

,155,240,6,153,100,6,200,8519 

3060 DATA 208,243,192,0,208,7,200,173, 

29,5,141,100,6,132,206,32,6786 

3070 DATA 196,41,173,29,5,32,202,35,32 

,119,36,165,207,208,9,76,6702 

3080 DATA 232,38,173,246,6,141,100,6,1 

69,10,133,85,169,0,133,86,6187 

3090 DATA 169,18,133,84,169,11,157,66, 

3,169,202,157,68,3,169,6,5948 

3100 DATA 157,69,3,169,20,157,72,3,169 

,0,157,73,3,32,86,228,5199 

3110 DATA 169,5,157,66,3,169,160,157,6 

8,3,169,6,157,69,3,169,5758 

3120 DATA 1,157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32 

,86,228,173,160,6,201,8015 

3130 DATA 89,240,2,208,3,32,22,39,169, 

1,141,240,2,169,15,133,5917 

3140 DATA 84,32,165,41,169,17,133,84,3 

2,165,41,169,19,133,84,32,4795 

3150 DATA 165,41,169,22,133,84,169,2,1 

33,85,169,0,133,86,32,165,6319 

3160 DATA 41,169,0,133,208,96,169,1,14 

1,247,6,169,0,133,135,173,9366 

3170 DATA 29,5,201,97,144,3,56,233,32, 

56,233,65,10,168,165,137,8534 

3180 DATA 217,152,0,144,70,240,2,176,7 

,165,208,75,203,76,136,217,1605 

3190 DATA 151,0,144,59,165,137,217,154 

,0,144,15,240,3,76,140,39,6719 

32fl0 DATA 165,136,217,153,0,144,3,76,1 

40,39,160,0,177,136,201,128,9071 

3210 DATA 144,8,169,1,133,135,177,136, 

73,128,217,130,6,144,16,240,9741 

3220 DATA 2,176,29,165,135,208,8,200,1 

95,206,240,20,76,88,39,160,9969 

3230 DATA 0,177,136,201,128,176,6,32,1 

18,40,76,125,39,32,118,40,3953 

3240 DATA 165,203,133,131,165,204,133, 

132,160,0,24,165,131,101,206,133,789 

3250 DATA 133,165,132,105,0,133,134,20 



5,49,2,240,5,144,55,76,180,7728 

3260 DATA 39,165,133,205,48,2,144,45,1 

69,10,133,85,169,0,133,86,6140 

3270 DATA 169,20,133,84,162,16,169,11, 

157,66,3,169,248,157,68,3,7015 

3280 DATA 169,42,157,69,3,169,28,157,7 

2,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,2918 

3290 DATA 86,228,76,129,40,177,131,145 

,133,56,165,131,233,1,133,131,193 

3300 DATA 176,2,198,132,56,165,133,233 

,1,133,133,176,2,198,134,165,1029 

3310 DATA 137,197,132,144,224,240,3,76 

,14,40,165,136,197,131,144,213,1938 

3320 DATA 240,211,185,130,6,145,136,20 

0,196,206,208,246,152,72,173,29,3616 

3330 DATA 5,201,97,144,3,56,233,32,56, 

233,65,10,168,200,200,24,8879 

3340 DATA 185,151,0,101,286,153,151,0, 

185,152,204,76,199,77,0,105,8922 

3350 DATA 0,153,152,0,200,200,192,54,2 

08,233,104,168,136,177,136,73,2904 

3360 DATA 128,145,136,173,248,6,72,173 

,249,6,72,24,173,27,5,105,5805 

3370 DATA 1,141,27,5,141,248,6,173,28, 

5,105,0,141,28,5,141,3386 

3380 DATA 249,6,32,7,42,104,141,249,6, 

104,141,248,6,96,24,165,7621 

3390 DATA 136,105,1,133,136,144,2,230, 

137,96,160,255,152,72,173,29,725 

3400 DATA 5,141,160,6,32,43,41,192,128 

,144,7,192,255,240,3,76,9341 



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ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 23 




Magic Spell 



continued 



34ie DATA 37,29,165,286,201,1,268,12,1 

73,29,5,205,100,6,288,4,6317 

3420 DATA 104,160,0,96,76,186,48,185,1 

00,6,141,160,6,152,72,32,5713 

3438 DATA 43,41,192,128,144,8,192,255, 

240,4,104,76,37,29,104,168,8186 

3448 DATA 200,196,206,208,226,96,72,16 

9,0,141,254,6,104,201,39,240,1911 

3450 DATA 27,201,45,246,23,201,65,144, 

12,261,91,144,15,261,97,144,9517 

3466 DATA 4,281,123,144,7,72,169,1,141 

,254,6,184,96,162,1,166,7683 

3476 DATA 6,189,253,3,153,253,3,232,22 

4,14,246,3,268,288,242,96,4289 

3486 DATA 152,72,162,16,169,11,157,66, 

3,169,168,157,68,3,169,6,5782 

3498 DATA 157,69,3,169,1,157,72,3,169, 

8,157,73,3,32,85,228,5494 

3568 DATA 164,168,96,165,129,261,125,2 

88,36,169,266,77,195,78,6,133,171 

3518 DATA 129,162,48,169,11,157,66,3,1 

69,158,157,68,3,169,4,157,6887 

3528 DATA 69,3,169,125,157,72,3,169,8, 

157,73,3,32,86,228,165,7281 

3536 DATA 129,176,173,168,6,157,158,4, 

236,129,96,165,128,281,125,288,3345 

3548 DATA 44,169,8,133,128,162,32,169, 

7,157,66,3,169,33,157,68,6139 

3556 DATA 3,169,4,157,69,3,169,125,157 

,72,3,169,6,157,73,3,4612 

3566 DATA 32,86,228,189,72,3,288,3,76, 

151,41,165,128,176,265,184,476 



3576 DATA 3,268,5,169,1,133,136,96,189 

,33,4,141,166,6,236,128,8596 

3586 DATA 96,162,16,169,11,157,66,3,16 

9,6,157,68,3,169,6,157,5278 

3596 DATA 69,3,169,37,157,72,3,169,6,1 

57,73,3,32,86,228,96,5895 

3666 DATA 168,8,185,188,6,261,97,144,3 

,56,233,32,153,136,6,286,8415 

3610 DATA 196,206,208,238,96,162,48,16 

9,11,157,66,3,169,158,157,68,9217 

3620 DATA 3,169,4,157,69,3,165,129,157 

,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,4686 

3630 DATA 32,86,228,96,24,173,248,6,18 

5,1,141,248,6,144,3,238,9273 

3640 DATA 249,6,96,32,154,42,177,243,2 

01,128,144,5,73,128,76,27,7568 

3650 DATA 42,153,51,5,200,16,239,153,5 

1,5,169,10,133,85,169,0,6106 

3668 DATA 133,86,169,18,133,84,162,16, 

169,11,196,78,99,79,157,66,7478 

3676 DATA 3,169,36,157,68,3,169,5,157, 

69,3,169,26,157,72,3,4138 

3688 DATA 169,6,157,73,3,32,86,228,96, 

32,248,41,238,265,165,265,3264 

3696 DATA 261,5,288,69,32,154,42,177,2 

43,261,128,144,5,73,128,76,9151 

3766 DATA 184,42,153,161,5,286,16,239, 

153,181,5,169,26,133,85,169,8649 

3718 DATA 6,133,86,169,12,133,84,162,1 

6,169,11,157,66,3,169,181,6542 

3726 DATA 157,68,3,169,5,157,69,3,169, 

7,157,72,3,169,6,157,5271 



A 



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• ATARI 2600 . TEXAS 

■ ATARI 5200 INSTRUMENT 

• ATARI 7B0O • COLECOVISION 

• INTELLIVISION . COMMODORE 



HOW TO ORDER: WSHIER CHECK. MONEY ORDER. MASTERCARD' OR VISA" (ADD 4% FOR CHARGE CARDS) . . NO PERSONAL CHECKS ... NO C.O.D.'s . . . 

SHIPPED U.PS. . . ALL PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. 

SHIPPING: ADD $3.00 ON Aa ORDERS UNDER $100.00 . . . ADD $5.00 ON ALL ORDERS OVER $100.00. ACTUAL FREIGHT CHARGED ON MULTIPLE ORDERS. 

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POLICIES: NO RETURNS WITHOUT A RETURN AUTHORIZATION ... NO RETURNS UNLESS DEFECTIVE. ALL DEFECTIVES WILL BE EXCHANGED ... NO 

EXCEPTIONS. 



ELECTRONIC ONE 
CALL r6 1 4J 864-9994 



CIRCLE »110 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



P.O. Box 13428 
Columbus, Ohio 43213 



PAGE 24 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



373e DATA 73,3,32,86,228,169,0,133,205 

,96,173,248,6,133,212,173,3039 

3740 DATA 249,6,133,213,32,170,217,32, 

230,216,160,0,96,32,32,32,6885 

3750 DATA 32,195,200,197,195,203,201,2 

06,199,32,196,207,195,213,205,197,9303 

3760 DATA 206,212,155,68,58,87,79,82,6 

8,83,155,68,49,58,126,79,5714 

3770 DATA 128,79,68,49,58,142,79,117,8 

0,67,65,78,78,79,84,32,4020 

3780 DATA 65,68,68,32,87,79,82,68,32,3 

2,77,69,77,79,82,89,3384 

3790 DATA 32,70,85,76,76,70,73,76,69,3 

2,76,79,67,75,69,68,3209 

3800 DATA 32,32,65,66,79,82,84,73,78,7 

1,32,32,32,32,32,32,418 

3810 DATA 32,68,73,83,75,32,70,85,76,7 

6,32,32,65,66,79,82,2712 

3820 DATA 84,73,78,71,32,32,32,32,32,3 

2,32,32,32,128,193,65,2887 

3830 DATA 212,65,212,65,205,86,197,79, 

210,65,77,197,79,77,197,201,2647 

3840 DATA 85,78,203,73,84,197,69,212,2 

17,207,206,79,79,210,85,73,2410 

3850 DATA 67,203,79,79,205,207,207,83, 

197,73,69,215,197,45,82,65,559 

3860 DATA 217,79,213,79,207,255,69,58, 

29,29,127,127,77,97,103,105,7758 

3870 DATA 99,32,83,112,101,108,108,155 

,155,155,127,127,80,114,101,115,9736 

3880 DATA 115,32,211,212,193,210,212,1 

55,28,127,32,32,32,32,32,76,5307 

3890 DATA 111,97,100,105,118,103,32,68 

,105,99,116,105,111,110,97,114,7584 

3900 DATA 121,155,155,127,67,111,112,1 

21,114,105,103,104,116,32,49,57,6117 

3910 DATA 56,52,32,98,121,32,65,46,32, 

71,105,97,109,98,114,97,5546 

3920 DATA 155,224,2,225,2,0,64,0,0,0,0 

,0,0,0,0,0,5887 



Listing 2. 



1000 DATA 255,255,0,64,251,64,169,0,13 

3,178,133,177,133,207,169,125,569 

1010 DATA 133,176,169,252,133,208,169, 

28,133,209,169,161,133,203,169,65,1554 

1020 DATA 133,204,160,0,177,203,145,20 

8,200,208,249,230,209,230,204,165,7839 

1030 DATA 209,201,38,144,239,240,237,1 

62,16,169,3,157,66,3,169,198,8275 

1040 DATA 157,68,3,169,38,157,69,3,169 

,0,157,72,3,169,0,157,2686 

1050 DATA 73,3,169,12,157,74,3,169,0,1 

57,75,3,32,86,228,165,4397 

1060 DATA 16,41,127,133,16,141,14,210, 

169,146,141,198,2,141,200,2,6715 

1070 DATA 169,1,141,240,2,169,11,157,6 

6,3,169,42,157,68,3,169,3710 

1080 DATA 37,157,69,3,169,46,157,72,3, 

169,0,157,73,3,32,86,894 

1090 DATA 228,169,21,133,84,169,11,157 

,66,3,169,57,157,68,3,169,3927 

Ilea DATA 38,157,69,3,169,30,157,72,3, 

169,0,157,73,3,32,86,819 

1110 DATA 228,169,0,133,85,133,86,169, 

12,133,84,162,16,169,11,157,4942 

1120 DATA 66,3,169,226,157,68,3,169,38 

, 157, 69,3, 169, 22, 157, 72, 3888 

1130 DATA 3,169,0,157,73,3,32,86,228,1 

73,31,208,201,6,208,249,9814 

1140 DATA 162,32,169,3,157,66,3,169,4, 

157,68,3,169,37,157,69,3003 

1150 DATA 3,169,0,157,72,3,169,0,157,7 



A REVOLUTION IN FLYING 




THE .Jii^yr^l^ JOYSTICK 



A unique product designed for use with FLIGHT SIMULATOR 
n™ to give you accurate and proportional control. Includes con- 
trol Yoke, Throttle, Flaps, Brakes, Gun and Elevator trim. 

OTHER FEATURES: 

• Software program drivers for other Flight programs 
available soon 

• Use with User generated BASIC programs 

• Use with User generated assembly language 
programs 

This is the ONLY fully proportional, continuously variable joys- 
tick control for Flight Simulator II. Now your home computer 
can be a truly realistic flight simulator. 

". . .1 flew all over the map with one landing after another and no 
mishaps." K.C. 

"...I am getting more use out of Flight Simulator now and will 
continue thanks to your joystick" R.T. 



WARNING: Use of the MicroFlyte joystick may cause 
Flight Simulator addiction. Order with caution. 



NOW AVAILABLE DIRECT FROM MICROCUBE 

ONLY $59.95 -I- $4.00 shipping & handling 
(VA residents add 4% sales tax) 



Payment enclosed check money order 

Bill my MasterCard Visa Choice 

Card # Expires 



Signature 
Name 



Address 
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Zip 



Computer Model 



MICRCKUBE CORPORATION (703)777-7157 

P.O. BOX 488 M-F9A.M.-6P.M.est. 

LEESBURG, VA 22075 DEALER INQUIRIES WELCOME 

Flight Simulator II is a Iiadeniailt of Sublogic Coip. 



CIRCLE #111 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 25 




Magic Spell continued 



3,3,169,4*157,74,3,1292 

1160 DflTft 169,8,252,64,247,65,157,75,3 
,32,86,228,48,3,76,88,2908 
1170 DftTfl 65,169,12,157,66,3,169,0,157 
,68,3,169,0,157,69,3,1203 
1180 DflTO 169,0,157,72,3,169,0,157,73, 
3,32,86,228,169,9,133,4057 
1190 DATA 85,133,84,169,0,133,86,162,1 
6,169,11,157,66,3,169,98,4007 
1200 DftTft 157,68,3,169,6,157,69,3,169, 
28,157,72,3,169,0,157,2966 
1210 DATA 73,3,32,86,228,169,0,133,20, 
165,20,201,150,208,250,108,9749 
1220 DATA 10,0,169,0,133,85,133,86,169 
,12,133,84,162,16,169,11,3684 
1230 DATA 157,66,3,169,200,157,68,3,16 
9,38,157,69,3,169,26,157,4409 
1240 DATA 72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,86,22 
8,162,32,169,7,157,66,4251 
1250 DATA 3,169,210,157,68,3,169,35,15 
7,69,3,169,54,157,72,3,2862 
1260 DATA 169,0,157,73,3,32,86,228,76, 
252,28,169,7,157,66,3,3692 
1270 DATA 169,76,157,68,3,169,43,157,6 
9,3,169,64,157,72,3,169,3996 
1280 DATA 156,157,73,3,32,86,228,162,3 
2,169,12,157,66,3,169,0,2978 
1290 DATA 157,68,3,169,0,157,69,3,169, 
0,157,72,3,169,0,157,2746 
1300 DATA 73,3,32,86,228,160,0,169,0,1 
41,240,2,162,16,169,11,4386 
1310 DATA 157,66,3,169,42,157,68,3,169 
,37,157,69,3,169,127,157,5204 
1320 DATA 72,3,248,65,243,66,169,0,157 
,73,3,32,86,228,169,5,4681 
1330 DATA 157,66,3,169,96,157,68,3,169 
,6,157,69,3,169,1,157,3294 
1340 DATA 72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,86,22 
8,173,96,6,201,49,240,7001 
1350 DATA 18,201,50,240,20,201,51,240, 
22,201,52,240,3,76,61,29,4605 
1360 DATA 76,165,34,32,26,30,76,61,29, 
32,2,33,76,61,29,56,7498 
1370 DATA 173,229,2,237,6,36,133,212,1 
73,230,2,237,7,36,133,213,8549 
1380 DATA 32,170,217,32,230,216,160,0, 
177,243,201,128,176,6,153,52,9366 
1390 DATA 38,200,208,244,73,128,153,52 
,38,162,16,169,11,157,66,3,3593 
1400 DATA 169,32,157,68,3,169,38,157,6 
9,3,169,25,157,72,3,169,3535 
1410 DATA 0,157,73,3,32,86,228,169,167 
,157,68,3,169,38,157,69,5624 
1420 DATA 3,169,31,157,72,3,169,0,157, 
73,3,32,86,228,169,5,3528 
1430 DATA 157,66,3,169,134,157,68,3,16 
9,6,157,69,3,169,1,157,3584 
1440 DATA 72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,86,22 
8,76,61,29,169,11,157,3567 
1450 DATA 66,3,169,169,157,68,3,169,37 
,157,69,3,169,19,157,72,3939 
1460 DATA 3,169,0,157,73,3,32,86,228,1 
69,5,157,66,3,169,36,3416 
1470 DATA 157,68,3,169,6,157,69,3,169, 
30,157,72,3,169,0,157,3256 
1480 DATA 73,3,244,66,239,67,32,86,228 
^^ 169, 11, 157, 66, 3, 169, 188, 7254 
1490 DATA 157,68,3,169,37,157,69,3,169 
,19,157,72,3,169,0,157,3321 
1500 DATA 73,3,32,86,228,169,5,157,66, 
3,169,66,157,68,3,169,4481 
1510 DATA 6,157,69,3,169,30,157,72,3,1 
69,0,157,73,3,32,86,1197 
1520 DATA 228,169,11,157,66,3,169,207, 
157,68,3,169,37,157,69,3,3850 
1530 DATA 169,27,157,72,3,169,0,157,73 
,3,32,86,228,169,234,157,8220 
1540 DATA 68,3,169,37,157,69,3,169,24, 



157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3175 

1550 DATA 3,32,86,228,169,2,157,68,3,1 

69,38,157,69,3,169,30,3260 

1560 DATA 157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,8 

6,228,169,167,157,68,3,5144 

1570 DATA 169,38,157,69,3,169,31,157,7 

2,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,1221 

1580 DATA 86,228,169,5,157,66,3,169,13 

4,157,68,3,169,6,157,69,4503 

1590 DATA 3,169,1,157,72,3,169,0,157,7 

3,3,32,86,228,173,36,4164 

1600 DATA 6,201,155,240,29,141,96,6,14 

1,3,37,169,1,141,130,6,2911 

1610 DATA 173,66,6,201,155,240,24,141, 

97,6,169,1,141,131,6,76,4025 

1620 DATA 66,31,169,0,141,130,6,169,65 

,141,3,37,76,25,31,169,2113 

1630 DATA 0,141,131,6,169,91,141,97,6, 

173,130,6,208,13,173,210,7610 

1640 DATA 35,133,240,67,235,68,208,173 

,211,35,133,209,76,102,31,173,9221 

1650 DATA 3,37,56,233,65,10,168,185,21 

0,35,133,208,185,211,35,133,79 

1660 DATA 209,173,252,2,48,33,72,169,2 

55,141,252,2,104,201,22,208,9598 

1670 DATA 3,76,73,34,173,252,2,48,251, 

72,169,255,141,252,2,104,9908 

1680 DATA 201,22,208,3,76,73,34,32,171 

,32,160,0,173,130,6,208,4979 

1690 DATA 3,76,191,31,185,12,37,201,15 

5,240,13,217,36,6,144,5,4740 

1700 DATA 240,16,76,191,31,76,109,32,1 

69,155,217,36,6,240,56,76,5978 

1710 DATA 109,32,200,169,155,217,36,6, 

208,218,160,0,173,131,6,240,9361 

1720 DATA 38,185,12,37,201,155,240,31, 

217,66,6,144,26,240,3,76,5541 

1730 DATA 73,34,200,169,155,217,66,6,2 

40,3,76,198,31,169,155,217,9702 

1740 DATA 12,37,240,3,76,73,34,160,0,2 

4,165,85,109,132,6,201,4540 

1750 DATA 38,144,37,169,155,141,134,6, 

162,16,169,11,157,66,3,169,4793 

1760 DATA 134,157,68,3,169,6,157,69,3, 

169,1,157,72,3,169,0,2081 

1770 DATA 157,73,3,32,86,228,160,0,185 

,12,37,201,155,240,40,141,7963 

1780 DATA 134,6,152,72,162,16,169,11,1 

57,66,3,169,134,157,68,3,3989 

1790 DATA 169,6,157,69,3,169,1,157,72, 

3,169,0,157,73,3,32,1167 

1800 DATA 86,228,236,68,231,69,104,168 

,200,208,209,169,32,141,134,6,9666 

1810 DATA 169,11,157,66,3,169,134,157, 

68,3,169,6,157,69,3,169,4288 

1820 DATA 1,157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32 

,86,228,160,0,177,208,6983 

1830 DATA 201,128,176,6,32,198,35,76,1 

09,32,32,198,35,173,3,37,2583 

1840 DATA 56,233,65,10,168,165,209,217 

,213,35,144,4,240,5,176,10,7515 

1850 DATA 76,102,31,165,208,217,212,35 

,144,246,238,3,37,173,3,37,6939 

1860 DATA 201,91,240,3,76,102,31,76,73 

,34,160,0,169,1,133,207,5067 

1870 DATA 162,1,177,208,201,128,176,11 

,157,12,37,169,0,133,207,200,8625 

1880 DATA 232,208,239,73,128,72,165,20 

7.240,35.173,3,37,201,65,240,9979 

1890 DATA 7,201,73,240,3,76,238,32,104 

,205,3,37,208,16,141,12,4569 

1900 DATA 37,169,155,141,13,37,169,1,1 

41,132,6,208,19,104,157,12,4183 

1910 DATA 37,173,3,37,141,12,37,232,16 

9,155,157,12,37,142,132,6,4829 

1920 DATA 96,162,16,169,11,157,66,3,16 

9,87,157,68,3,169,38,157,4968 

1930 DATA 69,3,169,31,157,72,3,169,0,1 



PAGE 26 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



57,73,3,32,86,228,169,5379 

1940 DATA 5,157,66,3,169,36,157,68,3,1 

69,6,157,69,3,169,38,2794 

1958 DATA 157,72,3,169,8,157,73,3,32,8 

6,228,173,36,6,141,3,2868 

1968 DATA 37,56,232,69,227,78,233,65,1 

8,168,185,218,35,133,288,185,1589 

1978 DATA 211,35,133,289,32,171,32,168 

,8,185,12,37,281,155,248,27,7417 

1988 DATA 217,36,6,144,22,240,2,176,56 

,208,169,155,217,36,6,208,8881 

1990 DATA 232,169,155,217,12,37,248,74 

,75,120,33,160,8,177,288,281,9428 

2800 DATA 128,176,6,32,198,35,76,128,3 

3,32,198,35,165,289,285,7,6791 

2010 DATA 36,144,193,240,3,76,158,33,1 

65,208,205,6,36,144,181,248,645 

2020 DATA 179,162,16,169,11,157,66,3,1 

69,139,157,68,3,169,38,157,5671 

2030 DATA 69,3,169,28,157,72,3,169,8,1 

57,73,3,32,86,228,76,3979 

2840 DATA 73,34,173,132,6,201,1,240,3, 

206,132,6,24,165,208,189,7488 

2850 DATA 132,6,133,203,165,209,105,8, 

133,204,160,0,177,283,145,288,1862 

2860 DATA 24,165,283,185,1,133,283,144 

,2,230,204,165,204,205,7,36,9564 

2070 DATA 144,12,240,3,76,1,34,165,203 

,205,6,36,176,6,32,198,5389 

2080 DATA 35,76,217,33,173,36,6,56,233 

,64,10,141,134,6,160,52,4218 

2090 DATA 56,185,210,35,237,132,6,153, 

210,35,185,211,35,233,8,153,9581 

2100 DATA 211,35,136,136,204,134,6,176 

,231,162,16,169,11,157,66,3,5889 

2118 DATA 169,118,157,68,3,169,38,157, 

69,3,169,21,157,72,3,169,4369 

2128 DATA 8,157,228,78,223,71,73,3,32, 

86,228,169,1,141,135,6,5266 

2130 DATA 162,16,169,11,157,66,3,169,1 

67,157,68,3,169,38,157,69,5474 

2148 DATA 3,169,31,157,72,3,169,8,157, 

73,3,32,86,228,169,5,4248 

2158 DATA 157,66,3,169,96,157,68,3,169 

,6,157,69,3,169,1,157,4114 

2168 DATA 72,3,169,8,157,73,3,32,86,22 

8,76,61,29,162,48,169,4936 

2170 DATA 11,157,66,3,169,133,157,68,3 

,169,36,157,69,3,165,177,6234 

2180 DATA 157,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,32,8 

6,228,96,173,135,6,288,7008 

2198 DATA 3,76,73,35,162,48,169,3,157, 

66,3,169,4,157,68,3,2461 

2280 DATA 169,37,157,69,3,169,8,157,72 

,3,169,0,157,73,3,169,3824 

2210 DATA 8,157,74,3,169,8,157,75,3,32 

,86,228,169,11,157,66,5101 

2220 DATA 3,169,210,157,68,3,169,35,15 

7,69,3,169,54,157,72,3,3832 

2238 DATA 169,8,157,73,3,32,86,228,56, 

173,6,36,237,210,35,133,7201 

2240 DATA 208,173,7,36,237,211,35,133, 

289,24,165,208,185,2,133,288,9867 

2250 DATA 144,2,230,209,162,48,169,11, 

157,66,3,169,76,157,68,3,4681 

2260 DATA 169,43,157,69,3,165,208,157, 

72,3,165,289,157,73,3,32,5688 

2276 DATA 86,228,162,48,169,12,157,66, 

3,169,8,157,68,3,169,8,3896 

2288 DATA 157,69,224,71,172,72,3,169,8 

,157,72,3,169,8,157,73,4314 

2298 DATA 3,32,86,228,188,18,8,165,177 

,201,125,208,36,169,8,133,7883 

2360 DATA 177,162,48,169,11,157,66,3,1 

69,133,157,68,3,169,36,157,5955 

2318 DATA 69,3,169,125,157,72,3,169,8, 

157,73,3,32,86,228,165,6071 

2328 DATA 177,170,173,96,6,157,133,36, 



238,177,96,165,176,281,125,288,3112 

2330 DATA 44,169,0,133,176,162,32,169, 

7,157,66,3,169,8,157,68,4819 

2348 DATA 3,169,36,157,69,3,169,125,15 

7,72,3,169,8,157,73,3,3498 

2358 DATA 32,86,228,189,72,3,288,3,76, 

184,35,165,176,170,205,104,148 

2368 DATA 3,288,5,169,1,133,178,96,189 

,8,36,141,96,6,238,176,7754 

2378 DATA 96,24,165,288,185,1,133,288, 

144,2,238,289,96,0,8,8,4569 

2388 DATA 8,8,8,8,8,0,8,8,8,0,0,0,8,8, 

8,8,2380 

2398 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,8,8,0,8,8,8,8,8,8, 

8,8,2398 

2488 DATA 0,8,8,8,8,8,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,2400 

2410 DATA 0,0,8,167,73,167,73,0,169,73 

,176,73,68,58,87,79,4284 

2428 DATA 82,68,83,155,287,73,282,74,1 

25,29,29,29,127,127,77,97,5284 

2438 DATA 183,185,99,32,83,112,181,188 

,188,155,155,127,32,32,32,68,4889 

2448 DATA 185,99,116,185,111,118,97,11 

4,121,32,77,97,185,118,116,101,5998 

2458 DATA 118,97,118,99,101,155,155,12 

7,32,32,32,49,46,32,32,76,1306 

2460 DATA 105,115,116,32,68,185,99,116 

,185,111,118,97,114,121,155,127,7824 

2470 DATA 32,32,32,50,46,32,32,68,101, 

108,181,116,181,32,87,111,3386 



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CIRCLE #112 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 27 




Magic Spell 



continued 



2480 DATA 114,100,155,127,32,32,32,51, 

46,32,32,70,114,101,101,32,1600 

2490 DflTft 77,101,109,111,114,121,155,1 

27,32,32,32,52,46,32,32,69,1151 

2500 DATA 110,100,155,127,32,32,32,155 

,127,32,32,32,76,79,87,32,1709 

2510 DflTfl 76,73,77,73,84,155,127,32,32 

,32,127,32,32,32,72,73,1251 

2520 DftTfl 71,72,32,76,73,77,73,84,155, 

127,32,32,32,127,32,32,1732 

2530 DATA 32,80,82,69,83,83,32,65,78,8 

9,32,75,69,89,32,84,1712 

2540 DATA 79,32,83,84,65,82,84,155,127 

,32,32,32,32,32,32,65,496 

2550 DATA 78,68,32,83,84,79,80,32,76,7 

3,83,84,73,78,71,155,3823 

2560 DATA 127,32,32,32,80,82,69,83,83, 

32,88,32,84,79,32,67,1183 

2570 DATA 65,78,67,69,76,32,76,73,83,8 

4,73,78,71,155,155,155,6180 

2580 DATA 155,127,32,32,203,74,156,75, 

32,70,82,69,69,32,77,69,2686 

2590 DATA 77,79,82,89,58,32,32,32,32,3 

2,32,155,127,67,111,112,3255 

2600 DATA 121,114,105,103,104,116,32,4 

9,57,56,52,32,98,121,32,65,2025 

2610 DATA 46,32,71,105,97,109,98,114,9 

7,155,155,127,32,32,32,69,4190 

2620 DATA 78,84,69,82,32,87,79,82,68,3 

2,84,79,32,68,69,76,1715 

2630 DATA 69,84,69,155,127,32,32,32,15 

5,155,127,32,32,32,32,32,1583 



2640 DATA 32,87,79,82,68,32,68,69,76,6 

9,84,69,68,155,155,127,5508 

2650 DATA 32,32,32,87,79,82,68,32,78,7 

9,84,32,73,78,32,68,1218 

2660 DATA 73,67,84,73,79,78,65,82,89,1 

55,155,127,32,32,32,80,3589 

2670 DATA 82,69,83,83,32,82,69,84,85,8 

2,78,32,87,72,69,78,2527 

2680 DATA 32,82,69,65,68,89,155,127,69 

,58,127,127,32,32,32,32,2296 

2690 DATA 32,76,111,97,100,105,110,103 

,32,68,105,99,116,105,111,110,6033 

2700 DATA 97,114,121,155,127,127,32,32 

,32,32,32,32,32,32,80,114,1117 

2710 DATA 101,115,115,32,211,212,193,2 

10,212,155,0,6,35,6,32,32,3933 

2720 DATA 32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,3 

2,32,32,32,32,32,32,7072 

2730 DATA 32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,32,3 

2,32,32,32,32,32,32,7082 

2740 DATA 32,155,98,6,125,6,32,32,32,7 

8,111,32,68,105,99,116,2909 

2750 DATA 105,111,110,97,114,121,32,45 

,32,65,98,111,114,116,105,110,5464 

2760 DATA 103,155,133,6,133,6,1,135,6, 

138,6,0,0,0,97,224,1923 

2770 DATA 2,225,2,0,64,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 

,0,0,0,3548 



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CIRCLE #113 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 28 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 




Boot 
Camp 



by Karl E. Wiegers 



Last time out, we ended up with the title screen to what 
promises to be a very silly program, "Attack of the Suici- 
dal Road-Racing Aliens." 

This is a mixed graphics mode screen, containing seg- 
ments of graphics modes 1, 2, 7 and 0. We created the 
screen by setting up our own "display list." This tells the 
computer which graphics mode to use for each horizon- 
tal line on the TV, and where in RAM to find the infor- 
mation to be displayed. 

Our title screen is nice, but it just doesn't have the color- 
ful pizzazz of real games. We need some way to get around 
the usual five-colors-at-a-time limit. Fortunately, just such 
an mechanism exists: the display list interrupt or DLL To- 
day we'll explore the DLI — and spice up our title screen 
in the process. 

Display list interrupts. 

An introduction to DLIs always begins with a review 
of the TV display process. The TV's electron beam begins 
viTiting on the screen at the upper left corner. It draws one 
horizontal line, then is turned off just long enough for the 
electron beam to move back across the screen and down 
one line. 

During this brief period, while the gun's doing a hori- 
zontal retrace, we have just enough time to rvm a tiny ma- 
chine language program. Such a program, my friends, is 
a DLI, sometimes called a "horizontal blank interrupt." 
The execution time may be short, but the possibilities are 
many. 



Depending on the graphics mode, the horizontal blank- 
ing period is between 15 and 60 machine cj^les long. This 
gives us time to run a program containing five to ten load- 
and-store operations. It's plenty of time to change the con- 
tents of color registers, point to a redefined character set, 
change the positions of players or missiles, alter the con- 
tents of sound registers, and so on. 

These changes will be in effect as soon as the electron 
gun begins to draw the next scan line on the TV screen. 
Many amazing special effects can be produced using DLIs. 
We'll concentrate mostly on color changes this month. 

Writing a DLI. 

There are just a few things to keep in mind as you write 
a DLI. The most important is that it must be short. If the 
DLI is still executing when the electron gim comes back 
on, there may be distortions in the screen display. Let's 
examine the DLI routine that appears in Lines 620-670 of 
Listing 1, reproduced here: 

0620 DLI PHA 
0630 LDA #68 

0640 STA WSYNC 

0650 STA C0LPF2 

0660 PLA 

0670 FtTI 

The first instructions in your DLI must save the con- 
tents of any registers (accumulator, X, Y) used in the DLI. 
In 6502 Ungo, the PHA instruction is used to push the con- 
tents of the accumulator onto the program stack. This is 
a good place to briefly stash the accumulator. 

Our load-and-store operations use only the accximula- 
tor, so that's the only register saved on the stack {Line 500). 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 29 




Boot Camp 



continued 



To save the X- and Y-registers requires a two-step proce- 
dure. First, transfer the contents to the accumulator with 
a TXA or TYA instruction. Then store the accumulator on 
the stack with the PHA again. Now our registers Eire ready 
for DLI use. 

The next portion of the DLI code contains the load-and- 
store operations. The decimal 68 is a color value for red. 
It's stored first into location $D40A (WSYNC). Storing 
something in WSYNC synchronizes the DLI with the TV 
display. Omit this line and you'll see a flickering, jagged 
edge, because the color change takes place on-screen, rath- 
er than tidily behind the scenes. (Incidentally, keyboard 
input can also interfere with DLI timing, so you may see 
flickers and jiuups in your display as keys are pressed.) 

Next, the accumulator (still 68) is stored in the "hard- 
ware color register" responsible for the background color 
of a graphics screen (COLPF2, $D018). A discussion of 
hardware registers is coming up. 

Naturally, we need to restore the contents of the registers 
before exiting from the DLI. The converse of saving them 
is to move a byte from the stack to the acciunulator with 
a FLA (pull) instruction. This byte can be transferred to 
the X- or Y-registers using the TAX or TAY instruction. Be 
sure to restore registers in the reverse order in which you 
saved them. 

The final instruction of the DLI routine must be to "re- 
turn from interrupt" (RTI). This is similar to the return 
from subroutine (RTS) instruction, but don't get them 
confused! 

Chasing your shadow. 

I'm sure you remember the five color registers at ad- 
dresses $2C4-$2C8 (COLOR0-COLOR4) that we've mani- 
pulated in previous columns. These are "shadow registers" 
for a corresponding group of "hEirdware registers" at ad- 
dresses $D016-$D01A (COLPF0-COLPF4). 

The real computer action takes place in the hardware 
registers. However, the hardware registers are "write-only"; 
we can't read them and find out what they contain at any 
time. Hence, the corresponding read/write shadow regis- 
ters were created. 

Most prograims make color register changes in the shad- 
ow registers, as we have. Every sixtieth of a second, dur- 
ing the vertical blanking period, contents of the shadow 
registers are written into the corresponding hardware 
registers, thus implementing any color changes in the next 
TV frame dravkm. 

DLI routines are executed in between vertical blank in- 
tervals. Thus, copying to a shadow register does us no 
good. The solution is to write directly into the hardware 
registers in our DLI routines. The playfield color registers 
are- not unique in this regard. Table 1 lists some other hard- 
ware/shadow combinations useful for DLI routines. 



Table 1. — 


Hardware and Shadow Registers. 


Hardware 


Shadow 


Purpose 


$D016-$D01A 


$2C4-$2C8 


Playfield colors 


$D012-$D015 


$2C0-$2C3 


Player/missile colors 


$D409 


$2F4 


Character set base address 


$D01B 


$26F 


Player priorities 



DLI setup. 

Besides writing the DLI routine itself, we have to tell the 
Atari what to do with it. There are three steps: 

(1) Select the mode line on the screen where you'd 
like the interrupt to take place. Then go to the display 
list and set bit 7 of the display list byte after which the 
interrupt is to be executed. This is the same as adding 
128 to the value of the display list byte in question. 

(2) Store the starting address of your DLI routine into 
locations $200 and $201 (low-byte, high-byte), called 
VDSLST. 

(3) Enable DLIs by storing a decimal 192 into address 
$D40E, also known as NMIEN (nonmaskable interrupt 
enable). 

Example 1 — Just a color change. 

This short example simply opens the screen and changes 
the background color from the default blue to a bright red, 
starting with the ninth mode Une on the screen. 

We begin with the familiar process of opening the screen 
device in graphics (Lines 320-430). The DO code itself 
appears at the end of the listing, in Lines 620-670. Lines 
440-470 store the starting address of the DLI routine into 
locations $200 and $201 (VDSLST, low/high format). 

Since the color change is to start with the ninth Une of 
graphics 0, we must set bit 7 of the display Ust byte for the 
eighth mode Une. But where's the display Ust? 

The open screen procedure lets the Atari create a dis- 
play list wherever it Ukes. Fortunately, it stores the address 
of the first byte of the display list in locations $230 and $231, 
referred to as SDLSTL. I'm going to copy these values into 
a couple of spare bytes in page 0, called TEMP in this ex- 
ample (Lines 480-510). 

Now, why did I do that? I want to access a byte in the 
display list, and an easy way is to use the 6502's "indirect 
indexed" addressing mode. An indirect indexed instruc- 
tion for loading the acciunulator looks like this: 

LDA ($CD),Y 

This procedure begins with an address in a 2-byte page 
location ($CD and $CE, low/high). It then points to that 
address, offsets by the value in the Y-register, and loads the 
contents of the resulting location into the accumulator. 

Going back to Listing 1, we have the address of the dis- 
play Ust in locations TEMP and TEMP+1. Now think about 
what the display Ust looks Uke, based on last month's dis- 
cussion. 

It begins something Uke this (in decimal form): 112, 112, 
112, 66, XX, XX, 2, 2, 2, 2,2,2,2,2. . . (The xs refer to some 
unknown location for the start of screen memory; it's not 
important now.) This portion of the display Ust goes down 
through the first nine mode lines of graphics (ANTIC 2) 
on the screen. The DLI is to be executed after the eighth 
mode line. Count down the display list, starting at 0, and 
the magic number is 12 bytes from the start. So load the 
Y-register with a decimal 12 and load the accumulator us- 
ing indirect addressing mode, as in Lines 520-530 of List- 
ing 1. 

To set bit 7 of whatever's in the accumulator, we can v&e 
the ORA instruction. Bit 7 corresponds to decimal 128 {$80 
hex), so Line 540 does the trick. Store the result right back 



PAGE 30 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



where we found it initially (Line 550), and our display list 
has been properly activated for one DLI. Lines 560-570 ac- 
tually cause the DLI to begin being executed. Run this pro- 
gram from address $5000 and you'll see the two-tone screen 
imtil you press RESET. 

Example 2. Back to the aliens. 

The statements in Listing 2 eire numbered, so they can 
be merged with the code from last month's title screen pro- 
gram. A new block of equates is inserted in Lines 441-448. 
These cover the color registers and some other registers use- 
ful in DLIs. The DLI routines themselves are at the very 
end of the listing. 

The only other change in this program from last time is 
that we're using color register 2, rather than 1, to draw the 
rocket ship; Lines 1300-1380 contain some alterations. 

Our goal is to enhven the title screen to "Aliens" by us- 
ing four DLIs to create several regions of different colors 
on the screen. For kicks, we'll also throw in a little charac- 
ter set manipulation. 

Please exeimine the custom display list in Lines 510-560. 
Notice that several bytes are larger than they were last 
month — by the quantity of 128. These are the mode lines 
after which our four DLIs will be executed. 

Lines 621-624 place the address of the first DLI (DLIl, 
naturally) into VDSLST. But wait! There's only the one DLI 
address pointer, yet we have four DLIs. Whatever shall we 
do? 

I suggest that DLIl load the address of DLI2 mto VDSLST, 
DLI2 load the address of DLI3, and so on, with DLI4 point- 
ing back to DLIl for the next time the screen's drawn. This 
is one ciunbersome feature of using multiple DLIs in a sin- 
gle display. Alternatives that sometimes work are "table- 
driven" or algorithmic DLIs, which we may encounter in 
future colimins. 

The code at Lines 921-931 enables DLIs and sets some 
initial values in the color registers. Notice that we're using 
the playfield color registers here, not the hardware registers. 

Look now at the DLI routines, starting at Line 3480. DLIl 
simply changes the background of the top part of the screen 
to gray {color 4). Then it loads the address of DLI2 into 
VDSLST (Lines 3530-3560). 

DLI2 uses both the accumulator and the X-register, so 
you can see how to save both on the stack and restore them 
later. The X-register is used for color change, but I got more 
creative with the accumulator. It actually selects a differ- 
ent character set to be used. 

You'll recall that the normal character set used for graph- 
ics 1 and 2 shows only uppercase letters in four different 
colors. In effect, only half of the standard Atari characters 
can be displayed in these modes. The hardware register 
called CHBASE ($D409) can be loaded with the decimal 
value 226, to show lowercase and control characters from 
the other half of the standard cheiracter set (the default val- 
ue in CHBASE is 224). Unfortunately, this half of the charac- 
ter set contains no blank character; a heart is printed in- 
stead. This explains the funny- looking display you see from 
DLI2. 

My point is to illustrate how a DLI can be used to change 
character sets in the middle of the screen. Many charac- 



ter set editor programs use this feature to show both the 
normal characters and your redefined characters at the same 
time. 

DLI3 and DLI4 simply cause some additional color 
changes, in both foreground and background registers. DLI4 
also sets the contents of VDSLST back to the address of 
the first DLI on this display, DLIl. 

Notice that there's no relationship between DLIs cind the 
"segments" in our custom display Ust. The DLIs can be 
placed anywhere on-screen. This feature permits niceties 
such as the two-tone graphics segment at the bottom of 
the display. 

I encourage you to experiment with different values in 
the color registers of these four DLIs, to make sure you im- 
derstand the effects each one is causing. Play with them 
vmtil you get the look you hke. Don't fiddle with the charac- 
ter set address in Line 3630, or you could get some very 
bizarre displays. HandUng redefined character sets in as- 
sembly language will be one of our future topics. 

Sneak preview. 

I think our title screen is spiffy enough now. Every Atari 
game has to have plenty of things moving aroimd the 
screen. These "things" are usually the famous players and 
their sidekicks, the missiles. Next month, we'll talk about 
how to define the shapes of some players and have them 
move aroimd the screen imder their own power. Moving 
them around under your control with a joystick will come 
after that. Do check back. . . fl 

Karl E. Wiegers provides computer support for photo- 
graphic researchers at the Eastman Kodak Company. This 
means he's wasting his Ph.D. in organic chemistry, but he 
has a lot of fun. He also writes commercial educational 
chemistry software for the Apple 11. 





Listing 1. 




Assembly listing. 


eioe 


;DLI Listing 1 


eiie 


r 


0120 


;b\f Karl E. Wiegers 


0130 


I 


0140 


.OPT NO LIST, OBJ 


0150 


t 


0160 


TEMP = SCB 


0178 


UD5L5T = S0208 


0180 


5DLSTL = S0230 


0190 


ICCOM = 58342 


0200 


ICBAL = $8344 


0210 


ICBAH = $8345 


0220 


ICBLL = S8348 


0230 


ICBLH = 58349 


0240 


ICAXl = $e34A 


0250 


ICflK2 = $034B 


0260 


CIOU = $E456 


0270 


C0LPF2 = $D018 


0280 


W5YNC = $D40ft 


0290 


NHIEN = $D40E 


0300 


t 


0310 


*= $5888 


0328 


LDX tt$68 ;Dpen screen 


0338 


LDA tt3 


0340 


STfl ICCOM, K 


0350 


LDA ttSCREEN&255 


0360 


STA ICBOL,X 


0370 


LDA ttSCREEN/256 


0380 


5TA ICBOH,X 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 31 




Boot Camp continued 



8390 




LDA 


ttl2 


8460 




STft 


ICAX1,K 


8418 




LDA 


tt8 


8428 




STfl 


ICAX2,X 


6436 




JSR 


CIOV 


6440 




LDA 


ttDLI&255 ; point to DLI 


6456 




STA 


UD5LST 


6466 




LDA 


ttDLI/256 


6476 




5TA 


VDSL5T+1 


6486 




LDA 


SDLSTL ;cop!; DL address 


6490 




5TA 


TEMP ;to page zero 


8568 




LDA 


SDLSTL+1 


8518 




5TA 


TEMP+1 


8526 




LDY 


«12 ;set DLI bit on 


6536 




LDA 


tTEMP),Y ;line 8 


6546 




ORA 


»128 


8558 




STA 


CTEMPJ ,Y 


8568 




LDA 


ttl92 ;enable DLI 


0576 




STA 


NMIEN 


6588 


END 


J MP 


END ;wait for reset 


6598 


J 






6668 


SCREEN . 


BYTE "S" 


6616 


f 






6626 


DLI 


PHA 


;save A on stack 


8636 




LDA 


tt68 ;color is red 


8646 




STA 


HSYNC ;s!/nchronize 


8658 




STA 


C0LPF2 ;background reg. 


6668 




PLA 


; restore A 


6676 

• 




RTI 


;all done 
Listing 2. 






Assembly listing. 



8180 
8118 
6126 
6138 
8225 
6441 
8442 
6443 
8444 
6445 
0446 
8447 
6448 
8478 
6496 
6568 
8516 
6526 
8538 
8546 
6556 
6566 
6561 
6621 
6622 
6623 
8624 
6921 
6922 
6923 
6924 
8925 
8926 
6927 
8928 
8929 
0930 
8931 
1386 
1316 
1326 
1338 



;DLI Listing 2 

Jby Karl E. Wiegers 

OdSLST = $0260 

;color & charset registers, etc . 



C0L0R6 = $e2C4 
C0LPF8 = SD816 
CHBASE = SD469 
NSYNC = $D46A 
NMIEN = SD46E 



;shadow register 
; hardware reg. 
; hardware, Charset 
;synchronize 
;enable DLI 



«= S3F6e 
DLIST 

.BYTE 112, 112, 112, 78, 6, $46 
.BYTE 134,7,7,135,7,7,7,13,13 
.BYTE 13,13,13,13,13,13,13 
.BYTE 13,13,13,13,13,13,13 
.BYTE 13,13,13,13,13,13,13 
.BYTE 141,2,136,2,2,65,0,S3F 

LDA »DLI1«255 ;set address 

STA UDSLST ;of first DLI 

LDA »DLIl/256 

STA VDSLST+1 

LDA ttl92 ;enable DLI 

STA NMIEN 

LDA ttl52 ;set initial 

STA COLORO ;colors 

LDA »86 

STA COLORO+1 

LDA ttl4 

STA COLORe+2 

LDA tt26 

STA C0L0R6+4 

LDA »34 J turn screen on 

LDA »REG2&255 ;color reg. 2 

STA ICBAL,X 

LDA »REG2/256 

STA ICBAL+1,K 



1348 
1380 
3105 
3470 
3480 
3490 
3500 
3510 
3528 
3538 
3546 
3558 
3566 
3578 
3586 
3598 
3666 
3618 
3628 
3636 
3646 
3658 
3666 
3678 
3686 
3696 
3768 
3718 
3728 
3736 
3746 
3758 
3766 
3776 
3788 
3798 
3800 
3818 
3826 
3836 
3846 
3856 
3868 
3878 
3888 
3898 
3966 
3918 
3926 
3936 
3946 
3958 
3960 
3970 
3980 
3990 
4000 
4010 
4020 
4030 
4040 
4050 
4060 
4070 
4080 
4090 
4100 



JSR PLOTPOINT 

LDA nz 

REG2 .BYTE "C" 



DLIl 



DLI2 



PHA 
LDA 
STA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
PLA 
RTI 
J 

PHA 
TXA 
PHA 
LDA 
LDK 
STX 
STA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
PLA 
TAX 
PLA 
RTI 



;save accun. 
tt4 ;color grag 
WSYNC ; synchronize 

COLPFO+4 

ttDLI2&255 ;point to 

VDSLST ;next DLI 

ODLI2/256 

UD5LST+1 

;restore accuH. 

;all done 

;save registers 



tt226 ;change charset 

tt70 ;color is red 

COLPFO ; for foreground 

NSYNC 

CHBASE ; Change charset 

»DLI3&255 ; point to 

UDSLST ;next DLI 

ttDLI3/256 

UDSLST+1 

;restore registers 



DLI3 



DLI4 



PHA 
TXA 
PHA 
LDA 
LDX 
STA 
STA 
STX 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
PLA 
TAX 
PLA 
RTI 
I 

PHA 
TXA 
PHA 
LDA 
LDX 
STA 
STA 
STX 
LDA 
STA 
LDA 
STA 
PLA 
TAX 
PLA 
RTI 



;all done 



ttl4 ;More colors. . . 

ttlB ; you've seen 

MSYNC ;it all before 

COLPFO+1 

COLPFO+2 

»DLI4&255 

UDSLST 

»DLI4/256 

UDSLST+1 



ttO 

ttl98 

NSYNC 

COLPFO+1 

COLPFO+2 

ttDLIl&255 

UDSLST 

ttDLIl/2S6 

UDSLST+1 



PAGE 32 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 




Soft Touch 



A Touch Tablet tutorial 
to help you use Atari Artist 



by Jack Morrison 



The AtariArtist cartridge that comes with the new Atari 
Touch Tablet is a marvelous piece of software, but the Tab- 
let itself has many uses besides picture drawing. 

Since the manual doesn't explain how to jump in with 
user-written software, I did some experimenting, in BA- 
SIC. This article will show you how to read Touch Tablet 
input, control a cursor and load AtariArtist pictures into 
your own programs. 

If you have an Epson or com- 
patible printer, you'll also find 
out how to make a hard copy of 
your masterpieces! 

Use as directed. 

Touch Tablet plugs into the 
controller jacks on the front of 
your Atari and acts as if it were 
two paddle controllers. It pro- 
vides an electrical resistance, 
which the computer digitizes into 
a niuneric value sixty times per 
second. You can read these 
values from BASIC by using the 
PADDLE function. If the Tablet is 
plugged into the first controller 
jack, PADDLE(O) reads the hori- 
zontal or X-coordinate value, and 
PADDLE(1) reads the vertical or Y- 
coordinate value. 

If nothing's touching the Tablet, both values are at their 
maximum, 228 (all values are in decimal, unless noted). 

When the stylus (or any other pointing object) is with- 
in the red border line of the Tablet's surface, the X-coor- 
dinate ranges from about 10 (left border) to 210 (right 




border). The Y-coordinate is from about 12 (bottom) to 215 
(top). 

The left control button can be read with the PTRIG(O) 
function, which returns a 1 normally, or if the button's 
pressed. The right control button can be read in a similar 
way, using PTRIG(1). 

The button on the stylus works like the joystick's "for- 
ward" switch. From BASIC, STICK(O) returns a 15 normal- 
ly, 14 if this button's pressed. Figm-e 1 (created with 
AtariArtist!) siunmarizes for you. 

A sound beginning. 

Listing 1 is a short example, to 
start you thinking about other 
uses for the versatile Tablet. Type 
in and run the listing. 
Whenever you touch the Tab- 
let, you'll create a sound; moving 
right on the Tablet raises the 
pitch, while moving up raises the 
volume. Pressing the stylus but- 
ton changes the distortion value. 
I like the effect produced by 
"walking aroimd" the Tablet with 
your fingers — try it! (Notes on all 
the listings are provided at the 
end of this article.) 
Cursors — foiled again! 
The most common Tablet use 
is as a pointing device. Apple 
Macintosh folks like to say that 
everyone knows how to point, so pointing programs tend 
to be easy to use. 

The AtariArtist feature menu is an excellent example. 
A menu in a computer program is like a one in a restau- 
rant — it lists what's available, and you can get what you 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 33 



^ Soft Touch continued 



want by pointing at a selection. In order to see what you're 
pointing at, programs usually display a cursor, a small 
symbol that moves around the screen, mimicking motions 
of the stylus on the Tablet. The Atari's player/missiles are 
perfect for displaying cursors, since they're so easy to 
manipulate on-screen. Below are two example programs 
controlling a cursor with the Tablet. 

The first cursor example (Listing 2) uses an "absolute" 
cursor, which just means that coordinates read from the 
Tablet are used for the cm-sor's absolute position. 

This works like the drawing cursor in AtariArtist — it 
appears when you press down on the Tablet, in a screen 
position corresponding to that on the Tablet. 

Note that the cursor blinks rapidly. This is because the 
player data must be erased when the cursor moves, since 
it could pop up an3rwhere. Some extra programming could 
prevent this, but I wanted to keep the example simple. 

The second example (Listing 3) uses a "relative" cursor 
position. This means that, when you move on the Tablet, 
what matters is the direction you take (not where you are) . 
It demands a bit more programming, but has some advan- 
tages. You can get much finer control over the cursor — 
and still be able to cover a large area, by "walking" the 
cursor in repetitive movements. 

The AtariArtist cursor in magnify mode is a variation 
of relative cursor control. Notice that the cursor stays on- 
screen. Since it can't take any sudden jumps, it doesn't 
have to be completely redrawn, so the flickering is gone. 

Now that we have control of a cursor, we can use it to 
select items from a menu. Listing 4 is a tongue-in-cheek 
example. 

Up against the wall. 

Listing 5 is a BASIC program, which reads a compres- 
sed picture and displays it, illustrating how you might use 
your AtariArtist creations in your own programs. 

This program will also create a black-and-white hard 
copy plot of the picture, suitable for framing. If you have 
a printer other than an Epson MX-70, you'll need to fig- 
lu-e out how to modify the plotting portion (or find an ap- 
propriate screen dump utility). 

By the way, Listing 5 is quite slow — a good candidate 
for use in polishing your assembly language skills (which 
I leave as an exercise for the reader). 

Another note: since each pixel is 2 bits wide, the plot 
ends up with the same half-height pixels that ANTIC mode 
E has. The proportions come out correctly — automatically! 
Program notes. 

Listing 1 — A simple tablet control example. 

Line 60 txirns off the sound, if nothing's pressing on the 
Tablet. 

Line 75 calls a subroutine to change the distortion val- 
ue, if the stylus button's pressed. 

Lines 80 and 85 read the Tablet coordinates. Pitch is 
reversed from the X-coordinate, so that the right edge of 
the Tablet gives the highest pitch (smallest pitch value). 
The Y-coordinate is scaled to provide a volume setting, 
ranging from to 15. 

Lines 110 and 120 modify the distortion and display the 
new value. 



Line 140 waits until the stylus button's released, so the 
distortion changes only once per button click. 

Listing 2 — Cursor control with absolute coordinates. 

Lines 110 to 2090 set up the player/missile graphics area 
and cursor image data. I've used a couple of BASIC string- 
handling tricks to simplify and speed up this program. 
Lines 2040 to 2090 fool BASIC into thinking string A$ is 
stored where the cursor graphics area actually is, so that 
storing into A$ causes the cursor to change. 

Line 3010 reads the tablet coordinates and reverses the 
Y-value. 

Line 3020 makes the cursor disappear (by setting the 
horizontal position to 0), if nothing's touching the Tablet. 

Lines 3030 to 3060 limit the range of X- and Y-values. 
You might prefer to "wrap around" from left to right and 
top to bottom. 

Line 3080 erases the old cursor data with another string- 
handling trick. 

Line 3100 plots the new cursor. 

Listing 3 — Cursor control with relative coordinates. 

Lines 110 to 2090 set up the player/missile graphics, as 
in Listing 2 . The cursor area is erased only once, in Line 
2800. 

Line 3010 reads Tablet coordinates; Line 3020 waits un- 
til something's touching the surface. 

Line 3022 uses the SGN function to increment or decre- 
ment the cursor X- and Y-position, depending on the differ- 
ence between current and previous tablet coordinates. 

Line 3026 saves the current tablet position for the next 
time around. 

Listing 4 — Menu input example. 

Lines 110 to 2090 are the same graphics setup used in 
the previous two programs. 

Lines 2110 to 2130 display the menu options. Make up 
your own menu, if you wish. 

Lines 3010 to 3110 move the cursor, using absolute tab- 
let coordinates. Line 3025 was added to check for any of 
the three buttons being pressed. 

Lines 4000 to 4500 perform menu decoding when a but- 
ton's been pressed. Since each menu item has its own line, 
only the Y-coordinate is needed. If this coordinate's close 
to a displayed menu item, that item is displayed; other- 
wise, the button press is ignored. By the way, the easiest 
way to figure out what coordinate limits to use for your 
menu is to write a dummy subroutine like this: 
4000 POSITION 3,17 : ? XT, YT " " : RETURN 
Then, just note the coordinates printed when the ciu-sor's 
at the boundaries of your menu items. 

Listing 5 — Read and plot packed pictures. 

Lines 30 and 32 get the pictm-e device and filename. 
For example, "D:ROBOT.PIC". 

Lines 35 to 50 read the file header and extract the im- 
portant data. The call to Line 400 sets up the graphics 
screen, while Line 50 POKEs in the color register settings. 

Lines 60 and 65 start the picture unpacking, determin- 
ing whether vertical or horizontal decoding is required. 

Line 70 starts the hard copy plot if requested. 

The subroutine starting at Line 100 is called from the 



PAGE 34 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



vertical and horizontal decoding routines when they're 
ready for the next picture data byte. Line 100 checks to 
see if any repetitions are left for the current decoded data 
run. If not, the next run is read and decoded. For a long 
run (first byte of 0), Line 120 computes the 2-byte run 
length. For a direct run, Line 130 adjusts the run length 
and sets the DIRECT flag. Lines 150 and 160 get the next 
byte and decrement the run length before returning. 

Lines 400 to 480 set up the ANTIC mode E graphics 
display list. If you have an XL, you can replace these lines 
with: 

400 GRAPHICS 15+16 

410 DI5PrPEEKt88)+256»PEEKt89) 

420 RETURN 

The rest of us need to build the display list ourselves. 
Since the display takes more than 4096 bytes of data, two 
"load memory scan" instructions are needed to cross the 
4K boundary. Line 470 tells the OS to use the new dis- 
play list. 

Lines 600 to 650 decode a vertically-compressed pic- 
ture. For each vertical column, two passes are made, fill- 
ing in every other byte of the column, calling the unpack 
routine at Line 100 for each data byte. 

Line 710 decodes a horizontally-compressed picture, by 



sequencing straight through the display area addresses. 

Lines 800 to 870 plot the decoded image from screen 
memory to an Epson MX-70 printer. A few strange tricks 
are needed here, since the Atari printer interface doesn't 
know about raw binary data (only about character data). 
It simply outputs data in 40-character blocks, unless a car- 
riage return comes first. Meanwhile, the Epson stores 80 
bytes of image data at a time, then stops receiving charac- 
ters while it plots this data. Lines 830 and 835, therefore, 
start each graphics line with exactly 40 characters, end- 
ing with spaces for a margin and commands to set the line 
height and bit graphics mode. 

Line 845 provides a delay between each 80 bytes of 
graphics data, while the Epson's doing its thing. Lines 850 
and 852 get the next byte and convert carriage return 
characters (13 ASCII, 155 ATASCII) into similar bytes that 
don't cause premature buffer output. Line 855 outputs the 
data to the printer. 

Drawing conclusions. 

I hope Soft Touch has given you some useful techniques 
and ideas for getting more from your Atari Touch Tablet. 
Together with AtariArtist, the Tablet's a powerful graph- 
ics tool. 



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ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 35 



^ Soft Touch continued 



With these techniques, it has many other intriguing 
uses. Here are two examples to get you thinking. 

Try a programmable touch keyboard. Take the menu 
concept one step further, perhaps with printed overlays 
on the surface of the Tablet itself. Your Tablet can become 
a piano keyboard, a calculator keyboard, a telephone key- 
pad, even a spacecraft control panel. 

Perhaps you'd Uke to see character recognition. Imagine 
word processing without a typewriter keyboard. Be 
warned though, this is not a simple project, fl 

Jack Morrison is president of SoftCenter industries, a 
company specializing in microcomputer games, while be 
also works as an aerospace consultant. A graduate of UC- 
LA's Computer Science department, his other interests in- 
clude music and a Great Dane called Rufus. 



The two-letter checksum code preceding the line 
numbers here is not a part of the BASIC program. 
For further information, see the BASIC Editor I J (is- 
sue 45) and its update on page 9. 



Listing 1. 
BASIC listing. 

i^X 18 REM Touch-Tablet Controlled Sound 

WE 20 REM 3/84 J. Morrison 

PA 30 REM 

PW 40 DI5T=10 

HJ 50 REN «« Main loop ** 

00 60 REM turn off sound if stylus up 

ZP 70 IF PaDDLE(0}=Z28 THEN SOUND 0,0,6,0 

:G0T0 50 
TN 75 IF STICK to J =14 THEN GOSUB 100 : REM S 

tylus button pressed 
HM 80 PITCH=228-PflDDLE(0J 
LY 85 VOLzINTCPflDDLECD/ZZ^Wie) 
Fft 90 SOUND 0, PITCH, DIST,UOL:GOTO 50 
BQ 95 REM 

II 100 REM «* Change distortion *» 
IX 110 DIST=DIST+2:IF DIST>14 THEN DIST=0 
HF 120 ? " DISTORTION = ";DIST 
5tt 130 REM wait until button is released 
UY 140 IF STICK CO] =14 THEN 140 
ZH 150 RETURN 



Listing 2. 
BASIC listing. 

'WS 10 REM »» cursor Control with Tablet 
H« 20 REM iHt (absolute cursorJ 
WW so REM iH* 3/84 J. Morrison 
EZ 100 REM ** setup P/M cursor ** 
XX 110 DIM ft$t512J,B$tl2J iGRftPHICS 
m 120 FOR 1=1 TO 12:REflD ft : B$ CIJ =CHH$ tfl) 

:HEXT I 
PH 130 DflTft 0,0,128,192,224,240,224,176,2 

4,8,0.0,0 
DE 140 ft5C512J=" ":P0KE 752,1:? 
MI 2000 POKE 559,62:P0KE 704,255 
QD 2020 I=PEEKtl06)-16:P0KE 54279,1 
EU 2030 POKE 53277,3 

MM 2040 UTAB=PEEKtl34)+256*PEEKC135) 
CX 2050 ftTftB=PEEKfl40)+256»PEEKC141J 
ftO 2060 OFFS=I«256+1024-flTflB 
QZ 2070 HI=INTC0FFS/256) :L0=0FFS-256*HI 
LU 2090 POKE VTftB+2, LO.'POKE UTftB+3,HI 
IP 2900 REM 
g,4. 3000 REM 4H( Main loop n* 



W 3010 XT=PODDLEtO) :YT=228-PftDDLEtlJ 

US 3020 IF XT=228 THEN POKE 53248,0: GOTO 

3000 
Hit 3030 IF XT>198 THEN XT=198 
BR 3040 IF XT<49 THEN XT=49 
RS 3050 IF YT>213 THEN YT=213 
TD 3060 IF YT<33 THEN YT=33 
MO 3080 A$(2}=A$ 

VJ 3100 ft$(YT,YT+llJ=B$:POKE 53248, XT 
Nft 3110 GOTO 3000 



Listing 3. 
BASIC listing. 

KG 10 REM #K Cursor Control with Tablet 

i>Q 20 REM it* crelatiue cursor} 

WW 30 REM »« 3/84 J. Morrison 

SB 40 REM 

EZ 100 REM *f» setup P/M cursor «» 

XX 110 DIM A$ (512), B$ tl21 : GRAPHICS 

H« 120 FOR 1=1 TO 12:REaD A : B$ CI) =CHR$ (A) 

:NEXT I 
PH 130 DATA 0,0,128,192,224,240,224,176,2 

4,8,0.0,0 
DE 140 ASC512)=" ":POKE 752,1:? 
MI 2000 POKE 559,62:P0KE 704,255 
00 2020 I=PEEKC106)-16:POKE 54279,1 
EU 2030 POKE 53277,3 

MM 2040 MTAB=PEEK(134)+256»PEEKC135) 
CX 2050 ATAB=PEEK(140)+256KPEEKC141) 
ftO 2060 OFFS=I»256+1024-ATAB 
OZ 2070 HI=INTC0FFS/256) :L0=0FFS-256*HI 
tU 2090 POKE MTAB+2,L0:P0KE MTAB+3,HI 
NF 2800 A$C2)=A$ 
IP 2900 REM 

EJ 3000 REM »« Main loop »» 
XD 3010 XT=PADDLEtO) :YT=228-PADDLEtl) 
CN 3020 IF XT=228 THEN 3000 
05 3022 X=X+SGNtXT-XTOLD) :Y=Y+SGNCYT-VT0L 

D) 
ED 3026 XTOLD=XT:YTOLD=YT 
SA 3030 IF X>198 THEN X=198 
UL 3040 IF X<49 THEN X=49 
BT 3050 IF Y>213 THEN Y=213 
MR 3060 IF Y<33 THEN Y=33 
EA 3100 A$CY,Y+11)=B$:P0KE 53248, X 
Mfi 3110 GOTO 3000 



Listing 4. 
BASIC listing. 

Wt 10 REM ** Menu DeMonstration 

WW 30 REM wt 3/84 J. Morrison 

BB 40 REM 

EZ 100 REM »» setup P/M cursor *» 

rW 110 DIM A$ C512),B$ (12), ITEMS (20) : GRAPH 

ICS 
m 120 FOR 1=1 TO 12:READ A : B$ (I) =CHR$ (A) 

:NEXT I 
PW 130 DATA 0,12,62,115,126,252,248,124,1 

27,62.12,0 
6E 140 AS(512)=" ":POKE 752,1:? 
MI 2000 POKE 559, 62: POKE 704,255 
OD 2020 I=PEEK(106)-16:P0KE 54279,1 
EU 2030 POKE 53277,3 

HM 2040 MTAB=PEEKC134)+256»PEEK{135) 
CX 2050 ATAB=PEEKC140)+256»PEEK(141) 
AO 2060 OFF5=I*256+1024-ATAB 
OZ 2070 HI=INT(0FFS/256) :L0=0FFS-256*HI 
LU 2090 POKE MTAB+2,L0:P0KE MTAB+3,HI 
IP 2100 REM «* setup Menu ** 
ttM 2110 ? " RESTAURANT ATARI":? :? 
e^ 2120 ? :? " Roast Beef" 



PAGE 36 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



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Atariwriter Plus 39 

Learning Phone 19 

Proofreader 14 

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ACCESS 

Beachhead 11 
Raid over Moscow 

ACCOLADE 

Hardball 
Fight Night 

ACTIVISION 

Music Studio 
Mindshadow 



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Conflict in Vietnam 
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Action 

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Basic XL 
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SYNAPSE 

Syn-File 
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Typesetter 
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Page Designer 
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PS. Interface 
Miniature Golf 
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28 
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21 
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24 
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Paperclip w/Speilpak 41 
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Printshop Companion 
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Library 1,2.3, (ea) 



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Never Ending Story 



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Racing Destruction Set 24 

Super Boulder Dash 17 

Chessmaster 2000 29 



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38 
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Microprint 29 

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Epson (80 Series) BIk 
Epson (Color) 
Panasonic Printers 

(Black) 
Panasonic Printers 

(Color) 



10 



MONITORS 

Thompson ColorComp. 139 

Samsung Grn. /Amber 69 

Aspra Amber 59 

Monitor Cable 7 

MODEMS 

Atari XM-301 39 

Supra 300 AT 39 
Avatex (300/1200 

Baud) 99 
CompuServe Starter 

Kit 24 

ICD 

P:R: Connection 62 
US Doubler/Sparta 

DOS 49 
US Doubter without 

Sparta DOS 29 

R-Time8 49 

RamboXL 29 
Sparta DOS 

Construction Set 29 
Multi I/O Board 

(256K) 179 

UPGRADES/ACCESSORIES 

4 
12 
6 



Flip N'FitelO 
Disk Bank/5 
Disk Coupler (Notch) 
Disk Cleaning Kit 

(5'/<") 
Disk Cleaning Kit 

(3Vj") 
Dust Covers 
Happy Enhancement 
Monitor Stands 
Joysticks (Pair) 



15 

15 

Call 

139 

12 

14 



3'A" 


Sony 


Sony 


Bulk 


SS/DD 


DS/DD 


10-29 


1.69 ea. 


2.49 ea. 


30+ 


1.59 ea. 


2.29 ea. 



ATARI 520 ST SOFTWARE 

CP/M Emulator 34 

Home Planetarium 24 

BATTERIES INCLUDED 

l/S Talk 54 

Degas 28 

HIPPOPOTAMUS 

Computer Almanac 23 

Joke & Quotes 23 

Disk Utilities 33 

Ramdisk 23 

Hippospell 25 

Backgammon 25 

Hippoword 59 

Hippoconcept 59 

Hippopixel 25 

Hippovision B & W 105 

MICHTRON 

Utilities 42 

M-Disk 28 

Mudpies 28 

Soft Spool 28 

Animator 28 

Calendar 22 

Mi-Term 32 

Cornerman 34 

Time Bandit 28 

Major Motion 28 

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Macro Assembler 60 

Meta Pascal 79 

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A-Calc 45 

Cad-3D 38 

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Flash 30 

OSS 

Personal Pascal 50 

UNISON WORLD 

Printmaster 26 

Art Gallery I 19 

VIP TECHNOLOGIES 

VIP(Lotus1-2-3 

Type) 89 

XLENT 

Typesetter 26 

Rubber Stamp 26 

Music Box 33 

Megafont 26 



SVi" 


Sony 


Sony 


Atari 


Box (5) 


SS/DD 


DS/DD 


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2-6 


11 Bx. 


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7+ 


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CALL FOR SOFTWARE: 520 ST Software 



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For information, order inquires, or for Olnio orders (513) 435-6868 

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CIRCLE #115 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PI Soft Touch continued 



zo 

KL 

m 

CM 

«u 

mn 
im 
|tt> 
^no 
mj 

JB 

sx 

J» 

BH 
ZK 
DI 

JT 

T 



2122 ? :? " Fried Chicken" 

2124 ? :? " Tuna Fish Salad" 

2126 ? :? " Cheeseburger" 

2130 POSITION 1,28:? ">>POINT TO 5ELEC 

TION AND PUSH BUTTON<<" 

2900 REM 

3000 REM ** Main loop W« 

3010 XT=PADDLEC01 : YT=228-PADDLE (11 

3020 IF XT=228 THEN POKE 53248, 0:G0T0 

3000 

3025 IF PTRIGtOJ=0 OR PTRIGC1J=0 OR ST 

ICK[0}=14 THEN GOSUB 4000 

3030 IF XT>198 THEN XT=198 

3040 IF XT<49 THEN XT=49 

3050 IF YT>213 THEN YT=213 

3060 IF YT<33 THEN YT=33 

3080 A$(21=A$ 

3100 A$tYT,YT+llJ=B$:POKE 53248, XT 

3110 GOTO 3000 

3190 REM 

4000 REN ** button pushed - find iten 

4010 IF YT>64 AND YT<76 THEN ITEM$="RO 

AST":GOTO 4500 

4020 IF YT>81 AND YT<93 THEN ITEM$="CH 

TOKEN" .-GOTO 4500 

4030 IF YT>97 AND YT<109 THEN ITEM$="T 

UNA FISH": GOTO 4500 

4040 IF YT>113 AND YT<125 THEN ITEM$=" 

BURGER":GOTO 4500 

4100 RETURN :REM out Of range 

4500 POSITION 3,17:? "ONE ";ITEMS;" CO 

MIN* UP! ": RETURN 



Listing 3. 
BASIC listing. 

WS 10 REM ** Read and Plot Packed Picture 

Data 
MY 12 REM wt 3/84 J. Morrison 
BG 14 REM 

^KX 20 DIM F$C201,A$C10},HDR$[321 
UT 25 REM »* get file to display ** 
JG 30 GRAPHICS 0:? :? "Enter Device:Filen 

awe for picture":INPUT F$ 
OH 32 ? "Plot iwage on hardcopy CY/NJ";:! 

NPUT A$ 
XM 35 REM *» process file header ** 
SH 40 OPEN ttl,4,0,F$:INPUT »1,HDR$ 
UL 45 FOR I=LEN[HDR$} TO 25: GET ttl,A:NEXT 

I 
m 47 GOSUB 400:REN setup graphics 
NG 50 A=708:FOR 1=14 TO 18:PDKE A,ASCCHDR 

$CI,IJ) :A=A+l:NEXT I 
HO 55 REM ** read and unpack picture »» 
01 60 IF ASCCHDR$(81)=1 THEN GOSUB 600: GO 

TO 70:REM vertical 
OR 65 GOSUB 700 : REM else horizontal 
NM 70 IF A$tl,lJ="Y" THEN GOSUB 808 
YH 80 END 
BG 90 REM 

HI 100 REM *» get next packed byte *» 
BD 105 IF COUNT>0 THEN 150:REM no read ne 

cessary 
5D 110 DIRECT=0:GET ttl,C0UNT:GET »1,B 
QT 120 IF COUNTzO THEN GET ttl, COUNT : COUNT 

-C0UNT+256*B-l:GET ttl, B: RETURN 
GV 130 IF C0UNT>127 THEN C0UNT=C0UNT-128 ; 

DIRECT=l:GOTO 160 
LH 150 IF DIRECT THEN GET ttl,B 
KA 160 COUNT=COUNT-l: RETURN 
RC 180 REM 

SX 400 REM »« setup Antic Mode E display 
YK 405 D=PEEKtl06J :DL=CD-lJ»256:DISP=CD-3 

1)*256 
UJ 410 FOR A=DL TO DL+4:READ B:POKE A,B:N 

EKT A 
j^, 420 DATA 112,112,112,78,0 



^^ 430 POKE DL+5,D-31 
m 440 FOR A=DL+6 TO DL+198:P0KE A,14:NEX 

T A 
SP 450 POKE DL+101,78:P0KE DL+102, : POKE 

DL+103,D-16 
m 460 POKE DL+199,65:P0KE DL+200, : POKE 

DL+201,D-1 
FC 470 POKE 560,0:P0KE 561, D-1 
ZQ 480 RETURN 
RH 490 REM 

HH 600 REM *» vertical decoding ** 
R& 610 FOR COL=0 TO 39: D=DISP+COL 
HY 620 FOR A=D TO D+7600 STEP 80: GOSUB lO 

0:POKE A, B: NEXT A 
IK 630 FOR A=D+40 TO D+7640 STEP 80:G0SUB 

100:P0KE A,B:NEXT a 
UJ 640 NEXT COL 
ZM 650 RETURN 
RD 660 REM 

PG 700 REM ** horizontal decoding »* 
ML 710 FOR A=DISP TO DISP+7679 : GOSUB 100: 

POKE A,B:NEXT A 
ZK 720 RETURN 
«Y 730 REM 

iO 800 REM »» Hardcopy plot to MX-70 ** 
JFT 810 CLOSE «i:0PEN «1,8,0,"P:" 
RH 820 FOR COL=0 TO 39 : D=DISP+COL 
StP 830 FOR B = l TO 20:PUT ttl,0:NEXT B 
RK 835 ? ttl;" ":CHRSf27J;"A"; 

CHRS C8) ; CHRS C27J ; "K" ; CHRS C192) ; CHR5 (OJ 

AJ 840 FOR A=7640 TO STEP -40 

CC 845 IF INTtA/3200)»32OO=A THEN FOR B=l 

TO 200:NEXT B 
ZH 850 B=PEEKCA+DJ :IF B=i55 THEN B=154 
OF 852 IF B=13 THEN B=12 
FM 855 PUT ttl, B: NEXT A:? ttl: NEXT COL 
LQ 860 CLOSE ttl 
ZS 870 RETURN 



WJI ^-^'^ 



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Figure 1. 



PAGE 38 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



Moonlord 



by Clayton Walnum 

MooiilonI I'lanvttDsky ivr/s a hitU^- num. 

You <:()ukln't /iltniH.' him. VV/(h a monikvr like that, you lind 
to fako II lot o/gii/J. llin first mniu: mnindcAl so much /ike (i title 
()/ office, people, could rfir(;ly ntsisf bowing when introduced 
(most p(;o;)/c (fiouglit the action extremely amusing; Moonlord 
ho((;d itj. And his last name. . .well, he didn't even like to think 
about that. 

As a child he was picked on incessantly, was always the one 
with the cootiunxphaloids (imaginaiy creatures about the size 
of a tcmphibootawep. used as an excuse to remove undesirables 
from the youngsters' social environmenlj. It was hard to take ^j 
af first, but humans are known throughout the universe for llyeir 
extraordinary adaptability, and Moonlord had been an extra- 
ordinary child. As he grew to adulthood, he learned to cope in the fj 
simplest manner possible; he became tough. ^ 

If he'd ever taken the time to sit down and think if out, he'd have reol- '.^ <^ ' ■ t 
ized that, even though he may have led a disastrous childhood, those early ^^.\\ . j 
years were solely responsible for the man he was today— a starfighter of Mr~f { 5 .■"*► 

heroic proportions, dedicated to the protection of his home, the Saturnian 
moon, 7'ilan. 

And now the aliens were back. 

They were first sighted circling Kpimetheus, but when they \earned of their discovery by the Tifanian fleet, they spread 
themselves thiixly across the galactic milieu to gain time for the finalization of their attack plans. 

To ordinary recruits of the Titanian Territorial Guard, the intruders had slipped info nonexiste/ice. lanished bc\()nfl 
any hope of reprisal. The Guard's helplessness in the face of this strange defense lactii: was understandable. After all. 
each of them had boring, normal names, like Regant Loppydock. (-'oriental Hiddgobber. and. the most common of till. 
Tilogartingham PhiJopeeperton. They had had happy childhoods, had been readily accepted by their peers, had ne\cr 
had to struggle with a mocking society. 

They weren't tough. 

'Ah. Moonlord." said Leeryup Coddldoop, Commander-in-Chief of the TTG. "Clad to see you again." The commonder 
began to bow, then snapped upright, cursing hiinsel/' for getting caught in old habits. The last thing he wanted was to 
alienate Moonlord Planetinsky now. But. hey, he must be used to it. Even Moonlord's best /ri(!nd Vup\up Manghat uti- 
liz(!d the bow once in a while for a little fun. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 39 



..^..Ci 




Moonlord 



continued 



"How's your buddy Yupyup doing?" Coddldoop asked. 
"Haven't seen him around in a while." 

Moonlord's eyes narrowed. "He's in the hospital, re- 
covering from a severe beating." His meaning was as clear 
as a starship porthole. 

The commander cleared his throat. "Uh . . . ahem . . . 
yes. . .well." His face flushed. He felt a little dizzy. 

"Communications problem?" MoonJord queried, light- 
ing up a Hyperion brand smokyngstickolungolator (the 
original settlers from Earth had used the silly name "ci- 
gar"). "Don't worry about it. I know why you sent for me." 

"You do?" 

"Sure. The aliens were sighted a couple of days ago, and 
now they've made themselves scarce. You need someone 
with the skills to track them down and blast them into as- 
teroid dust before they attack the moons. I was briefed be- 
fore I got here." 

"You were?" '. & ■*4.'s^ 

"Relax, Commander. I've made all the necessary ar- 
rangements." ^ ^Of 

"You have?" J**: IHI 

Im your man. 

"You are?. . .Uh, yes.' You are! There's ;ust a couple of 
minor problems." 

Moonlord frowned. "And what might those be?" 

The commander blinked, sniffed. "Well, first of all, our 
compudigibinotometer-XE says there's a maximum of 100 
galactic standard days until the alien invasion. You have 
to complete your mission by then." 

Moonlord shrugged. "No problem." 

"And. . .there's just one other tiny detail." 

"Yes?" 

"It seems nobody will go with you, except your own 
crew. It's just too dangerous." 

"What! You expect me to knock off an entire alien in- 
vasion single-handedly? How many ships in the alien 
fleet?" 

"A few," the commander squeaked. 

"Three?" Moonlord asked. 

"Well, a bit more than a few." 

"Ten?" 

"Closer." Coddldoop was beginning to fidget. 

"How much closer?" 

"A little." 

Moonlord sighed, cracked his knuckles, glared, 
ing to ask this one more time. Get the picture?" 

"How dare you talk to the commanding officer o/the.«wS«i 

"Stow it!" 

Coddldoop's mouth snapped shut. The fact was that no- 
body, nobody, wanted to be on the wrong side of Moon- 
lord Planetinsky. Besides, Moonlord was it, their only 
hope. 

"How many?" Moonlord asked. 

'About fifty," Coddldoop mumbled. 

"FIFTY! You want me to get rid of fifty alien craft?" 

"If it wouldn't be too much trouble." 

Moonlord thought for a minute. "What the heck. I'll do 
it. I need a good challenge." 

The commander's eyes glowed. "Thank you, thank you! 







¥ 



"I'm go- 



I knew we could depend on you." In the course of these 
expressions of gratitude, it was a natural thing to bow. 

Coddldoop learned to enjoy hospital food. 

lyping Moonlord. 

The instructions below should be followed exactly to 
create your copy of Moonlord. 

1) Type in Listing 1, using BASIC Editor II (issue 45) 
and its update (page 9 of this issue) to verify your work. 
Be sure to save a backup copy. 

2) Place a disk containing DOS in drive 1 and run the 
program created from Listing 1. A character set file and 
a machine language file will be vwitten to your disk. These 
files (MOONLORD.FNT and MOONLORD.ML) must be 
present when you play the game. 

3) Type in Listing 2, using the updated BASIC Editor 

II to verify your work. 

4) Save this program to the same disk containing the 
files MOONLORD.FNT and MOONLORD.ML. 

5) To play Moonlord, run the program created from List- 
ing 2. J 3 

Playing Moonlord. 

When you run the program, the first thing you'll see 
(after the title screens) is the galactic map, represented 
on your screen by a 18 x 8 grid. Each square in the grid 
is 1 sector of the galactic milieu. Hidden within these 144 
sectors are the 50 alien craft you must locate and destroy. 
Relax. It's not quite as bad as it seems. The aliens always 
travel in pairs, therefore only 25 sectors actually contain 
the enemy. 

To make yoin: job a little easier, there are two stcU'bases 
you may dock with, allowing you to stock up on supplies 
and make repairs. There's one base at each end of the gal- 
axy, and, just like the aliens, they're randomly placed at 
the beginning of each game, forcing you to explore. 

To win the game, you must locate and destroy all 50 
alien craft. You have only 100 galactic standard days in 
which to complete your mission. It'll take careful conser- 
vation of supplies and planned movement, so those who 
like to leap into the fray without a strategy will find fail- 
ure a constant companion. 

Though there's only one way to win the game, there are 
many ways to lose (natch) . The first is running out of time. 
You've got 100 days. No extensions. All begging will be 
ignored. 

The second way to lose your hero status is to allow your 
energy to run out. Keep your eye on it; when it's gone, 
so are you. Don't forget to check up on the status of your 
weapons, either. If you should be in the heat of battle and 
find that both your weapons systems are down . . .well, the 
aliens are pretty ruthless. They won't destroy you; they'll 
just disable your engines and leave you floating helpless- 
ly in space. The result? End of Game. 

Finally, use of your ship's jump capabilities is a risky 
venture indeed. Each time you decide to utilize them, 
you're taking a 1-in-lO chance of destroying your engines. 

The bridge. 

Below the galactic map, you'll find the bridge. This is 
where you'll gain access to the ship's main functions. 



PAGE 40 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



There are four systems available to you here: scanners, 
cruise engines, a status display and jump engines. Use 
your joystick to select the system you wish to activate, then 
press the trigger. 

To move your ship from one galactic sector to another, 
select the "cruise" command. You're allowed to move in 
only four directions, but may move as many sectors as you 
wish. Use the joystick to enter the cruise vector (the direc- 
tion you want to move), then press the trigger. You may 
then enter the length of the cruise by pushing your joystick 
forward or backward. When the number of sectors you 
wish to move has been selected, press the trigger. Your 
ship will appear in the target sector. 

If you should enter invalid cruise data (such as trying 
to move off the edge of the map) , the computer will insist 
that you try again. Each sector of movement uses ten imits 
of energy and one day of time. 

Throughout the game, it's important to keep close tabs 
on your ship's condition and supplies. You can't afford to 
be stuck far from a starbase when your energy's almost 
depleted, and it helps to know what weapons are func- 
tional before you spring into battle. All this information 
is available in the status display. To view the status dis- 
play, select the "status" option from the bridge menu, and 
press your fire button. 

Your ship's six systems are displayed on the left, each 
followed by a nimiber indicating how mciny days are need- 
ed to repair that system. A means the system is fully 
functional. 

On the right, information can be found on supplies, as 
well as the time remaining and the alien count. 

Damaged systems must be repaired before they can be 
used. Damage is measured by the number of days the crew 
requires to complete repairs. If you won't use a damaged 
system right away, you need do nothing. The crew will 
automatically get to work, applying their best efforts to 
'**' the restoration of your ship. Remember: one sector of 
movement on the galactic map consumes one day. A sys- 
tem that requires three days to repair will be operative after 
a move of three sectors. 

If you find you must make repairs immediately, before 
continuing with the game, you may do so by selecting the 
"repair" option from the status subsystem menu. Use the 
joystick to tell the ship's computer how long you wish to 
wait for repairs, then press the trigger. The repairs will 
be made, and the status screen updated. 

If more than one system needs repair, the times are not 
added together. Each system has its own crew. For exam- 
ple, if your photon launchers require four days to repair, 
and your short-range scanner needs two days, it'll take only 
four days to fix both systems. Given the above circum- 
stance, if you should select only two days of repair time, 
the short-range scanner would be operational, while the 
launchers would require two additional days of repair be- 
fore you can use them. Logical? 

Don't forget that the time you spend waiting for repairs 
will be subtracted from the time available to your mission. 
Sometimes it's better to continue crippled than to waste 
a lot of time sitting around . 



Should you find that you must move a long distance in 
a minimum amoimt of time, the jump engines may fill your 
need. Unfortunately, the jump engines are still experimen- 
tal; their safety and reliability cannot be guaranteed. You 
have no control over where you'll end up, and each jump 
carries a 1-in-lO chance of leaving you engineless, help- 
lessly afloat in the timeless void of space. In other words, 
the game could come to an abrupt ending. 

Each jump consumes one day and thirty units of ener- 
gy. Due to its undependability, you may have to jump 
several times before you get where you want (or at least 
in that general area). Is it worth the risk? That depends 
on how desperate you are. 

Scanners and such. 

When you activate the scanners, you'll be moved to the 
scanner subsystem menu, allowing you to choose between 
long- or short-range scanners. 

The long-range scanners examine sectors adjacent to 
your position and mark the galactic map appropriately. 
They do not indicate the status of your current sector. You 
must use your short-range scarmers to get this informa- 
tion (or move to a different sector, in which case your old 
sector will be marked with the proper icon). Empty sec- 
tors are indicated by a white dot; aliens are represented 
by a red cross; and starbases appear as a blue square. 

The short-range scan allows you to see your current sec- 
tor in greater detail. Each sector of the galactic map is 
divided into thirty-six smaller sectors. Suns, aliens, star- 
bases and your own ship are represented by icons on the 
SRS display (see Figure 1). Fovu- systems commands are 
available from the "Short-range scan subsystem" (SRSSS) 
menu: bridge, cruise, phaser and photon. To return to the 
bridge, select the bridge option. 

Once you enter the SRS, you must destroy all aliens in 
the sector. You won't be allowed to return to the bridge 
imtil you do so. And, of course, the aliens aren't going sit 
around polishing their antennae while you remove them 
from the galaxy. Each time you complete an action, the 
aliens will fire on you. If you get hit, you'll hear a low 
buzzing sound. Each hit causes up to six days' damage 
to one of your systems. 



Your ship 



Alien 




Starbase 



Star 



Figure 1. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 41 




Moonlord 



continued 



You may move about in the short-range display in much 
the same manner as in the galactic map. Select the cruise 
option from the SRSSS menu, press the trigger, then en- 
ter your cruise vector and distance. 

Unlike the galactic map, your movement here is some- 
what restricted. You can't move through a sun, an alien, 
or a starbase. If anything is in your way, you must maneu- 
ver around it. 

Movement on the short-range display consvunes no time, 
but costs you 3 energy points per sector. 

The phasers are the first of your weapons systems, and 
your most powerful. When activated, they release a burst 
of electromagnetic energy in every direction, damaging 
any alien craft on your scanners. The amount of damage 
done depends on the number of alien craft present and 
their distance from your ship. Damage is cumulative. You 
may have to fire more than once to get the job done. 

To activate the phasers, select the phaser option from 
the SRSSS menu, then use your joystick to tell the ship 
computer the amount of power to allocate. Each power 
point will be subtracted from your remaining energy, so 
be stingy, allocating just enough to get the job done. That, 
of coiu'se, is the trick. It'll take you a few games to figure 
out the magic numbers. 

Photon torpedoes (globes of compacted Light energy) can 
be used to fire on alien craft which are in alignment 
(horizontally, vertically, or diagonally) with your ship. 
Their range is sufficient to strike any ship on your scan- 
ners, and a strike is always fatal. To fire a photon, select 
the photon option from the SRSSS menu, then enter the 
torpedo's vector. Firing a photon consumes no energy. 

But nothing comes for free. In order to fire photons, your 
launchers must be working, and you must have photons 
on hand. (Can't fire something you don't have, can you?) 
At the start of the game, you're given ten photons. You'll 
be restocked only when you dock with a starbase. Obvi- 
ously, you're going to have to use them judiciously. 

When you set out from Titan Base, your ship is carry- 
ing all the supplies it can hold. It'll be necessary, at cer- 
tain points in the game, to stock up. For this reason, there 
are two starbases, one at each end of the galactic milieu. 

The starbases move from game to game and will not 
be mEirked on the galactic map until you locate them — 
one of your top mission priorities, obviously. 

Once you locate a starbase, you must go to the short- 
range scanners and dock with it. Docking is accomplished 
by moving your ship on top of the base. All your supplies 
will be restocked, and all systems will be repaired. 

'i Mission complete. 

All missions, regardless of success or failure, will be 
evaluated by the personnel at Titan Base. Your score is 
based on the number of aliens you destroyed, as well as 
the amoimt of time and energy you used (the less, the 
better) . 

It won't be easy. I've made sure of that. But with some 
perseverance and a touch of strategy, you should get the 
hang of it. 

Oh, by the way, don't tolerate any bowing. H 



The two-letter checksum code preceding the line 
numbers here is not a part of the BASIC program. 
For further information, see the BASIC Editor II, is- 
sue 45, and the update on page 9. 



Listing 1. 
BASIC listing. 



HO 
ft 

EJ 

GP 

XP 
5F 

av 

IX 

UB 

8L 
ME 

VI 

5E 
NG 

SO 

SX 
6C 

HX 

m 

.JMF 

ItP 

50 

FZ 
HZ 
MX 

i:" 

ZR 
Mf 

SO 

n 



18 DIM XFRS(28),flSClJ :FOR X=l TO 28:RE 

AD A;KFRS£K)=CHR$CflJ :NEXT X 

20 POKE 106,PEEK(ie6}-4:GRAPHICS 

30 ? "PRESS RETURN TO BEGIN": INPUT AS: 

GRAPHICS 8:P0KE 7ie,6:P0KE 752,1 

40 POSITION 4,10:? "Creating character 

set data file" 
50 POKE 203,N0:P0KE 204, PEEK tl061 :D=US 
RCADR[XFR$}) 
60 CHB=PEEKC106)*256 
70 READ A: IF A=-l THEN 90 
80 FOR Z=0 TO 7:READ J:POKE CHB+A*8+Z, 
J: NEXT Z:GOTO 70 

■50 OPEN ttl,8,0,"D:M00NL0RD.FNT" 
100 FOR X=0 TO 1023:A=PEEKCCHB+XJ :PUT 
ttl,A:NEXT X: CLOSE »1 
110 POSITION 4,10:? " creating Machine 

language file " 
120 OPEN ttl,8,0,"D:MOONLORD.ML" 
130 FOR X=l TO 100: READ A: PUT »1,A:NEX 
T X: CLOSE «1 

140 POSITION 4,10:? " ALL 

CONE! 

150 REM KKKXXK XFRg DATA KKKKXK 
160 DATA 104,169,0,133,205,168,169,224 
,133,206,177,205,145,203,200,208 
170 DATA 249,230,204,230,206,165,206,2 
01,228,208,239,96 

180 REM KXKKXK CHARACTER DATA KXXXKX 
190 DATA 2,0,20,20,85,85,20,20,0 
200 DATA 3,124,170,170,170,170,170,170 
,124 

210 DATA 5,0,31,120,89,89,89,89,89 
220 DATA 6,0,248,30,154,154,154,154,15 
4 

230 DATA 7,89,89,91,91,91,120,31,0 
240 DATA 8,154,154,218,218,218,30,248, 


250 DATA 10,16,40,56,40,124,198,198,0 
260 DATA 15,0,0,0,24,24,0,0,0 
270 DATA 16,0,126,102,110,118,118,125, 


280 DATA 17,0,120,120,24,24,24,126,0 
290 DATA 18,0,126,102,12,56,112,126,0 
300 DATA 19,0,126,14,24,12,118,126,0 
310 DATA 20,0,28,60,124,108,126,14,0 
320 DATA 21,0,126,96,126,6,118,126,0 
330 DATA 22,0,124,96,126,102,118,126,0 
340 DATA 23,0,126,6,14,14,14,14,0 
350 DATA 24,0,126,102,60,102,118,126,0 
360 DATA 25,0,126,102,126,6,14,14,0 
370 DATA 33,0,124,108,108,254,198,198, 


380 DATA 34,0,124,108,126,102,102,126, 


390 DATA 35,0,126,102,96,112,118,126,0 
400 DATA 36,0,124,102,102,118,118,126, 


410 DATA 37,0,126,96,126,112,112,126,0 
420 DATA 38,0,126,96,126,112,112,112,0 



PAGE 42 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



flU 430 DATA 39|e, 126, 102, 96, 110, 118, 126,0 
W^ 440 DATA 40,0,182,102,126,230,230,230, 


V1^ 450 DATA 41,0,48,48,48,56,56,56,0 
«« 460 DATA 42,0,12,12,14,14,110,126,0 
Jl 470 DATA 43,0,108,108,124,126,102,102, 


ft 480 DATA 44,0,96,96,112,112,112,126,0 
PH 490 DATA 45,0,119,119,127,107,99,99,0 
MP 500 DATA 46,0,126,102,102,102,102,102, 


ei 510 DATA 47,0,126,110,110,102,102,126, 


SM 520 DATA 48,0,126,102,118,126,96,96,0 
TZ 530 DATA 49,0,126,102,102,102,126,28,0 
&B 540 DATA 50,0,124,108,108,126,118,118, 


m 550 DATA 51,0,126,96,126,6,102,126,0 
TU 560 DATA 52,0,126,24,24,28,28,28,0 
XX 570 DATA 53,0,102,102,102,102,118,126, 


ISIJ 580 DATA 54,0,102,102,118,126,60,24,0 
fU 590 DATA 55,0,99,99,107,127,119,119,0 
DX 600 DATA 56,0,118,118,68,60,118,118,0 
€H 610 DATA 57,0,102,102,126,24,24,24,0 
ZF 620 DATA 58,0,126,14,24,112,112,126,8 
RQ 630 DATA 64,0,0,0,0,8,8,8,8 
HJ 640 DATA 65,24,24,28,31,31,28,24,24 
eU 650 DATA 67,24,24,56,248,240,0,0,0 
4Z 660 DATA 68,24,24,56,248,248,56,24,24 
U& 670 DATA 69,0,0,0,240,248,56,24,24 
ItM 688 DATA 71,0,3,3,7,31,31,3,3 
¥P 698 DATA 72,0,192,192,192,192,192,192, 

192 
4N 700 DATA 73,3,3,3,3,3,15,31,0 
^It 710 DATA 74,192,192,192,192,192,240,24 

8,0 
HI 720 DATA 81,0,0,0,15,31,28,24,24 
liH 730 DATA 83,24,24,60,255,255,60,24,24 
m 740 DATA 87,0,0,0,255,255,60,24,24 
IR 750 DATA 88,24,24,60,255,255,0,0,0 
CL 760 DATA 90,24,24,28,31,15,0,0,0 
MH 770 DATA 97,16,40,40,40,108,238,214,21 

VB 780 DATA 98,24,24,60,24,60,231,195,0 
TQ 790 DATA 99,0,24,102,255,129,255,0,0 
HQ 800 DATA 100,74,1,84,19,164,1,168,34 
BB 810 DATA 101,66,102,60,255,60,102,66,0 
BM 820 DATA 182,0,0,0,24,24,0,0,0 
Dt 830 DATA 103,0,0,60,36,36,60,0,0 
ZI 840 DATA 104,0,60,66,66,66,66,60,0 
m 850 DATA 105,126,129,129,129,129,129,1 

29,126 
HP 860 DATA -1 

XI 870 REM KKMICKIC MUS DATA MKKKMK 
m 880 DATA 216,104,104,104,133,213,104,2 

4,105,2,133,206,104,133,205,104,133,20 

4,104,133,203,104,104,133,208 
XM 890 DATA 104,104,133,209,104,104,24,10 

1,209,133,207,166,213,240,16,165,205,2 

4,105,128,133,205,165,206,105 
XA 900 DATA 0,133,206,202,208,240,160,0,1 

62,0,196,209,144,19,196,207,176,15,132 

,212,138,168,177,203,164 
m 910 DATA 212,145,205,232,159,0,240,4,1 

69,0,145,205,200,192,128,208,224,166,2 
; 13,165,208,157,0,208,96 



Listing 2. 
BASIC listing. 

19 10 GRAPHICS 0:P0KE 559,8 

i^t 20 N0=0:Nl=l:N2=2:N3=3:N4=4:N5=:5:N6=6: 
N7=7 : N8=8 : H9=9 : H10=10 : Nll=ll : N12=12 : HI 
3=13 : N14=14 : Hi5=15 : N16=16 ! N17=17 



38 N18=18 : N19=19 : N2O=20 : N21=21 : N22=22 : 

H87=87 ! H88=88 : N89=89 : N559=559 : M752=752 

:N756=756:5T=N0:G0T0 2350 
KX 40 FOR X=N1 TO 432 : L=INT (RND CN0}«36} :S 

ECSfX,K)=CHR$CL3 :HEKT X 
Pn 50 FOR K=725 TO 747!P0KE PMB+X,255 : PQK 

E PMB+X+128,255:MEXT X: RETURN 
m 60 FOR X=N1 TO 25 
SP 70 C=CINTCRNDCN0}#N18}+N1})(N2.-R=(INT(R 

ND tN0)»N8J J»N2+H1 : P= f (Rl^Nl} /H2-M1)*N18 

+C/H2:IF BRD$(P,P)<>"/" THEM 70 
Ur 80 BRD$CP,P)=CHR$t341 :NEXT X:RETURN 
V8 90 FOR X=N1 TO HIS STEP 8.1: POKE 709, X 

:HEXT X:F0R X=H1 to 450:HEXT X:FOR X=H 

15 TO HI STEP -0.1:P0KE 789,X:HEXT X 
VrX 100 RETURH 
tU 110 RESTORE 2940:F0R X=NO TO 44:READ A 

:P0KE 1536+X,A:HEXT X 
EI 120 FOR X=N1 TO 40:READ A : CL$ (X) =CHR$ C 

A) SNEXT X : RETURH 
m. 130 GRAPHICS H0:P0KE 710,H0:P0KE 709, H 

0:POKE N752,Hl:RETURH 
m 140 FOR X=N1 TO H6 : 5TS CXJ =STS tX) -U ! IF 

STS(XJ<NO THEH STS(X)=H0 
SL 150 NEXT X: RETURN 
5R 160 SY=INTtSSEC/M6) :SX=S5EC-SY«N6:AV=I 

NT (DA CA} /H6} : AX=0A (A) -AYWN6 ! DI5=INT (SQ 

R t tSY-AYJ A2+ (SX-AX) ^^21 +0.5)! RETURN 
ZP 170 5T=STICKCN0) :IF STRIGCH0)=H0 THEH 

RETURN 
CH 180 IF ST=H13 THEN RM=RN-i'N4 :IF RN>MAX 

THEN RM=MAX 
UR 190 IF ST=N14 THEH RW=RW-H4;IF RM<MIH 

THEN RH^MIH 
BD 200 FOR X=H1 TO 50:HEXT X: A=USR (PMU, N8 

,PNB, ADRCPO$) ,112,RM,N6) :GDTD 170 
JN 210 IF BRD$CSEC+H1,5EC+H1)<>CHR$C34) T 

HEH RETURH 
RO 220 POKE H87,H0:POKE N88,H2e:F0R X=H9 

TO H12:P0SITIDH H13,X:? " 
II ■ NEXT X 
PZ 230 FOR X=H0 TO N1:IF 0P(X)>N0 THEN GO 

SUB 250 
SK 240 NEXT X: RETURN 
41 250 POSITION N16,H10:? "ALIEH '^X+HlrP 

OSITIOH H15,Hll:? "ATTACKING" 
HH 260 FOR Z=255 TO NO STEP -NIO: SOUND NO 

,Z,H10,H4:5OUND Nl, Z+N2, NIO, N4 : NEXT Z 
m 270 SOUND N0,N0,NO,NO:SDUND HI, HO, NO, H 

0:DAM=INT(RNDCN0}«H6)+Hl:IF DAM>N1 THE 

H RETURN 
NG 280 DAM=INTCRNDCN01«H6)+Nl:DP=INT(RNDC 

N0)»N6)+Nl:STStDP)=STStDP)+DAM 
m 290 FOR XX=N1 TO N6:S0UND HO,10e,H12,H 

8:G0SUB 440:S0UHD HO, HO, HO, HO : GOSUB 44 

: HEXT XX 
KN 300 IF CSTS(H5}>N0 AND STS(H61>H0I OR 

(STSCN5)>N0 AND STS1CH4XH1) THEN 2170 
ZB 310 RETURN 

KP 320 IF STRIGCHO)=HO THEH 320 
ZF 330 RETURN 
50 340 SOUND NO, N15, N12, N2 : SOUND N1,15D,N 

12,N8:F0R X=N1 TO 150:NEXT X:SOUHD HO, 

NO, NO, NO: SOUND HI, HO, HO, HO : RETURH 
HZ 350 SOUND H0,H15,H12,H4:F0R XX=H1 TO N 

20:FOR X=H1 TO N16 STEP N3:P0KE 711, X: 

SOUND H1,X,N12,N8:NEXT X:NEXT XX 
LS 360 SOUND HO, HO, HO, HO : SOUHD Nl,He,HO,N 

0:POKE 711,154:RETURH 
CF 370 SOUND NO, NIO, NIO, N8 : GOSUB 440:SOUN 

D NO,N0,N0,N0:RETURN 
PP 380 SOUND H0,75,H10,H8:G0SUB 440:S0UHD 

N0,NO,N0,N0:RETURH 
Rft 390 POKE N87,Nl:P0KE N88, NO:POSITION C 

»N2+N4,R»N2+N2:? »6;"D" 
LB 400 FOR XX=N16 TO HO STEP -8.03:S0UHD 

NO,2O0,H0,XX:NEXT XX:POSITIOH CKH2+H4, 

RKN2+N2!? tt6;" " 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 43 




Moonlord 



continued 



¥$410 POKE N87,N0:P0KE N88, N20 : STSJL CN2] = 

5TS1CN2J-N1:1F STS1CH2)=H0 THEM 2170 
HL 420 IF OPCNOKNl AND OP (Nl) <N1 THEN BR 

D$f5EC+Nl,5EC+NlJ="/" 
ZG 430 RETURN 

UR 440 FOR Z=N1 TO NlOlNEXT Z.-RETURN 
UM 450 SOUND NO, 50, N12, N8 : FOR X=N1 TO N20 

:NEXT K:50UN(> NO, NO, NO, NO : RETURN 
FH 460 R=IMTtS5EC/H6) :C=5SEC-RWH6:P05ITI0 

M C*N2+N4,R*N2+N2:? ttN6; "B" : RETURN 
OJ 470 I0CB=848;ICC0M=I0CB+N2:ICBftL=I0CB+ 

N4 : ICBaH=I0CB+N5 : ICBLL=I0CB+N8 : ICBLH=I 

n p p XIJO 

UC 480 POKE ICCOM, N7:fiH=INT (6/256) :AL=a-A 

H*256 : HH=INT CX/'256J : NL=K-NH*256 
5Y 490 POKE ICBaL,AL:POKE ICBAH, AH : POKE I 

CBLL,NL:POKE ICBLH.NH 
UL 500 A = USR (ADR C'hhhJllLUE]"}, N161 : CLOSE ttN 

l: RETURN 
MT 510 REM KXXXMICK MAIN SCREEN KKXXKXKK 
ZA 520 GRAPHICS NO:POKE N559,N0:PDKE 5428 

6,255:P0KE 710,N0:PDKE 82,N0:P0KE N752 

,Ml:POKE N756,CHBA5E/256 
MH 530 DL=PEEK (5601 +256WPEEK (561) -l'N4: POKE 
DL,N0:P0KE DL+N1,GMAP:P0KE DL+N17,130 

:POKE DL+23,130 
EY 540 POKE N88,N0:P0KE N89,GMAP 
ND 550 POKE 512,N0:P0KE 513,N6:P0KE 1580, 

NOiPOKE 54286, i92:P0KE N559,46:P0KE HP 

0SP1,96;P0KE HP0SP2,128:RW=N87 
RR 560 FOR X=N18 TO N21:P0SITI0N N13,X:? 

M1$((X-N17)»N14-N13, (X-N17)*N14) :NEXT 

X 
YC 570 R=INT (SEC/NIB) :C=SEC-R»N18:R=RKN2+ 

HI :C=C*H2+N2: POSITION C,R:? "K'^OCHrAS 

C(BRD$(5EC+N1,SEC+N1)) 
UR 580 POKE 77,N0:MIN=N87:MAX=99:G0SUB 17 

0:0N (RM-83}/N4 GOTO 600,1860,1650,210 


HP 590 REM KKXKKKKXK SCAN KKKKXKKXX 
Zl 600 GOSUB 320:P0KE HPOSPO, NO : FOR X=N18 

TO N21:P0SITI0N N17,X:?_[^ ";NEX T 

X:P0SITI0N N13,N18:? ■■— .JtTiVinJM;— ■■ 
XR 610 POSITION N17,N20:? "SHORT" : POSITIO 

N H17 N21:? "LONG" ■" RW— 95 
YU 620 MiN=95:MAX=99:G0SUB 170:0N (RM-90) 

/N4 GOTO 640,1540 
JE 630 REM **}««HfSHORT RANGEWHHHW 
CO 640 IF STS(N3)>N0 THEN GOSUB 34e:G0T0 

560 
TO 650 GRAPHICS N0:P0KE N559,N0:P0KE 5428 

6,255:P0KE N756, (CHBASE/256) +M2 : DL=PEE 

K(560)+256»PEEK(561)+N4 
ZD 660 POKE DL-H1,70:F0R X=N2 TO N16:P0KE 
DL+X,N6:NEXT X:P0KE DL+N17,134:P0KE D 

L+23,130 
HY 670 POKE DL+25, 65 : POKE DL+26, PEEK (560) 

.-POKE DL-i-27, PEEK (561) : POKE 1580,Ne:P0K 

E 54286,192 
SI 680 POKE N88,N0:P0KE N89, SNAP : POKE DL, 

NOlPOKE DL+N1,SMAP:P0KE 708,52:P0KE 70 

9,H8:P0KE 710,44:P0KE 711,154 
RZ 690 POKE N87,Nl:P0KE N752,N1:P0KE 77, N 


CZ 700 FOR X=N4 TO N14 STEP N2 : FOR Y=N2 T 

N12 STEP N2:P0SITI0N X,Y:? tt6;" " : HE 

XT Y S NEXT X 
XF 710 FOR X=HO TO N2 :L=ASC (SECS ( (SEC+Nl) 

*H3-X)) :R=INT(L/N6) :C=L-R*N6 
HE 720 POSITION C»H2 + N4, R*N2 + N2 : ? ttN6;"[l" 

.-NEXT X: GOSUB 460 
KH 730 IF BRD$(SEC + Nl,SEC-i-Nl) <>CHR$(34) T 

HEN 780 
KS 740 FOR X=M0 TO Nl 

MB 750 L=INT(RND(N0}«36} :0A(X)=L:0P(X)=N5 
ND 760 R=INT(L/N6) :C=L-R»N6:L0CATE C*N2+N 

4,R«N2+N2,A:IF A<>ASC(" ") THEN 750 

770 POSITION C*N2+H4,R*M2+N2:? ttN6;"B" 



: NEXT X 
«F 780 IF BRD$(SEC+N1,SEC+Nl)<>"tt" THEN 8 

10 
an 790 L=INT(RND(N0)*36) :R=INT(L/N6) :C=L- 

RWN6:L0CATE CWN2-I-N4, R«N2 + N2, A : IF AOAS 

C(" ") THEN 790 
m 800 POSITION C»N2+N4,R»N2+N2:? «N6;"C" 
rr 810 RW=N87:P0KE N87,N0:POKE N559,46 
FJ 820 MIN=N87:MAX=99:G0SUB 170:0N (RH-83 

)/N4 GOTO 830.860,1050,1250 
CX 830 IF OP(NO)>NO OR OP(N1)>N0 THEN GOS 

UB 340:G0T0 820 
OF 840 GOTO 520 

M 850 REM KXKXXXX SHORT CRUISE mtMKKKK 
PR 860 GOSUB 320:IF STS(N2)>N0 THEN GOSUB 

340:G0T0 820 
LY 870 MAX=N5:0SSEC=SSEC:P0KE N87,N0:P0KE 

N88,172:P0KE N89, PEEK (H89) -N2 
BK 880 GOSUB 1940 : SSC=SSEC-U«N6*(DR=N1) +U 

»(DR=N2) +U«H6»(DR=N3) -U*(DR=N4) 
38 890 IF SSC<NO OR SSC>35 THEN GOSUB 450 
I :G0T0 880 
m 900 IF (DR = N2 AND INT (S5C/N6)>INT (S5EC 

/N6)) OR (DR = N4 AND INT (SSC/N6XINT (SS 

EC/N6)} THEN GOSUB 450:G0T0 880 
YA 910 POKE N87,Nl:P0KE N88,N0:P0KE N89,S 

MAP : R=INT (05SEC/N6) : C=05SEC-R*N6 : R1=R ! 

CI— C 
JK 920 IF U=N0 THEM 1020 
1IA 930 C1=C1+X0F:R1=R1+Y0F: LOCATE C1»H2+N 

4,R1*H2+N2,A 
EV 940 IF A<>ASC("C") THEN 990 
yS 950 POSITION C»N2+M4,R*N2+N2:? «M6;" " 

: POSITION C1»N2+N4,R1*N2+N2:? ttN6;"B" 
BE 960 FOR X=N1 TO 30:S0UND NO, 50, NIO, N8 : 

GOSUB 440:SOUND NO, NO, NO, NO : GOSUB 440: 

NEXT X 
m 970 FOR X=N1 TO N6: STS (X) =N0 : NEXT X:P5 

=PS+6O0-5TS1(N3) :STS1(N3)=600:STS1(N4) 

=Nie 

KK 980 POSITION C1»N2+N4, R1»N2+N2 : ? ttN6;" 

C": GOSUB 460: GOTO 1220 
ftL 990 IF A<>ASC(" ") THEN POSITION C1»N2 

+ N4,R1WN2-I-N2:? ttN6; CHR$ (A) : GOSUB 450:G 

OTO 870 
ET 1000 IF R1»N6+C1=5SC THEN 1020 
RP 1010 GOTO 930 
XM 1020 POSITION C«N2+N4,R«M2+M2:? ttN6;" 

":STS1(N3)=STS1(N3)-U»H3:IF STSl (N3) <N 

1 THEN 2170 
ZR 1030 5SEC=SSC:G0SUB 460:G0T0 1220 
IB 1040 REM KXKKKKKX PHASERS KXKXXKKKK 
XR 1050 IF STS(N5)>N0 THEN GOSUB 340:G0T0 

820 
ZO 1060 POKE N88,N20:F0R X=N9 TO N12:P0SI 

TION M17,X:? " ":next X:P0SITI0N 

N16,M10:? "POMER=0":PHP=N0 
GC 1070 POKE HPOSPO, NO:GOSUB 320 
CI 1080 IF STRIGtHO)=NO THEN 1130 
ZC 1090 ST = STICK(N0) :IF STOH13 AND STON 

14 THEN 1080 
VE 1100 PHP=PHP+N1»(5T=H14)-M1*(ST=N13) :l 

F PHP<NO THEN PHP=99 
LR 1110 IF PHP>99 THEN PHPrNO 
FX 1120 POSITION 22, NIO:? PHPj GOTO lO 

80 
BY 1130 ST51(N3)=STS1(M3)-PHP:IF ST51(M3) 

<N1 THEN 2170 
Pr 1140 GOSUB 350:IF OP (MOXMl AND OP(Nl) 

<N1 THEM 1220 
NW 1150 IF OP(N0}<N1 OR 0P(N1)<N1 THEN 11 

90 
RK 1160 FOR A=NO TO N1:G0SUB 160:DAM=INT( 

PHP/N6/DIS+0,5) :0P(A)=0P(A)-DAM:IF 0P( 

A)>NO THEN 1180 
YD 1170 POKE N87,N1:P0KC N88, MO : L=OA (A) : R • 

=INT (L/N6) : C=L-R*N6 : GOSUB 390 
IS 1180 NEXT A:GOTO 1220 



PAGE 44 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



m 1198 a = NO:IF OPCNlDNO THEN A=N1 

m 128B G05UB 168 : DfiM=INT CPHP/N3/DIS+0 . 5J 

:OP(Al=OPCA)-D<:iM:IF 0PCA)>N8 THEN 1228 
Mil 1218 L=8ACA) :R=INTCL/N6} :C=L-RKN6:G85U 

B 398 
VH 1228 G05UB 218:P0KE N87,N8:P8KE N88,N2 

0:Pe5ITION N15,N9:? " BRIDGE ";;P05I 

TI0N N15,N18:? " CRUISE "; 
RE 1238 POSITION N15,N11:? ■' PHASER "; : 

POSITION N13,N12!? " PHOTON "HG 

OTO 828 
XK 1248 REM XKKMMXMK PHOTOHS MKKKXXXK 
LM 1258 G85UB 32e:IF STSCN6]>N8 OR STSl CN 

41 <N1 THEN G8SUB 348:G0T0 828 
PC 1268 POKE 766,Nl:P0KE HPOSPO, NO : POKE N 

87, N8: POKE N88,N28:STS1CN41=STS1CN4)-N 

1:G0SUB 388 
PC 1278 POSITION N16,N9:? "UECTORS" : POSIT 

ION N17,NiO;? " rfll '^POSITION N17,N1 

1:7 " *■ * " 
6i> 1288 POSITION N17,N12:? " "-iJ ":05T=N 

14:X0F=N8:Y0F=-N1 
«U 1298 DlS=DD$:ST=STICK(N8J :IF STRIG CN8) 

=N8 THEN 1488 
m 1388 IF ST=N15 OR 5T=0ST THEN 1298 
Cft 1318 IF ST=N14 THEN Dl$ CN2, N2J ="0": XOF 

=N8:Y0F=-N1:0ST=N14 
CP 1328 IF ST=N6 THEN DlS CN3, N3) ="n" : X0F= 

N2:Y0F=-N1 
HA 1338 IF ST=N7 THEN Dl$ (N6, N6) ="B" : XOF= 

N2:Y0F=N0 
FP 1348 IF ST=N5 THEN Dl$ CN9, N9> r-'U" : XBFz 

N2:Y0F=N1 
LI 1358 IF ST=N13 THEN Dl$ (N8, N8) ="D": XSF 

=Ne:YOF=Nl 
TC 1368 IF ST=N9 THEN Dl$ tN7, N7J ="i;" : XOF= 

-N2:Y0F=Ni 

Tl 1378 IF ST=N11 THEN Dl$ CN4, N4) ="B" : XOF 

=-N2!Y0F=N8 
HX 1388 IF ST=N10 THEN DlS CNl, NIJ ="n" : X8F 

=-N2:Y0F=-Nl 
KA 1398 FOR X=N1 TO N3:P0SITI0N N18,X+N9: 

? D1$(X«N3-N2,X»N31 :NEXT X:GOSUB 378:0 

ST=ST:GOTO 1298 
TK 1488 R=INT[SSEC/N61 :C=SSEC-R«N6:R=RWN8 

+23 : C=C»N16+88 : X=N8 
OH 1418 A=USRCPMU,N3,PMB,ADR(P3$},C,R,N61 

: C=C+XOF : R=R+YOF : X=X+N2 : SOUND Nl, X, N8, 

N4 
IW 1428 H=PEEKC53255) IPBKE 53278, N1:IF H< 

>N1 AND HON4 THEN 1518 
VK 1438 POKE HP0SP3, N8 : SOUND N1,N8,N8,NB: 

C=INTCCC-80)/H16+8.5) : R= CR-23J /N8 : L=R» 

N6+C!IF H=N4 THEN 1478 
NU 1448 IF 8ACN8}=L THEN OP (N8} =Ne : GOTO 1 

468 
2M 1458 0PfNlJ=N8 
BJ 1468 GOSUB 39e:G0T0 1528 
IP 1478 C=C»N2+N4:R=R*N2+N2:P0KE N87,N1:P 

OKE N88,Ne 
XY 1488 SOUND N8, 188, N18, N8 : POSITION C,R: 

? tt6;"S": GOSUB 448:S0UND NO, 180, N18, N8 

rPOSITION C,R:? «6;"0"!GOSUB 448 
HZ 1498 SOUND NO, 60, NiO, N8 : POSITION C,R:? 
»6 ;"[!]••: GOSUB 44e:S0UND N0,N20,N18,N8: 

POSITION C,R:? tt6;"H":G0SUB 448 
RE 1508 POSITION C,R!? »6;"a":G0T0 1528 
ON 1518 IF C<17e AND C>78 AND R<68 AND R> 

18 THEN 1418 
m 1528 POKE HP0SP3,NB: SOUND N8,N0,N8,N8: 

SOUND N1,N0,N0,N8:G8T0 1228 
RX 1530 REM KMXXXXX LONG RANGE KXXKXKK 
LG 1540 GOSUB 328 : IF STSCN4)>N8 THEN GOSU 

B 348:G0T0 568 
»H 1558 FOR X=N1 TO N8 : IF X<N4 THEN SS=SE 

C-H28 + X 
HC 1568 IF X=N4 OR X=N5 THEN S5=SEC-CX=N4 

)+CX=N51 



F6 1578 IF X>N5 THEN SS=SEC+N18- tX=N6) + CX 

:N8) 
SE 1588 R=INTC5S/N18) :C=S5-R»N18:R=R»N2+N 

1 : C=C»N2 + N2 ! P= C CR + Nl) /N2-N1J«N18 + C/'N2 
XH 1598 TRAP 1638 : A=ASC CBRD$ CP, PI 1 : IF (IN 

TtCSEC+Nl)/N18)=CSEC+Nl)/N18) AND fX=H 

3 OR X=N5 OR X=N8} THEN 1630 
DI 1688 IF INT(SEC/N18)=SEC/N18 AND (X=N1 

OR X=N4 OR X=N6) THEN 1638 
CW 1618 POSITION C,R:? "i":FOR U=N8 T8 N8 
STEP -Nl:SOUND NO, 30, NIO, V: SOUND Nl,4 

0,N10,U:NEXT U 
CA 1626 SOUND NO, NO, N8, NO : SOUND Nl,Ne,Ne, 

HO:POSITION C,R:? BRD$(P,P1 
EF 1630 NEXT K:TRAP 48888 : RW=N87: G8T0 568 
MN 1648 REM XXXXXXX STATUS XXXXXXXXXX 
YY 1658 GOSUB 328:GRAPHICS N8:P0KE N559,N 

0:POKE 54286, 255:P0KE 756, CHBASE/256 : D 

L=PEEKC560)+256*PEEKt561)+N4 
JE 1660 POKE N89,STS:P0KE N752,N1:P0KE DL 

-H1,78:P0KE DL,8:P0KE DL+Nl, STS : POKE D 

L+N17,130:POKE DL+23,130 
EY 1678 POKE 512,N0:POKE 513,N6:P0KE 1580 

,NO:POKE 710,98 
MR 1680 FOR X=N1 TO N4:P0SITI0N 38,XKN2:? 
STSlfXJ;:IF STSlCXXlO THEN ? " ":G0 

TO 1700 
HT 1690 IF STSltX)<108 THEN ? " " 
BE 1708 NEXT X:P0KE 77, NO 
HJ 1710 FOR X=N1 TO N6 : POSITION N15,X»N2- 

Nl:? STS(X)!NEXT X : POSITION N13,N17;? 

"BRIDGE":POSITION N13,N18!? "REPAIR" 
5C 1720 POKE 54286, 192:P0KE N559,46 
ML 1730 RM=91:MIN=RN:MAX=95: GOSUB 170 : GOS 

UB 320:0N (RN-86}/N4 GOTO 520,1750 
CR 1740 REM KKKXKXXXX REPAIR XXXXXXXK 
GN 1750 GOSUB 320: POKE HPOSPO, NO : POSITION 
N13,N17:? "DAYS=0":POSITION N13,Ni8:? 
" ":DAY5=N8 
H¥ 1768 IF STRIG(N8)=N8 THEN 1818 
10 1778 ST=STICKCN8) :IF STON13 AND STON 

14 THEN 1760 
LN 1780 DAYS=DAY5+N1»CST=N14>-N1»CST=N13) 

:G0SUB 440:G0SUB 440:IF DAYS<N0 THEN D 

fiYS=N9 
TP 1790 IF DAYS>N9 THEN DAYS=N0 
HA 1800 POSITION N18,N17:? DAYS:GOTO 1760 
BU 1810 STSltNl)=STSltNlJ-DAYS:IF STSl tNl 

)<N1 THEN 2170 
UV 1820 FOR X=N1 TO N6 : STS fXJ =STS tX) -DAYS 

:IF STStXXNO THEN STStXJ=NO 
XQ 1830 NEXT X:GOTO 1650 
MA 1840 STSCN1J=STSCN1J-DAYS:IF STS (NlXN 

1 THEN 2170 
JO 1850 REM XXKXKKXMK CRUISE miMKMKKK 

MU 1860 G8SUB 328:IF STSCN2]>N0 THEN G8SU 

B 348:G0T0 588 
OF 1870 MAX=N17: GOSUB 1940 : 5C=5EC-U»N18*t 

DR=Nl)+U«CDR=N2)+U»N18»CDR=N3J-U*tDR=N 

4) 
TN 1880 IF SC<N8 OR SC>144 THEN GOSUB 450 

:G0T0 1870 
UL 1890 IF tDR = N2 AND INT tSC/N18) MNTCSEC 

/H18)) OR tDR = N4 AND INT CSC/N18XINT tS 

EC/N18}} THEN GOSUB 450:G0T0 1878 
DT 1900 POSITION C,R:? CHR$ tOCHJ : SEC=5C : 5 

T51 CNl) =ST51 tNlJ -U : STSl tH3 J =STS1 CN3) -U 

»N10 
JO 1910 IF STSltMlXNl OR 5TS1(N3J<N1 THE 

N 2170 
HM 1920 GOSUB 14e:G0T0 560 
LD 1930 REM XXXXXXX CRUISE SUB XXXXKXK 
GI 1940 POKE 766,Nl:P0KE HPOSPO, NO : DR=N1 : 

X0F=N0:Y0F=-Nl:0ST=N14 
PY 1950 FOR XrNl TO N4 : POSITION N13,X+H17 

:? M3SIXKN14-N13,X»N14J :NEXT X 
FJ I960 D1$=D$:ST=STICKCN0) :IF STRIGtN0)= 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 45 




Moonlord 



continued 



zu 

E5 
GH 
BA 
TF 
KH 

UZ 
IV 

GY 

MI 

Mfi 

VK 

ZX 

OP 

KM 
QA 

PF 

ST 
QQ 

EN 

YY 

NE 

CB 



DI 
RU 



FJ 

FJ 
ZM 

LH 

XL 
XB 



LX 



NO THEN U=N0:G0SUB 38e:G05UB 320: GOTO 

2638 

1970 IF CST<>Ni4 AND 5TON7 AND STONI 

3 AND 5TON11J OR 5T=0ST THEN 1960 

1980 IF 5T=N14 THEN DlS CN2, N2J ="0": DR= 

Nl:XOF=N0:YOF=-Nl 

1990 IF ST=N7 THEN DlS CN6,N6) ="B" : DR=N 

2:KOF=N1:YOF=N0 

2900 IF 5T=Ni3 THEN Di$ tN8,N8J ="D" : DR= 

N3 ■ XOF— NO • YOF— Nl 

2oi0 IF ST=N11 THEN Dl$ CN4, N41 ="Q" : DR= 

N4:XOF=-Nl:YOF=N0 

2020 FOR X=N1 TO N3:P0SITI0N N15,X+N17 

:? D1$CX»N3-N2,X«N3} :NEXT X:G05UB 370: 

05T=ST:G0T0 1960 

2030 GOSUB 320 

2040 ST=5TICK(N0) :IF STRIG(N0]=NO THEN 

GOSUB 380:RETURN 
2050 IF ST=N14 THEN U=U+N1:IF U>MAX TH 
EN U=NO 

2060 IF ST=N13 THEN U=U-N1:IF U<Ne THE 
N U=MAX 

2070 GOSUB 440:IF U<Nie THEN POSITION 
23,N19:? "0";U:GOTO 2040 
2080 POSITION 23,N19:? U:GOTO 2040 
2090 REM MKKKKKKKKK JUMP XKKKMKKKKM 
2100 IF STSCN1}>N0 THEN GOSUB 340: GOTO 

580 
2110 ST51CN1J=5T51CN1J-N1:5T51CN3)=5TS 
1(N3}-30:IF STSKNlXNl OR STS1CN3XN1 

THEN 2170 
2120 SEC = INT CRND CNOl W1431 +N1 : POSITION 
C,R:? CHR$(0CH1 :XX=48 

2130 FOR X=NO TO N16:S0UND N0,XX,N10,N 
8:XX=XX~N3:P0KE 710,X:NEXT X:SOUND NO, 
N0,Ne,Ne:U=Nl:GOSUB 140 
2140 IF INT CRND (N0}«N10)+N1=N1 THEN 21 
70 

2150 GOTO 520 

2160 REM KXXXKXK GAME OVER XXXXKXM 
2170 X=t5O-STSltN2))*50-PS+STSlCNlJ«N2 
O«CSTSlCN2)=N0)+10O0»tST51tN2J=NOJ 
2180 POKE HPOSPO,NO:POKE HPOSPl, NO : POK 
E HP0SP2,N0 

2190 GRAPHICS NO : POKE N559,N0:P0KE N75 
6,CHBASE/256:P0KE 752,N1:P0KE 708,54:P 
OKE 710, N20 
2200 DL=PEEKC560)+256«PEEK £5611 +N4: FOR 

Z=N4 TO N16:P0KE DL+Z, N6 : NEXT ZZPOKE 
DL+H20,N6:POKE DL+21,N6 

2210 POKE 82,N0:P0KE N559, 34 : TS="INCOM 
ING MESSAGE FROM TITAN BASE" : C1=N2 : Rl= 
Nl: GOSUB 2330: FOR Z=N1 TO 75: NEXT Z 
2220 IF STSltN2)<Nl THEN 2260 
2230 TS="D0 HOT ATTEMPT TO": C1=N0 : R1=N 
4:G0SUB 2330:T$="RETURN. THE M00NS":R1 
=N5:G0SUB 2330 

2240 T$="HAUE BEEN TAKEN BY" : R1=N6 : GOS 
UB 2330:T$="THE ALIENS. YOUR" : R1=N7 : GO 
SUB 2330 

2250 T$="MISSION HAS FAILED .": R1=N8 : GO 
SUB 2330: GOTO 2290 

2260 T$="C0NGRATULATI0N5!":C1=N1:R1=N4 
: GOSUB 2330:TS="YOUR MISSION HAS":R1=N 
5: GOSUB 2330 

2270 T$="BEEN COMPLETED .": R1=N6 : GOSUB 
2330:T$="Y0U WILL RETURN" : R1=N7 : GOSUB 
2330 

2280 TS="H0ME a hero. ":R1=N8: GOSUB 233 


2290 POSITION 28,N10:? "MISSION EUALUA 
TION: ";X:P0SITI0N 30,N14:? "PLAY AGAI 
N IY\N3"; 

2300 POSITION N6,N15:INPUT A$:IF ASO" 
Y" AND A$<>"y" AND AS<>"N" AND AS<>"n" 

THEN 2300 
2310 IF A$="Y" OR A$="y" THEN 2440 
2320 GRAPHICS N0:END 



ft«> 2330 FOR C=N1 TO LENCT$} :GOSUB 380:P0S 
ITION Cl+C,Rl:? T${C,C); :next C:RETURN 

XO 2340 REM ^HHHHHtlNITIALIZE XXXXXXX 

AN 2350 DIM BD$ C381 , BD1$ C381 , BD2$ (N13J , BR 
D$ (144) , P0$ CN6) . SEC$ f 432 J , CL$ C40) , MlS C 
56) ,M2$(240) ,M3$(56) ,DSCN9) ,D1$(N9) 

SI 2360 DIM STS(N6},0A(N2) ,0P(N21,STS1C4) 
,P3$CN6),DD$(N9),A$(N1),N$(N10),T$(4O) 

HF 2370 Ml$=" SCAN CRUISE 

STATUS JUMP " 

KP 2380 M2SCN1,80)="| 1 | 

'71 ''i- " 

AM 2390 N2$(81,160}="|M00NK&L0RD| I 

IMOONK&LORDI I 'C || 
II •£ I" 
AU 2400 M2SC161,240J="| jl ^ 

' I I" 



ON 2410 M3$=" 

* i' 
OH 2420 BDS=" 

I. I. I.I. I 



BDl 



Q II . «^ * II 00 
BEARING UNITS" 

ij..i.i.l.i7i.i.i.i.i 



I I I I I I I I I I I 



IM 2430 BD2$="| I I I I I | ";D$=" t * + * 

":DD$="rfn«- -it-W 
MH 2440 BRD5(Nl)="/":BRDSC144)="/":BRDStN 

2)=BRD$ 
MN 2450 SEC=81:S5EC=21:5T51tNl)=100:STSlC 

N2)=5O:STS1(N31=600:STS1CN4)=N1O:OPCNO 

) =N0 : OP CNII =N0 : OA (NO) =N0 : OA CNll =N0 
JE 2460 FOR X=N1 TO N6 : 5TS CX) =N0 : NEXT X 
MH 2470 PS=N0:HPOSP0=53248:HPOSP1=53249:H 

P0SP2=53250:HP0SP3=53251 
MG 2480 GOSUB 130 : POSITION N11,N8:? "ANAL 

OG CoMputin9":P0SITI0N N15,N10:? "Pres 

ents":GOSUB 98 
PW 2490 IF NOT ST THEN RT0P=PEEK C106) -37 

:POKE 106,RTOP 
GH 2500 GRAPHICS NO:POKE N559,N0:P0KE 82, 

H0:5TS=RT0P+N1 
ST 2510 6MAP=RT0P+N7:SMAP=RT0P+Nll:CHBASE 

- CRT0P + N17J *256 : PMU= CRT0P+21)»256 : PMG= 

RT0P+25:PMB=PMG«256:G05UB 110 
lU 2520 POKE N88,N0:P0KE N89, STS : A=USR CAD 

RCCL$} ,361 
NX 2530 GOSUB 130:P0SITI0N N11,N9:? "A CI 

ai/ton MalnuM":POSITION Nil, Nil:? "Prod 

uction of. . .":GOSUB 90 
HJ 2540 OPEN ttNl, N4, NO, "D : MOONLORD .HL" : A= 

PMU:X=1O0: GOSUB 470 
UG 2550 OPEN HNl, N4, NO, "D : MOONLORD .FNT" : A 

=CHBASE:X=1024:G0SUB 470 
NL 2560 FOR X=N1 TO N6:READ A : P0$ CXI =CHR$ 

CA1:NEXT X:F0R X=N1 TO N6:READ A:P3$CX 

}=CHR$CA1 :NEXT X 
TI 2570 POKE 53256, N3:P0KE 53257, N3:P0KE 

53258, N3:P0KE 53289, N3 : POKE 704,118:PO 

KE 705,52:POKE 706,53:P0KE 707, N14 
UP 2580 POKE 54279, PMG:P0KE 53277, N3 : POKE 

623, Nl 
HQ 2590 GRAPHICS N2:P0KE 710,N0:P0KE N756 

,CHBASE/256:P0SITI0N N5,N4:? ttN6;"noon 

y.&lord" 
TM 2600 POSITION N9,N5:? ttN6; "' C" : GOSUB 4 



YZ 2610 GRAPHICS NO:PDKE N559,N0:P0KE N75 
2,Nl:P0KE N87,N0:P0KE 88,N0:P0KE N89,G 
MAP 

HM 2620 POSITION N1,N0:? ' M | | | i | | | 

GO 2630 FOR X=N1 TO N15:P0SITI0N N1,X:IF 

INTCX/N21=X/N2 THEN ? BD$:GOTO 2650 
MS 2640 ? BD1$ 

MU 2650 NEXT X: POSITION N1.N16:? 
■■■■■'■■■■■ ^ ■ ■ 



J- 



■":GOSUB 



60 



3X 2660 C=CINTCRNDCN01«N31+N11«N2:R=CINTC 



PAGE 46 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



HJ 



KK 
GH 



ZV 



OH 
ftR 
ZU 
HT 
KM 
BM 
DX 
fJ 
XH 
YO 
UO 

an 

KU 

oc 

GF 



RND fN01»N8) ) WN2+N1 : P= ( CR+Nl) /N2-N1}»N1 

8+C/N2;IF BRDStP,P)<>"/" THEN 2660 

2678 BRD$CP,P)="tt" 

2680 C= tINT (RND (NO) »N3) +H15) »N2 : R= (INT 

(RND(Ne]«N8}}«N2+Nl:P=((R+Nl)/N2-Nl}«N 

18+C/N2:IF BRD$(P,P)<>'V" THEN 2680 

2690 BRD$(P,P)="«":FOR X=Ni TO N6:P05I 

TION N0,X+N16:? M2S{X»40-39,X»40); :NEX 

T X 

2700 POSITION N10,23:? "SELECT YOUR CO 

MMl^ND"; :P0KE N87,Nl:P0KE N89, SMAP : POKE 

82, NO 
2710 POSITION N3,Nl:? »N6;"| i i r I I 
-l" 

2720 FOR X=N2 TO N12: POSITION N3,X:IF 
INT(X/N2)=X/N2 THEN ? ttN6; BD1$ (Nl, N13) 
:GOTO 2740 
2730 ? nN6;BD2$ 
2740 NEXT X : POSITION N3,N13:? ttN6;"l— «■ 

' ' ■ POKE N87,N0 

2750 FOR X=NJ. TO N6:P0SITI0N N20,X+N7: 

? M2$(X»40-39,X»4O); :NEXT X 

2760 POSITION 37, N9:? "BRIDGE"; : POSITI 

OH 37,N10:? "CRUISE"; :POSITION 37, Nil! 

? "PHftSER"; 

2770 POSITION 37,N12:? "PHOTON"; : POSIT 

ION 30,N14:? "SELECT YOUR COMMAND"; 

2780 POKE N87,N0:POKE N89, ST5 : POSITION 

N7,N0:? "STATUS" 

2790 POSITION N22,N1:? "■ 



2800 POS ITION N22,N2!? 

m II r======~ 

2810 P OS ITION N22, N3 : 

■■■I llHifia 

2820 POS ITION N22,N4; 

SB II IHlHiiBHHI 

2830 P OS ITION N22, N5 : 

■■11 imsssam 

2840 POS ITION N22,N6: 

m II IBHHiBIHl 

2850 P OS ITION H22, H7 : 

■■■I \m3ns3km 

2860 POS ITION H22,N 8: 

SB II IHHBiaBH 

2870 P OS ITION N22, N9 : 
■IHI IIJil'lkHa 
2880 POSI TION N22,N10 ;? 

EBB II 



insEQ 



NCHERS: 




UA 
XC 



Zft 
W 



rt 
nn 



2890 PO SITION N22,Nll:? "| 

"":POSITION N22,N12:? 

II' , 

2900 PO SITION N22,N13:? "t^SSZS^I^ 

2910 FOR X=Ni TO N6:P0SITI0N N20,X+N15 

:? M2$(X«40-39,X»40J ; :HEXT X 

2920 POKE N88,N20:POSITIOH N17,N18:? " 

BRIDGE":P0SITI0N N17,N19:? "REPAIR" 

2930 POSITION N10,N22:? "SELECT YOUR C 

OMMAND"; :OCH=ASC(BRD$(SEC+Nl,SEC-i-Nll) : 

GOTO 520 

2940 REM IBHBH* DLI ROUTINE ***** 

2950 DATA 72,138,72,152,72,174,44,6,18 

9,40,6,232,188,40,6,141,10,212,141,23, 

208,140,24,268,232 

2960 DATA 224,4,208,2,162,0,142,44,6,1 

04,168,104,170,104.64,10,4,0,88,0 

2970 REM *******CL5 OAld********** 

2980 DATA 104,104,104,133,205,165,88,1 

33,203,165,89,133,204,162,0,169,0,168, 

145,203,200,208,251,232,228,205 

2990 DATA 240,11,24,165,204,105,1,133, 

204,240,234,208,232,96 

3000 REM ******PQ$ DATA KMKMMK 

3010 DATA 255,129.129,129,129,255 

3020 REM KXMKKK PSS DATA KKKKKX 

3030 DATA 0,0,24,24,0,0 



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SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 47 



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ANALOG COMPUTING 




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ST GRAPHICS & SOUND 

Detailed guide to graphics 
and sound on the ST. 2D & 
3D function plotters. Moir6 
patterns, graphic memory 
and various resolutions, 
fractals, recursion, waveform 
generation. Examples written 
in C. LOGO, BASIC and 
Modiia2. 250pp $19.95 



ST LOGO GUIDE 
Take control of your ST by 
learning ST LOGO— the easy 
to use, powerful language. 
Topics include: file handling, 
recursion- Hi Ibert & Sierpinski 
curves, 2D and 3D function 
plots, data structure, error 
handling. Helpful guide for 
ST LOGO users. $19.95 



ST PEEKS & POKES 
Enhance your programs with 
the examples found within 
this book. Explores using 
different languages BASIC. 
C, LOGO and machine 
language, using various 
interfaces, menwry usage, 
reading and saving from and 
to disk, more. 2&0pp $16.95 



BASIC Training Guide 

Thorough guide tor learning 
ST BASIC programming. 
Detailed programming funda- 
mentals, commands desaip- 
tiona, ST graphics & sound, 
using GEM in BASIC, tile 
management, disk operation. 
Tutorial problems give hands 
on experience. 300pp $16.95 



BASIC to C 

Move up from BASIC to C. If 
you're already a BASIC 
programmer, you can learn C 
all that much faster. Parallel 
examples demostrate the 
programming techniques and 
constructs in both languages. 
Variables, pointers, arrays, 
data stmcture. 250pp $19.95 



3D GRAPHICS 

FANTASTiCI Rotate, zoom. 
and shade 3D objects. All 
programs written in machine 
language for high speed. 
Learn the mathematics 
behind 3D graphics. Hidden 
line removal, shading. With 
3D pattern maker and 
aramator. $24.95 



The ATARI logo and ATARI ST are frademarks of Atari Corp. 



Abacus 



pfffimii 



II 



Software 



P.O. Box 7219 Dept. N9 Grand Rapids, Ml 49510 - Telex 709-101 - Phone (616) 241-5510 

Optional diskettes are available for all book titles at $14.95 

Call now for the name of your nearest dealer. Or order directly from ABACUS with your MasterCard, VISA, or Amex card. Add 
$4.00 per order for postage and handling. Foreign add $10.00 per book. Other software and books coming soon. Call or 
write for your free catalog. Dealer inquiries welcome-over 1400 dealers nationwide. 



CIRCLE #117 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Mk 



TNEArAmsr 

MAOAZiAfE 



JMG 



ISSUE 6 
SEPTEMBER 1986 



FEJiWffeS 



V/ 

Getting around 

GEM'S desktop . .Philip S. Gallo, Jr., Ph.D. 52ST 

One man's views of GEM and how to make living with 
it simpler— a user's guide to the system. 

BONUS— EXTRA LISTING FOR DISK SUBSCRIBERS INCLUDED 

Dx Lister Douglas Weir 57ST 

A directory utility capable of listing the entire contents 
of a disk to your screen or printer Included for disk sub- 
scribers is a ready-made program for labels. 

FormatH- Brian Duggan 67ST 

Experience far faster access to your floppy disk, after 
reformatting with this utility. 

The CES Scene Arthur Leyenberger 73ST 

The new, the exciting, the technically astounding . . .Tlie 
ST line stole the show in the computer division— aga/a' 

ST Index to advertisers 81ST 



ff£mivs 



LogiKhron 

Clock Card Matthew J.W. Ratcliff 

(Soft Logik Corp.) 

This cartridge plugs into your ST and provides you with 

the convenience of time- and date-stamping, anytime. 



y/ 



55ST 



Typesetter ST Matthew J.W. Ratcliff 71ST 

(XLent Software) 

A popular program on the Atari 8-bits is ported over to 

the ST giving you text and graphic editing capabilities. 




ST-Log is normally printed as a center section in ANALOG CiRiipiitiiig (ISSN 0744-9917), published monthly for $28 ($36 in Canada, $39 
foreign) per year by ANALOG 400/800 Corp., 565 Main St., Cherry \&lley, MA 01611. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced 
in any form without written permission of the publisher. Contents copyright © 1986 ANALOG 400/800 Corp. 



Getting 

around 
gem's desktop 

Some tips for the beginning ST user 



by Philip S. Gallo, Jr., Ph.D. 

Some six weeks ago, my ST arrived. The 
next day, I found a brand new IBM clone 
in my office, compliments of the universi- 
ty at which I work. 

As a dedicated 8-bit Atari user, I had no 
prior experience with either machine. To- 
day, the ST seems like an old friend, 
whereas the clone remains a mysterious 
and cantankerous adversary. It rarely, if 
ever, does what I want, in the way I want 
it done. 

The challenge of trying to learn two new 
machines at once has certainly convinced 
me that the ST is a marvelously friendly, 
easy computer to use. 

Nevertheless, a lot of ST users seem to 
be doing things the hard way, possibly be- 
cause of the lack of information in the 
somewhat skimpy owner's manucd. It's also 
probably this deficiency which has led 
reviewers to mistakenly complain about the 
difficulty of certain "housekeeping" oper- 
ations (e.g., the transfer of files into and 
out of folders). 

Before we get into that subject, let's be- 
gin with the basics. I'll assume you've read 
the owner's manual and are familiar with 
elementary operations, such as resizing 
windows, selecting options by "clicking" 
on them with the mouse, opening disk 
drives and "dragging" things with the 
mouse. 

On the color system, a newly formatted 
disk will boot into the machine in the low- 
resolution mode, with all windows closed. 
Since most of your work will be in medi- 
um resolution, this isn't usually desirable. 

I Uke to keep all my disks in a similar 
format, so I've prepared a master disk to 



use as a template for all my newly format- 
ted disks. 

In creating the master disk, I used the 
"set preferences" option of the desktop to 
call up medium resolution. With the 
mouse, I dragged the trash can to the lower 
right corner of the screen and the two flop- 
py disk icons to the lower left corner. I 
opened a window to drive A and sized the 
window so it has about a quarter-inch mar- 
gin at the top and sides, while extending 
downward to about one-half inch from the 
top of the disk icons. 

By doing this, I can view two complete 
rows of eight file icons each. The next step 
was to call the "save desktop" option and 
save this configuration to disk. 

Now, when I format new disks, I boot up 
with this master. After each disk has been 
formatted, I save this desktop on it. All my 
disks look alike and all boot up with the 
window to drive A open showing the first 
eight file icons. 

I can scroll up and down to see more 
icons, and they'll always be displayed in 
two neat rows. I'm sure all of you know by 
now that, if you place a new disk in drive 
A and press the ESC key, the new disk's 
icons will be displayed in whatever desk- 
top configuration's showing. If you didn't 
know it. . .well, you do now. 

Since each disk holds a considerable 
amount of information, it's possible to have 
literally dozens of programs on a single 
disk. Scrolling through them to find the 
one you want becomes a chore. GEM has 
conveniently provided us with subdirec- 
tories, called "folders." 

To create a folder, you merely go to the 
file menu and click on the "create new 
folder" option. If you had six different 
games on the disk, as well as a number of 



other programs, you might want to create 
a folder and name it GAMES. 

You can, of course, drag each file to the 
folder, copying the files in one at a time. 
But it's much simpler to drag all of them 
at once and copy them. The easiest way 
to do this is to hold the SHIFT key down 
and use the mouse to click each file you 
want transferred. 

Each file will turn black when clicked. 
Release the SHIFT key and click on any 
of the files you've selected. When you start 
to drag that file to the folder, all the select- 
ed files will come along. Thus, the whole 
set can be copied into the folder at one 
pass. 

Once they're safely copied into the fold- 
er, use the same SHIFT-click procedure to 
drag them to the trash can and delete them 
from the desktop in one fell swoop. 

Moving right along . . . 

The real problem, presumably, crops up 
when you want to copy a file from a fold- 
er to the desktop, or into another folder. In 
the January issue of Byte magazine, Jon Ed- 
wards and Phillip Robinson wrote ". . .to 
move a file out of a folder, matters are fur- 
ther complicated by the fact that the fold- 
er opens to take over the window from 
which it derived. You would first have to 
move the file to a different disk, delete the 
original file from the folder, then copy the 
file back to the original disk, but not within 
the folder, and then delete the first copy 
you made. It sounds difficult because It is." 
Wrong, gentlemen! 

GEM has a feature that allows four win- 
dows to be open simultaneously. When you 
opened up your folder, you used only two 
windows. Your next move: click on drive 
A to open it again. A third window will 



PAGE 52ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 



TUTORIAL 



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appear on-screen, identical to the first win- 
dow opened, namely, the original desktop 
of drive A. 

You may have to move this third win- 
dow down toward the bottom of the screen 
a bit, so it won't obscure the contents of 
your folder. Now, simply click the item you 
want to move from the folder to the desk- 
top, then drag it down to the window just 
opened. When you copy it, the item will 
be on the desktop. 

If you want it out of the folder perma- 
nently, you'll have to click it again in the 
folder and drag it to the trash can. Maybe 
this isn't as elegant as the Macintosh's 
procedure, but it's a lot better than copy- 
ing it to a completely different disk and 
back again! 

Remember, you still have only three 
windows open. If you want to move a file 
from your GAME folder into the PUZZLE 
folder, locate the PUZZLE folder in win- 
dow three and click it open. Now your 
fourth window's open, and your screen 
shows the contents of the GAME and PUZ- 
ZLE folders. 

From here, it's no great trick to copy a 
file out of one folder into another. When 
you're through, cUck the fourth, third and 
second windows closed — and you're back 
to the original desktop. 

Of course, these tricks will only work if 
you have enough empty disk space to tem- 
porarily hold both copies of the file (or 
files) you wish to transfer. If you don't, the 
use of a RAMDISK will solve the problem. 
Read on. 

How do you spell "relief"? 

The only really tedious GEM operations 
occur when you've only one disk drive and 
wish to copy whole disks or individual files 
to a second disk. GEM does require an in- 






D:\UTILITY\ 




254873 bytes used in 24 itens, 



CLI .nCC SNAPSHOT . fICC STIME. flCC CP.DOC 



SNAPSHOT. OOC CP.PRG EfiSVPflV.PRG EPSON. PRG 



VOLUME. PRG yOLUME.RSC COMMAND. TOS DATETIME.TOS 



ordinate nimiber of disk swaps for these 
operations. 

The first fix is to get the TOS ROM chips 
installed. Not only do ROM chips yield an 
additional 200K of program space, they 
provide enough free RAM to read an en- 
tire disk's contents at once. For $25.00 to 
$35.00 installed, they have to be the big- 
gest bargain in tovro. 

The second fix is to obtain two special, 
invaluable programs for your library. The 
first is a copy program; the second is a 
RAMdisk. Such programs are inexpensive, 
and are now being published by severed 
companies. If you have a modem, public 
domain versions can often be found on ST 
BBSs. 

All the copy programs have two things 
in common. . .They copy faster than 
GEM'S built-in routines and require only 
one disk swap. These programs read the 
disk in one pass, prompt you to insert the 
destination disk and write to it in one pass. 

By contrast, even with ROM chips, GEM 
makes you swap disks three times. Copy- 
ing individual files to another disk is really 
a headache. GEM makes you swap disks 
several times for each file to be copied. 

If you need to copy seven files from one 
disk to another, you'll get dizzy swapping 
disks — and quite confused. Here's where 
a RAMdisk can save the day. 

A RAMdisk sets aside a portion of mem- 
ory, then "tricks" the computer into think- 
ing this memory is another drive. When 
you "install" the RAMdisk, its drive icon 
will actually appear on the desktop. This 



icon can be opened to a window, just as 
a real disk drive icon would be. 

By defining the RAMdisk with enough 
space for all the files to be transferred, you 
can SHIFT-click the files and copy them 
all at once to the RAMdisk. 

Put the destination disk into your drive, 
press ESC to get a directory of your new 
disk, then SHIFT-cUck the files again, 
copying them from the RAMdisk to the 
destination disk. Since the RAMdisk oper- 
ates virtually instantaneously, the whole 
process hardly takes more time than it 
would with two drives. 

If you're trying the trick mentioned ear- 
lier for copying a file out of a folder and 
don't have disk space for two copies of it, 
open the RAMdisk instead of opening 
drive A again. Copy the file to the RAM- 
disk and delete it from the folder. Then 
close the folder and copy the file from the 
RAMdisk to the desktop, or into another 
folder. 

Use your GEM in good liealth. 

I hope these tips will prove helpful to 
you. "They'll certainly reduce the time 
you'll need to devote to disk housekeep- 
ing chores — and give you more time to ex- 
plore what has to be one of the most en- 
joyable computers ever designed. 

One final word. If you're about to buy 
a new printer for your ST, try to avoid any 
printer advertising itself as "IBM compat- 
ible." The ST wants its printer to be Ep- 
son compatible. . .which isn't the same 
thing at all. An IBM-compatible printer 
will probably produce text with no prob- 



ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 53ST 



/ 



Getting around 

gem's desktop continued 



lem. However, depending upon the brand, 
it could give you minor {or major) difficul- 
ties with graphics. 

The most common problems are random 
garbage or misalignments in your graph- 
ics dumps, and/or white spaces between 
each line of graphics. Sometimes the built- 
in screen dump activated by the ALTER- 
NATE-HELP keys or the "print screen" op- 
tion will print all right. But trouble will 
occur with the print functions in programs 
like DEGAS and Typesetter ST. 

Be sure to ask the salesman whether the 
printer you're considering is Epson or IBM 
compatible. Even many ST dealers aren't 
fully aware of this problem. 

If you do purchase an IBM-compatible 
printer, be sure to buy it with a return priv- 
ilege, fl 

Philip S. Gallo, Jr. , a pro/essor of psy- 
chology, is researching the effectiveness of 
computers in training and educating autis- 
tic children. He's dedicated to extolling 
Atari's virtues in an environment commit- 
ted to the notion that "computer" is spelled 
IBM. 



WHAT IS 

ST-CHECK? 



Most program listings in ST-Log are followed by a table of numbers ap- 
pearing as DATA statements, called "ST CHECKSUM DATA." These num- 
bers are to be used in conjunction with ST-Check (which appeared in 
ANALOG Computing/ST-Log issue 41). 

ST-Check (written by Clayton Walnum) is designed to find and correct 
typing errors when readers are entering programs from the magazine. For 
those readers who would like copies of the article, you may send for back 
issue 41 ($4.00). 

ANALOG Computing/ST-Log 

P.O. Box 625, Holmes, PA 19045 



WORD FOR WORD 

A crossword game for the ATARI 



7 ST/^H 











" 




S K 1 


L 


L 







1 
T 

E 






_. 


hI7 




Z 






f" 









It's a challenging new game in 
which the players take turns 
creating words on a playing 
board. Here's what reviewers 
have to say: 



"...the whole game design is extremely user- 
friendly. . .a winner." analog computing, June 1986 

". . .It's easy to use the mouse to design and save 
your own board layout. . .makes the game even 
more fun." antic, Apriii 986 

". . ./ am very impressed with Word for Word. . .full 
utilization of GEM. . .solid performance. . .a joy to 
play. . .attention to detail. . .excellent product." 

ST APPLICATIONS, Jan -Feb. 1986 



To Order 

Contact your Atari ST dealer, or 
send $39,95 plus $3.50 for 
shipping and handling. ($43.45) 
California residents add $2.40 
sales lax. ($45 85) 

MasterCard or Visa accepted 



Bay View Software 

177 Webster St., Suite A-295 

Monterey, CA 93940 

(408) 373-4011 



Works with color (meijium resolution) or monochrome monitor. 




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CIRCLE »118 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



CIRCLE «119 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 54ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 



REVIEW 



v/ 



k 



LogiKhron Clock Card 





SOFT LOGIK CORP. 
4129 Old Baumgartner 
St. Louis, MO 63129 
(314) 894-8608 
Card with software $49.95 

by Matthew J.W. Ratcliff 

I really like time- and date-stamping on 
my disk files — when I remember to set the 
time, that is. If the time isn't correct, those 
stamps are of no use to anyone. 

With it set properly, the stamps provide 
a valuable reference. They're helpful in 
keeping track of the last time files were up- 
dated. This is especially true for hard 
disks, where you can afford the space for 
many archive copies of a program under 
development. 

The problem with maintaining a record 
on the ST is that you must boot up a disk 
with DESKl.ACC on it, pull down the 
desktop, and click on the control panel. 
Then you have to click on the time Une and 
type the correct time. Ditto for the date 
line. This is a major drag — and usually 
doesn't get done. Thank goodness for the 
LogiKhron Clock Card! 

The LogiKhron plugs into the ST's car- 
tridge port, extending the width of the 
computer's "footprint" another 2 'A inches. 

The package comes with a disk contain- 
ing two files, DESK5.ACC and CLOCK. 
RSC. If your TOS allows it, I suggest 
renaming the DESK5.ACC to CLOCK.ACC. 
(Some older versions of TOS looked for 
DESKx.ACC, where x was a digit from 1 
to 6.) This will help you associate the files, 
when copying your timing accessories to 
other disks. There's no copy protection on 
the disk. 

With these files on your boot disk (with 



TOS in ROM or RAM), your system clock 
is set automatically. You can pull down the 
desktop and select the CLOCK. The cur- 
rent time and date will be displayed. If you 
wish to set either, the process is the same 
as when using the control panel. 

Sometimes the control panel clock won't 
be automatically updated when the Logi- 
Khron is loaded. There's a time lag, which 
may range from 1 to 59 seconds. This is 
documented in the manual and is not a 
problem. The correct time is always writ- 
ten to disk, even if the control panel 
doesn't show it yet. The LogiKhron acces- 
sory displays the proper time. 

The brief manual adequately describes 
setup and use of the LogiKhron card . Files 
for it will only cost you about 5K of disk 
space. (And you ROM/TOS owners will 
want these files on just about every disk.) 

When loaded, the accessory actually 
takes about llK of RAM. The additional 
RAM is due to operating system overhead , 
for installing an accessory. It's true for ail 
accessories. You can probably do without 
DESKl.ACC on most of your disks, how- 
ever, saving 19K of RAM. 

The DESKl.ACC contains the control 
panel and install printer functions. Once 
these are set to your specific needs, you 
can just save your desktop (only about 500 
bytes) to your disks and forget about that 
accessory. And, with LogiKhron, you can 
forget about the time — it's already taken 
care of. 

I have only two minor complaints about 
the LogiKhron. The cartridge has battery 



backup which will last from three to six 
years. The problem is that it can't be re- 
placed. The "cartridge" is actually a cir- 
cuit board, sealed in plastic resin. When 
the battery wears out, the LogiKhron must 
be replaced. 

Product manager Shawn Fogle of Soft 
Logik informs me that the cartridge will 
be replaced free of charge, if the battery 
fails within six months after purchase. Any 
time after that, it may be replaced for a 
reasonable $15.00. 

My second complaint about the clock 
card is that it doesn't have a "piggyback" 
slot for other cartridges. When other car- 
tridges become available for the ST, the 
LogiKhron must be removed to use them 
— you lose your automatic time setting. 

Both of these limitations are minor. . . 
and understandable. This product is being 
delivered at a very affordable $49.95. The 
only reason this cartridge doesn't have a 
removable case for battery replacement is 
because none are available. 

Once ST ROM cartridge cases are avail- 
able, the LogiKhron may well be modified 
to make battery replacement quite simple. 
With a battery life of three to six years, you 
won't have to worry about it for a while, 
anyway. 

The LogiKhron has performed flawless- 
ly for me. Being the lazy sort of program- 
mer, who hates typing any more than 
necessary, I found the LogiKhron an ab- 
solute must. I highly recommend it. H 



ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 55ST 



Now available: Prospero's professional 
language compilers for the Atari ST 



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PRO FORTRAN-77 

FOR ATARI ST 

-$149 



USE THE LANGUAGES THE 
PROFESSIONALS USE: PASCAL 
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C is high on performance but low 
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ISO-PASCAL 

Pro Pascal is validated to ANSI 
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Good Housekeeping 

All files closed on exit from 
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16 digit accuracy 

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Compilers include: 

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Interlinkable code means you can 
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It's easy to order! 

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CIRCLE #120 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



All resolutions 



UTILITY 



y/ 



Dx 



This utility will 

quickly list a disk's 

entire contents to 

your screen or printer 




by Douglas Weir 



According to a possibly apocryphal story, Digital Re- 
secirch originally intended to include routines in GEM and 
TOS that would get directory listings from the disk drives 
and send them to a printer. Specifications were scribbled 
out during a project meeting and a programmer hastily 
assigned. Unfortunately, he misread the name of a data 
structure called "drive block" as "livestock" and wrote a 
cattle-sorting program instead (watch for "HerdStar," soon 
to appear on local software shelves). 

This is a two-in-one feature: "Dx.ttp" is a ready-to-run 
program included on this issue's ST disk version, briefly 
described below. The bulk of this article, however, gives 
a listing and explanation of a set of routines from Dx which 
you can use in your own assembly language programs. You 
don't need the subscription disk to use this article. 

Dx lists the entire contents of a disk either to the screen 
or to a printer. Unless told to do otherwise, it will recur- 
sively search the entire disk and give the contents of all 
subdirectories. If you have a Star SG-10 or Gkidata 192 
printer, you can tell Dx to print its output in a special 
reduced format, suitable for disk labels. (The normal-size 
print option will work on any printer.) 

The full pathname of a subdirectory is printed before 
its contents, in order to make clear just "where" the sub- 
directory is. If the disk has a volume name, this will be 
printed at the top of the listing. You can also define a title 
string to be printed before everything else, if you wish. 
Details of these and a few other options will be found 
below. 

The program will handle about 400 separate pathnames 
(subdirectory names) and a total of about 3000 filenames. 
It does not check for conformance to these limits. 

Now for a discussion of the set of subroutines listed be- 
low. I use these routines to interpret single characters typed 



after the program name, before RETURN. With a ".TTP" 
application, you would type these characters in the dia- 
log box GEM presents, after double-clicking on the pro- 
gram icon. The routines look for occurrences of any of a 
set of programmer- defined characters, and if a valid char- 
acter is foimd, a corresponding flag is set to "true." Other- 
wise, it remains "false." 

The nice thing about these routines is that, in order to 
add, delete or change flags and codes, all you have to do 
is change the data declarations. Everything else is auto- 
matic; you never have to alter the routines themselves. 

The characters (separated by spaces) can be typed in 
any order and may be upper- or lowercase. The number 
of characters is limited by the value of ARG SIZE (argu- 
ment size), which is the number of bytes reserved by 

check c args for parse word to copy the next word 

into. For our purposes, these words will always be one 

character long, but you can use parse word to return any 

size string of blank-terminated characters. Of course, you 
can change the value of ARG SIZE, if you wish. (Warn- 
ing: changing anything may result in an increase in argh 
size, a mysterious debugging constant.) 

An explanation of how these routines work ought to 
serve as a nice introduction to 68000 assembly language 
programming. But where should I start? Beginners will 
find the 68000 easier than most other chips, simply be- 
cause the 68000 does so much more. Still, brief comments 
are almost doomed to appeal only to those with some pre- 
vious assembly language experience. For this I apologize. 

With this disclaimer in mind, let's take a look at the rou- 
tines. The first section should be the very first in your pro- 
gram. When an ST program begins execution, the stack 
pointer is pointing to the return address used at the end 
of the program to retiorn to the caller (i.e., the operating 
system). This address is a longwrord. 

Next on the stack is another long word, the "base page" 



ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 57ST 



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UX JUlStCr continued 



address of the executing program. This marks the begin- 
ning of a memory eirea with useful facts about the pro- 
gram. We're interested only in what was on the program's 
command line when it was typed in. A location 128 bytes 
from the start of the base page contains the address of the 
command line. 

So the program does the following in its first four lines: 

(1) Gets the base page address from the stack and 
puts it into register a5. 

(2) Computes the address of the command line 
pointer by adding 128 (hexadecimal 80) to the base 
page address, and puts the result into a2 (Jea — "load 
effective address" — calculates an address and puts it 
into the designated register; pea — "push effective 
address" — also calculates an address, but pushes the 
result onto the stack). 

(3) The contents of a2 now point to a byte holding 
the number of characters on the command line; this 
is followed by the actual characters. So the character 
count is put into dO, and after the post-increment, a2 
points to the start of the command line. 

I should mention that the string of characters made avail- 
able to the program as the command line includes all char- 
acters typed after the program name, terminated by a nuJJ 
(binary zero). 



If running as a .PRG appUcation from TOS, the program 
will find a blank at the start of the string (this is the space 
separating the program name from the rest of the line). 
But the command line received by a .TTP appUcation won't 
have that first blank. Usually this makes no difference at 
all, but it's worth pointing out. 

The next four lines put a couple of parameters on the 

stack, call init flags and clean up the stack afterwards; 

then check c args is called in the same way, only with 

five parameters on the stack. After this call, the flags in 
your data area are set to true or false, depending on which 
characters were typed on the command line, and you can 
continue with the rest of your program. 

As for the subroutines, I'll discuss only a couple of in- 
teresting points. The header information found at the be- 
ginning of each gives a synopsis of the function. 

I chose to pass parameters to these subroutines via the 
stack. This is slower than simply using registers, but it's 
much easier to maintain register integrity within subrou- 
tines this way. Let's take a closer look at how it's done. 

To pass two values to init flags, I push the veJues onto 

the stack and branch to the subroutine. At the beginning 
of the subroutine, a link instruction is executed, specify- 
ing an address register and an immediate value. This is 
what happens: 



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ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 59ST 



/ 



Dx Lister 



continued 



(1) The contents of the designated register (here, a6) 
are saved on the stack. Naturally, this is always a 32-bit 
value. 

(2) The new value of the stack pointer is loaded into 
the designated register. 

(3) The specified immediate value is added to the 
stack pointer. 

The net result of all this activity is that the address reg- 
ister you specify in the instruction now points to a con- 
stant location in the stack. 

When a subroutine begins, the stack pointer is point- 
ing to a 32-bit (i.e. , 4-byte) return address. Above this ad- 
dress is whatever data was pushed on the stack before the 
routine was called. After the link, the specified register 
points to its old value; 4 bytes up from that is the return 
address; and 4 bytes from the return address is the data. 

So by adding 8 to the value of a6 in init flags, you get 

the address of the last data put on the stack before calling 
the routine. By adding 12, you get the address of the next- 
to-last data, etc. Suppose code nr was word-size (2 bytes) 

instead of a longword; then you would only add 10 to a6 
to get the stack address of "flags." 

What about the immediate value that's added to the stack 
pointer by link? Remember that the 68000 stack grows 
downward in memory. If you add a value to the stack point- 
er, you effectively remove space from the stack. If you sub- 
tract a value, you reserve space. For example, whenever 
parameters have been passed on the stack to a subroutine, 
a value equal to the combined size of all the parameters 
should be added to the stack pointer after the subroutine 
completes. In this way, the stack pointer is restored to its 
original value before the parameters were pushed. 

Look at the beginning of check c args. Here the nega- 
tive immediate value ARG SIZE is added to the stack 

pointer. A section of the stack ARG SIZE-bytes large is 

now reserved. But how do you access it, and what do you 
use it for? 

This is where the register specified in link becomes dou- 
bly useful. Just as you add values to a6 to access data 
higher up in the stack, you can subtract values from a6 
to access memory lower down. By subtracting the same 
immediate value specified in link, you get the base address 
of the stack memory area which you reserved. This mem- 
ory can now be used for whatever purpose you want. 

The beauty of this system is that the area thus reserved 
is completely private to the subroutine which uses it. 
While the routine is active, the variables in this area are 
active; when the routine completes and unik is executed, 
all this space is de-allocated from the stack, and the vari- 
ables go away. 

An area allocated on the stack in this way is called a 
stack frame, and the register used to access it is called 
the frame pointer. Languages like C and Pascal implement 
local variables with stack frames. 

Thus, link has a double function. Sometimes it's used 
only to set up a frame pointer, to retrieve parameters 
pushed on the stack before the subroutine was called (in 
this case, an immediate value of is added to the stack 
pointer, as in init flags). 



Sometimes it's used to allocate space for VEU-iables lo- 
cal to a subroutine. Or it can be used to do both at once. 
Whenever link is used, unIk must be used at the end of the 
subroutine, to restore the stack situation before you at- 
tempt to return: Link a6, #-local_size set up frame pointer 
movem.l d0-d3,-(sp) save registers 
. . .(code). . . 

movem.l (sp)+,d0-d3 restore registers 

unik a6 restore stack 

rts and return . . . 

The space between the parentheses was originally oc- 
cupied by my new Koala Pad-driven version of the ST oper- 
ating system, K-OS. 

You can use any register (except a7, of course) as the 
frame pointer; by convention, it's usually a6. 

Finally, I'd like to discuss the bit of code in check 

c args between the labels c c scan and c c s001 . 

Here the 68000 "decrement and branch" instruction is 
used to loop through all the valid character codes and com- 
pare each one with the character returned by parse word, 

imtil a match is found or the valid codes are exhausted. 

Most of this work is done by the two instructions: 

cmp.b (a1),d4 code found? 

c c stest: dbeq d2,c c sloop if not and more codes. . . 

Here, the byte pointed to by al is compared to the byte 
in d4. The dbeq instruction takes care of everything else: 
either the zero flag is set (i.e. , the b3rtes are equal), so that 

the branch back to c c sloop is not executed and the 

loop ends. Else if the bytes are not equal, then register d2 
is decremented: if d2 contains a non-negative value (in- 
cluding 0), then the branch to "c c sloop" is executed 

and the loop continues; otherwise, the loop ends. 

In other words, dbeq means: imless the equal condi- 
tion is met (i.e., the zero flag = 1, meaning that a com- 
parison has been successful), decrement the indicated 
register and branch if the result is not -1. 

There are two ways to get around this: either load the 
loop counter with a value one less than the intended count 
value, or label the dbra instruction and jump to it on the 
first iteration, thereby decrementing the counter once, be- 
fore doing anything. 

I use the latter method, but it has a pitfall. You must 
make sure, when you first jump to dbeq, dbmi, or what- 
ever, that the 68000's status bits are not by coincidence 
set in such a way that the terminating condition is already 
true — and the loop never executes at all. 

This can be a very hard bug to track down. If you make 
sure the last thing you do before the jump is load the count 
register, you won't have to worry. Move sets the status bits 
according to the value moved, and if the count is to start 
with, the loop won't execute — which is what you want. 
But one can't always Eirrange things this way. 

Remember, too, that move's to address registers have no 
effect on the status bits. Of course, with the dbra form, 
you don't have to worry about the status bits. 

Note that, at the end of the check c args section, I 

test the count register to see if it was counted down to -1. 
If so, no valid match was found. The important thing to 
remember is that you must check the register as a word 
(16 bits), not as a longword. The dbra family decrements 



PAGE 60ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 



the count register as a word value and leaves the upper 
16 bits untouched. So, if I virere to test d2 as a longword, 
I virould never detect an error condition. This also means, 
of course, you can't have a count value greater than 32767 
when using the "decrement and branch" instructions. 

A government official was recently quoted as saying that 
"friends come and go, but enemies linger on." The same 
could be said of assembly language. Despite the experts' 
predictions, it's still there, lurking underneath C, BASIC 
and Pascal, like the old plumbing in a remodelled house. 
I hope these routines prove useful tools for those who want 
to learn to work at this level. 

How to use the program. 

Options. 

Options can be in upper- or lowercase. They must be 
separated by spaces. They can be in any order, as long as 
those requiring strings are immediately followed (with a 
space separator) by the string. 

— okidata printer (with r). 

t — star/gemini printer (with r). 

V — verbose mode (print file size, type, creation 

date, etc.). 
p — print listing, normal size. 
r — print listing, label size (with o or t). 
a — specifies drive a:, 
b — specifies drive b:. 
c — specifies drive c:. 
d-k — specifies drives d:-k:. 
n — include a title string in 
s — set stack size (+ string) I 

is approximately 200K; minimum is IK.) 

1 ("ell") — set search level pathname (+ string). 
> — redirect output to a disk file (followed with 

no intervening spaces by filename. The file- 
name is not terminated by a quote.) 

Note: all strings are terminated by a single quote ('). 
Here are some examples, to help clarify the usage: 
dx a p. . .print a short-form listing of the director- 
ies and their contents on disk a. 

dx V c s 4000' p. . .print a long-form listing of the 
directories and their contents on disk c (hard disk), 
and set the stack size to 4K. 

dx n disk contents' b v t s 3000' r. . . print a long- 
form Usting in reduced size of the directories and their 
contents on disk b, with a title "disk contents" at the 
top of the listing, and set the stack size to 3K; SG-10 
printer is specified. 

dx I \stuff\nonsense' v c. . .display the contents of 
the directory \stuff\nonsense on disk c, long form, on 
the screen only. 

dx a V >b:blip.dir b. . .output the directories and 
their contents from disk a (long form) to a file on disk 
b named blip.dir. 

The sUght inconsistency in the syntax for output redirec- 
tion occurred because this was not a feature of the pro- 
gram as written, but rather of the operating system. I 
discovered it by accident(!) as I was testing the program, 
and am simply passing it on. 



listing (+ string), 
(maximum stack size 



r 

DISK CONTENTS 


3 JUUV 


19661 






ODAPEBUQ. COX 


ee 


04 


as 


10/16/69 


3S034 


noxBnsic.TRN 


oe 


18 


04 


03/S9/63 


3S034 


nonpossb. pro 


00 


0A 


44 


10/16/63 


3896 


ooneaeee. run 


00 


01 


13 


10/16/69 


3S034 


RDAPnes*. PRO 


00 


00 


36 


10/16/63 


32034 


TINV10S. IMG 


00 


00 


46 


10/18/63 


64 


aDRPnssa. pro 


00 


01 


03 


10/18/63 


3S034 


ODBPnSSl.PHQ 


00 


01 


S4 


10/16/65 


3S034 


nOAPOSSS. PRQ 


00 


18 


S4 


03/S9/89 


3Se34 


aDnp«ss3. PRO 


00 


17 


33 


03/89/69 


3S034 


nDnDcx:s 


16 


81110 


03/S9/B3 





ADAIO 


16 


SI 


16 


03/29/63 





\OOOOOC9\ 












REPOME 


00 


ei 


11 


0S/S9/6S 


6144 


TUTOR inu. DOC 


00 


SI 


11 


03/S9/a3 


11711 


IMP. PRO 


00 


SI 


11 


03/S9/a3 


13687 


LIB. PRO 


00 


SI 


IS 


0S/S9/63 


17369 


\nonio\ 












KCYBOPRD. INC 


00 


SI 


16 


03/S9/e3 


333 


SCREEN. INC 


00 


SI 


la 


03/S9/e3 


6144 


BEMl. INC 


00 


SI 


16 


0S/S9/6S 


1932 


OEMS. INC 


00 


SI 


16 


03/S9/a3 


36S7 



I included a large number of drive designators because 
of the possibility that users might have hard drives parti- 
tioned into several logical drives. The original selection 
(which can be seen in the sample data section above) 
would not have allowed access to drives beyond c. H 

(Listing starts on next page) 



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ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 61ST 



// 



Dx Lister 



continued 



Listing 1. — Assembly listing. 



Note: in the coHnents to the following code, the synbol 
Means "pointer to" or "contains a pointer to". 



m 



*** This version is conpatible with the AS68 assenbler included in the 

»** atari Developer's Kit. 

*K# INITIALIZATION: these should be the first instructions in your 

*** progran. . . 

sys_start: 



Move. 1 
lea.l 
clr.l 
Move.b 



4(a7],a5 
$8e(a5),a2 
dO 
Ca2]+,d8 






a2 
dO 



-> coMMand line 

:= byte count of conMand line 
Move.l ttflags,-CspJ 

Move.l ttcode_nr,-(spl 

bsr init_flags 

addq.l tt8,sp 



*** process coMMand line codes 



Move. I 


«code_scale,-fspJ 


Move. 1 


«code_nr,-(spJ 


Move. 1 


»codes,-tsp) 


Move. 1 


d0,-tsp) 


Move. 1 


a2,-cspj 


bsr 


check_c_args 


add.l 


tt2e,sp 



as == base page address 
point to coMMand line 
clear for byte size value 
get byte count 



base of flags area 
nr of flags in table 
initialize flags 
pop args 



nuMber of codes possible 

table of codes 

byte count 

address of coMMand line 

set flags 

pop args 



*** ...the rest of your prograM follows here. 



XXXXKKKXXKKXXXKKKXKKKXKKKKXKXXXXXXXXKKXXXXKKXXXXXXXXXXKKXXXXXKXXXXXXXXXXX 

4HH( SUBROUTINES: these are called froM the Main prograM (above). 

xxxxx 

* 

* init_flags — initializes a standard table of (byte-sizel flags to 
» FALSE. 

« at entry: 

» a6 + 8 -> size of table. 

* a6 + 12 -> base of table. 

* at exit: 

)( table is initialized. 

* all registers preserved. 
* 

xxxxx 
init_flags: 

link 

MOVeM. 1 

Movea. 1 

Move. 1 

bra.s 
initf_loop: 

MOve.b 
initf_test: 

dbra 

MoveM. 1 

unik 

rts 



a6,tt0 

a0/dO,-Csp) 
12Ca6} ,aO 
8Ca6),dO 
initf_test 



set fraMe pointer 
save registers 
base of table 
size of table 
now start 



ttFALSE, CaO)->- initialize a flag 



dO, initf_loop 

(sp}+,ae/de 

a6 



go till end 
restore registers 
deallocate fraMe 
and return 



l-f ^J IJ' ■w ^# 

M A A K n 

* 

* parse_word — returns a word CdeliMited by a space or end of string) 
» froM a string. 

« the word Must be <= 76 chars (ARG_SIZE, == size of local 

* area reserved by caller). 
» at entry: 

» a6 + 8 -> address of string. 

» a6 + 12 -> byte count of string. 

« a6 + 16 -> area into which to copy word Cnull-terMinated) 

« at exit; 

« aO -> next word of original string. 



PAGE 62ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 




\/_ 



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// 



UX 1^1SX6I* continued 



* 

* 

parse_word: 



dO == updated byte count to if string exhausted} 
al -> word returned Cterwinated by OJ . 
dl == byte count of word, 
if error, dO == -1 t'BAD'). 
all other registers preserved. 



P— w_001 I 



link 
Movea. 1 
nove. 1 
bgt.s 
nove. 1 
bra 



novea. 1 
Moven. 1 
clr.l 
nove. 1 
parse_loop: 

cnp.b 
bne.s 
subq. 1 
addq.l 
bra 



^ac 



P_i_oei: 



P_l_082: 



P_l_eB3 : 

P_w_exiti 

w_f_fl8l: 

w_f_002: 



subq. 1 
bne.s 
addq. 1 
nove.b 
bra 

nove.b 
addq.l 
subq. 1 
bne.s 
subq. 1 
bra 

bra 

nove.b 

noven. 1 



unik 
rts 



a6,tte 
8Ca6) ,ao 
lZ(a61 ,de 
P_w_801 
nBAD,dO 
W_f_fl02 

16Ca6],al 
al/d2,-tsp) 
dl 
ttARG_SIZE-l,d2 

ttBLANK, (aei 

p_l_0fli 

ttl,de 

ttl,aO 

P_w_exit 

ttl,dO 

p_l_082 

»l,dl 

caei-t-, (aii + 
p_w_exit 

Cae]+, Cal}+ 

ttl,dl 

ttl,d2 

P_1_D03 

»l,de 

p_w_exit 

parse-loop 

»0, fal]+ 

fsp)+,al/d2 



a6 



set frane pointer 
get string address 
get byte count 
if count > e, continue 
else return error 
and leave 

point to copy space 

save it and count register 

clear word count 

start control count c-1 for null) 

blank? 

if not 

else decrenent string count 

point to next char 

and return word 

else decrenent string count 
continue if string not exhausted 
else count this last char... 
copy last valid char... 
and return final word 

copy char 

count this one 

decrenent control count 

if > e, continue 

else decrenent string count 

and leave 

keep going 

terninate word with null 

point back to start of return word 
and restore d2 

deallocate frane 
and return 



» check_c_args- 

* at entry: 

* 

* at exit: 

« 

KKKKK 

check_c_args: 
link 
nove 
nove 
bgt 
nove 
bra 



- checks one-letter connand-line argunents and sets 
internal flags as appropriate. 

a6 + 8 -> address of connand line string. 

a6 + 12 -> byte count of connand line string. 

a6 + 16 -> base address of array of char codes to 

look for. 
a6 + 20 -> nr of char codes in array. 
a6 -I- 24 -> code table scale factor. 

dO == conpletion code (returns GOOD if there's 

anything else on connand line — even only spaces) 
flags will be set TRUE or FALSE as appropriate, 
all other registers preserved. 



a6,«-ARG_SIZE 
n.l a0-a2/'dl-d4,-{sp) 
.1 12(a6),d0 
s c_c_a0Ol 
.1 »BAI>,d0 
s c_c_exit 



c_c_a001: 



novea. 1 8Ca6l,ao 



set frane pointer 
save registers 
connand line byte count 
if count > 0, continue 
else load error code 
and leave 

connand line address 



PAGE 64ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 





nove.l 


24Ca6),d3 




SUbq.l 


ttl,d3 




clr.1 


d4 


c_c_word! 








tst.l 


de 




bne.s 


c_c_woei 




Move.l 


ttGOOD,dO 




bra.s 


c_c_exit 


c_c_w001; 








pea 


-ARG_SIZECa6) 




Move.l 


d0,-tspj 




nove.l 


ae,-(sp) 




bsr 


parse_word 




add.l 


ttl2,sp 


*«* (al) 


-> code to 
da == b 


check; dl == 
vtes left 



c_c_scan; 



count; 
eft 
CMp.l ttl,dl 
beq.s c_c_scan 
bra.s c_c_word 

Move. I 20(a6)jd2 
novea.l 16Cae),a2 
bra.s c— c_stest 



scale factor 

-1 to allow for address reg inc 

holds byte for coHparisons 

anything left in coMHand line? 

if so, continue 

else load success code 

and leave 

local space address 

current cohinand line count 

rest of connand line 

get next word 

pop args 

CaO) -> rest of CMdline; 

one-char arg? 
if so, continue 
else skip this one 

nr of codes to check 
base of codes table 
start checking 



c_c_sloop 


• 








Move.b 


Ca2]'>',d4 


next byte 




CMp.b 


(al.),d4 


code found? 


c_c_stest 


; 








dbeq 


d2,c_c_sloop 


if not and More codes to check 




tst.w 


d2 


really a Match? 




bHi.s 


C_C_S001 


if not 




Move.b 


»TRUE,0Ca2,d3.1] 


else set flag = TRUE 


c_c_s001; 










bra.s 


c_c_word 


and get next word 


c_c_exit; 










MOVeM.l 


Csp)-i',ae-a2/'dl-d4 


restore registers 




unlk 


a6 


deallocate local space 




rts 




and return 



*** DATft DECLARATIONS; 

***** 

* 

* Standard flags table. 
* 



K. n n n K 

GOOD 


equ 


BAD 


equ 


ARG_5IZE 


equ 


TRUE 


equ 



e 

-1 

76 

1 



return code == success 

return code == fail 

Max total length of coMMand line arguMents 

== C "true" cond 




Mountain 
Magic 
Software 



f 



Wizardware for Atari ST 

Route 1 , Box 653 

Boone, North Carolina 28607 

704/264-3021 

ProCharge $99.95 

Professional Time & Billing at ST pnces. Full accounts 
receivablei Statements pnnted on YOUR own letterhead 
or commercially available forms. 

B+CTree $49.95 

C-ISAM/B'-Tree Utility that makes handling files a 
breeze Designed for use with Atari Development Kit. 
Easy, to use, well documented calls. 



ProA/D 



S29.95 



K 



The professional Amortization and Depreciation program 
Top quality print-outs of schedules. All major methods are 
supported. 

Julian $19.95 

Julian calendar routines. TNs is a group of library routines (J 
for use with your C programs. FREE with B + C Tree' 



CIRCLE #124 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



a 



ATARI ST 
SOFTWARE 

MICRO C-SHELL"- $49.95 

Unix™-style C shell with aliases, I/O 
redirection, and batch files. 

MICRO C-TOOLS™- $24.95 

Unix-style software tools for text 
editing and de-bugging. 

MICRO MAKE "-$34.95 

Automatically builds programs and 
much, much more! 

Special Offer 
ALL 3 for $99.00 

Beckemeyer Development Tools 

592 Jean Street #304 
Oakland. CA 94610 

(415)658-5318 



CIRCLE #125 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



The Exciting Atari ST 
Computers Are Here... 

New software and enhancements are arriving 

daily for this wonderful computer. We will 
evaluate and carry only the best products, so 
you can depend on us to support everything 

we sell! 

Call or circle our Reader Service Number on 

the Response Card to put your name on our 

mailing lisl. That will entitle you to our FREE 

CATALOGS with product reviews, tips and 

rumors on the ST. 

VISA *mI MailerCinl flady icceptcd 

Tod Free 800-782-7007 (Orer>» vs-Kis) 




837 NE 6th St.-Granti Pan, OR 97526 



CIRCLE #126 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 65ST 



/ 



UX luiStCr continued 



FftLSE 
BLANK 



equ 
equ 




32 



== c "false" cond 
ascii space == " " 



code_base 



even 
equ 



base of codes table 



*** now coMes a list of the characters you want to use 

codes dc.b 'O'f'G' coMMand line codes 

dc.b 'V ,'P' ,'R' ,'0' ,'B' ,'C' 

dc.b 'M-.'S','!)' 



*** the next four lines do not change! 
code_nr equ w-code_base 

code_count del code_nr 

code-Scale equ M-code_base 

flags equ w 



size of table 

save it 

index between codes and flags 

base of flags table 



*** these are the flags which correspond to the characters listed above. 
*** If the codes are changed, then the flags Hust also be changed to 
wwM Haintain a one-to-one corrspondence. If a valid character code 
*** (one of those listed above) is found on the coHMand line, then its 
JHH* corresponding flag will be set to "true" after the routine 
«** 'check_c_args' is called; otherwise it renains "false". 



okidata 

star 

verbose 

print_it 

SMall_prt 

drive_a 

drive_b 

drive_c 

set_title 

set_stack 

search 



ds.b 

ds.b 

ds.b 

ds. 

ds. 

ds. 

ds. 

ds. 

ds. 

ds.b 

ds.b 



oki printer 
star/genini printer 



alternate search level 



InSoft ST NETWORK 
Membership - $50 

Buy software and hardware 

at wholesale + 5% + S/H 

Aug. - Sept. Member Specials 

(add 5% to all prices) 

Atari Dev. Kit $205 

Atari Hardware 

520ST Keyboard 340 

(1 MEG) 500 

1/2 MEG Drive 120 

BAV Monitor 150 

20 MEG H.D 625 

Avatel< 1 200 Modem 81 

Blank Discs -3.5" 

Verbatim/10 SSDD $14 

Brown/10 DS DD 20 

Hippo EPROM Burner 99 

Sound Digitizer 99 

Video Digitizer 99 

SLC Clock Card 34 

Supra 1200ST Modem 125 

Supra 20 MEG H.D 625 

******* SPECIAL TO NEW MEMBERS **•»*** 

When you sign up as a member in Aug.-Sept. with 

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Add $2 for S/H for each software item ordered. 

Add 57o to total. 

For further information call (617) 739-9012 

InSoft, Corp. 

P.O. Box 180 

Boston, MA 02123 

CIRCLE #127 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




BACKUP PROTECTED 
SOFTWARE FAST. 

From the team who brought you 
COPY II PLUS (Apple), COPY II PC 
(IBM) and COPY II MAC (Macintosh) 
comes a revolutionary new copy 
program for the Atari 520 and 1040 ST 
computers. 

• Copies many protected programs - 
automatically (We update 

COPY II ST regularly to handle new 
protections; you as a registered 
owner may update at any time for 
$15plus$3s/h.) 

• Supports single and double sided 
drives. 

• Includes both a fast sector-based 
copier and a true bit copy mode for 
protected disks. 



Requires an Atari 520 or 1040 ST 
computer with one or two drives. 

Call 503/244-5782, M-F, 8-5:30 

(West Coast time) with your S |B^ 
in hand. Or send a check 
for $39.95 U.S. plus $3 s/h, $8 
overseas. 

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CentmlFbint 



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ojtware 



Backup utilities also available for the IBM, Apple il, Macintosh and Commodore 64. 

This product is provided lor the purpose of enabling you to make archival copies only. 



CIRCLE #128 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 66ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 




Double 

your 

disk access 

rates 



by Brian Duggan 



The ST is the first compiiti i uilli (|u<ilitii s 
needed by both home and biisnu ss ( (inipiitcis — ,i 
user-friendly, graphics-oriented interface at a moder- 
ate price, with lots of memory, high-speed CPU and 
a DMA interface for easy hard disk expansion. 

However, the true value of a PC for business purposes 
is highly dependent upon its floppy disk I/O speed. The 
new database, spreadsheet and integrated business pro- 
grams are himdreds of thousands of bytes long. They'll 
tax floppy disk I/O to its limit. Indeed, everything's larg- 
er in the 16-bit world. Even BASIC has expanded to 140K 
on the ST, and that, at the ST's present speed, takes 18-20 
seconds just to load. 

After reformatting your disks with Format+ , you'll ex- 
perience a large increase in I/O speed, plus a correspond- 
ing increase in your ST's value for business use. How large 
an increase? Well, hold on to your hat, this is not a mis- 
print . . . Read/Write will now take place at the raw rate 
of 23,000 bytes/second. This is at 5 tracks/second — double 
the present rate, it's the theoretical maximum for a flop- 
py disk. 

In fact, all disk access rates are doubled. Even writing 
to the disk with Verify on (the default on the ST) is dou- 
bled to 11,500 bytes/second or 2.5 tracks/second. This is 
also the theoretical maximum speed, as it takes one turn 
of the disk to Write and one turn to read back and verify. 

If you're not experiencing any soft errors and are using 
work disks, you can write with reasonable safety, having 
verify off, and enjoy the full 23,000 byte rate. By the way, 
the disk copy utility will always automatically perform a 
verification, whether the verify flag is set or not. 

No changes, just more. 

Fonnat+ doesn't change the present 9-sector format of 



th( disk in rfn\ Udy (except for a slight squeez- 
ing I't iIk sp.K iiif" between sectors, from 40 to 
id b\ li s) \\ li It s c luinged is the "dead" space on 

CiJC li IliK k 

This is the space after the last sector and before 
the index mark, which signals the start of the track's 
first sector. Extra formatting information is put there in 
three small "pseudo" sectors, numbers 10, 11 and 12. 

These supply the 8-MHz 68000 CPU and the DMA Con- 
troller with sector and track information they need to per- 
form the low-level housekeeping required for a move to 
the next track to take place. They're so quick that they can 
reset the disc controller, get the new track and read/write 
commands from DOS, step the disk head to the next frack 
and verify the head movement . . . All in the time it takes 
for the "dead" space to pass by the disk head — and be- 
fore the next index (or start) mark appears. 

This permits a continuous read/vwite — something that's 
impossible for 8-bit computers, and for the IBM PC. This 
is the vaunted "68000 power." 

The extra format information on the disk is completely 
transparent to GEMDOS, which knows nothing about sec- 
tors 10,11 and 12. Only the lowest level XBIOS knovre about 
them, and it (being a drone) just takes and executes or- 
ders. It doesn't question the orders. 

If you have any concern about overworking the stepper 
motor, this is on for 3 in every 200 milliseconds (one disk 
rotation), a duty factor of only 1.5 percent. In fact, since 
the raw disk read rate is now consistently doubled at all 
times (no matter what the program or DOS does, unlike 
the write rate) , drive head wear is also pretty much halved 
— which greatly extends both drive and disk life. 

To the keyboard. 
Format+ has been kept as simple as possible. Instead 
of writing a lengthy stand-alone assembly language utili- 



ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 67ST 



/ 



Format + 



continued 



ty, difficult to type in and debug, I've taken advantage of 
having TOS available in RAM and used BASIC to modify 
it, shuffling the barest modicum of bytes. T3?pe it in, save 
it to disk, and then let's Format+ some disks. 

Ready? Boot TOS into RAM (the original 5-29-85 or 
6-20-85 version is needed and will be checked for), reload 
BASIC and run the program. It will modify the XBIOS for- 
mat routine of TOS. Quit BASIC and format several disks. 
TOS has now been "corrupted," so remember to reboot 
after you finish formatting. 

Test the results using the disk copy utility, by copying 
BASIC to one of the newly formatted disks (single disk 
copy should take about 17 seconds less). Erase everything 
from the disk except BASIC and its RSC file. Load BASIC 
(it should now tcike 11 or 12 seconds, instead of 18) and 
POKE &-H444,0. This turns off the write verify flag (POKE- 
ing 255 will turn it back on). 

Now, time how long it takes for BASIC to do a BSAVE 
"Test",100000,W0000. If everything has gone well, BASIC 
will write lOOK to the disk in 10 seconds flat, a net write 
rate of lOK/second. 

Quit BASIC and "trash" the test file. You can now check 
and test the system file copy and file read utilities by copy- 
ing BASIC to itself. Click on and move the BASIC icon 
down on the desktop. Then click on the copy box when 
it appears. You will get a Name Conflict Warning . . .Type 
in any name you Uke (I used BASICA), then time how long 
it takes for the system utilities to read and copy BASIC 
back to the same disk. 

It should've taken 20 seconds to read and write the 140K 
file — only 2 or 3 seconds longer than it takes just to load 
(read) BASIC in the normal format! With verify off, read- 
ing and writing are now taking about equal times (10 se- 
conds in, and 10 seconds out). So, net read and net write 
rates are about equal, at 14,000 bytes/second each. 
Who ate the rate? 

By this time, you might be wondering whatever hap- 
pened to the 23,000 bytes/second. What's slowing down 
the net disk read/write rate? If you guessed GEMDOS, 
you're right. GEMDOS is very slow. Including head move- 
ments, it took GEMDOS 8 seconds to do its high-level file 
search work, while the low-level XBIOS made the actual 
transfer in 12 seconds (60 tracks at 5 track/second). 

The business or power user who uses disk-sized data- 
bases and compilers will find that the ST can now load 
(without searches) an entire 350K disk into its memory 
in 18 to 20 seconds. And it performs a memory-to-disk 
dimip at a comparable rate. This is about 19,000 bytes/sec- 
ond despite DOS overhead, which comes close to the the- 
oretical maximum, and is even comparable to some hard 
di^. 

What to expect. 

Reads will be performed at a constant 23,000 or 5 
tracks/second rate, with a net read rate of 14 to 16,000+ 
bytes/second for large files (i.e., STWriter loads its ST- 
WMAN file— 90K— at 15.5K in 5.8 seconds and, by the 
way, will also copy it to a new name at 12K in 7.5 seconds. 

For small files of less than 40K, GEMDOS will now take 
as much or more time than the actual read itself. A 20K 



file loads in less than 1 second (at 5 tracks/second) , while 
GEMDOS putters around taking 2+ seconds to do what- 
ever it does. 

Writes are completely at the mercy of the program. A 
well-behaved program, writing with verify off, can run 
at or near the speed of the read cycle, as STWriter does. 
This is up to a net 14,000+ rate for larger files, with GEM- 
DOS and the program determining the small file time. It's 
still less than 6 seconds for a 40K file. 

Writes with verify on will take longer, at the raw 11.5K 
rate. However, 20 to 40K files still will only take 6 to 8 
seconds to complete, even then. All this permits rapid fire 
PC/user interaction — a real boon in business use. 

Misbehaved programs with small (<16K) and/or non- 
disk track-sized I/O buffers will tack on an extra 30 to 100 
percent overhead. With verify on, they can drag the write 
rate to its knees, down to 1.3K/second. You now know 
where the blame lies for poor output performance times! 

Enjoy using your "super" 16-bit computer, with its 
23,000 byte I/O rate. Listen to that little disk drive give 
its all for you! Now, if someone would optimize those slow 
GEMDOS routines. . . B 

Brian P. Duggon is a graduate chemist who's a new Mar- 
ian. He got into computing back in 1981, with a TRS-80. 
The power of the ST has now made his writing, program- 
ming and cerebral recreation all pleasure with no pain! 

Listing 1. 
BASIC listing. 



le ■ FoTMat Plus: Copyright 1986 by 

Brian Duggan 
20 Fullw 2: Clearw 2 
38 Gotoxy 24,2: ? "» » » FORMAT P L 

U S » » » " 
40 Gotox!^ 27,5: ? "TOS Version: " 
50 Gotoxy 26,3: ? ChrSC1891;" 1986 
by Brian Duggan" 

60 Txt =9 : Gosub Effect: Gotoxy 14 
,10 : ? "REMIMDER:"; 

70 Txt =0: Gosub Effect: ? " For 2 
3,000 bytes/sec MRITE rate" 
80 Gotoxy 24,11: ? "Poke &H444,0 C 
255 to restore Verify!" 
90 'TOS Version check mxkkkxxk 
100 Def Seg =&H5000: tt =Peek(&Hl8}: 
B =PeekC&Hl9} 
110 If (A =5 AMD B =41) OR (A =6 AND 

B =321 Then f =0: Goto Modify 

120 F$ ^" XKKKKKKKMKMKX ABORTED 

KKKKXKKKXKMKKKMKX " 
130 Gotoxy 41,5! ?"Not 5-19 or 6-20- 
85 TOS" 

140 Color 2: Goto Finish 
150 Modify: If A =6 Then Adjust =-2 

Else Adjust =8 
160 Gotoxy 40,5: ? "O.K.":F$ ="«**«» 
•^COMPLETE D — Ready To Forwat 

KKXKKXX 

170 Color 3: Goto ChangeTOS 

180 Effect: Def Seg =0 

190 Poke Contrl,ie6: Poke contrl+2,e 

: Poke contrl-i-6,l:Poke intin,Txt 

200 vdisysdl: Return 

210 FINISH: Gotoxy 14,8: ? F$: Color 

1 
220 Sound 1,8,10,4,55: Sound 1,0,0,0 
,0: End 



PAGE 68ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 



VIP Professional 

Finally - A Business Program that Brings 
Lotus 1-2-3* Functionality to Your AtuH ST I 



VIP Professional is a state-of-the-art, integrated 
spreadsheet program which brings together a spread- 
sheet, a database and graphing capabilities. Professional 
was modeled after the powerful and best-selling Lotus 
1-2-3* program which dominates the business world 

Worksheet Magic 

Nothing is left out of the workings of the worksheet. Ranges of 
cells can be named for convenience; column widths are variable; 
the screen can be split into two windows; titles can be frozen; 
contents of cells may be copied or moved; the worksheet may be 
altered as a whole or only partially; the list goes on and on. 
Perhaps most important, Professional can use and save Lotus 1-2-3 
files for transfer between computers. 

The worksheet includes over 45 special functions to simplify 
commonly used formulas, including powerful financial functions 
for the internal rate of return, present value, and future value. Of 
course Professional also has all mathematical, trigonometric, table, 
conditional and logical functions. 

Database Power 

The built-in database can handle up to 8192 records, with a 
possibility of up to 256 fields. The records can be searched, sorted 
and analyzed to find your best salesperson or your rarest stamp. 
Sorts can be done using multiple criteria, in ascending and 
descending order. And database functions can be used to do up to 
seven different kinds of statistical analyses of your database. 

Graphs 

The graphing capabilities of Professional are astounding. Not 
only are there six completely different types of graphs available, 
there are tens of ways to manipulate the data, titles, grids, colors, 
legends, keys, and scaling of the size of the graph. 

Macros 

Professional also includes sophisticated macro programming 
commands. With several special macro commands, the user can 
actually program Professional to be dedicated to a specific task 
such as accounting. 

Just Minutes to Learn 

Professional is as easy to use as it is powerful. It comes with a 
user-sensitive tutorial for the newcomer. And help is built right 
into the program. With the handy tutorial, you will be able to 
create professional worksheets in just minutes. 



Introducing Professional LITE™ 

For those of you who do not need the full power of Profes- 
sional, we offer Professional LITE'^". Though without the 
macros and the database features, and having a smaller sheet 
size (256 columns by 2048 rows, LITE still packs a powerful 
punch for only $149.95! 





n: 


1-85 
2-15 
3-85 








WfB 






hartgdge 

SSBB.SO 
5502.50 
5585.01 
5507.54 


Househalii Budget iar 1185 

Car Payncnts Education 

5200.00 5300.00 
5201. BO 5101.50 
5282.00 5383.01 
5203.02 S30«,52 


Food 

5250.00 
5251.25 
5252.51 

5253.77 


Insurance 

51SB.00 
5150.75 
5151.50 
5152.26 


um 




5-85 
t-85 
7-85 
8-85 
5-85 
18-85 
11-85 
l!-85 


5510. OS 
5512.61 
S515.1) 
5517.76 
5520. J5 
5522,16 
5525,57 
5528.28 


5201.03 5306.05 
5205.05 530.', 58 
5206.01 5301. 11 
5207.11 5310.66 
5201. 1< 5312.21 
5201.1! 5313.77 
5210.23 5315.34 
5211.28 5316.12 


5255.64 
5256.31 
5257.51 
5250.88 
5260.11 
5261.48 
5262.71 
5264.18 


?i53l2 
5153.71 
5154.56 
5155.33 
5156.11 
5156.85 
5157.67 
5158.46 






1 



Integrated Spreadsheet Power 



Five Vear Stock Portfolio Analysis 

Five leir Sumijry 




1981 1582 1583 19B4 1985 
Vearly Breakdoun 



Easy-to-Use Graphs 



The Power of Professional 
Only $249.95 
Or the Power of LITE 
Only $149.95 

If your dealer is out of stock, order direct. Send your check or 
money order to the address below, together with $3 for shipping 
and handling. In California add 6% sales tax. COD's and purchase 
orders not accepted. Personal checks will be held for three weeks to 
clear. All prices are subject lo change without notice. 



TcCHNClCGiES = 



132 Aero Camino 
Santa Barbara 
California 93117 

(805) 968-9567 



SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS: Amiga with 512K; One disk drive; Monochrome or 
color monitor; Works with printers supported by the Workbench. 

VIP Professional, Professional, Professional LITE and LITE are trademarks of VIP Technologies 
Corporation; 1-2-3 and Lotus 1-2-3 are registered trademarks of Lotus Development Corp.; Atari. ST, 520ST. 
and 104QST are trademarks of Atari Corporation. 

Copyright^ 1986 by VIP Technologies Corporation 



// 



Format + 



continued 



238 ChangeT05: ' **** 

eded in Raw **** 

240 Def Seg = &H18e+ 

250 Poke &H56C,e: Pok 

266 Def Seg = &H60eO+ 

270 Poke &H563,&H22:P 

e &H583,&H18 

280 Poke &H57C,&H61:P 

e «H57e,&HlF:Poke «H57f 

290 for X =0 to 30O:p 

ekt&H4f6+XJ :HEXT 

300 Poke &H2521,&H01: 

F:P0ke &H2573,&H6C 

310 Poke &H2576,&H4e: 

5 

320 Goto Finish:' Rea 

t utility 



Original T05 ne 

Adjust 

e &H56d,&Hec 

Adjust 
Oke &H582,2:Pok 

Oke &H57d,0:Pok 

,&H78 

Oke &H24f6+x,Pe 

Poke &H254f,&H6 

Poke &H2577,&H7 

dy to run Forna 



ST-CHECKSUM DATA. 

(see page 54ST) 

10 data 377, 606, 987, 418, 616, 780 
, 482, 965, 462, 366, 6059 

110 data 510, 980, 50, 86, 197, 225, 

567, 325, 222, 628, 3782 

210 data 445, 603, 779, 814, 391, 85 
8, 194, 629, 730, 970, 6413 

310 data 738, 928, 1666 



EZRAM' 
520 



n n n n n r 



51 2K Memory 
Upgrade for 
the AtariS20ST« 

Featuring the 
EZTemp'" 
Soldering Guide 



Upgrade Your 52087"* 

to a Full Megabyte of RAM 

• Increase spreadsheet and database 
capability 

• Dramatically improve RAM disk capacity for 
enhanced I/O operations 

Designed for Simple Installation 

• Features the EZTemp'" solder template. All 
the soldering occurs on the template not at 
the RAM chips. Eliminates chip stacking. 

• Clear, easy to follow, illustrated installation 
instructions. 

Free Software S.L.: $199.00 

• Memory check diagnostic software 
and additional accessory programs 
included. 

6 Month Warranty Made In the U.S.A 



terrific ] 



See your Dealer or 
call us at (617) 232-2317 
Brookline, MA 02146 



EZRAM520 & EZTemp are trademarks of Terrific Peripherals Atari & 
Atari 520ST are registered trademarks of Atari Corp. 



CIRCLE #129 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



Don't be 
Puzzled 



REGENT BASE: 

A Relational GEM Database 

Solve your business and personal needs with 
our easy to use database. Regent Base makes 
full use of the GEM system so using any of the 
available templates is as easy as dragging the 
Mouse and pressing a few keys. Included with 
Regent Base are two templates: A fviailing List 
Manager and A Checkbook Manager Other 
templates available include: Accounts Receiv- 
able, Payables, General Ledger, Customer 
Billing, and Invoicing. Many other templates 
are also available. Regent Base supports over 
fifteen printers and even "mail-merges" with 
Regent Word II. 




REGENT WORD II: 

GEM Word Processor 
with Spelling Checker 

Power through any word processing needs 
with Regent Word II. Regent Word II makes full 
use of the GEM system, so editing is powerful 
and easy! As text is typed Regent Word II 
reformats the document on the screen to 
show exactly what will be printed. Bold, 
Superscripted, Subscripted, Italic and 
Underlined text are displayed while editing. A 
30,000 word Spelling Checker is built in. Insert 
or delete words — up to 100,000 — in Regent 
Word ll's spelling dictionary with the click of a 
mouse button! Regent Word II "mail-merges" 
with Regent Base tor instant form letters. On- 
line Help Menus and over fifteen printer drivers 
are built in. 



The Perfect Match for the Atari ST 




Ri|Sf 



REGENT SOFTWARE 

7131 Owensmouth, Suite 45A 
Ganoga Park, CA 91303 
(818)882-2800 



CIRCLE #130 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 70ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 



REVIEW 



r/ 



▲ 



Typesetter ST 




XLENT SOFTWARE 
P.O. Box 5228 
Springfield, VA 22150 
(703) 644-8881 
lUlonochrome & color $39.95 

by Matthew J.W. Ratcliff 

Typesetter ST is the first in XLent Soft- 
ware's "printware" series for the new Atari 
520ST systems. This is a graphics and text- 
editor package, suited to designing small 
newsletters or business advertisements. 

Unlike NEO-Chrome or DEGAS, Type- 
setter ST allows you to edit within an area 
equal to one page on your Epson or NEC 
(or compatible) printer. A pa^ on the 
printer works out to 960 by 672 pixels, as 
opposed to the ST's 640 by 400 (mono- 
chrome) . 

Typesetter breaks the picture into quad- 
rants, which overlap for editing. It isn't a 
full-blown drawing program, like NEO- 
Chrome or DEGAS, but Typesetter ST has 
a few advantages over both of these. 

Typesetter seems to be suited more for 
use as a utility, to supplement the draw- 
ing programs mentioned above. It comes 
with routines that will convert picture files 
into different display formats. Several char- 
acter set files are contained on the unpro- 
tected disk, as well as both versions of the 
program — monochrome and color. The 
color version was tested for this review. 

When Typesetter is run, you're present- 
ed with the "graphics card" menu of func- 
tions. Behind it is your graphics work area. 
The usual drawing functions are available, 
to plot points, draw Unes, and so forth. Ob- 
jects like rectangles, pies and ellipses may 
be drawn with different pattern and hatch 
fills. Pen width and color may be changed 
as you draw. 

Typesetter can automatically create 
shapes which the current version of NEO- 



Chrome (0.5) can't handle. But you can't 
dynamically resize them, as in DEGAS. 
The objects may be more accurately 
thought of as icons, whose size you can 
adjust. 

It uses the trial-and-error method — you 
change size from the graphics card, enter- 
ing a value from 1 to 10 and drawing the 
new sized shape. Your best bet is to start 
small and work your way up. There are no 
cut-and-paste features in Typesetter. 

Although you use a mouse to draw and 
place shapes on the screen, all program 
commands are accessed through function 
keypresses. Most are from the graphics 
card menu, but many are submenus. 
You're constantly reaching from the key- 
board to the mouse, and back again. 

If you get confused and type while in 
the mouse edit mode, all the keys are buf- 
fered. Then, when you do get back to the 
menu, the keyboard buffer isn't cleared — 
all your accidental keystrokes are treated 
as coirmiands. 

Also, whenever you select a menu func- 
tion, you're returned to the graphics screen 
as your command is processed, then again 
to the menu. You must press the SPACE 
BAR to get back to your picture. The most 
logical interface would be to go directly to 
the graphics screen. 

Each time you go to a different menu or 
mode of editing, all the functions take on 
different meanings. Aside from being very 
confusing, this doesn't take advantage of 
the elegant mouse interface used in most 
other programs (DEGAS, for instance). The 
function key interface makes using Type- 
setter during a long editing session a tedi- 
ous chore. 



You will have great fun playing with all 
the pattern and hatch fills, thirty-six in all. 
Examples are given in the brief manual. 

If you wish to experiment with differ- 
ent patterns, you'll find the "user interface" 
a real pain. While drawing, you click the 
right mouse key to get back to the graph- 
ics card. Press F for the fill style, then type 
in the fill value (1 through 24) and press 
RETURN. 

After the graphics card comes back 
again, you must hit the SPACE BAR to go 
back to the graphics screen. 

The primary advantage of Typesetter is 
that it can load, edit and print a screen 
larger than the ST can display. Typically, 
you'll load a DEGAS or NEO-Chrome pic- 
ture and add to it. Once the picture's load- 
ed, you can easily add text, shapes and 
patterns to the extra "white space" at the 
bottom of the original. 

NEO-Chrome supports text, and DEGAS 
also supports custom character sets. But 
custom characters have long been a hall- 
mark of XLent's products. 

You can load and edit with different 
character sets, placing letters anywhere on 
the original, or in the "extra white space" 
at the bottom. Text may be rotated in incre- 
ments of 90 degrees (sideways and upside 
down). DEGAS comes with a character set 
editor; Typesetter does not. 

Several "border texts" are provided with 
one of the custom character sets. With it, 
you can create fancy borders around an en- 
tire screen, or any portion of it. 

I've run into a minor problem here. As 
mentioned in the documentation, while 
entering text at any angle of rotation other 
than degrees, you don't have a cursor. It's 



ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 71ST 



// 



Review continued 



very difficult to accurately set up a text bor- 
der this way. 

Once in text entry mode, you may 
choose from 24 font sizes, the smallest giv- 
ing you 106 characters across the display. 
Pressing the Fl key yields a menu of com- 
mon text entry parameters you can change, 
such as underline or outline mode. While 
editing in text mode, you have several oth- 
er function keys at your disposal, none of 
which appear in menus. You'll find these 
only in the documentation. 

Pressing F2 gets you to yet another func- 
tion menu, where inverse or normal vid- 
eo characters may be chosen. Character 
height and width can be adjusted, as well 
as overlay mode. Text adjusts to many 
heights and vvidths. This gives you much 
more control over text sizing than does ei- 
ther NEO-Chrome or DEGAS. 

The F7 and F8 keys allow you to define 
margin widths, to make columnar text en- 
try easier. And finally, from the text entry 
mode, pressing FIO will send control to the 
disk input/output options. 

Here's my biggest gripe about Typeset- 
ter. If you forget how to spell a filename, 
you're out of luck. There's no way to get 
a disk directory — an absolute must in any 
applications program. I hope future ver- 
sions will incorporate this feature. At any 



rate, from the disk I/O submenu, you can 
load or save Typesetter screens in many 
different formats. 

While editing in graphics mode (with 
the mouse), you may press SHIFT keys for 
one of two differently scaled overlay grids. 
These tell what quadrant you're in and 
show an overlay of the exact pixel areas on 
the display, in terms of the printer's out- 
put. This is very helpful in keeping track 
of where you're editing "on the paper." 
While in text entry mode, these grids are 
accessed through the F4 and F5 keys. 

You can also shrink a picture vertically 
by 25% or 33%, which can bring your im- 
ages into better proportion. Typesetter 
can't "stretch" a picture, however, to make 
it fill a printed page. Height to width ra- 
tios of icons are adjustable, and the screen 
may be cleared — by page, quadrant (one- 
fourth of the current display), or current 
cell (portion of the entire picture filling the 
display). 

Once you have your finely tuned docu- 
ment saved and ready to print, select the 
print option from the graphics card menu. 
This is where Typesetter truly shines. 

I've been disappointed with my Gemi- 
ni lOX printer, since getting the ST. The 
ALTERNATE-HELP-key picture dimips 
look sloppy, with about one-half dot of 



white space between each line of graph- 
ics. Contrast was poor, as well. I was about 
ready to trade up, vmtil I started dumping 
pictures with the Typesetter. These have 
an excellent gray scale, with tighter line 
spacing, and fill the page nicely (if you 
edit in all the quadrants). 

If you want pictures to take up the en- 
tire p§ge and need a better graphics dump 
facility for your ST, Typesetter may suit 
your needs. It has many features lacking 
in NEO-Chrome. XLent's docimientation 
highly recommends DEGAS to create pic- 
tures, with a Typesetter-performed final 
edit. No, Typesetter ST can't replace DE- 
GAS or NEO-Chrome, but it will serve as 
a useful companion utility. H 

Matthew Ratchff is on electrical engineer 
in St. Louis, Missouri. When not using his 
spare time to write articles, he's president 
of ACE St. Louis and a remote SYSOP on 
Gateway City BBS, (314) 647-3290. 



Announcing . . . 

ST-TERMzo 



by 
Matthew R. Singer 



ST-Tcrm 2.0 is the ultimate Atari ST communica- 
tions program for the serious BBS'er . . . 

ST-Term features the familiar commands of 
Amodem Plus with enhancements that take 
advantage of the power of the Atari ST. 

Compare the features of ST-Term with Comm 
packages costing two to four times its 29.95 price 
and voull find there is no more feature packed 
terminal emulator you can buy for your ST. 



VT 52 emulation with keypad 

VT 100 subset emulation 

Full RS232 controi 

Baud rates 300 9600 

Full/Half Duplex 

Remote echoing 

Lne feed toggle 

Atari 8 bit Atascii Emulation 

Wrap around toggle 

20 macro keys with built in editor 

Clock 

Connect time/billing calculator 

Multiple setup files 

WK capture buffer 



Kermit (Batch file transfer) 

Xmodem protocol 

Atari 8 bit Amodem protocol 

Promoted/Throttled Ascii uploads 

Printer spooling 

Full status screen 

400 entry audodialer with 

Redial 

ID dialing prefixes 

Automatically sets RS232 
Full DOS commands without exiting 

type copy dir 

print delete chdir 

format rename chdrv 



To Order Phone 301-428-0474. 
For Technical Assistance phone 301-552-2517. 



Commnet Systems 

7348 Green Oak Terrace Lanham, MD 20706 

■■■laiaBB CIRCLE «131 ON READER SERVICE CARD t^t^^^^tm 




MODULA-2 

the successor to Pascal 



• FULL interlace to GEM DOS, AES 
and VDI 

■ 32-bit native code implementation with 
all standard modules. 

■ Full screen editor linked to compiler 
for rapid error detection 



■ Smart Linker/Automated desktop 

■ Installs on hard disk and RAMdisk. 

■ Supports transcendental functions 
and real numbers. 

■ CODE statement for assembly code 

■ Modula-2 is NOT copy protected 




RAMdfsk Benctimarlu 

Seive of Eratosthenes 
Null Program 



Compile 

10 
7 1 



Unk 



Execute 



21 

5 5 



Added features of Modula-2 not found In Pascal | 


■ CASE has an ELSE and may contain 


■ Programs may be broken up into 


subranges 


rwkxlules for separate compilation 


■ Dynamic strings of any size 


■ Multi-tasking is supported 


• Machine level interface 


• Module version control 


Bit-wise operators 


■ Open an-ay parameters {VAR r: ARRAY 


Direct port and Memor/ access 


OF REALS:) 


Absolute addressing 


■ Type transfer functions 


Interrupt structure 


■ Definable scope of objects 



Pascal and Modula-2 source code are nearly identical. Modula-2 should be thought of 
as an enhancement to Pascal (they were both designed by Professor Niklaus Wirth). 



Regular VerskHi: $7a95 Developer's Venk>n: $149.95 

The developer's version supplies an extra diskette containing a symbol file decoder. 
Imk and load file disassemblers, a source file cross referencer, symbolic debugger, 

high level Windows Module, and the Resource Compiler 



TDI 



SOFTWARE, INC. 



10410 Markison Road ■ Dallas, Texas 75238 ■ (214) 340-4942 
Telex; 888442 CompuServe Number: 75026,1331 



CIRCLE #132 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 72ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 



THE 



CES 

Scene 

A look at the 

June sho^v tells us . . . 

"The STs are all right!" 



y/ 



by Arthur Leyenberger 



"Toto, I have a feeling we're not in Kan- 
sas anymore. . ." (Glenda, the Good Witch 
of the North arrives in a marvelous 
sphere). Dorothy, upon seeing Glenda: 
"Now I know we're not in Kansas." 

These immortal words from The Wizard 
o/Oz kept going through my mind, as I 
entered the Atari booth (the largest seen 
since the Tramiels took over) at the June 
Consiimer Electronics Show (CES) in Chi- 
cago. After the last few shows, nothing 
here looked like what I was used to — 
either in the video game glory days or in 
the vacuum that had followed.. 

The video game and home computer in- 
dustry had taken a nose dive two years ear- 
lier, and each succeeding exposition gave 
evidence that the golden days had passed. 
I entered the largest annual trade show, 
amidst Dixieland bands and 100,000-plus 
attendees, I was prepared to report on yet 
another gloomy show. 

Then I saw the Atari booth — thirty-odd 
software vendors, showing off their wares 
in what was easily the most exciting, over- 
crowded booth in West Hall. Kansas, 
indeed! 

We bring you the new, the exciting, the 
technically astounding ST software that 
was being exhibited at the twentieth an- 
nual Summer CES. From what I saw at this 
four-day electronics, hardware and soft- 
ware bazaar, the remainder of 1986 will be 
very good for Atari ST users. The ST is an 
unqualified success, and the floodgates 
have opened wide to let forth a rush of 
software. 



Software forever. 

With the STs beginning to enjoy national 
popularity, you might ask how many pro- 
grams are currently available? As of the 
start of CES, I could count over 200 titles 
on my local dealer's shelves. 

The following companies announced or 
demonstrated ST software in Chicago. 
Some of the information here was obtained 
while viewing demos in the hectic Atari 
area; other tidbits were gleaned from the 
vendors' booths. For this reason, the de- 
tail presented here varies from one pub- 
hsher to another. Companies are presented 
in alphabetical order. 

Abacus Software was showing their 
CAD-like program, PCBoard Designer. It 
provides interactive layout of PC boards, 
component listing, automatic routing of 
traces and camera-ready printout. PC- 
Board Designer was demonstrated on a 
monochrome monitor and appeared to be 
a sophisticated program. It's currently 
shipping and retails for $395.00. 

Abacus also announced a number of 
new titles. ST TextPro is a professional 
word processor that features multi-column 
output, automatic indexing and table of 
contents, fast text input and scrolling, de- 
finable function keys, and the ability to 
print sideways — for $49,95. 

ST Text Designer is a page-making pack- 
age, to create layouts from word process- 
ing files. The program can read files from 
TextPro or other ASCII files, then add lines 
and merge graphics with text. Available 
this summer. Text Designer will retail for 
$49.95. 

ST DataPro is billed as a simple yet ver- 
satile database program for the ST. Screen 



templates are used, to make database de- 
sign and data input easier. Unlimited rec- 
ord length is possible, with a maximum 
of 64000 records. Available by the time you 
read this, it will list for $49.95. 

ST PaintPro is a drawing and design 
package. Multiple windows allow you to 
copy and paste between them; rotation and 
a wide range of text formats and options 
are offered. Available now for $49.95. 

Abacus also displayed three new ST 
books. Atca^i BASIC Training Guide is a 
functional, educational introduction to ST 
BASIC. From problem analysis to com- 
mands to algorithms, the book provides 
fundamentals of programming in an easy- 
to-understand format. 

Another new Abacus book is Atari ST 
Graphics and Sound. It teaches you how 
to create graphics and use the ST's built- 
in sound facilities. Examples are in BASIC, 
C, Logo and Modula-2, so there's some- 
thing for every programming taste. Some 
of the topics are: mirror and rotation, 
graphics under GEM, coordinate transfor- 
mations, raster and vector graphics, plot- 
ting and 2- or 3-D functions, waveform 
generation, the sound chip, and the ST as 
a synthesizer. Of course, there's far more 
information than space allows me to men- 
tion here. 

The third new Abacus book is entitled 
Atari ST Tricks and Tips. Chapters cover: 
using GEM from BASIC, combining BA- 
SIC and machine language, creating a 
RAMdisk and print spooler, automatically 
starting TOS appUcations, and much more. 
If you'd like to learn more about program- 
ming your ST, this and the two books men- 
tioned above can help. All iiave sample 



ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 73ST 



// 



CES Scene 



continued 




One of the Cinemaware offerings, SDl. 

programs and tips for the new or expert 
programmer. 

The Abacus books are currently available 
for $20.00 each, except hASlC TYaining 
Guide, which is $17.00. 

Activision shared a booth with several 
other publishers. The most exciting news 
from these folks is that their Music Stu- 
dio has recently been released for the ST 
computers. 

This music composition program, de- 
signed by Audio Light, allows the user to 
create music interactively and control up 
to fifteen instruments in one song, or up 
to eight voices at once. Music Studio has 
foiir tracks and can be interfaced with a 
MIDI instrument, though it also works 
with the built-in, three-voice sound chip 
of the ST. 

When using a synthesizer keyboard, via 
the MIDI interface, Music Studio does not 
function as a sequencer or multi-track tape 
recorder. It is, rather, a composing program 
and uses standard music notation to edit 
and compose. Although real-time key- 
board input is not accepted, the program 
can send output to a MIDI keyboard. Drop- 
down menus and mouse control make the 
Music Studio easy and enjoyable to use. 

With this program currently selling for 
$50.00, work is already beginning on the 
next version. The latter will have real-time 
keyboard capture, as well as a MIDI patch 
librarian capability. 

Activision also showed the Paint Works 
(formerly N-Vision), by Audio Light. This 
easy-to-use painting program is also avail- 
able now, for $49.95. Look for ST-Log re- 
views of both these Activision programs 
soon. 

Artworx demonstrated Strip Poker for 
the ST within Atari's exhibit area. This is 



basically the same program released for 
the 8-bits a few years ago. 

Now, however, the program's complete- 
ly mouse driven, and the graphics are sub- 
stantially improved. Interestingly, the 8-bit 
graphics were uploaded to the Amiga, and 
Deluxe Paint by Electronic Arts was used 
to improve the pictures. 

Resolution was increased to about four 
times the previous capacity, and colors 
were added. As a last step, the graphics 
were ported to the ST. Talk about a round- 
about trip to the ST! 

Strip Poker for the ST will be selling for 
$39.95, with optional data disks at $19.95 
each. The original game-playing algo- 
rithms were used for the ST version, so it's 
neither easier nor more difficult than its 
predecessor. Future data disks will use 
digitized graphics for, um . . . added real- 
ism. Strip Poker will be available by the 
time you read this article. 

Artworx is already shipping Compu- 
Bridge for the ST, at $29.95. A backgam- 
mon variant will also be out by the time 
we're in print. And a new game called 
Hole-In-One Golf will be available soon, 
too. Artworx is solidly behind the ST and 
will continue to offer programs for it. 

Batteries Included, a longtime support- 
er of 8-bit and now 16-bit Atari users, 
showed several new products at their 
booth. One of these was Thunder!: The 
Writer's Assistant. 

As a spelling checker for the ST, Thun- 
der! is unique in a number of ways. One 
is its ability to correctly check a word 
which has a number within it. No other 
currently marketed spelling checker for 
any computer can handle this type of spell- 
ing error. 

Another unique aspect of Thunder! — 
its dictionary has 50,000 real words. Other 
products claim as many or more words, but 
count derivatives sepetrately. For example, 
walk, walks, walked and walking could be 
counted as four separate words in some 




Batteries Included 's Thunder.'- 



spelling checkers. In Thunder!, they're 
considered one word. Of course, you can 
create your own supplemental dictionaries, 
as well. 

Two versions of Thiuider! are provided 
on the distribution disk. One is a desktop 
accessory, to be used whenever accesso- 
ries are normally available. It works only 
with GEM-based word processors (actu- 
ally, with any GEM-based program). 
What's especially useful is that, when 
Thunderl's been loaded as a desk acces- 
sory, consuming about lOOK of memory, 
it can be disabled at any time, freeing up 
that memory — without rebooting. Nice 
touch! 

The other version is a stand-alone pro- 
gram to be used with any file. It's handy 
in checking files created by non-GEM pro- 
grams, or an entire GEM-created file. This 
program runs from the desktop and, when 
finished, returns you to the desktop. In ad- 
dition to doing a spelUng check, it provides 
you with a range of statistics, like charac- 
ter, syllable, word and sentence counts, and 
two types of readability indices. 

In addition to a spelling checker acces- 
sory. Thunder! provides a word expansion 
feature. If I want, for example, I can de- 
fine CES as "Consumer Electronics Show." 
Then, whenever I type CES, "Consumer 
Electronics Show" would be entered ... a 
very useful feature. 

Thunder! retails for $39.95. It's quality 
ST software, clearly one of the most im- 
pressive ST programs at CES. 

According to President Michael Reich- 
mann. Batteries Included has sold over 
25,000 copies of DEGAS. In discussing the 
fact that DEGAS has done so well while 
not copy protected, Reichmann said copy 
protection is no longer an issue. All BI's 
products are sold without copy protection, 
a policy they intend to continue. The in- 
dustry is slowly realizing: this is the way 
application software should be marketed. 

I had a sneak preview of the next-genera- 
tion DEGAS, DEGAS EUte. Scheduled to 
be released by August, it will sell for 
$79.95. Current DEGAS owners will be able 
to upgrade for half the price and their origi- 
nal DEGAS disk. 

DEGAS Elite has significant improve- 
ments, too many to state here. Eight 
screens are now provided , and colors, ob- 
jects, clip art, and so forth can be copied 
easily from one screen to another. Anoth- 
er powerful feature is the ability to speci- 
fy a starting and ending color — and have 
the program fill in all the colors between 
for your palette. 

Drives from A to P are now supported, 
and folders can also be used. Regardless 
of what resolution you're now in, any pic- 
ture type — low, medium or high — can be 
loaded into the current screen. DEGAS 
EUte automatically does the conversion as 
it brings in the program. 

NEO-Chrome and Koala pictures can be 



PAGE 74ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 



loaded directly, too. And the current on- 
screen picture can be saved in any of these 
file formats. 

You can use four different animation 
speeds, in four different directions, in four 
different ranges of colors at once, on one 
screen. In addition, any portion of a pic- 
ture can be grabbed and copied to anoth- 
er screen, or even used as a brush. Very 
impressive! 

The new DEGAS will automatically do 
anti-aliasing of a picture. The concept of 
anti-aliasing is that, if you put a comple- 
mentary color along the edge of another 
color, it will seem to smooth the original's 
jagged lines. It's truly amazing to watch all 
the corners being magically rounded off. 
The effect is a marked improvement in 
your image. 

One of the cleverest aspects of the pro- 
gram is that you'll be able to save a DE- 
GAS picture as an ST icon. Also, you can 
grab a corner of a picture and stretch it in 
any direction. Eight levels of magnifica- 
tion are available in DEGAS Elite, for fine 
detail work, and both manual rotation and 
rotation by degrees are provided. 

All in all, DEGAS Elite is state-of-the- 
art software for the ST, a significant im- 
provement over its excellent original. 



Batteries Included also showed their 
IS*Talk ST telecommunications program. 
It's a full-scale terminal program, based on 
the GEM graphics interface. IS*Talk is 
easy to use, with a host of sophisticated 
features — spelling checker, macros, replay, 
auto log-on, and much, much more. It's re- 
tailing now for $79.95. 

Also coming from Batteries Included: an 
upgraded version of the popular 8-bit 
HomePak; PaperClip Elite, which will al- 
low the inclusion of DEGAS Elite files 
within text; BTS The Spreadsheet; a per- 
sonal diary program called Time Link; and 
another 8-bit upgrade, B/Graph, the graph- 
ics charting and statistics package. No 
question about it — BI is soUdly behind the 
ST, with a wide range of products. 

Batteries Included also announced a 
merger with ITM Corp. , a Canadian hold- 
ing company. BI will retain its autonomy, 
but will now have a parent company, to 
provide greater financial strength for 
growth. Basically, this deal means they'll 
be able to publish more software in the 
months ahead. 

Broderbund, parent company of Syn- 
apse, brought two previously released 8-bit 
titles for the ST, Essex and Brimstone. 

Essex puts you in the realm of science 



fiction, playing the part of a tourist aboard 
the starship Essex. What began as a peace- 
ful vacation turns into an intergalactic res- 
cue mission, led by the one person who 
can thwart the insidious Vollchons threat- 
ening all planets in the Sirius sector. 

Brimstone is a fantasy, wherein you help 
Sir Gawain of the Round Table find the five 
mystical words which will release him 
from Ulro, the netherworld. Beyond the 
moat and massive door to the castle, you 
must outwit deranged white apes and de- 
feat the Underdemons — or be trapped for 
eternity. Sounds pretty tough to me. 

Both text adventure games feature 1500- 
word vocabularies and are played in real 
time. If you linger making a move, the ac- 
tion continues. Essex and Brimstone are 
available now at $44.95 each. 

Electronic Arts shared a distributor's 
booth with other software publishers. The 
views of its president Trip Hawkins, con- 
cerning the Atari ST and Amiga compu- 
ters, are well known. Briefly, he feels the 
Amiga is the better machine, while the ST 
has no future. Therefore, he won't develop 
ST software, but has heavily supported the 
Amiga. 

The company does, however, have one 
ST program: Financial Cookbook. This is 




Shrink In ABox 



DrXes 



A detailed psychotherapeutic 
game on a disk, Dr Xes takes the 
form of a Gestalt therapy session. 
Leam more about artifical 
intelligence, psychotherapy and 
yourself. Dr Xes even talks. More 
fun than a padded room, great 
for parties. $49.95. 

Call collect to leam more 
about Dt Xes. Or, order risk free, 
your satisfaction is guaranteed. 

(714) 854-4434 



ROSEYT/ 



S F T * « « E 

4000 MacArthur Blvd. Suite 3000 
Newport Beach, California 92663 




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We Teach Your Computer Spanish. 
It Teaches You. 



Senor Tbtor leads a begin- 
ning Spanish student through 
self-paced, changing lessons. 
You learn greetings and 
phrases, household terms, 
and much more. 

Sophisticated speech 
synthesis actually lets your 
computer speak Spanish. 

Tbrn your computer into 
your Spanish teacher with 
Seiior Tbtor 

iEIEspanolesfacil! 

Call collect to learn more 
about Senor TUtor Or, order 



risk free, your satisfaction is 
guaranteed. 

(714) 854-4434 




ROSETL^ 



SOFTWARE 

4000 MacArthur Blvd. Suite 3000 
Newport Beach, California 92663 



ST-LOG 



CIRCLE #133 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 75ST 



// 



CES Scene 



continued 



an updated, improved version of the 8-bit 
title. We hope, as the ST's success is seen, 
EA will develop software for it. 

Epyx Software, the folks who brought 
you Rescue on Fractalus and Ballblazer, 
two great Lucasfilm games for 8-bit com- 
puters, among others, were proudly show- 
ing two titles for the ST. 

A new, enhanced version of Temple of 
Apshai, called The Trilogy, is available 
now. This role-playing adventure features 
1400 separate chambers, multiple dungeon 
levels, improved graphics and faster action 
play. The Trilogy lists for $30.00 and in- 
cludes Temple of Apshai, Curse of Ra and 
Upper Reaches of Apshai. 

Epyx's Rogue has been a popular game 
at colleges for years. The goal is to find 
your way through a maze of ever-changing 
dungeons and magical places, recover the 
Amulet of Vendor and return to level 1. Of 
course, spending time in the underground 
world sounds a lot easier than it really is. 
Available now for $34.95. 

Winter Games, enjoyed on a host of sys- 
tems, now comes to the ST. Seven true-to- 
life sporting events, from bobsledding and 
ski jumping to figure skating, challenge the 
user. The Biathlon and four other events 
are included, and skill and stamina are re- 
quired to succeed. An opening ceremony 
complete with national anthems greets up 
to eight players. Winter Games, available 
now, sells for $34.95. 




Epyx's Winter Games. 

World Games is a continuation of Epyx's 
"Game" series. In this one, eight events al- 
low you to compete with up to eight other 
players. Cliff diving, sumo wrestling, bar- 
rel jumping, bull riding, weight lifting, gi- 
ant slalom, pole vaulting, and hop, skip 
and jumping should keep you busy for 
quite some time. World Gaines will be 
available in the third quarter for $34.95. 

Infocom announced three new interac- 
tive fiction titles for the ST this time 
around. Leather Goddesses of Phobos, by 
veteran author Steve Meretzky, is Infocom's 
first entry in the comedy category. 

This product, geared tor the standard- 
level player, combines comedy and sex, 
and takes the genre to new heights (or 
depths, depending on how you look at it). 
Three different playing modes are provid- 
ed — Tame, Suggestive or Lewd — corre- 



sponding to P, PC and R movie ratings. 

The saga begins in 1936 in Upper San- 
dusky, Ohio, where you've been boozing 
it up at a sleazy bar (Lewd) — or where 
you're enjoying an evening with your 
friends in a local lounge (Tame). You get 
the idea, right? Anyway, you're kidnapped 
by space creatures and carried to the Mar- 
tian moon Phobos. There you learn that 
the Leather Goddesses are planning to turn 
Earth into their private sexual playground 
(L) — ahem, use Earth for their ovni indis- 
creet purposes (T). 

Your goal is to get what you need in or- 
der to build a special Anti-Leather God- 
desses Machine. Included with the pro- 
gram are a 3-D comic book, an intimate 
map of the catacombs and a sensuous 
scratch 'n' sniff card. All this fun, and the 
three different naughtiness levels, can be 
had for $39.95 this fall. 

Another new Infocom ST title is Trini- 
ty, written by Brian Moriarty. A cross be- 
tween the "Twilight Zone" and Alice in 
Wonderland, Trinity leads you to an alter- 
nate universe, where magic and physics 
coexist — and every atomic explosion that's 
ever occurred is inexplicably connected. 

The story's chilling climax takes place 
in the New Mexico desert on July 16, 1945, 
where you'll arrive minutes before the 
most fateful experiment of all time: the 
world's first atomic explosion, code-named 
Trinity. 

This is the first Infocom story to recre- 
ate actual locations and events. It begins 
in London; you're a tourist on a budget va- 
cation. Where it ends is up to you. To en- 
sure accuracy, Moriarty conducted exten- 
sive research, visiting Los Alamos Nation- 
al Laboratory and the Trinity site. 

To get you started, the package includes 
a copy of The Illustrated Story of the Atom- 
ic Bomb, in the famous Classic Comics 
style. Trinity will be retaiUng for $39.95 
by the time this issue's out. 

The third title announced was Moon- 
mist, by Stu Galley and Jim Lawrence. 
This introductory-level game has a Gothic 
setting. Each of the four variations has its 
own puzzles, treasures, hiding places and 
solution. As a result, Moonmist has more 
replay value than any other Infocom title 
to date. 

You play a famous young sleuth ready 
for adventure. A friend declares, "I know 
it sounds dramatic, but I think someone 
is trying to kill me," and you dash into ac- 
tion. Arriving at Tresyllian Castle, you're 
about to be in a treasure hunt, meet eccen- 
tric characters (including a ghost or two), 
and otherwise be put upon to solve the 
mystery. Moonmist will sell for $39.95 this 
fall. 

Metacomco, the systems software house 
specializing in the 68000-based compu- 
ters, announced a couple of new products 
for the ST. 

No details were forthcoming, but it was 



learned that Metacomco's redoing Atari ST 
BASIC. The improved implementation will 
be out in the third quarter of 1986. 

The company also announced MCC Pas- 
cal for the ST. This is an ISO Pascal com- 
piler with a screen editor, linker, libraries 
and user manual. This version conforms 
to the ISO 7185 international standard Pas- 
cal. A company spokesperson told me that, 
compared to OSS's Personal Pascal, MCC 
Pascal has a faster compiler, slower linker 
and produces code that's almost identical. 

MichTron was showing many existing 
products in their stall at the Atari booth. 
One of the most popular programs there 
was Time Bandit. 




Time Bandit from MichTron, 

Written by Bill Dunlevy and Harry Laf- 
ner. Time Bandit is billed as the most 
detailed video game ever designed for a 
home computer. And it's not hype — 
anyone who's seen, played or been with- 
in 10 feet of the screen when the program's 
running can attest to that. 

In it, you're the Time Bandit, an animat- 
ed adventurer travelling through time and 
space in search of treasure. From a land 
called Timegates, you can choose to enter 
one of sixteen portals, each leading to a 
different "land" and a distinct time peri- 
od. The future, ancient Egypt, deep space 
and the old West await your visit. 

Once in, you must fight off the Evil 
Guardians — and search for scrolls, books, 
computer consoles, or even people. With- 
in the arcade action of the game there are 
three graphics-activated text adventures. 
To get out of the cm'rent land , you must 
find the key to the lock blocking yom- exit. 
This is one exciting game. 

There's much more to it, but suffice it 
to say that Time Bandit demonstrates the 
power, speed and graphic beauty of the 
Atari ST. The program's written entirely in 
machine language and consumes 350K of 
memory. You can buy it now, for $39.95. 

Another major title shown by Gordon 
Monnier, president of MichTron, was Cor- 
nerman, a Sidekick-Uke multiple desk ac- 
cessory. It can be purchased now for 
$49.95 and gives you no less than ten func- 
tions, all under one accessory name. 

Here's what you get: a complete ASCII 

(continued on page 78) 



PAGE 76ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



STLOG 




ATARI 520ST SYSTEM PACKAGE 



Comes complete with 520ST 
computer with modulator, disk 
drive, mouse, logo, Basic, 
1st Word, and monochrome 
or color monitor. 



1040ST OWNERS 
CALL! 





MONOCHROME SYSTEM 

$64900 

COLOR SYSTEM 

$74900 



X-JIK. j.^....jCjj > y^^f^^.^. ^r^^..jS,,^ {<,^;^',i^-ri({ft,t,r,-y4- ■ , 



> J 



SUPRA 
DISK 

20 Meg HARD DRIVE 

$829<>o 



■ % \ \ i \ \ 



SUPRA MODEM 
MODEL ^^ ^«%AA 




ATARI 314 

1 Meg Double Sided 
DISK DRIVE 

$21900 



ANCHOR 
520 

Direct Connect MODEM 

300/1200 Baud 



$i4goo 



CITIZEN 

MSP-10 (80 col.) $279.00 

MSP-15 (132 col.) $419.00 

MSP-20 (80 col.) $349.00 

MSP-25 (132 col.) $509.00 

C.ITOH 

Prowriler 1550P $299.00 

Slarwriter 10-30 $299.00 

EPSON 

Homewriter 10, LX80 CALL 

FX85, FX286. RX100 CALL 

SQ2000. HI80, HS80, AP80 CALL 

LQ800. LQ1000 CALL 



— PRINTERS — 



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1380 Dot Matrix 130 cps... 
1385 Dot matrix 165 cps,,.. 

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3000 Series 

8000 Series 

ELF 360 

Pinwriter 560, 660, 700 



,.$179,00 
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CALL 



PANASONIC 

KX1091 $239.00 

KX1092 $359 00 

KX1592 $469 00 

TOSHIBA 

P321 (80 column) $489.00 

P341 (132 column) $749.00 

P3b1 (132 column) $1049.00 

STAR 

NX/SB/SD/SR Series CALL 

Powertype Letter Quality CALL 



SUBLOGIC 
Flight Simulator II 

$3799 



ACCESS 

Leaderboard $29.99 

ACTIVISION 

Hacker $29,99 

Borrowed Time $34,99 

BATTERIES INCLUDED 

D,E,G,A,S $27,99 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 

Financial Cookbook $37,99 

HABA/ARRAYS 

Hippo-C $44,99 

Business Letters $29,99 

Write Your Own WiN.,, ,$29,99 

Haba Writer $37,99 

Habadex Phonebook, ..$27. 99 
Mail Room Manager, ,,,$39.99 



SOFTWARE 



INFOCOM 

Cutthroats $29,99 

Deadline $34,99 

Enchanter $29,99 

Hitchhiker's Guide $29,99 

Infidel $34,99 

Planetfall $29,99 

Sea Stalker $29,99 

Sorcerer $34,99 

Starcross $34,99 

Suspect $29,99 

Suspended $34,99 

Wishbringer $29.99 

Witness $29,99 

Zork I $29,99 

Zork II $29,99 

Zork III $29,99 



MINDSCAPE 

Deja Vu $37,99 

MIRAGE 

Express $34,99 

MUSE SOFTWARE 

Final Word $99,99 

Hex $27,99 

PC Intercom $79.99 

O.S.S. 

Personal Pascal $49,99 

PENQUIN SOFTWARE 

Crimson Crown $29,99 

SIERRA-ON-LINE 

Ultima II $39,99 

King's Quest $37,99 

V.I.P 

Professional $139,00 



ATARI 520ST 
Hardware/Peripherals 

Atari 520 CPU $369.00 

Atari 124 Monochrome Monitor $189.00 

Atari 1424 14" Color Monitor $269.00 

Atari 354 Single Sided Drive $179.00 

Haba 10 Mb Hard Drive $669.00 



BLANK DISKETTES & ACCESSORIES 

AMARAY 

Disk Tub 31/2" $9.99 SONY 

MAXELL (10) 31/2" SS/DD $18,99 

(10) 31/2" SS/DD $18.99 (10) 3V2" DS/DD $29.99 

(10) 31/2" DS/DD $29.99 

CURTIS Surge Suppressors 

Emerald $39,99 „,. „. , 

Ruby $59,99 Safety Stnp $19,99 

Diar^ond $29,99 Sapphire $49,99 








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use your credit card or send cashier's check or bank money order. Pennsylvania residents add 6% sales tax. All prices are sub|ect to change and all items are subject to availability 
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[Mi 



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All prices Shown are tor U.S A orders. 
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// 



CES Scene 



continued 



reference table, with decimal, hexadecimal, 
character and mnemonic information for all 
256 ASCII codes; a 16-digit calculator con- 
taining binary, octal, decimal and hex 
modes, three smnming memories, printing 
tape display and more; a notepad with full 
editing, word wrap and automatic date and 
time stamp; a phone dialer with autodial 
capability; a phone log which automatically 
transfers information from the dialer; a 
fifteen-puzzle game; two clocks (one digi- 
tal, one analog); a complete setup module 
to customize dialer, RS-232, clock, calcu- 
lator and window position parameters; a 
print utility; and (gasp) a DOS window for 
use with MichTron's DOS Shell. Corner- 
man is one big bargain. 

Microprose was demonstrating their 
nearly complete version of Silent Service 
for the ST. Here, you command a World 
War II submarine in the depths of the Pa- 
cific — and must sink enemy ships with- 
out being destroyed. Written by F-15 Strike 
Eagle author Sid Meier, the game will ship 
almost immediately. 

The most notable difference between the 
ST and previous 8-bit versions lies in the 
graphics. Far more detail is evident in the 
ST program. For example, only four ship 
sizes could be seen through the periscope 
of an 8-bit, whereas there are now 128 
different ship sizes. This adds greatly to 
the realism of the game. 

Another major difference: the game has 
been entirely reconfigured, to be played 
via mouse icons. Periscope, throttle, game 
speed, zoom, etc., are now controlled by 
pointing and clicking. 

In addition, varied screens appear in re- 
sponse to moving Captain Bob. The dam- 
age screen shows problems separately, as 
the instrument screen shows a set of ana- 
log gauges. 

The third big change in the ST Silent 
Service is that the game's been made more 
historically accurate, wherever possible. 
More authentic convoy routes, behavior of 
the Japanese and additional Japanese war- 
ships have been added. Now you can run 
into Japanese convoys that are fast, dan- 
gerous and make for juicy targets. 

Three different games are provided: 
training, convoy with heavy cruisers and 
carriers, and war patrol. The most chal- 
lenging is war patrol, where you try to sink 
as much tonnage as you can before you: 
run out of ammunition, are too damaged 
-to continue, or are sunk. 

Silent Service for the ST is scheduled for 
the end of June at $39.95. Like all Micro- 
prose products, it's well conceived, well 
implemented and fun to play. 

One of the more impressive software 
products of the show was Migraph's Easy 
Draw. Billed as a professional ST drawing 
program, it's object-oriented, allowing you 
to create custom business graphics, presen- 
tation materials, multi-dimensional illus- 
trations and line drawings. 



The program offers many features to 
make drawing easy — multiple windows, 
full GEM interface with drop-down menus 
and mouse action, zooming, clipboard art, 
predefined patterns, object rotation, and 
multiple font selection. Available now, it 
sells for $149.95. 

The news at Mindscape was an ST pro- 
duct line being developed independently, 
Cinemaware. The idea here is to have pro- 
ducts with movie-oriented themes. All are 
played in real time and are, for the most 
part, decision-making games of strategy. 

For example. King of Chicago finds Al 
Capone in jail; you're one of the young 
gangsters fighting to take over the city. An- 
other title, Sinbad and the Throne of the 
Falcons, brings up memories of Tyrone 
Power and the Arabian Nights. The third 
title is Defender of the Crown, a kind of 
Robin Hood tale. 

The initial ST title, scheduled for release 
this fall, is SDI (Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive). This science fiction adventure puts 
a young, beautiful Russian cosmonaut and 
a handsome American scientist in the 
midst of global war. It's billed as a story 
and flight simulator in one package. At 
least twenty-seven screens will accompa- 
ny the story line, requiring two disks for 
the entire game. 

Each product in the series will have at 
least 700K (really over a megabyte, due to 
the company's proprietary data compres- 
sion technique). All the graphic adventures 
are mouse driven, with several action se- 
quences — a sky battle, jousting, a sword 
fight with skeletons — controlled interac- 
tively by you. 

These arcade sequences require a cer- 
tain amount of expertise for completion. 
Moreover, the games are nonlinear in na- 
ture; you can find yourself in any part of 
the story. 

The designers of Cinemaware are striv- 
ing for interactive movies. The games com- 
bine arcade action, the depth and interest 
of text adventure and the appeal of graph- 
ics and sound (ail will feature original mu- 
sic scores). From the sample screens I saw, 
they all look like hits. 

All four will be available by the end of 
the year. 

Omnitrend Software demonstrated Uni- 
verse II in Atari's section. This is a sci- 
ence fiction role-playing game for one, in 
which you're an undercover agent for the 
Federated Worlds Special Forces. 

While operating a merchant vessel, 
you're called to perform covert missions 
within the United Democratic Planets — 
still earning a living, organizing a crew, 
upgrading your equipment from the 98 
available parts, and exploring planets first- 
hand, to solve object-oriented puzzles. 

As the game progresses, the long-range 
goal is gradually revealed; it's something 
about an ancient alien artifact, known only 
as the hyperspace booster. 



Omnitrend's Universe 11 is selling now 
for $69.95. 







Universe II from Omnitrend. 

Optimized Systems Software (OSS), long 
supporters of Atari 8-bit computers (with 
products like Action!, BASIC/XL and BA- 
SIC/XE), also had a booth within the Atari 
area. The ever-congenial Bill Wilkinson 
demonstrated their first ST product: Per- 
sonal Pascal. 

The programming language runs under 
GEM and contains drop-down menus for 
editing, linking and compiling. Of course, 
the mouse makes creation all the more 
simple. 

OSS decided to create their own GEM 
AES and VDI calls in this version of Pas- 
cal. The program editor uses a text-based 
design, with cut and paste capability, and 
help screens similar to those of the Action! 
editor Automatic file backup, automatic 
indenting, English language error mes- 
sages and debug tracing are included. 

Personal Pascal retails for $75.00 and 
has been shipping for a few months. The 
language is disk-based and comes with an 
almost 300-page manual. OSS plans to 
support the Atari ST, as it has the 8-bits. 

One of the most exciting software pro- 
grams at this year's CES was The Pawn 
from Rainbird, a British publisher It had 
been available for almost two months and 
was demonstrated by Anita Sinclair, one 
of the authors. 

The Pawn is an ST graphic text adven- 
ture startling in both its sophistication and 
implementation. If you've gotten used to 
parsers in text adventures from Infocom 
and others, you'll be amazed at the level 
of this one. 

One attractive feature of the game is that 
its pull-down menus, in the shape of 
scrolls, are used to issue commands. An- 
other remarkable feature of The Pawn: 
when you pull down on one of these 
scrolls at the top of the screen, you bring 
a low-resolution color picture over your 
medium-resolution text. The pictures, by 
a noted British artist, are excellent. 

The entire adventure is written in ma- 
chine code, rather than C or Pascal, so it 
runs a lot faster than others you're used to. 
The Pawn, at $45.00, can be purchased 
now. 

I was privy to a glance at The Pawn's se- 



PAGE 78ST / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ST-LOG 



quel, Guild of Thieves. Though sworn to 
secrecy, I can tell you the graphics are even 
better than those of The Pawn! 




Sophisticated — TVie Pawn 
from Britain's Rainbird. 

Another product shown by Rainbird was 
Starglider. It's an all-action, air-to-air and 
air-to-ground combat flight simulator that 
uses fast-moving, 3-D vector graphics. Ex- 
tensive development went into the smooth 
vector graphics, to create the experience 
of low-level flight. 

Pilot of the sole surviving ground attack 
vehicle left to oppose invaders from the 
planet Novenia, you have defense, attack 
and maneuver capabilities. But you must 
plot strategy while flying, refueling in 
flight and entering rotating missile depots. 
Your mission: destroy the alien's powerful 
flagship, StargJider. The game will be 
available in the third quarter, at $44.95. 

Shanner displayed a variety of products 
in their booth. Recently recovered from the 
mess with VIP, Shanner's ready to move 
ahead — with software, hardware and ac- 
cessories — according to James Copland. 

At CES was their full-color, GEM-based 
word processor, which allows four docu- 
ments to be edited simultaneously. Priced 
at $79.95, it will be available by the time 
this issue hits the stands. 

Shanner also showed the LogiKhron 
Qock Card, acquired from Soft Logik. The 
manual's been rewritten and the cartridge 
modified, to allow access to the internal 
battery. See the review on page 55ST. It's 
currently retailing for $49.00. 

ST-Key is a $20.00 macro key program 
for the ST. It lets you assign up to twenty 
macro functions to the ST's ten function 
keys. This program is said to work in con- 
junction with any other ST program. 

Sound Wave One is a single-track, seven- 
octave ST MIDI sequencer. On the shelves 
now, it lists for $50.00. 

Sound Wave Eight, an eight-track "pro- 
fessional" MIDI sequencer, will accept and 
control up to sixteen synthesizers. It's sup- 
posed to duplicate the functions of a pro- 
fessional recording studio, at $180.00. 

Shaimer has recently acquired two pro- 
ducts from Blue Moon Software, Macro 
Manager and Macro Desk. The first is a 
Sidekick-style program, with a scientific 
calculator, alarm clock/calendar, event log 



and card file. In addition, it has project 
time recording and scheduling functions. 

Macro Desk is not as feature-laden; it 
gives you everything but the project func- 
tions. Macro Manager retails for $70.00, 
and Macro Desk is $40.00. 

Shanner also displayed the complete line 
of accessories from ITC. The Shanner 
Planner comes in 3V2- and 5 'A -inch disk 
versions, each with space for a notepad, 
disks, pen, calculator, software manual, 
business cards and ruler. The zippered 
portfolio comes gift boxed, for $39.95. 

On the hardware side, Shanner display- 
ed the SD-2000, a $429.00 dual disk drive 
for the ST. It has two double-sided, double- 
density drives in one fairly small en- 
closure, and a beefed-up power supply ac- 
companies the unit. 

Sierra On-Line brought their new ST 
chess game, Kemplin Chess (Kempelen is 
thought to be the father of game-playing 
machines). 

This soon-to-be-released, $34.95 pro- 
gram is said to be one of the most power- 
ful chess games on any microcomputer. 
Besides being a phenomenal chess game, 
it takes advantage of the ST's unique fea- 
tures. The board can be rotated or tilted, 
in order to be seen from another perspec- 
tive (including 3-D), and colors can be set 
to your preference. 

Sierra On-Line also showed the first in 
their business product series. Called ST 
OneWrite, its main target is the small busi- 
nesses — storefronts and single doctor's or 
lawyer's offices. 

Most accounting programs for compu- 
ters expect the user to do General Motors' 
accounting on a micro. ST OneWrite goes 
the other way. 



It follows the pegboard binder metaphor 
of the cash disbursement accounting mod- 
ule, but goes a step further — it replaces the 
traditional manual system with the ST's 
power and graphics. Once a check's writ- 
ten, the information is kept for future use. 
Whenever another check's made out to the 
same payee, all you have to enter is its 
amount. 

Checks can be printed on a dot-matrix 
or daisy-wheel printer, with notes on the 
stub. Your cash account is automatically 
credited, so you need only specify the ac- 
count to debit. If you're unsure of your 
chart of accounts, pull it up in a window 
at any time. Expenses can be split over 
several accounts, if need be. 

Once the account is specified and RE- 
TURN is pressed, the program will cross 
check numbers entered. Then the bank 
balance is automatically adjusted and the 
transaction posted to all necessary ac- 
counts. It's also posted separately into a 
vendor record — to keep track of how much 
business is done with individual vendors. 
Finally, all numbers are entered on the bal- 
ance sheet and income statements. 

Basically, the drudgery (in which errors 
often occur) is eliminated by this system. 
Especially useful: the income statement is 
accurate right up to the last check written. 

ST OneWrite is a three-module system: 
cash disbursements, receivables and gener- 
al ledger. Suggested retail for each mod- 
ule is $130.00. Sierra's currently working 
on a payroll system, although no firm ship- 
ping date has been announced. 

This is the first major small-business 
software I've seen. As this program and 
others like it become available, the Atari 
ST can fulfill its potential — as the power- 
ful computer for "most of us." 



File Edit Options Reports Month Vear Pract 


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3/1/86 iDepreciation Entry 1570 IDeprec iat i on 

h70 jHccum. Depr- - Furn. 


3540.44 


3540^44 


3/2/86 1 Acquired Truck 


160 jFurniture K Equipmen 
100 jCash in Bank - Check 
260 JMote Payable - Bank 


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Tod 




Deposi ts 

Cash in Bonk - Check 


1000 00 


Tdbd ' 00 


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14 


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3/18/86 


Misc Office SuppI ies 


670 iOf f ice SuppI ies 


348.72 




wtmm 






















■1^ 



Toward better business with Sierra's ST OneWrite. 



ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 79ST 



£«Z CALC 



For The Atari ST" 



TM PUTEZ CALC™TO WORK 
FOR YOU AND BENEFIT 
FROM THE RESULTS 



Desk Filt 



EZ CALC T" is a fully implemented GEM^" 
based spreadsheet for home and business 
use. This is by far the most powerful 
spreadsheet available for the price. Better 
yet, all commands are mouse controlled 
for speed and ease of use. EZ CALC™ 
also uses less memory than other spread- 
sheets tor the ST, leaving more room for 
your data and formulas. If you've never 
used a spreadsheet before, you'll be 
amazed how easy EZ CALC^** Is to learn 
and use. The experienced user will love 
the speed of a mouse controlled spread- 
sheet. 



MOUSE CONTROL 



Cx 



E! 



WIRK 

:iBi 

m 
eLki 

ilATEi 

fiiiilir 



Print ReciUulition Defwlts Htlp 



.tir Hunt 



I'Sli 



iete 
Fpe«M TitU 
(oto 
Instrt 
Justifi) 
Hove 
Mote Pid 
HepUott 
leplicite Cell 
Set Colum Hidtb 
Sirt 

Split Scrun 
[ 511 



mMT 



FWIIIITME 
TMD 







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STtT W B« MM jgMC 




I 



Extensive use of the GEM^'^ v\/indows 
makeEZ CALC^^^a fast, extremely easy- 
to- use spreadsheet. With over 50 
connmands available from the mouse, 
the ease of use is unsurpassed. Imagine 
being able to move or copy an entire 
column of figures with a simple mouse 
control. 




CALCULATOR 



EZ CALC includes an easy to use' 10 
key calculator that can be pulled dov(/n 
at anytime and operated either by 
mouse or keyboard. With the point of a 
mouse, the results of the calculation can 
then be transferred to the cell of your 
choice. 



ONLY $69.95 

FEATURES 

^ 300 columns by 999 rows 

^ Extensive use of GEM^*^ windows 

ly' All commands are under mouse 

control 
^ Built in 10 keypad calculator 
^ On-line help windows (No commands 

to memorize) 
^ Built in sort routine 
^ Developed exclusively for the Atari ST 
1^ 10 macros controlled by the function 

keys 
u^ Split-screen capabilities 
^ Note Pad 

GEM is a Trademark of DIGITAL RESEARCH, INC. 
EZ CALC is a Trademark o( ROYAL SOFTWARE. 

NOTE PAD 




EZ CALC lets you attach a personal 
note of up to 4 lines to any cell. The cell 
is then highlighted to remind you there 
is a note attached. For example, you 
could attach a note to the insurance cell 
of your personal finance spreadsheet 
reminding you that the cell applied only 
to car and home insurance. The note pad 
can be pulled down at any time. 



HelpCalc™ omy 24.95 

For The Atari ST" 

• 11 preprogrammed templates for use 
withEZ CALC™or VIP Professionar*^ 

• ioad-and-go and these templates will 
take the work out of tedious 
spreadsheet setup. 

Templates include: 

- Check Register 

- Depreciation schedules 

• Investment Portfolio Analysis 

- Name & Address directory 

- Home Inventory 
■ Loan Amortization Schedules 

- Personal Finance Statement 

- and more VIP PROFESSIONAL is a Trademark of 
VIP TECHNOLOGIES 




ST STAND 




ONLY $29.95 

+ $5.00 Min. Shipping & Handling 

Custom made just for the ST, beautifully 
finished stand to iiold your ST monitor, 2 disk 
drives, a modem, disk files, ETC... 



IF YOU OON'T HAVE OUR CATALOG . 
. . .YOU'RE MISSING OUT ! ! ! 



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DELUXE DUST COVERS 

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• COMPUTER— ATARI 520;iO40ST • PRINTERS— ATARI 825 

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• PRINTERS— EPSON EX 100/185 



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• 10 Key calculator 

• Appointment calendar with alarm functions 

• Telephone/name index 

All in one program 






m 


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n oaa 
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The best part is that HelpMate stays "hidden" in 
memory until needed, and then can be called up for 
use, even while another program is running. The pull 
down menus can be used with most ST programs or by 

themselves. 



Coming Soon!! 

INVENTORY 
MASTER ™ 



For The Atari ST" 

Only $179.95 



INVENTORY MASTER ''" Is a power- 
ful, Inventory control and Report genera- 
tion program. It will do more than just 
keep track business inventory, such as: 
detailed report generation, fast and easy 
data retrieval, versatile data entry, takes 
the work out of decision making, plus 
much more. 



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CIRCLE #135 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



// 



CES Scene 



continued 



Sublogic had hoped the ST Flight Simu- 
lator would be out in April. At the June 
CES, though, 1 was curtly told it would be 
available real soon. Those of you holding 
your breath for it may now exhale. 

Supra Corporation (formerly MPP, Mi- 
crobits Peripheral Products) showed a SVz- 
inch, 20-inegabyte hard disk for the ST. 
Actually, they weren't showing it, but had 
provided other companies with demo units 
for CES. What better way to advertise? 

Anyway, the disk will retail for $799.00, 
by the end of June. A 10-megabyte hard 
disk is sold directly from the factory at 
$549.00 (reduced from its earlier price). 
The 20-megabyte drive will be available 
from dealers, and a 60-megabyte drive is 
in the prototype stage. All Supra ST hard 
disks coimect to the DMA port and come 
with a boot program. 

Unison World, makers of PrintMaster, 
exhibited The Newsletter Program on an 
IBM PC. It should be available for the ST 
by the end of the year. 

It will let you mix text and graphics on 
the same page, in a newsletter format. 
Fonts can be changed dynamically any- 
where on the page, and multiple column 
printout is supported. 

The Newsletter Program works with the 
QSL laser printer, as well as dot-matrix 
printers. Price will be under $100.00 (or, 
more likely, closer to $50.00). 

XLent Software had several ST products 
out. Rubber Stamp ST is a combination of 
several graphic utilities, to let you create 
custom printouts for labels, index cards, lo- 
gos and letterheads. 

You can use graphics from NEO-Chrome 
and DEGAS, or create your own within the 
program. Complete control adds text, 
shrinks, rotates, copies sections, inverts 
and otherwise manipulates images. Rub- 
ber Stamp ST can also use custom charac- 
ter sets designed with the DEGAS font 
editor. The program, available now, sells 
for $39.95. 

Another new XLent program is Mega- 
font ST. This, too, is a port of an existing 
8-bit program. With it, graphic files from 
DEGAS, NEO-Chrome, Rubber Stamp and 
others can be printed, in a variety of sizes. 
In addition, IstWord, ASCII and program 
files can be printed in varied character 



^mh 



Hr^^ 



E 




styles, including those used by the DEGAS 
font editor. The program supports a num- 
ber of printers and will be going for $39.95 
by the time you read this. 

ST Music Box is a MIDI package to let 
you compose for a MIDI keyboard or the 
ST console speaker. Compositions can be 
entered via mouse or keyboard, and a 
range of editing features (insert, delete, key 
signature and many more) are provided. 
The ST Music Box should be selling for 
$49.95 at this issue's release. 

The End. 

The amount of software now available for 
the Atari ST is simply amazing, all the 
more incredible when you realize the ST 
appeared thirteen short months ago now. 
There was still more from others like Hip- 
popotamus, but we just couldn't include it 
all. 

To all skeptics out there (publishers, 
dealers and users): the ST is real; ST soft- 
ware is real; and I personally welcome 
back a healthy computer industry. 

As Dorothy said, clicking her heels, 
three times, "There's no place like home, 
there's no place like home, there's no place 
like home" For an ST user, the 1986 Sum- 
mer CES was a hell of a show. H 



^^^W^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ff^^^^^^^^^ 



FOR THE 

ST COMPUTER 

SBMST 

$ 99.95 

SBM ST is a Point of Sale, 
Inventory Control program. 
Produces purchase orders, 
invoices, statements, quotes, 
mailing labels, sales and 
account reports, plus much 
more. 

Unlimited Inventory Items 
Unlimited Vendors 
Unlimited Accounts 

256 K XL 

Now Only $ 69.95 

Get 256K Ram for your 800/ 

1200 XL at this unheard of 

new low price. This even 

includes the Mydos Dos and 

manual. 

Without Ram $39.95 

Contact . . . 

Newell Industries 

602 E. Hwy 78 

Wylie, Texas 75098 

(214)442-6612 

for a complete list of products 

for Atari computers. Dealer and 

Distributor inquiries welcome. 
aaannMM 



UBuau 



CIRCLE IH36 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ST INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



r// 



ST Music Box. 



READER SERVICE « 



ADVERTISER 



117 Abacus Software 50ST 83ST 

121 Access Software 58ST 

157 Batteries Included OBC (regular pages) 

118 Bayview Software 54ST 

125 Beckemeyer Development Tools 65ST 

119 GAL COM, INC 54ST 

128 Central Point Software 66ST 

131 Commnet Systems 72ST 82ST 

134 Computer Mail Order 77ST 

135 Computer Palace 80ST 

127 InSoft, Corp 66ST 

123 Megamax 61ST 

— Megatech 63ST 

101 MichTron IPC (regular pages) 

122 Micro Illusions . 59ST 

124 Mountain Magic Software 65ST 

136 Newell Industries 81ST 

137 Omnitrend 82ST 

120 Prospero Software 56ST 

130 Regent Software 70ST 

133 Rosetta Stone Software 75ST 82ST 

126 Serious Software 65ST 

132 TD.1 72ST 

129 Terrific Peripherals 70ST 

— VIP Technologies 69ST 



ST-LOG 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 81ST 



IL©®DsSmg floff a Iblbs wraiUln g^ffoaiilcBrp 
©©ipItinsilScsattncDiii aimdl msics)S(B 

FoReM ST 

The ULTIMATE ST BBS SYSTEM 

is NOW available! 

For a limited time, receive $10 off the regular 
$99.95 price of FoReM ST when you trade in 
your current commercial ST BBS system. 

Offer expires August 30, 1986. 

Requires receipt of proof of purchase. 

For a trial run, call the FoReM ST BBS at 301-552-2573 

FoReM STs lengthy list of features includes: 



Status window 

Individual user 

Electronic Mail 

Kermit 

Buiit In Terminal Mode 

Full Message Editor 



300 9600 baud Hard disk support 

restrictions Accounting system 

Full Message Editor Distnbulion lists 

Xmodem 65536 access levels 



Privilege system 
64 sigs 
20 file sigs 
Multiple Data Bases 



Full remote sysop access 



To Order Phone 301-428-0474. 
For Technical Assistance phone 301-552-2517. 



Commnet Systems 

7348 Green Oak Terrace, Lanham, MD 20706 



prvjrER A NEW WOfJLD Of unprecen- 

j=dented depth and excitement with 

'Omriitrend's Universe N. It's quite unlike 

any game you've ever seen before, 

^witng the thnti of role playing 

"*" > depth of story possible only in 

entures. 

a free trader tn a cluster of stars 
as the Local Group. Through 
ding, mining, passengei 
and orbital piracy, 
to earn 
your ship, 
rew. repa: 





CIRCLE IH31 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




Un- 

Of your 

also an active c 

for one of the govern 

cal Group. As the interstella- 

ens, you'll be called upon to . 

operations deep within enemy tt 

Universe II is available for the Atari S 
intosh, and IBM computers Price S6C 
Omnitrend: Universe I for the Atari XUXE, -Appre 
IBfVl computers. Price S59.95, 

To order tontact your local dealer ( 
Omnitrend at (203) 658-691 7 
PO Bo< 3, West Simsbury, CT 06092 

Circle #u/ on reader SERVICE CARD 




Talking W)rd Processor 



Talker does everything you'd 
expect from a full-featured word 
processor, plus Talker does just 
that — talks. It reads your text, 
word-for-word or letter-by-letter. 

So, Talker is great for 
proofreading, learning to type and 
the sight impaired. 

Talker's puO down menus and 



simple commands make it easy to 

use, and at $69.96 it's easy on your 

budget. 

Bring your words to life with Talker 

S69.96 

Call collect to learn more aix)ut Talker Or, 
order risk free, your satisfection is guaranteed. 

(714) 854-4434 




ROSETL^ 



SOFTWARE 

4000 MacArthur Blvd. Suite 3000 
Newport Beach, California 92663 



CIRCLE #133 ON READER SERVICE CARD 




FESSIONAL 
DUCTIVITY 



New ST software from a name you can count on... 



PCBoard 
Designer 

Create printed circuit board layouts 




Features: Auto-routing, component 
list, pinout list, net list 




FilePro 



Word processor for the ST 



The electronic 
filing system 
for the ST 




tXJbOJ 



PCBoard Designer 

Interactive, computer-aided design 
package thtat automates layout of 
printed circuit boards. Auto-routing 
with 45° or 90° traces; two-sided 
boards; pin-to-pin, pin-to-BUS or BUS- 
to-BUS. Rubberbanding of components 
during placement. Prints board layout, 
pinout, component list, net list. Output 
to Epson printer at 2:1. Pays for itself 
after first designed board. $395.00 



ST TexlPro 

Wordprocessor with professional 
features and easy-to-use! Full-screen 
editing with mouse or keyboard 
shortcuts. High speed input, scrolling 
and editing; sideways printing; 
multi-column output; flexible printer 
installation; automatic index and table 
of contents; up to 180 chars/line; 30 
definable function keys; metafile 
output; much more. $49.95 



ST FilePro 

A simple-to-use and versatile database 
manager. Features help screens; 
lightning-fast operation; tailorable 
display using multiple fonts; 
user-definable edit masks; capacity up 
to 64,000 records. Supports multiple 
files. RAM-disk support for 1040ST. 
Complete search, sort and file 
subsetting. Interfaces to TextPro. Easy 
printer control. $49.95 




PaintPro 



(1 



PaintPro 



PaintPro 



Hamiyro^ gH^ 

/iTj/j^ir^^-^. lonJhaST 
^■^>i r^ <ffl> "O^ .Jj Multiple 
For creative illustrations on the S' "i""*"*' 





ex 





Combine graphics 
with your text 



AssemPro 

The complete 68000 

assembler development 

package for the ST 




fywmmmmmmMW 



ST Forth/MT 

Powerful, multi-tasking Forth for 
the ST. A complete, 32-blt imple- 
mentation based on Forth-83 
standard. Developn^ent aids: full 
screen editor, monitor, macro 
assembler. 1500+ word library. 
TOS/LINEA commands. Floating 
point and complex arithmetic. 
Available Sept. '86. $49.95 



ST PaintPro 

A GEM™ among ST drawing 
programs. Very friendly, but very 
powerful. A must for everyone's 
artistic or graphics needs. Use 
up to three windows. Free-form 
sketching; lines, circles, ellipses, 
boxes, text, fill, copy, move, 
zoom, spray, paint, erase, undo, 
help. $49.95 



ST Text Designer 

An Ideal package for page layout 
on the ST. Accepts prepared text 
files from TextPro or other ASCII 
wordprocessors. Performs block 
operations — copy, move, col- 
umns. Merges bit-mapped 
graphkis. Tools to add borders & 
separator lines, more. Available 
September '86. $49.95 



Abacus 



Hsmmi 



[ 



Software 



ST AssemPro 

Professional developer's pack- 
age includes editor, two-pass 
interactive assembler with error 
locator, online help Including 
Instruction address mode and 
GEM parameter Information, 
monitor-debugger, disassembler 
and 68020 simulator, more. 
Available Sept. '86. $59.95 

ST and 1 (MOST are trademarks of Atari Corp. 
GEM is a trademar l( o( Digital Research Inc. 



P.O. Box 7219 Dept.N9 Grand Rapids, Ml 49510 -Telex 709-101 - Phone (616) 241-5510 

Call now for the name of your nearest dealer. Or order directly from ABACUS with your h^asterCard, VISA, or Amex card. Add 
$4.00 per order for postage and handling. Foreign add $10.00 per item. Other software and books coming soon. Call or 
write for your free catalog. Dealer inquiries welcome-over 1400 dealers nationwide. 



CIRCLE #117 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



We Challenge You! 

With our Atari ST programming contest 




THIRD PRIZE 

$1000 



3 HONORABLE MENTIONS 
$500 each 



Take up the gauntlet! We're challenging ST programmers— give us your best. Original, exciting software for the ST is what we 
want, and your work could win $5,000 for 1st prize. Winners will also get our normal royalty payment when their programs are 
published in ST-Log, the ANALOG Computing ST resource. If your program doesn't win, it could still earn you money Normal 
publication fees will be paid for inclusion in ST-Log. Read the rules below and meet our challenge! 



RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE ST-LOG 

ST PROGRAMMING CONTEST 



1. All entries must be original creations and cannot be submitted, 
or be under consideration, anywtiere eise. This includes any ottier 
contests or competitions currently underway, 

2. Feel free to submit as many entries as you like, as often as you 
like. Ttie deadline for submissions to the contest is December 31. 1986. 
All entries must be in by that date to qualify for the contest judging 
(however programs received after this date will be considered for regu- 
lar ST-Log publication). 

There is no limit to what types of programs we are looking for Busi- 
ness or educational, graphics oriented or musically inclined, we want 
to see them all 

3. The entries can be in any programming language of your choice, 
on 3V2-inch single- or double-sided disk, with both run-time and source 
code. It's quality that counts, not format. If your program is in a com- 
piled language, the compiled object or run-time code must be a free- 
standing program—one which can be run by someone without a copy 
of that language. This rule does not apply to 
programs written in ST BASIC and Logo, 
which come with the ST Also, we need to be 
able to distribute the program legally with- 
out licensing fees or obligation to the lan- 
guage's maker Contact the manufacturer to 




find out if the language you're using has distribution requirements, 

4. Please make sure that all entries have accompanying documen- 
tation, and that all written materials pertaining to the entries (includ- 
ing articles) are submitted as standard double-spaced typewritten 
manuscript. Please try to make the text as informative as possible, 
as it pertains to the usage of the program. This accompanying piece 
could be in the vein of a "making of" the entry and could include 
some of your personal programming hints, etc, 

5. Any submissions that do not qualify for prizes will be returned only 
if you supply us with a stamped, self-addressed envelope or mailer 
Please do not send originals of your program— make sure you keep 
a copy for your own use, 

6. Contest judging will be done by the staff of ST-Log, The decision 
of the judges in all contest categories will be final. Contest winners 
will be announced in ST-Log during the first quarter of 1987, 

7. This contest is void where prohibited by law. Full-time employees 
of ANALOG 400/800 Magazine Corp, are in- 
eligible for this contest, 

8. Send your entries to: ST-Log, c/o ANA- 
LOG 400/800 Magazine Corp,, PC Box 23 
Worcester MA 01603 _ , , , , 

Good luck! 



rHBArAfiisr 

OPB/l/ITVfJ'S 
MACAZMB 

LOG 



REVIEW 



^ 

**•-< 




hawk 



by Andy Eddy 



I've always rooted for small, indepen- 
dent software producers to overcome their 
size handicaps and become successful in 
a volatile marketplace. With so much to 
lose, should a product not meet the pub- 
lic's approval, the ones out there who try 
should be commended for their unseen 
battle. 

Orion Software is one such company. 
They've introduced their first product, 
Blackhawk. I had hoped for a bigger thrill, 
but it seems they have a bit of work ahead 
of them before challenging the major soft- 
ware manufacturers. 

Your main plan, as the mission leader 
in Blackhawk, is to guide your helicopter 
deep behind enemy lines, to rescue the for- 
ty hostages held captive there (reminiscent 
of the bestselhng Choplifter) and bring 
them back to the safety of your aircraft car- 
rier This takes you and your chopper 
through the rocket-irrfested jungle lands of 
yovu- hostile opponent — the computer 

Along the way to the American Embassy 
(now in enemy control and where the cap- 
tives are being held) you can opt to destroy 
the many oil tanks, buildings and battle 
tanks that your limited arsenal can oblit- 
erate. This weapon cache consists of air- 
to-ground rockets (for blasting the above- 
mentioned land-based targets) and auto- 
matic cannons, which come in handy 
when battling the occasional enemy heli- 
copter straying into your path. 

The updated "status window" at the top 



of the screen will constantly keep you 
abreast of suppUes remaining, as well as 
vital information about fuel quantity, alti- 
tude and rcinge to the embassy. 

Excessive rocket strikes on your ship 
will lower the crew total, and, should the 
crew's number reach zero, your heUcopter 
will crash. You must also exceed a mini- 
mum altitude over the terrain — or risk a 
crash that will bring a quick end to the 
scenario. 

Unfortunately, there are a few things that 
prevent you from enjoying this game to the 
fullest. While it's Orion's intention to pro- 
vide inexpensive programs to Atari users 
(and indeed they've succeeded at that task) 
it appears that Blackhawk lacks the neces- 
sary pohsh to make it an exciting battle. 

It's a mixed blessing that the game can 
be controlled through the use of two joy- 
sticks. Without the ability to hold both of 
them comfortably, there are problems. 
While functions handled by the second 
stick are still keyboard controllable, it re- 
minds me of my experiences with the ar- 
cade game Defender; there were simply too 
many buttons to keep track of. 

My main complaint with games of this 
type accompanies their increases in diffi- 
culty. Consideration has to be made for 
differences in player ability, and, unfortun- 
ately, most programmers make the game 
more intense just by increasing speed of 
play or the mileage you must cover. With- 
out the incorporation of fresh challenges 
into the contest, play cjuickly becomes run- 
of-the-mill. 



Blackhawk is a promising start for this 
freshman company, and I'd hate to see their 
talents go for naught in the eyes of wary 
consumers. No one wants to spend money 
on a lackluster product, so when someone 
comes along offering performance and a 
good price to boot, they can expect to go 
through greater-than-normal scrutiny. 

Blackhawk, with its somewhat blocky 
artwork and hardly innovative theme, is a 
mediocre introduction — but, at $15.00, it 
shines a little more than it normally 
would. Computers and software have come 
a long way in the last few years, and we've 
come to expect a great deal from the in- 
dustry. Let's hope Orion tightens things up 
for the next go-round. We'll see if they can 
live up to the promise they show, fl 

Andy Eddy works as a cable TV techni- 
cian in Connecticut, but has been interest- 
ed in computers since high school. While 
his family's Atari 800 is three years old, 
he's been avidly playing arcade games 
since Space Invaders and is a former rec- 
ord holder on Battlezone. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 85 



Color Monitor 

Sale 




(Premium Quality) 

* Built in Speaker & Audio 

* For Video Recorders 

* For Small Business 
Computers 

* Apple - Commodore 
-Atari - Aplus 3000 -etc. 

* One Year Warranty' 



y^0 



RGB 

Super High 
Resolution 





(Premium Quality) 



Beautiful Color 
Contrast 

High Resolution 

Sharp Clear Text 

Anti-Glare Screen 

40 Columns x 24 Lines 

Front Panel Controls 



13" Color Computer Monitor' 

*C64/ Atari composite coble $9.95 
* C128 RGB/Composite 80 column cable $19.95. 



List $329°° 

$ 

Sale 



139" 



Add $14.50 Shipping 



14" RGB & Composite Color Monitor 

Allows use of C-128 and C64 mode - composite ond 80 column RGB mode. 
Must be used to get 80 columns in color with 80 column computers. Specially 
designed for use witfi tfie C128's special composite video output, plus green 
screen only option switch, (add $14.50 shipping) 



List $399.00 $OOA95 

Sole AOl 



12" 80 Column Green/ Amber Monitor ust $12900 

Super high resolution composite green or amber screen monitor. 80 Cm 1 A 

columns x 24 lines, easy to read. Fantastic value. Limited Quantities. J**lt» 



79 



95 



9" Samsung Hi Res Green Screen Monitor 

Super High Resolution 80 column monitor perfect for Apple & Loser 3000/128 
computers. Fantastic Value. Very Limited Quontities. 



List $129.95 $ 

Sale 



59 



49 



95 



Turn Your Monitor into a TV Set Without Moving Your Computer 

Elegant TV Tuner with dual UHF/VHF selector switches goes between your . . . »i/jq qc 
computer and monitor. Includes mute, automatic fine tuning and computer- fi/y-yj 

TV selector switches. Inputs included for 300 ohm, 75 ohm, and UHF. Can be #* I 

used with coble TV and VCR's. Fantastic Value. Limited Quantities. (Includes SO I G 

loop antenna for UHF & RCA connecting cables) (Add $3.00 Shipping. Plus 
$3.00 for APO/FPO). 

15 Day Free Trial - 90 Day Immediate Replacem ent Warrant y 

» LOWEST PRICES 'BEST SERVICE IN U.S.A. • ONE DAY EXPRESS MAIL • OVER 500 PROGRAMS ' FREE CATALOGS 



Add $10.00 for shipping, hondling and insurance. Illinois residents 
please odd 6%% tax. Add J20.00 tor CANADA, PUERTO RICO, 
HAWAII, ond ALASKA orders. Canadian orders must be in U.S. dollors. 
WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES, EXCEPT CANADA. Enclose 
Cashier Check, Money Order or Personol Check. Allow U doys for 
delivery, 2 to 7 days for phone orders, t day express mail! Prices & 
Availability subject to chonge without notice. 
VISA — MASTER CARD — C.O.D. C.O.D. on phone orders only 



COMPUTER DIRECT 

We Love Our Customers 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington, III. 60010 

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Famous National Brand 

4f Commodore"* Atarf* Apple • IBM" ^ ^ 

f^ 8V2 " Letter Size"^ 

^ 80 Column^^ 
^Printer Sale 

• Word Processing • Program Listings • Graphics • Quiet 

Operation • Upper and Lower case • Ail points addressable 

Graphics • Underline • Enhanced • Much much More 

Super Quality 



*f 



i 




81/2" Letter Size Carriage 



This printer was made by Canon® for 

one of the largest computer 

manufacturers in the world. The Big 

Blue printer comes ready to hook up 

to the serial port of the IBM® PC jr. 

Plus with low cost adapter cables you 

can connect the Big Blue printer to the 

IBM®PC, IBM®XT, IBM®AT, 

Apple®II,IIe,IIc, Commodore® 

64,128, Atari®, plus many more. 

• 15 Day Free Trial 
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Now you can have a full fledged 8 '/2 " letter size 80 column printer for less than the cost of a large 
box of paper. This printer uses advanced thermal technology to print upper and lower case (with 
true lower descenders), underline, enhanced, all points addressable graphics (works with Print- 
shop) plus More. Print out pictures, program listings, wordprocessing pages, graphics and more. 
Perfect for the homeowner or student and definitely affordable. Fantastic Printer at an unbeatable] 
price. List $199.00 Sale $39.95 



Intslllgent Commodore Interface — Allows you to 
connect the Big Blue printer to the( printer port of the 
Commodore 64 and 128 computer. Print Commodore 
graphics, use Printshop, Word processors and more... 
List $49.95 Sale $24.95 



Intelligent Atari Interface — Allows you to connect 
the Big Blue printer to Atari computers (except 1200). 
Print Atari graphics, Printshop ,word processors, and 
more... List $49.95 Sole $24.95 



IBM®, Apple® RS-232 Adapter — Adapts the Big Blue printer to be used with any RS-232 port. 
List $19.95 Sale $9.95 ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^.^^ ^^^^^ ^,^ ,, ,^ 

IBM, Appl«, Conon, Commodor», Atorl of trod^mofka of IntTnottonol Bmtn»»» MqchliTS, AppU ComputT, Concxi Inc. Commodof Bualrwi Mochln*», Atorl Inc. R»«p«ctlvlY. 



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Electronic Arts 

A0790 CHESSMASTER 2000 (D) $26.95 

A079I AGE OF ADVENTURE (D) $12.95 

A0792 GOLDEN OLDIES (D) $19.95 

A0793 SUPER BOULDERDASH (D) $12.95 

A0794 RACING DESTRUCTION SET (D) $12.95 

A0684 DR. J & LARRY BIRD GO 1 ON 1 (D) $12.95 

A0685 MOVIE MAKER (D) $23.95 

A0686 SEVEN CITIES OF GOLD (D) $12.95 

A0687 PINBALL CONSTRUCTION SET (D) $12.95 

A0688 MUSIC CONSTRUCTION SET (D) $12.95 

A0689 FINANCIAL COOKBOOK (D) $27.95 

A0690 M.U.L.E. (D) $12,95 

A0691 MURDER ON THE ZINDERNUEF (D) $12.95 

Designware 

A0409 SPELLAKAZAM (D) $ 9.95 

A0403 MATH MAZE (D) $12.95 

A0406 TRAP-A-ZOID (D) $ 9.95 

A0401 CRYPTO CUBE (D) $12.95 

A0400 MISSION ALGEBRA (D) $24.95 

A0404 SPELLICOPTER (D) $12.95 

A0402 SPELLAGRAPH (D) $ 9.95 

A0475 BLUE CHIP TYCOON $19.95 

A0477 BLUE CHIP MILLIONAIRE $19.95 

Broderbund 

A0045 PRINT SHOP (D) $25.95 

A0046 GRAPHIC LIBRARY 1 (D) $15.95 

A0047 GRAPHIC LIBRARY 2 (D) $15.95 

A0300 GRAPHIC LIBRARY 3 (D) $15.95 

A0669 BANK STREET WRITER (D) $32.95 

A0517 LODE RUNNER (D) $23.95 

A0670 CHAMPIONSHIP LODE RUNNER (D) $18,95 

A0671 KARATEKA (D) $18.95 

Activision 

A0520 STAR BOWL FOOTBALL (D) $23.95 

A0795 ON TRACK RACING (D) $17.95 

A0796 MUSIC STUDIO (D) $20.95 

A0797 STAR LEAGUE BASEBALL (D) $17,95 

A0598 SPACE SHUTTLE (D) $15,95 

A0599 GHOSTBUSTERS (D) $23.95 

A0665 HACKER (D) $15.95 

A0666 MIND SHADOW (D) $15.95 

A0667 MASTER OF THE LAMPS (D) $15.95 

A0668 GR AMER CROSS CNTRY RD RACE (D) ... $1 5,95 

Avalon Hill 

A0960 COMPUTER TITLE BOUT (D) $18.95 

A0961 JUPITER MISSION 1999 (D) $29.95 

A0962 COMBAT CHEES (D) $17.95 

A0963 MISSION ON THUNDERHEAD (D) $17.95 

A0578 TAC (D) $24.95 

A0606 QUEST OF THE SPACE BEAGLE (D) $22.95 

A0607 CLEAR FOR ACTION (D) $19.95 

A0609 GULF STRIKE (D) . . . .• $19.95 

Cosmi 

A0509 CAVERNS OF KHAFKA (TSD) $12.95 

A05O7 FORBIDDEN FOREST (TSD) $12.95 

A0798 TALLEDEGA (TSD) $12.95 

A0799 MASTERS OF TIME (D) $12.95 

A0506 AZTEC CHALLENGE (D) $ 5.95 

A0610 E FACTOR (D) $ 5.95 

A0612 CRYPTS OF PLUMBOUS (D) $ 5.95 

A0615 SPIDER INVASION (T) $ 5.95 

A0614 MELTDOWN (D) $ 5.95 

Xlent 

A0810 TYPESETTER (D) $24.95 

A081 1 RUBBER STAMP (D) $19.95 

A0812 PAGE DESIGNER (D) $21.95 

A0813 MEGAFONT (D) $18.95 



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Woekly Reader 

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A041 5 STICKYBEAR OPPOSITES (D) $1 4.95 

A0416 STICKYBEAR ABC (D) $14.95 

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BUSINESS 

A0201 ATARI WRITER PLUS (D) $49.95 

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A02I3 PAPERCLIP $49.95 

A0208 MENU WRITER (D) $19.95 

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A0717 SYN CALC (D) $32,95 

A0718 SYN CALC TEMPLATES (D) $14.95 

A0672 APPT PLNR/WKLY SCHEDULE (D) $12,95 

A0673 ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE (0) $1 1 ,95 

A0674 ACCOUNTS PAYABLE (D) $1 1 ,95 

Synapse 

A0535 BLUE fAAX 2001 (D) $19,95 

A0537 NEW YORK CITY/ELECTRICIAN (D) $14.95 

A0540 BLUE AAAX (D) $19.95 

A0715 MIND WHEEL (D) $24.95 

A0716 ESSEX (D) $24.95 

Epyx 

A0520 JUMPMAN (D) $14.95 

A0521 DRAGON RIDERS OF PERN (D) $14.95 

A0522 SUMMER OLY GAMES (D) $22.95 

A0523 PITSTOP II (D) $22.95 

A0524 BALL BLAZER (D) $22.95 

A0525 RESCUE ON FRACTULUS (D) $22.95 

A0693 KORONIS RIFT (D) $22.95 

A0692 THE EIDOLON (D) $22.95 

A0355 WORLD KARATE CHAMPIONSHIP (D) $18.95 



Strategic Simulations, inc. 

A0968 SIX GUN SHOOTOUT (D) $23.95 

A0969 BATTLE OF ANTIETAM (D) $31 .95 

A0970 U.S.A.A.F. (D) $36.95 

A0971 CARRIER FORCE (D) $36.95 

A0972 NAM (D) $23.95 

A0973 MECH BRIGADE (D) $36.95 

A0527 FIELD OF FIRE (D) $23.95 

A0530 IMPERIUM GALATUM (D) $23.95 

A0531 RAILS WEST (D) $23.95 

A0533 50 MISSION CRUSH (D) $23.95 

A0590 BROADSIDES (D) $23.95 

A0591 COMPUTER QUARTERBACK (D) $23.95 

A0592 COMPUTER AMBUSH (D) $36.95 

A0593 COMPUTER BASEBALL (D) $23.95 

A0712 COLONIAL CONQUEST (D) $23.95 

A0714 KAMPFGRUPPE (D) $36.95 



Atari 

A0420 ATARI MUSIC I (D) $19.95 

A0421 ATARI MUSIC II (D) $19,95 

A0422 INTRO PROG I (T) $14,95 

A0423 INTRO PROG 11 (T) $14,95 

A0424 INTRO PROG III (T) $14,95 

A0425 ATARI LAB STARTER (C) $39,95 

A0425 ATARI LAB LIGHT MOD (C) $28,95 

A0428 SKYWRITER (C) $16,95 

A0429 CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH (T) $16.95 

A0430 CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH (T) $16.95 

A0431 MY FIRST ALPHABET (D) $16.95 

A0432 SPEED READING (T) $19.95 

A0433 TYPO ATTACK (C) $16.95 

A0435 VERBAL MODULE SAT (D) $29.95 

A0436 SAT SAMPLE PRETEST (D) $17.95 

A0437 MATH MODULE SAT (D) $29.95 

A0438 TOUCH TYPING (T) $14,95 

A0439 JUGGLES RAINBOW (D) $16,95 

A0440 JUGGLES HOUSE (D) $16,95 

A0442 TOUCH TABLET/SOFTWARE $49,00 

A0443 PAINT (D) $19,95 

A0315 PILOT/TURTLE GRAPHICS (C) $29,95 

A0316 LOGO (C) $39.95 

A0318 ASSEMBLER/EDITOR (C) $19.95 

A0319 MACRO ASSEMBLER (C) $19.95 

Fislier Price 

A0444 LINKING LOGIC (C) $4.95 

A0445 DANCE FANTASY (C) $4.95 

A0446 MEMORY AAANOR (C) $4,95 

A0447 LOGIC LEVELS (C) $4,95 

Spinnaicer 

A0448 KINDERCOMP (C) $4.95 

A0449 PACEMAKER (C) $4,95 

A045O KIDS ON KEYS (C) $ 4.95 

A0451 GRANDMAS HOUSE (D) $16.95 

A0452 KIDWRITER (D) $16.95 

A0454 IN SEARCH AAAAZ THING (D) $22.95 

A0455 TRAINS (D) $18.95 

A0456 ALPHABET ZOO (C) $4.95 

A0457 AEROBICS (D) $22.95 

A0710 DELTA DRAWING (C) $4,95 

A07I 1 ADVENTURE CREATOR (C) $4,95 

American Educational Computer 

A0485 SPELLING $19.95 

A0459 VOCABULARY WORD BLDR (D) $9.95 

A0460 GRAMMAR WRK USE SKILLS (D) $9.95 

A0461 WORLD GEOGRAPHY FACTS (D) $9.95 

A0462 SPANISH VOCAB SKILLS (D) $9.95 

A0463 FRENCH VOCAB SKILLS (D) $9.95 

A0464 WORLD HISTORY FACTS (D) $9.95 

A0465 US HISTORY FACTS (D) $9.95 

A0466 US GEOGRAPHY FACTS (D) $9.95 

A0467 US GOVERNMENT FACTS (D) $9.95 

A0468 LEARN TO READ (D) $19,95 

A0470 READING COMPREHENSION (D) $19,95 

A0418 BIOLOGY FACTS (D) $9.95 

A0493 ELEM SCIENCE 3 8 4 (D) $9,95 

A0494 ELEM SCIENCE 5 8 6 (D) $9.95 

A0495 ELEM SCIENCE 7 8 8 (D) $9.95 

Artiworx 

A0660 BRIDGE 4.0 (D) $15.95 

A0661 COMPUBRIDGE (D) $15.95 

A0738 LINKWORD LANGUAGE-SPANISH (D) . . ,$16.95 

A0739 LINKWORD LANG-FRENCH (D) $16.95 

A0740 LINKWORD LANG-GERAAAN (D) $16.95 

A0741 LINKWORD LANG-ITALIAN (D) $16.95 

A0663 MONKEYMATH (D) $15.95 

A0664 MONKEY NEWS (D) $15.95 



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r.lRP.I F #1M nw nPAHPn CCD\/if^c r-zvor. 



M 1 52K Lowest Price In The USA ! i 52k 

ATARr Computer System Sale 

• Students • Word Processing • Home • Business 




Limits*^ Time 

ffltt software «( system Purctase 

iOO/C/^r>^U YOU GET FOR ONLY 5 3 #9 

llAlirED OUANTITIES 

® Atari 130XE 152K Computer 

©Atari 1050 127K DisK Drive 

©Atari 1027 Letter Quality 20 CPS Printer 

Super Atari Word Processor 

Atari BASIC Tutorial Manual 



SYSTEM PRICE 



LIST PRICE 

$249.00 

299.00 

299.00 

59.95 

16.95 



INDIVIDUAL 

SALE PRICE 

$134'* 

159'* 

159" 

49" 

7" 



All connecting cables S T.V. interface included. 
■d Monitors sold seporetly. 



TOTALS 



$923.90 $512.75 



SAVE 
OVER $100 

All 5 ONLY 

$3^900 

SYSTEM 
SALE PRICE 



CALL FOR 1027 PRINTER REPLACEIVIENT OPTIONS 



' Free software subject to substitution for other titles 



Other Accessories List Sale 

it 12" Hi Resolution Green Screen Monitor $199.00 $79.95 

ii- 13" Hi Resolution Color Monitor $399.00 $139.95 



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Connection Cables 

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15 DAY FREE TRIAL. We give you 15 days to try out this ATARI COMPUTER SYSTEM! I If it doesn't meet your expectations, just send it back to us prepaid 
and we will refund your purchase price! ! 90 DAY IMMEDIATE REPLACEMENT WARRANTY. If any of the ATARI COMPUTER SYSTEM equipment or 
programs fail due to faulty workmanship or material within 90 days of purchase we will replace it IMMEDIATELY with no service charge ! ! 



Best Prices * Over 1000 Programs and 500 Accessories Available * Best Service 
* One Day Express Mail * Programming Knowledge * Technical Support 



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ATARI 1200XL 

CLOSE-OUT 




$4999 



Order No. MB1200 



Quantities Limited 



ATARI 400 




$2999 

Order No. AAB400 "See disclaimer below 



LAST 

CH4NCE 

SPECIAL 



ATARI 130XE 






2 Fmb Program* 
Our Choice 



Order No. 
AA130XE 



$-12900 



ATARI 65XE 

/iffVi'iViViVi'r/'' 

/ i""'''''V,,'l/ 



2 Free Progrmm* 
Our Choico 



Order No. 
AA65XE 



$8909 



EPSON LX-90 
PRINTER 




ATARI 1050 
DISK DRIVE 

DOS 3.0 Included 



INDUS GT 
DISK DRIVE 



80 Column Dot Matrix 
$14900 





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$12900 



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lADD 



$18900 



AXLON 
CLOSE-OUT 

C.M.O. Exclusive 

32K RAM Boards.. ^29®® 

48K RAM Boards.. ^39®® 

128K RAM Disk^l 19'® 
We bought the entire 
inventory from Axion! 



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ATARI 850 
INTERFACE 
$10900 



ATARI 1020 
COLOR PRINTER 

$2909 



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APEFACE 

PRINTER INTERFACE 
$3999 



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DIRECT CONNECT 

MODEM 



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HACKER SPECIAL! 
Not in worthing condition 



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2 for 



$999 



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$11900 



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14" Color Composite Monitor 

$16900 



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Model 1200AT 
$15900 



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ATARI 
Cassette Specials 



SCRAM 
MICKEY IN 
GREAT OUTDOORS 

YOUR CHOICE 



KINGDOM 

MAIL LIST . 

BLACK JACK 

PROGRAMMING 2 

BIORHYTHM 

HANGMAN 

MORTGAGE & LOAN ANALYSIS 

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$39^ 



ea. 



ATARI ROM Specials 



Video Easel 
Space Invaders 
Star Raiders 
Missile Command 
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Defender 

• E.T. Phone Home 

• Eastern Front 

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DISKETTES 

SONY S'A" SS/SD (10) »9» 

SONY 31/2" SS/DD (10) •IB" 

SONY 31/2" DS/DD(10) »29»« 

MAXELL 5V4" SS/SD(10). No. MX01 Sll"" 

GENERIC SS/SD (10), No. NT01 »9» 

AMARY 5V4" Disk Tub, 50 capacity S9»» 



Neiv Factory-Sealed 

Summer Special 

ATARI ROMS 



Ms. PacMan 
Tennis • 

Donkey Kong Jr. • 

Star Raider YOUR . 
Asteroids CHOICE • 
PacMan $EQQ • 
Galaxian ^WtJa ' 
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Donkey Kong 

E.T. Piione i-lome 

Dig Dug 

Missile Command 

Defender 

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Qix 





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CIRCLE #134 ON READER SERVICE CARD 







Panak 
strikes! 

Reviews of the latest 
software * ^^ 



by Steve Panak 



We've hit it again, loyal readers: the mid- 
summer drought. Software seems to evap- 
orate, and the few new games which ap- 
pear do so like small islands on the hori- 
zon, viewed by the sailor lost at sea — 
optimistic mirages. My frenzied mind, 
groping for anything to play, seems to seize 
upon and enjoy what hindsight tells me are 
the worst games I've ever seen. 

Fortunately, such is not the case this 
month, for I'm just entering the drought. 
Its most acrid fruits will reach these pages 
in early autumn. To help you get through 
those dreaded days, I've selected these 
games for your perusal. Enjoy. 



Fooblitzky 



by Michael Berlyn 
INFOCOM, INC. 
125 CambrldgePark Drive 
Cambridge, MA 02140 
48K Disk $39.95 

This new program proves that success 
belongs to those who take chances. Let me 
explain. 

Most companies, when they have a good 
thing going (are selling at least enough to 
nudge themselves into the black), tend to 
become complacent. They stick to their 
tried and true formula. They may change 
some minor variable ever so slightly, but 
are otherwise stagnant. 

For the past few years, Infocom has been 
following this pattern, issuing a chain of 
top-notch text adventures consistently 
among the best I review in these pages. 
That's stagnation I can live with. 

But the geniuses who have given us such 



classics as Zork and 
Deadline have appar- 
ently, and surprisingly, 
diverged from their usual 
course. They've released a 
product which might very well 
be the most talked-about game 
this year. . . Fooblitzky. 

Having skillfully accomplished 
the remarkable task of merging com 
puter and novel, they've taken on a possi- 
bly greater challenge — fusing board game 
and computer. Gaming may never be the 
same. 

A strange mixture of games like Clue, 
Mastermind, and Trouble (as well as a 
number whose names I no longer remem- 
ber), Fooblitzky will supply board game 
fans with hours of pleasure. The concept 
is simple: up to four players each secretly 
select one of eighteen items; the object of 
the game is to deduce the four selected 
items (if less than four play, the computer 
selects the remainder). 

The items are available in and around 
various shops in the town of Fooblitzky. 
You move about the board (displayed on 
a highly detailed screen), using up your 
available moves and foobles (money). 

You might have to buy something, or 
work to earn more cash. You might call a 
store to see what it has, or bump into an- 
other player and pick up his dropped 



items. Since you can only carry four items 
at once, you might want to hide something 
in your locker, or sell it, or give it away. 
And, if you're not careful in the crosswalk, 
you'll land in the hospital. I could go on 
and on. 
All moves and choices are made with 
one joystick, which must be passed 
around. After setting up the game 
and choosing the items, play pro- 
gresses just as in any other board 
game. Each player, in tvnn, spins the 
wheel of fortune, moves a few squares, 
then performs some action. 

The game is easy to learn and even eas- 
ier to play. But, like all Infocom games, it 
requires you to think. When you believe 
you've deduced the four items, take them 
to a checkpoint. If you're right, you're the 
winner. And if not, you'll be told how 
many are right (although not which are 
right). Using these clues, as well as care- 
ful observations of the other players' ac- 
tions, you'll soon have the four items. 

The package continues Infocom's tradi- 
tion of superb documentation and game 
paraphernalia. The game is completely ex- 
plained in a rules and regulations manu- 
al, supplemented by a "bare essentials" 
pamphlet, which lets you get right into the 
game. Both are well written and easy to 
understand. 
To support the game, there are large 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 91 



^ALOG Computing 

on Delphi . . . 
more of a good thing! 



The ANALOG Computing Telecommunications System, or TCS. has been overwhelmingly 
successful. Because of this popularity, we've now integrated with Delphi, an on-line, full service 
communication and information network. Delphi offers news and sports from the Associated 
Press, weather reports, movie reviews, shopping services, travel information, and much more. 

But now, Delphi offers the Atari Users' Group, operated by the same people who bring you the 
#1 Atari magazine. ANALOG Computing. You can access Delphi for as little as 10 cents a min- 
ute from most cities in the U.S. There are no additional telephone charges, and there's no extra 
charge for access at 1200 or 2400 bps. 

On Delphi, we'll give you a variety of services, including a Forum, where you can send and re- 
ceive messages from Atari users worldwide. The Atari database consists of hundreds (soon to be 
thousands) of programs you can easily download and use right away. . .even those from the 
pages of ANALOG Computing. You can also upload your own programs for others, 

A conference feature allows you to meet electronically with other Atari users. From time to time, 
ANALOG Computing will arrange electronic gatherings with some of the big names in the Atar' 
world. These will give you a chance to ask those tough questions and offer your opinions in 
discussions. 

ANALOG Computing has set up some of the most knowledgeable people in Atari-dom. 
fvlatthew Ratcliff will handle your 8-bit questions, while Arthur Leyenberger will keep you posted 
on what's hot (and what's not). 

Specials for current TCS and ANALOG Computing subscribers 

Your TCS membership (before April 15, 1986) entitles you to join Delphi and the Atari Users' 
Group absolutely free. If you were a TCS subscriber before the date above, you've probably 
already received our letter about the switch. You should receive a free lifetime Delphi 
membership, a Delphi Command Card and $10 of line time. 

ANALOG Computing magazine subscribers may join Delphi free of charge, too. All subscribers 
will receive the lifetime Delphi membership and a $5 line-time credit. If you purchase the Delph 
Handbook for $29.95, you'll get $20 worth of line-time And you can subscribe to ANALOG 
Computing directly, while you're on-line, to be eligible for these bonuses. 

It's easy to join us on Delphi. First, determine which data communications network you'll use: 
Unmet, Tymnet or DataPac (in Canada). If you're in the Boston area, you can dial direct 
(617-576-0862). For local numbers, call Uninet (800-821-5340, in Missouri, 800-892-5915), 
or Tymnet (800-336-0149). If you have difficulty call Delphi at 800-544-4005 (in 
Massachusetts, 617-491-3393). 

To reach the sign-up stage, current ANALOG Computing subscribers should type 
JOINATARI when asked for user name, then type ANALOG when asked for a pass- 
word. Those who wish to start subscribing on-line should type SUBSCRIBE. Once 
you're on Delphi, you'll find the Atari Users' Group on the "Groups & Clubs" 
menu. Just type GR ATARI from the main menu prompt. It's that easy! 



The change will do you good! 





[COMPUTING! 

P.O. BOX 23, WORCESTER. MA 01603 



Ei 



J Panak strikes! continued 



plastic -coated worksheets and magic mar- 
kers, to keep track of everything which oc- 
curs along your journeys. The worksheets 
are continuously used and erased, and ex- 
ist perpetually. 

This being Infocom's first foray into gra- 
phics, you might very well ask how they 
were. I might very well answer, "Great." 
The various caricatures were whimsically 
drawn and entertaining. The board is nicely 
detailed and scrolls smoothly among the 
four gaming quadrants. The only problem 
lies in the disk loads necessary to display 
them, which slowed play somewhat. 




Fooblitzky. 

Another problem was in design. Often, 
when you're stuck in the hospital, or work- 
ing in the restaurant — with no desire to 
spin — you must spin anyway. This, too, 
slows play down. But we're nitpicking. 
Your biggest problem will be getting three 
other players to join you in the quest. 

Fooblitzky does for board games what 
the other Infocom works did for books — 
revolutionize them. . .computerize them 
. . . and bring them into the 21st century — 
and beyond. Like all great games, it's a 
merger of chance, luck and skill, which 
will perplex and entertain you for hours. 
If you like board games, and the comrad- 
ery that accompanies them, then Foob- 
litzky is for you. 

Racing Destruction Set 

ELECTRONIC ARTS 
2755 Campus Drive 
San Mateo, CA 94403 
48K Disk $29.95 

Once upon a time, there was a compa- 
ny whose games you could count on as be- 
ing consistently worthwhile. Then they 
forsook Atari, to develop software for the 
wondrous Amiga. 

However, now that the Amiga's flounder- 
ing, the company has come back to pub- 
lishing software for the Atari machines. 
Unfortunately, if this new game is the best 
they can do, Commodore can have them. 

Racing Destruction Set (RDS) is the 
newest Electronic Arts game. In the past, 
they've blessed us with such classics as 
One on One and Pinball Construction Set. 
However, those consumers who will buy 
EA's games sight unseen are surely going 
to curse this one. 



While RDS may not be the most abys- 
mal thing I've ever seen, it wins hands 
down for being the most disappointing. 
This is both because of the company it 
came from and because of its failure to live 
up to the promise implicitly made. 

The concept is exciting and immediately 
grabbed my interest. I really looked for- 
ward to trying this game. But, unlike Pin- 
ball Construction Set, the quality is just 
not there. 

As you might expect from the title, the 
program allows you to design racing 
tracks, then race on them. Again expect- 
edly, you Ccin race against the computer, 
or against a human opponent. 

Unexpectedly, you can choose from a 
number of cars, as well as motorcycles, 
dune buggies, jeeps and even lunar rovers. 
Further, RDS lets you vary the tires and 
engines, and add a number of specialized 
features for the destruction mode, includ- 
ing armor and land mines. The variety I 
like to see in software is certainly available 
here. 

Alas, there seems to be a little too much 
for the program and computer to handle — 
the graphics suffer. To say the graphics 
were atrocious would be a compliment. 
The lack of control is frustrating. Although 
a standard joystick control pattern is used 
(right/left to turn, forward to accelerate, 
back to brake) and is thus learned quick- 
ly, even with a lot of practice it's not like- 
ly that you'll ever be satisfied with your 
performance. 




Racing Destruction Set. 

Setting up tracks is fun and simple. Us- 
ing the joystick, you select and move pre- 
shaped segments, placing one against the 
other, building your dream track. 

Unfortunately, for the reasons I've men- 
tioned in the foregoing paragraphs, racing 
on it is a nightmare. I hesitate to tell you 
much more, for fear you'll be tricked into 
actually buying the RDS. The track editor 
is powerful, and, if you could satisfactorily 
race on RDS, the game would be a must. 
But you can't, and it isn't. 

As a result of these problems, the Rac- 
ing Destruction Set's not going to be play- 
ed much. But relax, there are other uses; 
personally, I'm always in need of blank 
disks. 



l\/londay l\/lorning IManager 

TK COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

P.O. Box 9617 

Downers Grove, IL 60515 

48K Disk $39.95 

ST Version $50.00 

Computer Baseball 

by Cliarles Merrow and Jack T. Avery 

SSi 

883 Stieriin Road, Building A-200 

MounUin View, CA 94043 

40K Disk $39.95 

With baseball season just about over, I 
thought it might be a good time to appease 
the baseball fanatics out there, who are 
currently buckling down to prepare for 
withdrawal. My heart goes out to you 
poor, demented souls. So, in an uncharac- 
teristic act of mercy, I've taken a look at 
a couple of simulations, which should tide 
you over until next April. 

Of the two games reviewed here, Mon- 
day Morning Manager (MMM) was the 
cheapest looking. But, though its looks im- 
ply a low standard, hidden inside the sim- 
ple plastic portfolio is an adequate simula- 
tion. 

After booting the disk, you choose your 
teams and decide whether or not the com- 
puter will manage. All choices are made 
with the joystick. The version I tested, last 
year's, had thirty-six teams on the game 
disk. It offered the chance to order, by mail, 
any additional tefims from 1901 to the pres- 
ent. The 1986 version contains sixty-four 
teams from 1905 to 1985. 

Next, you set batting order and fielding 
positions, and select the starting pitcher. 
Since the players may oidy take certain po- 
sitions, you can encounter problems if you 
run out of eligible players. You'll have to 
start over when you fall into this trap. This 
slight problem aside, setup is speedy. You 
can have teams on the field within three 
to four minutes after booting up. 

A message area at the bottom of the 
screen displays a commentary on action on 
the field. Other readouts provide stats on 
the batter, batter on deck and team line- 
up. To the right is a graphic representation 
of the field, which shows plays dynamical- 
ly, as they occur. Both games tested had 




Monday Morning Manager. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 93 






Panak strikes! continued 



this feature, to differing extents. A prompt 
requests you to input your strategy. 

The offensive player has four choices: 
hit, bunt, pinch hit and run, or steal. The 
defensive player's choices are: pitch, walk, 
attempt a base runner pickoff , or to go to 
the bullpen. 

In addition, after a hit, the offense may 
choose to tag up and run, while the de- 
fense chooses where to throw the ball. The 
joystick input method allows players to 
lean back and enjoy the game, although it 
also tends to limit the available options. 

With the computer controlling both 
teams, it takes about eight minutes to com- 
plete a game. Once done, you may save the 
game stats for later use, storing them on 
disk. These stats may also be viewed. 
What's more, they can be sorted (as to top 
ten in various categories) and printed. You 
can also print team rosters. Other special- 
ties of MMM allow you to trade players 
and draft free agents. 

The manual for MMM was truly a bar- 
gain job — four pages printed on a dot- 



matrix printer. Fortunately, although it's 
not overly attractive, it does explain the 
game thoroughly. The reference cards — 
useful to remind you of the commands un- 
til you master the program — are equally 
spartan, but, again, they do the job. 

So as I see it, Monday Morning Man- 
ager is the minor leaguer of these games. 
Even though it offers the fan the most use 
of his printer to document his own league. 




Computer Baseball. 



Computer Garden 

Wilkes-Barre & Scranton's #1 Atari Dealer 



sinsT's... 

520ST with SS drive.... $479 
520ST wilh DS drive.... $579 
Monitor is opiional.Use a TV! 

SF.1I4 DS disl< drive $219 

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QMl 1200ST modem.... $1-19 
Logikhron Clocls Card $39.99 

Casio CZ-101 $269 

Hippo EPROM Burner.. .$10-'> 
Hippo Video Digitizer. ..$105 
.ST Productivilv 

N-Vision $25.99 

Copy II ST $25.99 

PrinlMasler $25.99 

An Gallery I or II $19.99 

Music Studio ST $38.99 

Michtron BBS $32.99 

Newell SBMST $64.99 

Synsoft Gen. Udgcr.. $37.99 

Mirage H&D Base $59.99 

ST F.nlerlainmenl 

The Black Cauldron... $24.99 

The Pawn $28.99 

Silent Service ST $25.99 

Universe 11 $44.99 

Kings Quest II $32.99 

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Sundog or Mudpies.... $24.99 

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Fantastic Four $14.99 

Winnie the Pooh $18.99 

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Philon Basic/M $79.99 

Softworks Basic $59.99 

OSS Personal Pascal.. $48.99 

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Primer Bareains; 

Panasonic 1080 $199 

Panasonic 1091 $229 

Panasonic 1092 $309 

Star NX-10 $259 



XL/XF... 

65XE/I-30XE $89/$l29 

1050 disk drive $129 

XM301 modem $37.99 

QMl 120OXEmodem....$159 

Atari Light Pen $39.99 

Atari Touch Tablet $44.99 

Covox Voice Master... $69.99 

Supra Microprint $34.99 

ICD P:R:Conneclion... $54.99 

XL/XE ProJutli Y ily 

Print Shop Companion $22.99 
SynCalc or SynFile+.. $29.99 

Peachtree modules $38.99 

Music Studio $22.99 

Magniprinl 11+ $17.99 

Paperclip 1.30XE $37.99 

AtariWriter Plus $34.99 

OSS Basic XL/XE .. $37/$47 
XI./XR Rnlfrlainmenl 

Alternate Reality $24.99 

Beach Head II $22.99 

Pinball Construct. Set. $16.99 
Raid over Moscow.... $25.99 
Racing Destruction Set $23.99 

Ultima IV $36.99 

Spy vsSpy. I or II $18.99 

Newell Indiislries 

256 KXL (includes MYDOS 

and RAM chips) $54.99 

Ramrod XL $54.99 

Omniview 256K (for 80 
columns with 800XLs)$38.99 
Omniview XL/XE (for 80 
columns with 130XEs)$38.99 

Sector Copier $13.99 

SBM.I30 $64.99 

1050's, l30XE's: $29 to $79. 
Estimates: $20 (refunded if 
you award us the job). Mail us 
your unit insured , with $20 & 
a description of the problem. 



Free Discount Catalog! 

To get yours call, write, or use Reader Service. 



To order send check or money order to Computer Garden, 

106 W.Carey St., Plains PA 18705, PA customers add 6% lax. 
Please include enough postage (oveipayments are refunded). 
Cash COD'S call (717) 823-4025. VISA /MasterCard, add 3%. 



CIRCLE #140 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



MICROMOD3.0 

The database with BUSINESS POWER for 3-bil Ataris 

HOME USE — Save on disks/disk-switching. Up to 
5000 (SD) or 10,000 (DD) records/disk. Simplified oper- 
ation/instructions for home users. Intelligent interpreter 
cuts procedure to VeVti. Only 1 drive required. 

EDUCATION — Features/operation/flexibility com- 
parable to the best 16/32 bit software. Set up any ac- 
counting system. 400 pg. manual lays flat! Discounts 
available. 

BUSINESS — Immediate programmer phone sup- 
port. Customizing to your specs, $200. Immediate menu 
access to 65 3-6K relocatable program modules 
minimizes disk-switching, NOT COPY PROTECTED! 

6 FULLY INTEGRATED PROGRAMS FOR ONLY $79.95! 

DATED RECORDS MANAGER — G/L,A/R,A/R 

Statements, scheduling. Spread sheet/calender/ 
graphs. "Melting pot" listings-mix account info/ad- 
dresses/WP text/formatted text/keyboard input. Single/ 
double entry. 

DIRECTORY FILER — For mail, labels, oust info, 
etc. Address sort. 1500/3000 addresses/disk. 

BUSINESS TEXT WORD PROCESSOR — 49 

screen buffer, standard features, spelling. 

POINT-OF-SALE INVOICING* — (2 drives req.) 
Time billing option. Stock update. Data stored in general 
ledger. Many extras. Remote XE terminal. No disk- 
switching. 

BILLING/CONTINUOUS STATEMENTS* — 

(2 drives req.) All listing options selectable for each 
customer include track/list prior unpaid invoices. Con- 
tinuous forms includes "melting pot" listings, form letter, 
form name lists. 

INVENTORY* — 2000 (1 SD drive/1 disk) to 8000 
(2 DD drives/2 disks) model numbers. Supplier/descr/ 
cost/MOQ/4 price s/stock at 3 locations for each item. 
Easy edit/ufxiate/search. All listings, COGS, orders. 

Requires SparlaDOS and XL oi XE computer. 

800/XLyXE. any drive(s) or hard drive, any printer. 
Speed with ram upgrades comparable to 16/32 bit sys- 
tem. Too many individual features to list. Full sorting. 
Printed/blank forms. Standard and business utilities, 
loan/interest schedules, etc. Optional payroll available. 

TOTAL MICROMOD 3.0 PRICE, $79.95. Full guarantee. 
Full credit for MICROMOD 2.4 programs. Orders, info 
requests to: MicroMiser Software, 1635-A Holden Ave., 
Oriando, FL 32809. Tel. (305) 857-6014. 

CIRCLE #141 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



and even though the joystick control al- 
lowed the easier play, I can't recommend 
it highly. 

Since SSI is tops in the field of simula- 
tion software, I expected their Computer 
Baseball would be the closest to the real 
thing possible inside a scant 48K. And it 
was. Like many SSI games, you'll need a 
BASIC cartridge for this one. What you'll 
also need is a lot of spare time. . .because, 
Uke the real thing, this game drags on end- 
lessly. 

Once again, you start out by picking the 
teams to play, and whether or not the com- 
puter will control a team. You then select 
batting line-up, fielding positions and, of 
course, the pitcher. The method of selec- 
tion is very time-consuming. Every choice 
must be input, as there are no defaults. 
Eight to nine minutes were needed to set 
up the teams. I found this to be simply too 
long. However, to offset this, SSI has in- 
cluded a number of unique features. 

Probably the best feature is the ability 
to create your own teams. You can make 
up computerized versions of any team for 
which you can find statistics. All the fa- 
miliar stats — RBIs, ERAs and batting 
averages — are used, so there should be lit- 
tle problem computerizing your favorite 
major league team, or any minor and lit- 
tle leagues you come across. Again, the 
time problem appears. It takes quite a 
while to create a single player, much less 
a team, so you've got to be really commit- 
ted to use this feature. 

Two stiff cards remind you of the six- 
teen defensive and ten offensive options. 
These are as varied as how tightly you hold 
the runners on base, how the infield and 
outfield play and, of course, pitching op- 
tions. Each choice is made with a two- 
letter code selected via the keyboard. It 
takes about thirty minutes to play a game. 
Slowing down play are the frequent disk 
loads necessary when you change players. 

Finally, graphically, the screen is the 
worse of the two games. Further, the ac- 
tion on it moves very slowly. The 10-page 
manual is complete, especially at explain- 
ing how to estimate abilities to help you 
accurately create your own teams. It also 
gives some background on legendary 
world series match-ups. 

Despite its potential, Computer Baseball 
is a strikeout. H 

The author wishes to express his ap- 
preciation to The Magic One Computer 
Shop o/Barberton, Ohio for their constant 
support in the creation of this series. 

For a review of MicroLeague Baseball, 

see page 95. 



PAGE 94 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



REVIEW 






4 




MicroLeague Baseball 



MICRO LEAGUE SPOFiTS ASSOCIATION 
2201 Drummond Plaza 
Newark, DE 19711-5711 
48K Disk $39.95 

by Bob Curtin 

Tony Armas takes a few steps off sec- 
ond as the batter sets himself, waiting for 
Guidry's pitch. Marty Barrett managed to 
fend off the previous pitch, a bHstering 
fastball, which just caught the inside cor- 
ner. The count still remains at three and 
two. It's the top of the ninth with one out, 
and the Yankees are leading the Boston 
Red Sox three to one. 

Guidry stretches and delivers a vicious 
slider to the outside. Barrett reaches for it 
and hits a towering fly ball to shallow right 
field. Dave Winfield trots in, gets under it 
and hauls it in for the second out. 

Well, folks, it looks like it's up to Dewey 
Evans. No, wait! The manager's pulling 
him out! There's going to be a pinch hit- 
ter! It's Bob Curtin! Guidry pales as he 
stares, slack-jawed, at the figure stepping 
into the batter's box. Steeling himself 
against the inevitable and trying to ignore 
the sudden, deathly silence from the 
stands, Guidry winds up and throws. . . 

Wait a minute! Hold it! Time out. Bob 
Curtin doesn't play for the Boston Red Sox! 
Well, true. But with the Micro League 
Sports Association's MicroLeague Baseball 
(MLB), yoii may put him or any other play- 
er on the team of your choice. 

MLB is a computer simulation of major 
league baseball, using the statistics from 
real players — both past and present. The 
game comes boxed with a disk containing 
the game program and twenty-five histor- 
ical teams, two reference manuals (Mana- 
ger's Rulebook and Team Rosters), and two 
double-sided quick reference cards. 



Be aware that MLB is not an arcade 
game, nor is it a dry statistical simulation 
devoid of graphics. Quite the contrary. The 
graphics are beautiful and detailed, right 
down to occasional head-first slides and 
the manager's stomping out to the mound. 

Unlike an arcade game, which oftimes 
requires frantic manipulation of a joystick 
to play the game, MLB requires simple 
(and leisurely) one-touch keypresses. You 
take the part of the team manager, not that 
of a player. 



»»« pnny> *»««»«7»» 



-rg^»T 



— «■ ■H.I.PCKl 



MicroLeague Baseball. 

Once you've booted up, you'll be asked 
to choose the two teams and who'll play 
them (computer or human) . You may play 
against the computer or another human, 
or even have the computer play itself. This 
last option would come in handy for any- 
one ambitious enough to try to recreate an 
entire season. 

At this point, you choose the starting 
pitchers and set the lineups. A full roster 
of fifteen players and ten pitchers is provid- 
ed for each team, and the lineup defaults 



to that most commonly used by each team 
historically. 

You may, of course, shuffle the team 
around at will and set the batting order to 
whatever you want. You may even change 
position assignments, though putting a 
player in a position he's not "rated" for will 
likely produce a flurry of errors from the 
poor soul, since his defense rating drops 
as low as is possible. 

Just as in the real thing, you may warm 
up relief pitchers in the bullpen, replace 
pitchers, bring in pinch hitters or runners, 
and even go out to the mound to settle 
down your pitcher. Failing to warm up a 
pitcher before he's brought in for relief 
raises the chance that he'll be a bit shaky 
at the start of his stint. 

Also, as in the real game, your pitcher 
can lose his stuff. I've had a pitcher coast- 
ing along, the game well in hand, only to 
have him start getting hammered. A trip 
to the mound sometimes works (for a 
while), but generally it's time to give him 
the hook. 

This is where your expertise comes in, 
especially in a series of games, where 
pitching rotation comes into play. It's dif- 
ficult to pull your ace starter in early in- 
nings in an important game; there's always 
the chance he'll settle down, but then 
again . . . 

MLB gives you all the same ammunition 
enjoyed by real major league managers. 
You're equipped with a full range of pitch- 
ing, running and batting options. Squeeze 
plays, sacrifice and surprise bunts, steals 
and double steals, pitchouts, bringing the 
infield in (or just in at the corners), inten- 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 95 



p 



°j Review 



continued 



tional walks, and hit and run plays — all are 
at your disposal. 

The MLSA offers a General Manager/ 
Owner disk for an additional $39.95. If 
you're a baseball fan, it's worth every 
penny. 

With the GM/O disk, you can load team 
rosters from any team disk or the game 
disk, then trade and draft players, alter 
statistics, create new players (now you 
know how Bob Curtin infiltrated the Red 
Sox), or create entire new teams. 

I formed a league with some friends of 
mine and, after a preliminary session of 
setting up the pitching rotation rules and 
updating the 1985 rosters to 1986 status, 
we proceeded to play a fifty-game "sea- 
son." 

The competition was fierce, and we even 
had some mid-season trades go on. (In 
case you're wondering, the KC Royals took 
the pennant.) This game is ideal for league 
play. It usually only takes 30 to 40 minutes 
for a 9-inning game, so a number of games 
can be played in a single evening. 




One thing that struck me was that play- 
ers whose teams weren't scheduled to play 
on a particular night would show up any- 
way, just to watch the games. I toyed with 
the idea of selling beer and hot dogs, but 
my wife glared me down. 

The game is a masterpiece and, with the 
optional disks, its shelf-life borders on the 
infinite. It's a game with enough subtleties 
to satisfy the most demanding baseball 
fan, yet simple enough to be played enjoy- 
ably by anyone. I recommend it highly. 

Oh, one last note. The ST version of 
MicroLeague JBaseball is due for release 
in September, with additional features and 
even more superb graphics. I, for one, will 
not hesitate to buy it. 

Huh? Curtin? Oh, he struck out. H 

Bob Curtin is a machinist who got into 
computing in 1982, when he bought an 
Atari 800. He uses if /or writing, program- 
ming and feJecommunications. He prefers 
the more cerebral computer games. 




• 3-D Scrolling Arcade Style Graphics 
' Select your oujntJifflculty level 

• Choose from Color or Block/LUhite displo^i options. 

• Pouse Feature qIIoujs you to freeze the gome. 

■•- amm mmmif^ UJITH 30mm flutomotlc Cannon and 2.7Sin Rockets. 
MISSION OBJ6CTIV6: Fly from your aircraft carrier across hostile enemy 
territory, lond ot the embassy to rescue the hostages, then fly bock to the 
carrier. Beiuare of surface to air missies ond enemy aircraft. 
To order. Send check or money order for $1 5.00 (TX res, odd 1 5%) 
C.O.D.'s accepted. Coll (713) 454-5285 ORION S0FTIUflR6 

17303GlenheujRd. 

Humble, Teios 77396 




outmet 

from New Horizons 



Tired of always searching (or the right recipe? 

Are the pages ot your recipe books covered with your recipe ingredients' 

Fed up at guessing amounts when a recipe serves five but you want it for two? 

If so then you need The Computer Gourmet. 

With The Computer Gourmet you can: 

• Easily save your favorite recipes (even give them a rating!) 

• Find any recipe you need within seconds 

• Adjust for a different serving size automatically 

• Print the whole recipe or just the list of ingredients 
Best of all. The Computer Gourmet comes with a disk full of recipes! 

'(With everything from main courses to desserts). 

Available on disk for Atari" computers (requires 48K) To order, send $29,95 plus 

$2 00 for postage (Texas residents please add 5 1/8°/; sales tax) to 

New Horizons Software • P,0 Box 43167 • Austin, Texas 78745 

Or call (512) 280-0319 



CIRCLE #142 ON HEADER SERVICE CARD 



New Horizons 

Expanding Your Life 

MasterCard and Visa accepted 

Please write to us for Information on all of our products for Atari computers. 

Dealer inquiries invited. Atari is a trademark of Atari. Corp. 

CIRCLE #143 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 96 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



THE END 
USER 



THIS MONTH: 

A ^vealth of 
information, 
replies to 
readers, ST 
notes and copy 
software for 
honest folks. 



by Arthur Leyenberger 



Arthur Leyenberger is a human /actors 
psychologist and jree-Iance writer living in 
New Jersey. He has been an Atari enthusi- 
ast for four years. When not computing, he 
en;oys playing with robotic toys. 
CompuServe — 71266,46 
Delphi — NJANALOG 



"Why did the computer user throw the 
clock out the window?" 

"I dunno." 

"To make time fly." Hey, I don't Invent 
these jokes, I just report them. Seriously, 
is time flying for you as it is for me? Does 
it really seem like two years since Jack 
Tramiel and family rescued Atari? A lot 
has happened in those two years — to the 
computer industry, to Atari and to me. 
Read on, my friend. 

Assuming you got this issue recently, it's 
been a year and a month since the 520ST 
became available. It took Atari six months 
to develop (from June 1984, when Jack and 
friends bought the company), and anoth- 
er six months after that to get it on the 
street. Not only is this remarkable, but 
many so-called experts in the computer in- 
dustry predicted it couldn't be done. 

Free enterprise. 

The United States was founded on free 
enterprise: some normal citizens got tired 
of paying tribute to England, so they got 
together and started a revolution. Grant- 
ed, there was a little more to it than that, 
but, basically, some folks had a good 
idea. . .and did something about it. 

That story's been retold dozens of times 
in the world of computers. From Wozniak 
and Jobs, who started Apple in their ga- 
rage when Hewlett-Packard declined to 
take them seriously, to Dan Bricklin, one 
of the authors of VisiCalc — a little hard 
work never stopped anyone with a good 
idea. Such is the case with William 
Brandt, Jr. 



Who's William Brandt, Jr., you ask? His 
name or picture will surely not be on the 
cover of Time this year, but he's one of 
many Atari users who put their money 
where their computers are. 

Like a lot of new users, he found need- 
ed, useful information in various Atari- 
oriented magazines. But it seems, when he 
finally realized he needed information, he 
could never remember where he'd seen it. 
He therefore did the only logical thing 
— he started an index of magazine arti- 
cles. 

Little did Bill know that what he began 
for his own use would eventually become 
a major tome, handy for other Atarians. I 
happened recently across a copy of Bill's 
69-page index, and I wanted to pass the 
information along. It's available for $15.00, 
postage paid, from: Article Index, c/o Wil- 
liam Brandt, Jr., 27 Mohawk Trail, West- 
field, NJ 07090. 

The index is broken down by topics — 
fifty-five in all. Within each topic, entries 
are categorized by article, game, review, 
or utility. Each entry consists of title, au- 
thor, magazine, volume, number, issue, 
date, page and progrEunming language (if 
appropriate). 

The current version covers ANALOG 
Computing, Antic, Atari Connection, Atari 
Explorer, COMPUTE,' and Home Comput- 
ing. Bill hopes to include other publica- 
tions (such as Creative Computing, Byte 
and Family Computing) in a future edition. 

Bill Brandt's done an excellent job. He 
invested the time for a thorough job and 
took the risk of publishing it on his own. 
I've no financial interest in his endeavor, 
but I'm proud that I encouraged him. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 97 




THE END USER corUinued 



No other publication I know of puts all 
this information in one place and is so 
easy to use. My advice is to buy a copy — 
support Bill Brandt, Atari computerists 
and free enterprise. Nice work, Bill. 

The mailbag. 

I don't know about your cat, but mine 
likes to sleep on papers, magazines and 
software. Actually, I have three cats — and 
sometimes feel like Fred MacMurray. Any- 
way, Raggs is sleeping on some old pa- 
pers. . .Oops! That's reader mail. Thanks, 
Raggs, for reminding me: I need to catch 
up. 

Some interesting mail has arrived in the 
last month or so. Much of it chastises me 
(and ANALOG Computing) for spending 
too much time on the ST and "neglecting" 
the 8-bits. Interestingly, an almost equal 
nimiber complain about not enough ST 
coverage. The rest is a mixed (mail)bag. 

Gordon Billingsley of Murphysboro, Il- 
linois writes to tell me about the new 1st 
Word for the ST. Its version 1.04 (and later) 
overcome two flaws of the original: the 
lack of double spacing and the idiotic form 
feed that occurs before every printout. 

The latest 1st Word contains a new op- 
tion, "spacing," in the drop-down style 
menu. When it's checked, you're in dou- 
ble spacing, both on-screen and in your 
printout. 

Gordon also says the form feed can be 
eliminated, by editing the printer descrip- 
tion file. Load the printer driver appropri- 
ate for your setup into 1st Word and 
change the line that reads 20, C * Verti- 
cal Initialization. Change the C (or what- 
ever's there) to a (zero), save the file, then 
run INSTALL. PRG again. Select the re- 
cently edited file when prompted. The 
.DOT file created will no longer cause a 
form feed each time you print. 

Thanks for the update, Gordon. It's good 
to know these changes have been made to 
an otherwise good program. My only prob- 
lems: a more descriptive term than spac- 
ing could have been used, and two options 
might have been presented — "single 
space" and "double space." Also, the meth- 
od used to get rid of the initial page eject 
is more hokey than the concept of "write 
only memory." 

Whether or not the printer page ejects 
ought to be an option in a drop-down 
menu, or in the setup procedure. Why do 
we have to become programmers to get 
things to work properly? 

The next letter comes from Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin. It must have been a long, cold 
winter for Kenneth Jennings to write such 
a tome. To reply cogently required me to 
first take my blood pressure pills. Next, I 
had to study his tirade and pick out the 
salient points. Having done this, I thought 
I'd share a few of his comments — and my 
response — with you. 

Kenneth says, "Do not give up your 8-bil 



computers in favor of the ST." He cites two 
main reasons: public domain software for 
the 8-bits won't run on the ST, and your 
peripherals won't work. Of course they 
won't work. The ST is a different compu- 
ter; it uses different hardware and soft- 
ware. Why should they work? 

Next he talks about Atari really being 
Commodore and vice versa, referring to 
the fact that Jack Tramiel was Commodore 
for many years. Now, with Jack as head of 
Atari, the ST seems to really be a Commo- 
dore computer, in terms of price and the 
way it's advertised, whereas the Amiga has 
a chip set by Jay Miner, designer of the 
Atari 800. So the ST is a Commodore, and 
the Amiga is truly an Atari. Sigh. I think 
we've been over all this before. Where have 
you been, Kenneth Jennings? 

There are other ironic comparisons be- 
tween Commodore and Atari. For example, 
8-bit Atari owners have used the Commo- 
dore 1701/02 color monitor for years. It 
was, simply, the best monitor for the job. 
Now we find many Amiga owners using 
the Atari ST RGB monitor, because it's su- 
perior to the washed-out look of the Ami- 
ga's color monitor. 

Kenneth then asks: "Why did you buy 
an 8-bit Atari computer in the first place? 
If you bought it because it was cheap, then 
go buy an ST — it's cheap, too, not power- 
ful. If you bought your Atari 8-bit because 
it was the most technologically advanced 
computer, then buy an Amiga because it 
is the most advanced." I won't bore you 
with the details of the two machines, most 
of which have already been printed, in 
ANALOG Computing and elsewhere. 

What Kenneth fails to realize is that peo- 
ple purchased 8-bit Atari computers be- 
cause they were (and are) good computers 
and a good value, not because they were 
the most expensive, or the least expensive, 
or whatever. Atari's hallmark has always 
been value. Sure, I bought a 48K Atari 800, 
two 810 disk drives and a printer for $2000 
in 1981. I did so because it was the best 
value around. 

The same is true for the Atari ST. It hap- 
pens to be less costly than the Amiga. Both 
are good machines, but the Atari is sim- 
ply the better value. Looking at all aspects 
of the two — graphics, sound, memory, disk 
drives, amount of available software, and , 
yes, price — the ST wins, hands down. It 
ain't just my opinion, either. 

Keimeth goes on to chastise ANALOG 
Computing for not covering the Amiga. We 
"don't run full-page, 4-color ads for the 
Amiga," he says. He claims that ANALOG 
Computing is an "Atari house organ." Give 
me a breEik, Ken! 

We don't cover the Amiga, because we're 
a magazine for Atari users. We don't run 
Amiga ads, because Commodore doesn't 
place their promotional material in an 
Atari-only magazine. As for being a "house 
organ" for Atari Corp. . . . Have you been 



reading the magazine with your eyes open 
lately? 

Consider this: several times I've written 
about what I consider a "mushy" keyboard 
on the ST. In addition, the keys are too 
wide and too sculpted , causing me to con- 
tinually make typing errors. Reread the is- 
sue 39 End User and see what I had to say 
about the way Atari does business. In bed 
with Atari? Hardly! 

As far as the hype you spoke of in your 
letter, ANALOG Computing is not (and has 
never been close to being) the leader in this 
area. If you want to see hype, check out 
Amiga World or Mac World. 

Finally, Kenneth Jeimings tells us, "If 
ANALOG Computing courageously de- 
cides to print all or even part of this obvi- 
ously anti-Tramiel letter, I urge everyone 
reading it to compliment them on not be- 
ing a house organ for Atari. Maybe I was 
wrong." Q.E.D. 

The 8-bit scene. 

Until a few days ago, I thought a chip- 
munk was a cute, furry, outdoor version of 
a hampster. Now I know: a Chipmunk is 
an ingenious 8-bit backup program from 
Microdaft. 

Chipmunk offers Atari 800, 1200, XL 
and XE owners the ability to copy complete 
disks, without expensive disk drive hard- 
ware modifications. 

The catch is, since Chipmunk isn't as 
sophisticated as the hardware boards, it 
can copy only the software for which it has 
pEirameters. Not to worry, though, the ini- 
tial release can copy over 250 programs. 

Here's how it works: the original pro- 
gram is first sector copied, with the one 
provided or with any sector copier. Then, 
the parameter menu's brought up on- 
screen, and you select the name of the pro- 
gram you wish to back up. Chipmunk 
loads the parameters and writes them to 
the destination disk. No fuss, no muss. 

What you end up with is an unprotect- 
ed copy of the original boot disk — not a 
binary file. That is, if you were to make 
a copy of the copy, you could do it with 
Atari DOS. 

The program works with any disk drive 
available for the 8-bit Ataris. In addition, 
one or two drives can be used. There's also 
a utility to list BASIC programs that can't 
otherwise be listed, plus an undelete util- 
ity 

Under Federal copyright laws, you can 
make backups of software for your own 
use. Some software companies copy-pro- 
tect their programs, to prevent illegal 
duplication. Unfortunately, this prevents 
software owners from making legitimate 
backup copies. Chipmunk is provided only 
for the copying of disks you owm, not for 
illegal purposes. 

Ironically, Chipmunk will not copy it- 
self, in order to "prevent widespread pir- 
acy of our product." At least, though, a 
backup copy's included with the package. 



PAGE 98 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



If you want the ability to backup your soft- 
ware for archival reasons, but don't want 
to spend big money for the drive modifi- 
cation, check out Chipmunk from Micro- 
daft. 

It sells for $35.00 and is available from: 
Microdaft, 19 Harbor Drive, Lake Hopat- 
cong, NJ 07849. If you send a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope, Microdaft 
will return a free list of programs that can 
be copied by Chipmunk. 

ST notes. 

Three new ST books have found their 
way to my desk. Actually, they've been 
there for a while, buried with my 1977 tax 
return. But that's another story. All three 
books are from COMPUTE! Books and are 
described briefly below. Each of the trio 
sells for $15.00. 

The Elementary Atari ST by William 
Sanders is, as the title suggests, a begin- 
ner's guide to the ST. It's meant to prepare 
the novice to use the ST's sound, graph- 
ics and other features. Detailed setup and 
step-by-step instructions for ST BASIC are 
provided. It, hke other COMPUTE! Atari 
books, gives plenty of examples to help you 
understand all the nuances of each topic. 

The Elementary Atari ST has tutorials on 
disk and file usage, printer access, draw- 
ing and animation graphics, Logo and 
FORTH. Most of the book is spent discuss- 
ing how to program in ST BASIC. In this 
its goal as an ST BASIC primer is accom- 
plished. 

The second title. Elementary ST BASIC, 
is written by C. Regina. It picks up with 
ST BASIC where the first leaves off. As 
usual, program examples are frequent, to 
aid the reader. 

With the book is information for order- 
ing a disk of the programming examples. 
Elementary ST BASIC is a very complete 
treatise on the language. 

The third COMPUTE! Books ST title is 
Introduction to Sound and Graphics on the 
Atari ST, by Tim Knight. It takes you 
through the process of creating impressive 
graphics and sound, and shows you how 
to get the most from your ST. Examples are 
provided in three languages: ST BASIC, 
Logo and FORTH. 

ST Sound and Graphics is heavily illus- 
trated with sample screen photos. Because 
of the book's organization, it seems a tu- 
torial, rather than a reference guide ap- 
proach. In other words, the fundamentals 
of programming sounds and graphics are 
learned in a step-by-step fashion. 

All three books are available from COM- 
PUTE! Books, P.O. Box 5406, Greensboro, 
NC 27403 — (919) 275-9809. 

Cloning? 

I get excited when I receive a Federal Ex- 
press package. It occurs infrequently, and 
there's a certain element of "big business 
pizzazz" associated. Often, no one's home 
during the day to accept the parcel, so it's 



usually left with a neighbor. This height- 
ens the excitement — I must wait a little 
longer before discovering its contents. 

I recently got such a package from Cen- 
tral Point Software. Inside was Copy II ST, 
a disk-copying program for the ST. It can 
make backup copies of most copy-protect- 
ed (and unprotected) programs. Copy n ST 
can handle even the most sophisticated 
protection schemes. Of course, it's de- 
signed for archival copies only, for your 
own use. 

Many software manufacturers copy-pro- 
tect their products, to physically prevent 
people from making and giving away or 
reselling copies. Under the law, as above, 
you have a right to make copies only for 
your use, to back up the original. This is 
the only right afforded you under the law. 
Making disk copies with this or any other 
program, for any other purpose, is strictly 
illegal and a Federal offense. 

Copy II ST comes with a short, well- 
written instruction manual and over six- 
ty programs tested with it. You'll find pro- 
grams like VIP Professional, Final Word, 
Haba and Hippo products, and more, can 
be successfully backed up. 

Copy n ST provides a fast sector copier 
and a bit copier utility, to make "carbon 
copies" of disks. The procedure usually re- 
quires sector copying a disk, then bit copy- 
ing a specific track. One or two single- or 
double-sided disk drives can be used. 

The program's easy to use and complete- 
ly mouse driven. Information about pro- 
gress of the copy is displayed on-screen in 
a two-dimensional grid called the "Copy 
Status Box." 

As Copy II ST reads a track, the letter 
R appears in each cell of this box. As the 
program writes a track, the letter W ap- 
pears. Then, for every track copied suc- 
cessfully, a dot is left behind in that posi- 
tion. If there was an error copying the 
track, a R or W is left behind, referring to 
either a read or write error. 

Some people question the legitimacy of 
disk copy programs like this one. I typi- 
cally answer with an example. . .If you 
have any Hippopotamus Software pro- 
ducts, such as Hippo Disk UtiUties, with 
their copy protection technique which oc- 
casionally trashes this or another disk, 
you'll want to back up the program before 
you use it. There's a need for the copying 
programs, and I'm glad to see that Central 
Point has decided to fUl the void with their 
product. 

Illustrating that their intent is: (1) for the 
program to be used only in making per- 
sonal backup copies of disks, and (2) to in- 
form people about their rights under the 
law. Central Point has included ADAPSO's 
"Thou Shalt Not Dupe" flyer. 

ADAPSO is an industry group spread- 
ing the word: pirating software is not only 
a crime, but is wrong. For more informa- 
tion, contact ADAPSO, at (703) 522-5055. 



Copy II ST is retaiUng now for $39.95 
(plus $3 shipping, if purchased direct from 
the company) and is not, itself, copy pro- 
tected. Check your local dealer, or order 
from: Central Point Software, Inc., 9700 
SW Capitol Highway, Suite 100, Portland, 
OR 97219. 

There isn't much to say about a copying 
program, other than whether it works or 
not. This one works as advertised and 
represents the first professional disk back- 
up progrcim for the ST. My advice: buy the 
program and use it — don't abuse it. 

Calling it a day. 

That's it for this installment of The End 
User. It's time to pack up and move on 
down the road. See ya next time. H 



Now add up to 1 MEG of extra 

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With the NEW "RAMCART" 

• Ram upgrade for ALL 8 Bit Atari 
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do any soldering. Just plug RAMCART 
into the cartridge slot. 

• Requires No External power supply. 

• Tme RAM not just a Ramdisk. 

• Comes with Ramdisk software. 
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extra Ram. 

• More Software to come soon from 
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• Canoe Computer Services will also 
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• All units have a 90 day factory 
warranty. 

• Dealer inquires invited. 

RAMCART Prices: 256K - $ 1 49.95 (US) 
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Make all cheques payable to: 

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CompuServe 1D# 74746. 2406 
Credit card orders welcome. 



CIRCLE #144 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 99 



16K Cassette or 32K Disk 



GAME 



^^ 



Launch 
Code 



Only you can 

save the day 

by cracking 

the enemy's code 




by David Schwener 



You've got thirty-six hours to disable the twelve ICBM's 
enemy spies have tampered with. After locking your Atari 
into the scrambling circuits of the defense computer, you 
must discover the laimch code for each of these twelve mis- 
siles, in time to abort launch. 

Using your joystick controller, you enter a three-digit 
launch code. The number's then evaluated for accuracy. 
If the entered code is incorrect, the computer will give 
clues which can be used for another try. 

Unfortunately, the enemy spies were clever enough to 
add a tamper-sensing device. Becoming careless with your 
attempts causes the missiles to enter the immediate-launch 
mode — giving you less than two minutes to stop their 
takeoff. 

Each group of four missiles, with their single launch 
code, is more difficult to disable than the last. If a mis- 
sion is completed by disabling all twelve, you'll receive 
a message of congratulations. 

Entering launch codes. 

To enter the first digit of a launch code, push or pull 
the joystick, to increase or decrease the number in the 
launch code indicator window. When you've reached the 
nimiber you wish to enter, press the trigger button. A tone 
will sovmd, and you'll be ready to enter the second digit. 
Continue using your joystick and trigger for the second 
and third digits. 

After pressing the trigger button for your third, the en- 
tire code will be entered for computer evaluation. You may 
abort this process by pressing the SELECT key, instead 
of the trigger button. 



Clues. 

Clues are the key to success in winning Launch Code. 
The concept may seem difficult at first, so pay attention! 

Each time a launch code is entered, the computer com- 
pares it to the four missile launch codes hidden inside your 
Atari. Above each missile is displayed the code that was 
entered, plus a two-digit number to the right. The two- 
digit number is your clue. 

Its first digit indicates how many numbers are correct — 
and in the correct position. Its second digit indicates how 
many numbers are correct, but in the wrong position. 

Confusing? Let's try some examples. 

The first column below is the secret launch code, the 
second column is a number we've entered, and the third 
is the clue the computer would give. All possible combi- 
nations of clues are shown. 



SECRET 
LAUNCH CODE 


ENTERED 
LAUNCH CODE 


CLUE 


123 


145 


10 


123 


415 


01 


123 


135 


11 


123 


023 


20 


123 


230 


02 


123 


132 


12 


123 
123 


456 
123 


00 

30 Missile Disabled!!! 



Notice a 30 clue means a perfect match; this will, there- 
fore, disable the missile. 

A 00 clue means none of your three nmnbers match the 
secret launch code. Beware: the 00 clue is the triggering 
mechanism for the immediate launch mode. 

When you get this one, depending upon which group 
of missiles you're working on, two or three of the 00 clues 



PAGE 100 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 




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^ 



Launch Code continued 



will start the missiles into countdown. The countdown 
time also varies, as shown below. 



SILO 


NUMBER OF 


COUNTDOWN 


# 


00 CLUES 


TIME 


1-4 


3 


90 seconds 


5-8 


2 


90 seconds 


9-12 


2 


60 seconds 



When the immediate launch mode is triggered, the 
green bar at the bottom of the screen will begin flashing 
red, with a warning tone. The timer below the silo that 
triggered the immediate launch mode will begin count- 
ing down. 

Don't despair! You can still abort the launch and con- 
tinue with the game — if you can discover the secret laimch 
code in time. If you do, and no other missiles are count- 
ing down, the red bar will tvtrn green again, indicating 
that no missiles are in the immediate launch mode. Any 
timer, however, that reaches :00 seconds will cause the 
game to end. 

Game over. 

The game is over when: (1) you disable all twelve mis- 
siles; (2) a silo timer reaches zero; or (3) the main count- 
down clock reaches zero. 

If (2) or (3) occurs, the missiles are put into the launch- 
ready position, and the correct launch codes for each silo 
are displayed. You can then play again by pressing the 
START key 

Happy launching! B 

David Schwener has been programming on an Atari for 
two and a half years, mainly in BASIC with some assem- 
bly. All his royalties noiv go into a "Jackintosb" fund. He 
hopes to get an ST with as little outside income as possi- 
ble. His wife has the same hopes. 



The twD-letter checksum code preceding the line 
numbers here is not a part of the BASIC program. 
For further inibrniation, see the BASIC Editor II (is- 
sue 45) and its update on page 9. 



Listing 1. 
BASIC listing. 



II REM aanaaiMaiiiii ver 5.1 
2 REM David schwener Mar 85 
3 REM ANALOG Computing 
5 Ql=l : 02=01+01 : 03=02+01 : 04=02+02 : 05=0 

3+02 : 06=03+03 : 07=04+03 : 08=04+04 : 09=04+ 

05:010=05+05 
JJ 10 G05UB 15000 :GDSUB 27408 : GOSUB 30800 

:G05UB 20000 
UX 12 POKE 712,00:P0KE 788,12:P0KE 752,01 
LM 19 GOSUB 28e00:P0KE 559,34 
JA 20 FOR TRY=01 TO OlO 
VM 21 POSITION 32,01:? " "; 
UE 30 FOR NUM=01 TO 03 
MM 32 UALUE=00 
IW 33 POSITION 07,01:? DIGITS C03*NUM-Q2,Q 

3WNUM) ; 
QD 35 ST=STICKCQ8J :IF ST015 THEN POKE 77 

,QO:SOUND Q3,UALUE»0ie,010,08:S0UND Q3 

,00,00,08 
IM 40 gALUE=UftLUE+C5T=14)-CST=13J 
MP 50 IF VALUE>09 THEN VALUE=08 
LN 55 TTIME=INTtt256-PEEKtl9)J/7.111J :POS 



» ITIOH 24-tTTIME>Q9),Q3:? TTIME-OTIME 
1^ 56 IF TTIME=09 THEN POSITION 23,03:? ■' 

0" 
HY 57 IF TTIME-0TIME<=08 THEN GOSUB GAMEO 

UER 
00 60 IF UALUE<08 THEN UALUE=09 
m 62 POSITION 3e+NUMKQ2,01:? VALUE 
IJ 65 IF PEEKC53279)=05 THEN FOR Z=01 TO 

Q3:CCZ)=00:NEXT Z : POP :GOTD 21 
VO 68 FDR D=01 TO 15: NEXT D 
CL 70 IF STRIG(Oei=QO THEN SOUND Oe,PEEK( 

20} , QIO, 08 : C CNUM) =UALUE : GOSUB TIME : SOU 

ND 00,0e,0e,08:NEXT NUM:GOTO 95 
IX 80 GOSUB TIME 
UG 90 GOTO 35 
KX 95 SOUND 01,254,010,02 
AA 108 GOSUB CHECK : SOUND 01,08,08,08 
HT 118 NEXT TRY 
PQ 120 GOTO 28 
OG 1088 Tl=PEEK{2ej :T2=PEEKC19J :T3=PEEKtl 

8) : SEC= C4 . 267»256»T3J + tT2»4 . 267 J + tTl/6 

0} 
iL 1001 T=INTCINTCSECK18e]/188} 
Ktt 1818 FOR X=Q1 TO 04 : IF C0NCX)=00 THEN 

NEXT X:G0T0 1858 
UB 1015 M=M+01:P0KE 1735, 68 : SOUND 02,288, 

010,06 
BR 1020 TIMECXJ=CL0CK-T+C0NCXJ 
AO 1025 IF TIME(X)<=0 THEN POP :F0R I=Q8 

TO 03:S0UND I,00,00,Qe:NEXT I:GOSUB GA 

MEOVER 
m 1030 IF TIME (X) =09 THEN POSITION 04+ (X 

-011*018,23:? "0"; 
OF 1040 POSITION 04+01»tTIME CXJ <Q10J + tX-Q 

1J*Q18,23:? TIME CXJ ;: NEXT X 
OE 1050 IF M=00 THEN POKE 1735, 196 : SOUND 

Q2,00,08,08:M=0e:RETURN 

xf 1068 m=08:p0ke 1735, 00 : sound 02,00,08, 
qo:return 

IG 1508 REM 

SU 1505 POKE 1707+24+20-TRY,14 

LH 1506 POKE 1707+24+20-TRY+l, 2 

PR 1507 IF TRY=1 THEN POKE 1707+24+18,2 

JB 1588 POSITION 00,15-TRY:? "I || 

II II ■■; 

AE 1509 FOR A=Q1 TO 04 

HI4 1510 RP=Q8:RN=08:CX1=08:CX2=08:CX3=08 

eZ 1520 IF DISABLE CA) =01 THEN NEXT A: GOTO 

1625 
%M 1530 IF C0DE(A,Q1I=C(01) THEN RP=RP+01 

:CXi=oi 

9T 1540 IF C0DE(A,02)=CC02} THEN RP=RP+Q1 

:CX2=0i 
Sfli 1550 IF C0DECA,03}=C(031 THEN RP=RP+Q1 

:CX3=01 
5T 1560 IF CX1 = O0 THEN IF CODE CA, Oil =C (02 

} OR C0DECA,01)=C(03} THEN RN=RN+01 
VS 1565 IF CX2=Q0 THEN IF CODE (A, 02] =C COl 

1 OR C0DECA,02)=CC03} THEN RN=RN+01 
mf 1570 IF CX3=00 THEN IF CODE (A, 031 =C COl 

] OR C0DECA,03}=CC02) THEN RN=RN+Q1 
«A 1580 IF RP=00 AND RN=Q8 THEN FLAGCA)=F 

LAGCAJ+Ql 
J8S 1600 IF FLAGCA}=LUL THEN COUNTER=COUNT 

ER+1 
CG 1610 POSITION 02+CA-01)»010,15-TRY:? C 

C01);CC02J;CC03J;" ";RP;rn; 
m 1615 IF RP=03 THEN GOSUB SHUTDOMN 
nU 1620 GOSUB TIME: NEXT A 

§1625 IF COUNTER>QO THEN GOSUB LAUNCH 
1630 RETURN 
2000 T1=PEEK(28J : T2=PEEK C19) :T3=PEEKC1 
8J : SEC=1892 . 352«T3+T2»4 . 267+T1/68 
5ft 2881 SEC=INT(5EC»188J/'18e:MIN=INTCSEC/' 
681 :M=MK6e:T=INT(SEC) :IF T=08 THEN 288 
8 
m. 2885 FOR A=01 TO 04: IF FLAG(A)=LVL THE 
N CON CA) =T : FLAG CA) =FLAG CA} +Q1 



PAGE 102 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



mr 2007 NEXT A:C0UNTER=Q8 
HF 2810 POKE 1735,68 
AG 2020 RETURN 

UH 2500 DISABLE(ai=Ql:CON(A)=Qe 
ZG 2510 POSITION 01+ Cfl-QlJ»QiO, 23 : ? "DlSfl 

BLED"; 
OB 2550 TDI5ABLE=TDI5flBLE+Ql:IF TDISflBLE= 

4 THEN POKE 1707+24+20-TRY, 2 : POP :GOTO 
CMPLT 
BC 2560 RETURN 
DV 4000 GRAPHICS QO:POKE 16,64:P0KE 53774 

,64:P0KE 710,4:P0KE 709,12:P0KE 752,01 
HO 4005 FOR I=QO TO Q3:50UND I,QO,QO,QO:N 

EKT I 
AR 4010 POSITION 12, Q2:? "CONGRATULATIONS 

LU 4020 POSITION 12,05:? "Hission conplet 

e" 
FA 4030 POSITION Q5,Q9:? "You have succes 

sfully disabled"; 
Jl 4040 POSITION 11,11:? "the twelve ICBM 

■s" 
PX 4050 POSITION Q9,13:? "With ";TTIME-OT 

IME;" hours renaining" 

LR 4060 POSITION 03,20:? "Press ■■^f:1:lM f 

or another nission"; 

CA 4070 POSITION 02,22:? "Press ■i1A*<i1:B 

if you've had enough"; 
BL 4080 IF PEEK(53279)=03 THEN NEW : GRAPH 

ICS QO:END 
OU 4090 IF PEEKC53279)<>Q6 THEN 4080 
NN 4100 GOSUB 80ie:G0SUB 30000:G0SUB 2002 

5: GOTO 12 
BK 8000 FOR D=01 TO 300:NEXT D:POKE 53248 

,Q0:G0SUB 8010:G0T0 8015 
EA 8010 GRAPHICS QO:POKE 16,64:P0KE 53774 

,64 
Yi> 8012 POKE 710,(t0:P0KE 752, 01 : POSITION 

15,12:? "Standby. . .":FOR 1=01 TO 200:M 

EXT I: RETURN 
OE 8015 POKE 559,00 

LP 8020 GOSUB 30000:G0SUB 20025:G0T0 12 
KB 9000 FOR 1=01 TO Q8:P0SITI0N 00,16:? " 

□":NEXT I 
TU 9010 FOR N=21 TO 28:P0KE N+DSTART, 130 : 

POKE 1707+N,68:P0KE 1707+N+24, 14 : NEXT 

N 
VA 9020 POKE 1707+25+24,00 
JA 9030 POSITION 14,16:? "BIRD'S AWAY!" 
MW 9040 POSITION 08,18:? "The correct cod 

es were:" 
TC 9050 FOR A=01 TO 04:P0SITI0N 03+tA-QlJ 

HQ10,20:? CODE (A, 01) ; CODE CA, 021; CODE (A 

,Q3):HEXT A 

ys 9070 POSITION 06,22:? "Press K^nria t 

try again."; 
GP 9210 IF PEEKC532791 <>06 THEN GOTO 9210 
XK 9215 GOSUB 8010:P0KE 559,00 
LX 9230 GOSUB 30000:G0SUB 20025:G0T0 12 
EI 15800 GRAPHICS 02:P0KE 16,64:P0KE 5377 

4,64:P0KE 752,01:P0KE 712,166:P0KE 709 

,14:P0KE 710,166:P0KE 708,186 
KH 15802 SOUND 00, 00, QO, QO : POKE 53768,04: 

POKE 53761, 170:P0KE 53764, 150 : POKE 537 

63,170 

YH 15005 M=Q1:L=00 

WG 15010 POSITION Q4,Q2:? ttQ6 ; " rFTTTiHfJ.ri 

S" 

JC 15020 POSITION 08, Q6:? ttQ6;"^'^'^" 
FG 15030 POSITION 08,05:? »Q6;"080" 
PP 15058 ON M GOSUB 15100,15120,15140,151 

58,15168,15180 
RI 15855 GOSUB 15500 
AT 15060 IF L>75 THEN L=00 : M=M+Q1 : GOTO 15 

850 
LK 15065 IF M>Q5 THEN M=QO 
FE 15870 GOTO 15055 
XR 15100 ? :? "Can you discover the launc 



^ h code. . .":? :RETURN 
LSI 15120 ?:?:?" ...in tiHe?" 

:? :RETURN 
KM 15140 ? :? " By David Schwener 

":? :RETURN 
10 15150 ? :? " For ANALOG Conputi 

ng":? : RETURN 

^^C 15160 ? :? " Press »^n:ia to begin yo 

ur Mission":? :RETURN 
IHH 15180 ? :? " Hurry! Tine is running 

out":? : RETURN 
PV 15200 GOSUB 15500 
AF 15250 GOTO 15200 
RE 15588 A=INT(RNDC0)«999I :POSITION 08,05 

:? ttQ6;A:L=L+Ql 
TU 15503 IF LL THEN POKE 711,74 :LL=00 : GOT 

15510 

e»$ 15505 POKE 711,154:LL=Q1 

118 15510 IF PEEK (532791 =06 THEN POP :SOUN 

D O0,QO,O0,O0:SOUND 01, QO, QO, 00 : GOTO 1 

6000 
Z& 15520 IF L>37 THEN POKE 53760, C75-L1 +9 

: POKE 53762, t75-Ll +91 : RETURN 
es 15530 POKE 53760, L+90:P0KE 53762, L+91: 

RETURN 
l>J 16000 RETURN 
BJ 20000 DIM C0DECQ4,Q3),FLAG(Q4],TIMECQ4 

1,C0NCQ41 ,CCQ31 , DISABLE C041 , DIGIT$ (Q9) 
ME 20028 DIGIT$="lSt2nd3rd" 
m 20025 LEUEL=O0 
JO 20030 CLOCK=90:LUL=Q3 
eU 20100 UALUE=QO:TIME=ie00:CHECK=150O:RE 

START=28188:SHUTDOWN=2500:LAUNCH=200e: 

CMPLT=25886:GAMEOUER=9000:MESSAGE=40O0 
UE 20185 OTIME=OO:TTIME=Q0 
OF 20110 C(Q11=Q0:CC021=08:CCQ3}=Q0:TDISA 

BLE=QO 
IX 28128 FOR A=01 TO 04 : FOR B=Q1 TO Q3:C0 

DECA,B1=A«B:NEXT B : NEXT A 
RP 28150 FOR A=01 TO 04 
RK 28160 FOR B=01 TO 03 
PX 28178 CODECA,Bl=INTCRNDCOei«Q10} 
Hit 20180 IF C0DECA,Q11=C0DE(A,Q21 OR CODE 

(A,Q21=C0DECA,031 OR CODE (A, Oil =CODE CA 

,03) THEN 20170 
&R 20190 NEXT B 
EO 28200 FLAGCA1=Q0:C0NCA1=Q0:DISABLECA)= 

00 
CC 20210 NEXT A 

IX 20220 POKE 20,Q0:P0KE 19,Q0:P0KE 18,00 
HE 28248 POSITION 1, 01:? "Enter digi 

t Of ffiECiaJMaiEE:"; 

Pr 28280 POSITION 08, Q3:? "TIME REMAINING 

: HOURS"; 
AW 20290 FOR 1=05 TO 14:P0SITI0N QO,I:? " 

1 II II II 
I " ' : NEXT I 

FB 20295 FOR 1=01 TO Q4:P0SITI0N Q3+CI-Q1 

)*Q18 23:' ":"■ CLOCK ■ 
QR 2O296'pO5iTl6N'Q2+CI-Qll*Q10,Q4:? "SIL 

";I+LEyEL»04; 
XJ 20297 NEXT I 
QH 20300 RETURN 
NY 25880 LEUEL=LEyEL+Ql:IF LEUEL=03 THEN 

GOSUB MESSAGE 

41 25885 A=PEEKC191 

HX 25810 POSITION 12, QO:? " Mii:H:r'»IIT;l*<ii:i 

0"; 
KL 25820 POSITION Q0,Q1:? " Prepare 

for the next 4 silos "; 

FT 25030 POSITION 09,02:? "press tULU Wh 

en ready"; 
MU 25035 FL=QO 
PS 25040 FOR P=201 TO 250 
KP 25042 IF PEEKC532791=6 THEN FL=1:P0SIT 

ION 6,1:? " 

II • 

ZP 25043 POSITION 7,2:? "**H«t»Piease Stan 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 103 




Launch Code continued 



dby XMKKKM "; 

25045 K=PEEK{1717J 

25850 SOUND QO, P, QIO, Q8 : SOUND 01,9*01, 

018,Q8:5DUND 02, P+Q2, QIO, Q8: SOUND 03, P 

+Q3,Q10,Q8 

25051 POKE 1717, PEEK {1718J ! POKE 1718, P 
EEKC1719) :POKE 1719, PEEK C1720J : POKE 17 
20,PEEKC1721J :POKE 1721, PEEK 11722) 

25052 POKE 1722,PEEKC1723J IPOKE 1723, P 
EEKC17243 ;POKE 1724, PEEK C1725) ; POKE 17 
25,PEEKtl726) :POKE 1726,K:NEXT P 

25053 IF FL<Q1 THEN 25040 

25055 FOR P=QO TO a3:S0UND P,Q0,Q0,Q8: 

NEXT P 

25060 LUL=Q2 

25070 IF LEVEL=Q2 THEN CL0CK=6e 

25080 POKE 559,00 

25085 POKE 19, A 

25090 0TIME=36-TTIME+0TIME 

25120 ? "^■':GOSUB 20110: GOTO 19 

27400 POKE 106,PEEKtl06)-O5:STflRT=CPEE 

Ktl06)+Qi)»256:POKE 752,01 

27402 GRftPHICS 17:P0KE 16,64:P0KE 5377 

4,64 

27405 POSITION 04,04:? It06 ; "LOCKING IN 
TO": POSITION 05,07:? « Q6 : "i.-in:r ; i:i:i*<:[n " : 
POSITION 06,09:? tt06;"[53a!iiiua" 

27406 POSITION 03,15:? tt06;"please sta 
ndbbP" 

27407 POKE 712,70:POKE 710,156:P0KE 70 
8,206 

27409 DIM MS t38J : RESTORE 27415 

27410 FOR 1=1 TO 38:REaD A:M$CI,I}=CHR 
$fAJ :NEXT I 

27415 DflTfl 104,169,0,133,203,133,205,1 
69,224,133,206,165,106,24,105,1,133,20 
4,160,0,177 

27416 DflTfl 205,145,203,200,208,249,230 
,204,230,206,165,206,201,228,208,237,9 
6 

27420 E=U5R tADR CMS) J : RESTORE 27510 

27430 READ K : IF X=-01 THEN RESTORE : RE 

TURN 

27440 FOR Y=O0 TO 07: READ Z:PDKE X+Y+5 

TART,Z:POKE 709, 64+Y»02 : NEXT Y 

27450 GOTO 27430 

27510 DATA 520,0,8,8,8,0,0,3,3 

27520 DATA 528,3,15,15,63,255,255,255, 

255 

27530 DATA 536,192,240,248,252,255,255 

,255,255 

27540 DATA 544,0,0,8,8,8,8,192,192 

27558 DATA 552,15,63,63,255,85,85,85,8 

5 

27560 DATA 560,255,255,255,255,85,85,8 

5,85 

27570 DATA 568,255,255,255,255,85,85,8 

5,85 

27580 DATA 576,240,252,252,255,85,85,8 

5,85 

27598 DATA 584,85,85,85,85,85,85,85,85 

27588 DATA 592,89,89,89,89,90,85,90,89 

27610 DATA 600,101,101,101,161,165,85, 

165,85 

27640 DATA 688,98,85,98,85,98,89,90,89 

27650 DATA 616,165,101,165,85,165,181, 

165,181 

27700 DATA 624,89,85,85,105,185,105,10 

5,105 

27710 DATA 632,181,85,85,125,125,125,1 

25,125 

27728 DATA 648,185,185,105,105,105,85, 

85,85 

27730 DATA 648,125,125,125,125,125,85, 

85,85 

27750 DATA 656,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,3 

27760 DATA 664,3,3,15,15,63,63,255,255 

27770 DATA 672,192,192,240,240,252,252 



,255,255 
CO 27780 DATA 688,0,0,8,8,8,8,8,192 
HC 27790 DATA -1 

HI 27999 REM l;M>iH=f'l:ri1!aE 

US 28000 FOR 1=01 TO 04 

5C 28010 POSITION 04+ fI-Ol)»O10, 16 : ? CHRS 

t2) ; CHRS (3) 
GZ 28020 POSITION 04+ CI-01)»018, 17 : ? CHRS 

(6);CHR$C7) 
XU 28030 POSITION 04+ tl-01)»010, 18: ? CHRS 

(10) ; CHRS til) 
GD 28040 POSITION 04+ II-01)«010, 19 : ? CHRS 

C12);CHR$(i3) 
DS 28050 POSITION 04+ £I-Qi)«018, 28: ? CHRS 

(14);CHRSC15) 
MB 28060 POSITION 04+ CI-O1)»O10, 21:? CHRS 

Ci6) jCHRS(17) 
GO 28070 POSITION 04+ £I-O1)«O10, 22 : ? CHRS 

C19) ;CHR$f20) 
HG 28080 NEXT I 
EY 28090 RETURN 
5Z 30000 RESTORE 30170 : FOR N=Q0 TO 99:REA 

\> X:POKE 1664 + N,X:NEXT N 
JB 30005 GRAPHICS 00:POKE 16,64:P0KE 5377 

4,64:P0KE 756,5TART/256:P0KE 559,00 
XU 30010 C0LTAB=1712:LUMTAB=C0LTAB+24 
ZT 30014 X=USR(1693) 
ML 30030 POKE 512,128 
m 30040 POKE 513,06 

HP 30060 DSTART=PEEKt568)+256»PEEKC561) 
TG 30070 FOR N=DSTART+6 TO D5TART+28 
FR 30080 POKE N,130 
JD 30090 NEXT N 
YK 30092 FOR N=DSTART+21 TO D5TART+27 : POK 

E N,132:NEXT N 
KS 30095 POKE DSTART+28, 138 
JM 30100 POKE DSTART+03.194 
RG 30120 POKE 54286,192 
HQ 30125 ? "H" 

DL 30140 POKE 718, PEEK (COLTAB) 
UE 30150 POKE 709,PEEK(LUMTAB) 
EA 30160 RETURN 
HN 30170 DATA 72,138,72,174,156,6,189,176 

,6,141 
OU 30180 DATA 10,212,141,24,268,189,200,6 

,141,23 
RB 30190 DATA 208,238,156,6,104,178,184,6 

4,1,184 
SW 30200 DATA 169,7,168,168,162,6,32,92,2 

VX 30218 DATA 169,1,141,156,6,76,98,228,1 

00,168 
AO 30220 DATA 100,166,0,56,72,88,104,128, 

136,152 
5N 30230 DATA 168,184,288,0,148,148,148,1 

48,148,148 
RY 30248 DATA 148,196,14,14,14,2,12,2,2,2 
RX 30258 DATA 2,2,2,2,2,2,2,68,68,68 
HG 30260 DATA 68,68,68,68,68,14,0,0,0,8 



PAGE 104 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



HARDWARE 




Bits &s Pieces 



A hardware 
utility series 



by Lee S. Brilliant, M.D. 



If imitation is the highest form of flattery, then 
Jonathan Buckheit should be very flattered. "Who?" 
you ask. Well, go back to ANALOG Computing's is- 
sue 31, June 1985. You'll see he authored the article 
Atari Clock. 

I found this one of the most imaginative programs 
I'd seen in a long time; it was original, novel, use- 
ful, simple, elegant and just about the same as a pro- 
gram I'd written. Atari Time. In fact, about the only 
difference is that Atari Clock forgets the time when 
the power's off; Atari Time won't forget! . . . and it 
also knows the date and day of the week. 

C'mon now, how can the computer remernber any- 
thing once the power's off? If you haven't guessed 
3'et, it involves the joystick ports. If you did guess, 
then go to the head of the class! 

Atari Time started while I browsed through a lo- 
cal electronics shop, where I saw a clock chip for 
only $15 — and it was a 4-bit clock chip. "So what!" 
you say? Well, that's 4 bits for addresses and 4 bits 
for data; 4+4=8. Perfect: it fits into two joystick 
ports. Now, if you were wondering what you could 
do with all the trivia of the last three Bits & Pieces 
articles, this is for you! 

The heart of the matter. 

Atari Time uses an MSM5832 clock chip manu- 
factured by Oki Semiconductor and sold by several 
sources (see parts list) . If you remember from the 
first in this series, we said that computers have 



address and data buses. This chip is like a 16-byte 
memory on a 4-bit address and a 4-bit data bus. 

We'll use joystick plug 1 for the data bus and 2 for 
the addresses. The set-up will be almost exactly the 
same as the simultaneous I/O experiment we rigged 
up in the last Bits & Pieces (issue 44). Instead of 
LEDs and wire jumpers, we'll output an address 
through plug 2 , then read the data from that address 
through plug 1. 

Because there are 4 address bits on joystick 2, 
there can only be 16 possible addresses. This is 
enough for the day of the week, the month, day, year, 
hours, minutes and seconds. Joystick 1 also has only 
4 bits, so each address or register must store a num- 
ber between and 15. Each part of the time must 
be stored in low/high bytes in decimal form. 

So, if the clock time is 24 seconds, then address 
contains the number 4, and address 1 contains the 
number 2. Counting all the registers in Table 1, you'll 
see that you only need thirteen, so we only need ad- 
dresses to 12. The rest are nonfunctional. The ad- 
dresses hold data according to Table 1. 

The clock keeps time with a crystal that oscillates 
at 32,768 cycles a second. Dividing this base fre- 
quency by 2 fifteen times yields pulses once a sec- 
ond. This pulse drives the seconds register, while 
the other registers trip when the lower ones overflow. 

Reading the clock isn't too difficult. You start with 
the first register's address, send it out over the four 
joystick pins connected to the address bus, then read 
the contents of that register on the data bus connect- 
ed to the other joystick pins. Simple, right? 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 105 




Bits &? Pieces continued 



Joystick 2 
Pin 



n 



3#- 



4»- 



Figure 1. 
Atari Time. 



AO 



A1 



A2 



A3 



Test 



Adj 



14 
15 



13 



Gnd 



IC 1 



10 



12 



18 



16 17 



ci; 



xt 



XI 

LI 



DO 



D1 



D2 



D3 



Hold 



Write 



Read 



+V 



C2 



Joystick 1 
Pin 



M 



-•3 



R1 

n/WWWVV- 



si 



-•7 



R2 



I 



D1 



B1 



ADDRESS 


FUNCTION 





SECONDS LO 


1 


SECONDS HI 


2 


MINUTES LO 


3 


MINUTES HI 


4 


HOURS LO 


5 


HOURS HI (bits 0&2) BIT 2;0=AM 1 = PM 




BIT 3:0=12 HOUR 1=24 HOUR 


6 


DAY OF WEEK 


7 


DAY LO 


8 


DAY HI BIT 2: 0=LEAP YEAR 




1=N0RMAL 


9 


MONTH LO 


10 


MONTH HI 


11 


YEARS LO 


12 


YEARS HI 


13 


NONE 


14 


NONE 


15 


NONE 



Table 1. — Registers. 



PAGE 106 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



The other pins on the chip have functions, too. 

Write: A 1 on this pin allows you to send time data 
to the registers, to set the proper time. 

Read: A 1 here allows you to read the registers. 

Chip Select (CS): A 1 here enables all the functions 
of the clock. A disables everything, but the clock 
internally keeps time. 

Hold: A 1 here stops the clock from counting. This 
must be 1 to write the time to the registers. 
The rest don't concern us here. 

You can build Atari Time on the breadboard from the 
last Bits & Pieces, or use the printed circuit shown in Fig- 
ure 2. 




43J1 874321 
PLUG 3 PLUG I 

Figure 2. 

Solder two joystick cables to the pads on the edge as 
labeled, and connect to two 9-pin "D" plugs. Although the 
parts list calls for solder-type plugs, I use solderless IDC 
plugs. They're more expensive and harder to find (you 
might have to order them by mail, or go to a computer parts 
store), but they're easier to use and don't require a hood 
or any modifications to fit into the joystick ports. 

If you use the solder-type plugs, you'll need to break 
off the tabs on the hoods and use small flathead screws 
to join the hoods to the plugs. If you use manufactured 
joystick cables, be sure of your color codes for each cable, 
because the colors used for each pin may differ. 




House the circuit board and batteries in a plastic case 
large enough to hold them. Note that, even though there's 
no direct connection between the IC's + voltage and the 
computer power, no current is drawn from the batteries 
when the computer's on. In fact, the diode, Dl, is needed 
to keep power from flowing from the computer into the 
batteries. Using a good quality alkaline battery should al- 
low a year's continuous operation. 

Got the time? 

Using Atari Time isn't very complicated; there are three 
programs. Listing 1 is in BASIC and lets you set your Atari 
Time. Type it in and save it to disk, then plug in Atari 
Time. Now run it. 

You'll be prompted to input the time, date, and so forth, 
but not seconds — writing anything to the seconds registers 
only sets them to 0. 

When prompted, open the clock case and move the 
SET/RUN switch to SET, then press RETURN. As soon 
as the screen says the time is set, move the switch to RUN; 
otherwise, the clock won't start keeping time. 

The addressing in BASIC may seem a little complex, 
because the time data must stay stable while the address 
changes. Changing the address and the time data at the 
same time causes new data to be written to the old ad- 
dress, since the clock is slower than the computer. 

Listing 2 is simply a BASIC demo program to show how 
the clock works. Note that the addresses are multiplied 
by 16, to give the correct bit values for joystick 2. 

For example, if the address is 9, you multiply by 16 to 
give 144. Again, this is like the experiment in issue 44. 
Remember, the pins are viewed in the reverse of the order 
that binary numbers are written. 

PLUG 2 PLUG 1 

0000 1001=9 



10 1 







144 



X 16 



Figure 3. 
Photo of completed Atari Time unit. 



This is similar to calculating low-byte/high-bi^e address- 
es, except you multiply by 16 instead of 256. 

Listing 3 is a BASIC loader for a machine language pro- 
gram that works like the Atari Clock mentioned earlier. 
The initialization routine sets up joystick ports and alters 
the display list, to create an extra screen line in graphics 0. 

The program reads and displays the time during the ver- 
tical blank interval (VBI), and is both auto-loading and 
reset-proof. It also uses a display list interrupt (DLI) to keep 
the display set to the border color, regardless of how you 
change color registers. Without this, you could cause the 
display to disappear, if you set COLORl and COLOR2 to 
the same value. 

If you use a 400 or 800, there'll be a flicker whenever 
keys are pressed. My 800XL doesn't have this problem. 
If you want to get rid of it, delete the DLI routine in the 
assembly listing and reassemble as AUTORUN.SYS. 

Atari Time loads and runs in memory above the DOS 
buffers. If you increase the number of default buffers (or 
use a different DOS), you'll need to reassemble to a differ- 
ent starting address. The source code is included. 

You'll notice there's a loop called DELAY, which seems 
to have no function. This loop compensates for the 8 
microseconds it takes the clock to stabilize data outputs. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 107 



^ 



Bits &5 Pieces 



continued 



This is necessary because the CMOS circuits in the 5832 
chip are very slow — but use very little power. 

Your computer uses TTL circuits. While they're fast, 
they consume a lot of power. I measured the actual power 
consumed in standby mode at 12 microamperes, as op- 
posed to the approximately 1,500,000 microamperes eat- 
en up by a typical 800XL. 

The rest of Listing 3 acquires time data and converts 
it to the Internal Code needed by the ANTIC display hard- 
ware, then formats it in the display buffer. Note that two 
registers also contain data for 12/24-hour display, AM/PM 
and leap year. These must be handled before the time is 
displayed. 

If you want to write your own program to read time from 
the clock — perhaps to put time stamps onto disk files — 
you need to be aware of a minor potential problem. Let's 
say it's 10:59:59 when you start reading the time. 

You have read the the hour, but, before you can read 
the next register, the seconds increment — the rest of the 
registers now contain 0. Thus, while the actual time is 
11:00:00, you've read 10:00:00! 

To avoid this, you can either add some circuitry, or sim- 
ply loop until you detect the seconds register increment, 
then read the time. 

Now you know: lighting little LEDs isn't all the joystick 
ports are good for. There are many useful devices which 
can be interfaced through joystick ports. 

I like making little gadgets and writing short, cute pro- 
grams; I don't like writing DOS patches. But the most im- 
mediately useful application I can think of for Atari Clock 
is a DOS which records the time and date whenever a pro- 
gram or file is written to disk. Someone out there, please 
write a program to do this. 

Another practical use would be for the security system 
considered in our last segment, to turn lights or radios on 
and off at specific times. A BBS would find this clock use- 
ful to keep accurate time, or to power-up knowing the time. 

You can read the hardware clock and use it to set the 
Atari's internal real-time clock. That way it would come 
up smart — knowing the correct time and date. This could 
be a real blessing if you live in an area subject to power 
outages. 

In our next installment, we'll consider a few more 
aspects of the joystick ports, including optical sensors, 
light pens and timer programs. Until then, keep tinker- 
ing. And please write. If you have any great applications 
or any topics you'd like to see discussed, please let me 
know. H 



An obstetrician-gynecologist by day, Lee Bnlliant, M.D. 
turns into a bug-eyed computer monster by night. He start- 
ed on computers in August 1983 with TI 99/4A and rapid- 
ly graduated to Atari. He's programmed Apple, TI, Com- 
modore and IBM, but prefers his old 800. His favorite pas- 
time is tearing computers apart to see how they tick. Of 
course, he uses a scalpel! 



PARTS LIST 

B1 Size AA alkaline batteries 

C1,C2 20 picofarad capacitors 

01 Any small signal diode 

(Radio Shack 276-1122) 
IC1 MSM5832 clock chip 

(see sources below) 
P1,P2 9-pin female "D" plugs with hoods 

(Radio Shack 276-1538 & 276-1539; 

see text) 

R1,R2 100K ohm 'A-watt resistors 

SI Single-pole double throw switch 

(V2 of Radio Shack 275-407) 
X1 32.768 kiloHertz crystal 

(see sources below) 
Miscellaneous Battery holder 

(Radio Shack 270-383) plus a clip 

Plastic case (Radio Shack 270-230) 

Multiconductor cable (like ribtwn cable) 
SOURCES 

The IC is sold by Teknopak, 1534 E. Edinger Ave., Suite 8, Santa Ana, 
CA 92705, through their local distributors. They sell the chip with a micro- 
sized crystal for about $15.00. 

JDR MIcrodevices, 1224 S. Bascom Ave., San Jose, CA 95128 also mail 
orders the IC tor $3.95 and the crystal for $1.95, but they have a minimum 
order of $10.00 You can get the IDC plugs here (#IDB9S at $3.25 each) 
to pad out the order 



The two-letter checksum code preceding the line 
numbers here is not a part of the BASIC program. 
For further information, see the BASIC Editor II, is- 
sue 45, and its update on page 9. 



Listing 1. 
BASIC listing. 



10 OPEN ttl,4*8,"K:":? "V 

2e TRAP 1080 

30 T=54eie 

40 DIM DAY$C2),AP$C2] 

50 DftTft SU,M0,TU,WE,TH,FR,5fl 

100 ? ■■ *»» CLOCK 5ETTIHG «*»■■ 

110 POSITION 2,3:? "EMTER YEAR Clast 2 
digits only] 4440';:INPUT YR 

115 IF VR>9? THEM 110 

120 POSITION 2,5;? "ENTER MONTH: << 

ii"; : INPUT MO 

125 IF M0>12 THEN 120 

130 POSITION 2,7:? "ENTER DAY: m< 

"; :INPUT DAY 

135 IF DAY>31 THEN 130 

140 POSITION 2,9:? "WHICH FORMAT: 
;1J 12 HOUR":? "►► 2J 24 HOUR"; 

150 GET »1,AMPH:IF AMPM<49 OR ANPM>50 

THEN 170 

160 AMPM=ANPM-49 
1170 POSITION 2,12:? "ENTER HOUR: ^1 

4^"; :INPUT HH 
il71 IF HR>AMPMH12412 THEN 170 

172 IF AMPN=1 THEN 180 

174 ? "CHOOSE 1) AM OR 2J PM:"; 
1 175 GET ttl,AP:IF AP<49 OR AP>5e THEN 1 

75 

176 AP=AP-49:IF AP=0 THEN APS="AM" 

177 IF AP=1 THEN AP$="PM" 

180 POSITION 2,15:? "ENTER MINUTES: 

4^4<"; : INPUT MIN 
1185 IF MIN>59 THEN 180 
190 POSITION 2,17:? "CHOOSE THE DAY OF 

THE WEEK:" 
[195 ? " 1. SU 2. HO 3. TU 4. 



PAGE 108 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



i' WE":? " 5. TH 6. FH 7 . " 

PJ 200 GET ltl,M:IF M<49 OR N>55 THEN 200 
me, 210 W=W-49 
Va 220 POSITION 2,21:? "IS THIS A LEAP YE 

AR <Y/N>"; 
ZN 230 GET ttl,LY 

OA 240 IF LY=78 THEN LY=0:GOTO 270 
PM 250 IF LY=89 THEN LY=1:G0T0 270 
MK 260 GOTO 230 
BO 265 REM 
CM 266 REN CONVERT INPUTS TO BINARY CODED 

DECIMAL 
m 267 REM 
«T 270 TRAP 4OOO0:HRH=INTCHR/10] :HRL=HR-1 

OWHRH : MINH=INT (MIN/IO) : MINL=MIN-10WMIN 

H:5ECH=INT(5EC/10J : SECL=SEC-10»SECH 
Gfi 280 YRH=INTCYR/10) :YRL=YR-10«YHH:M0H=I 

NT tMO/10) : M0L = M0-10»M0H : DAYH=INT (DAY/1 

0) :DAYL=DAY-10»DAYH 
HK 300 ? "K":REST0RE 50 : POKE 182,W:READ D 

AY$ 
T8 310 ? DAYS;" ";MOH;MOL;"/";DAYH;DAYL;" 

/";YRH;YRL:? :? "TIMECHR:MIN:SECJ":? : 

? HRH ; HRL; " : "; MINH ; MINL ; ; SECH; SECL; 

ME 320 IF AMPM=0 THEN ? " ";APS 

BY 330 ? :? :? "IS THIS CORRECT? <Y/N>"; 

CR 340 GET ttl,K 

HN 350 IF K=78 THEN RUN 

UR 360 IF K=89 THEN 380 

OX 370 GOTO 340 

GH 380 P=PEEKC54018) :POKE 54018, P-4 :POKE 

54016, 255:P0KE 54018, P 
EF 400 HRH=HRH+4*AP+8*AMPM:DAYH=DAYH+4»LY 
VR 410 ? "HQQ":? "SWITCH CLOCK TO THE 3S 

T MODE THEM":? "PRESS AMY KEY TO WRITE 
THE TIME TO":? "THE CLOCK." 
HO 420 POKE 764,255 
to 430 IF PEEK(764]=255 THEN 430 
ilY 435 REM KKKKXXKXXKKKKKMMKKXMKKMKKKXKKK 

*|R 436 REM THIS PART ACTUALLY SETS THE TI 

ME 
XE 437 REM XXXXXKXKKKKKXXXXKKXKXXKKXXXXXX 

JM 440 POKE T,192+YRH:P0KE T,176+YRH 
m 450 POKE T,176+YRL:P0KE T,160+YRL 
°%H 460 POKE T,160+M0H:P0KE T,144-i'M0H 
3n 470 POKE T,144+M0L:P0KE T,128+M0L 
M. 480 POKE T,128+DAYH:P0KE T,112+DAYH 
JM 490 POKE T,112-l'DAYL:P0KE T,96-l'DAYL 
NH 500 POKE T,96+W:P0KE T,80+W 
K2 510 POKE T,80+HRH:P0KE T,64+HRH 
Va 520 POKE T,64+HRL:P0KE T,48+HRL 
FK 530 POKE T,48+MIMH:P0KE T,32+MIMH 
MC 540 POKE T,32+MINL:P0KE T,16+MINL 

5F 550 POKE T,16:P0KE T,0 

XC 600 ? :? :? "QQRESET CLOCK TO [iT^Til AND 

YOU ARE":? "DOME." 
PR 999 END 

re 1000 L=PEEKC186}+256»PEEKC187] :TRAP 18 
08: GOTO L 



Listing 2. 
BASIC lisUng. 

UD 10 T=54O16:TC=54018 

KX 20 P=PEEK{TCJ :POKE TC,P-4:P0KE T,240:P 

OKE TC P 
IS 30 DIM'DAYSfl0),APSC2) 
OG 40 POKE 752,l:REST0RE 50 
SW 50 DATA SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDA 

Y, THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY 
Htf 90 ? "«":? " »)«H«t THE CORRECT TIME I 

S KKKXX " 
PS 100 POKE T,96:M=PEEKtT)-96:P0KE T,112: 

DLO=PEEK tTJ -112 : POKE T, 128 : DHI=PEEK tTJ 



micrOtyme 



A 

ATARI 



A DIVISION OF MICRO PERIPHERALS. INC. 

P.O. BOX 3B8 

KETTERING, OHIO 4S409 



A 

ATARI 



ATARI 

520 ST's 

SF 314 Double Sided Drive 

SHD 204 20 Megabyte Hard Disk 

SC 1224 RGB Color Monitor 

130XE, (8-bit Wonder of the World!). 

65 XE 

1050 Disk Drive 

1020 Color Printer/Plotter 

Power Supply 400/800/81 1 050/850 

Power Supply 600/800 XL. 130 XE 

INDUS GT 

Power Supply for Indus GT 



PANASONIC 

KX-P1080 5 NLQ MODES' NEW 

KX-P1091 Rated the No 1 Printer' 
KX-P1092 80col.True180cps 
KX-Pt592 136 col. True tSOcps 
KX-P3131 L.Q.Daisy. 80 col . 
KX-P3151 L.Q.Daisy. 136 col 

KX-P1 10 Ribbon. BIk 

COLOf) RIBBONS 



SOFTWARE and BOOKS 

CALL ST SOFTWARE TOO MUCH TO LIST CALL 

CALL ALL titles from: Haba. VIP. Broderbund. 

CALL Mark of the Unicorn, Hippo, Unison World. 

CALL Migraph. Oss. Infocom. Atari. Michtron. 

CALL SST Systems. Mirage Concepts, etc. 

CALL We will have everything WORTH having! 

CALL 'THE C PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE" by B W. 

.25 Kernighan and DM Ritchie 19 

15 8 BIT SOFTWARE FOR THE LATEST, CALL 

26 PAPERCLIP 39 

219 PRINTSHOP 29 

15 GRAPHICS LIBRARY #1.if2, or « (each) 16 

O.S.S. BASIC XE 46 

OSS. BASIC XL 36 

CALL 

CALL MONITORS 

CALL TEKNIKAMJ-10 Composite Color 

CALL TEKNIKAMJ-22 RGB and Composite 

CALL THOMPSON Green W/Audio 

CALL THOMPSON Amber W/Audio 

9 THOMPSON Composite Color 
.11 



189 
279 
.85 
.90 
159 



CITIZEN 



MSP-tO 
MSP-15 



CALL 
CALL 



EPSON 

LX-80(80col) CALL 

FX-85(80col| CALL 

FX-286200cps(135col) CALL 

STAR MICRONICS 

NX-10(80col) NEW MODEL CALL 

SG-10(80col| CALL 

SG-15(135col) CALL 

STAR SG-10 Ribbons 4 

MODEMS 

ATARI 1030 45 

XIVI-301 Direct Connect 38 

QM1 1200 ST (for 520 ST Complete') 179 

HAYES 1200 Smartmodem 399 

US ROBOTICS COURIER 2400-100% Hayes' 429 

PRENTIS P212ST-1200 bps. 100% Hayes' 239 

SUPRA 1200AT 179 

SUPRAST MODEM 1200 bps 179 

V0LKSM0DEM1200 189 

AVATEX Smart 1200 bps Special 99 

INTERFACES/BUFFERS 

ATARI 850 In Slock' 119 

P:R: CONNECTION (100% 850 compatible) 66 

CABLES - We've Got Em CALL 

U CALL (For Hayes, etc.) 39 

U PRINT A CALL 

U PRINT A-64 with 64K Butler CALL 

APE FACE XLP CALL 

SUPRA/MPP MICROPRINT CALL 

SUPRA/ MPPMICR0STUFFER(64K Buffer) 69 
SUPRA/MPP 1150 CALL 



ACCESSORIES 

ST- COVERS. Heavy Grade Vinyl 

ST- MOUSE MAT . Matching ST Color 

ST- 6' PnnterCable 

ST- Modem Cable do Hayes, etc ) 

ST- Monitor Stand. Swivel & Tilt 

Disk File lor 3.5'' disks (holds 40) 

Flip N File DATA CASE (holds 50) 

Disk File, with Lock (holds 100!) 

Rotary Disk File (holds 72) 

Power Strip. 6 outlet. (15 amp Surge) 

Printer Stand. Heavy Duty. Sloping 

ATARI ■■Standard" Joystick 

6" Atari Serial I/O Cable 

CompuServe Starter Kit 

US D0UBLER(Dbl Density (or 1050) 

■Duplicator" 

PRINTER SUPPLIES 

MAILING LABELS, White. SCO pack 

per 1000 

Blu, Pnk, Gn, Yel, 800 pack (200 ea) 

per 500, any 1 color 

per 1000, any 1 color 
Big Labels, 1-7/ 16x4", White, per 500 
PRINTER PAPER, Micro-Fine perls, 20 lb 
500 sheels. Pure White Bond 
1000 sheets, same as above 
Carton (2600 sheets), as above 
PRINTSHOP "Rainbow ' Color Paper Packs 
Pastels (5 colors), 50 sheets ot ea 

Matching Envelopes, 20 of each 
Brights (8 colors), 50 sheets ot ea 

Matching Envelopes, 20 of each 
ALL 13 colors, 50 sheets ot each 

Matching Envelopes 20 of each 
(Deduct 10% for 100/color paper packs) 



10 
19 
17 
15 
9 
8 
13 
15 
15 
13 
6 
7 
21 
49 
129 



Prices Are Per Box of 10 DISKETTES Minimum Order of 2 Boxes 













WABASH 


3,5" MICRO-FLOPPIES 


No of 


GENERIC 


BONUS 


SONY 


VERBATIM 


Boxes 


SS/DD 


DS/DD 


SS/OD 


DS/DD 


SS/DD 


SS/DD 


DS/DD 


SS/DD 


2-5 


850 


10,50 


10 50 


1350 


10 50 


20 50 


29,50 


15 50 


6-10 


7,50 


9 50 


9,50 


12,50 


9 50 


19 50 


28 50 


1450 



Rainbow Colored Centech Disks (2 ea ot 1 colors per pl<g) 17 

"Silver" Centech Disks (20 Pack) 17 



TO ORDER, CALL TOLL FREE 

1-800-255-5835 



M-TH9am-9pm • FRI 9 am-5 pm • SAT10am-2pm 
EST 



Ohio Residents, Order Status or /•^^•►c. 
Tech. Info Call (513) 294-6236 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS 

24 HH shipp.ng on in siocn Hems • NO EXTRA CHARGES FOR CREDIT CARDS' • Minimum mder $20 • C O D lo 
ci^iHineniai US oily add S3 • Omd lesiQenis aOQ 6' v sales la. * Ptease aiiow 3 weeks foi oe'sonai m company 
Checks 10 clear • Shippmg/Handlmg Hardware S4 fiummum Sotlwa'e and most accessories. S3 minimum • Over 
nigni shipment available ar e«Ha cfia'ge • We snip lo Alaska. Hawan Pueno Rico (UPS Blue Label Oniyi, APO. and 
FPO • Canadian orde'S. actual Shipping plus5°'. minimum S5 • All de'eclive pioducrs require a 'elu'n aulho'izalion 
number 10 be accepled tor reoair or repiacemeni • No tree I'lais or-credil • Due 1o changing ma'kel ondihons call 
II free 'or laiesi price and auaiiaOiHty o' p'oOuct 



CIRCLE #146 ON READER SERVICE CARD 





ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 109 



SPyco Gomf)ute/i J^Aakkd'mq & Cot^sufitants 




PANASONIC 

1080 195 

1091 225 

1092 309 

3131 249 

3151 399 

1592 419 

1595 599 

EPSON 

LX80 209 

FX85 CALL 

DX10 207 

HI80 355 

HS80 298 

FX286 CALL 

LQ800 529 

LQIOOO 659 



SAVE ™ PRINTERS 



SEIKOSHA 

SP-1000VC(C-64) 175 

SP-1000 A Centronics .. 195 

SP-1000IIBM 195 

SP-1000 AS RS-232 195 

SP-1000 AP Apple lie... 195 

BP-52001 649 

BP-1300 469 

BP-5420 999 

SP-1000 ribbon 8.50 

BP-5420 ribbon 12.50 

SILVER REED 

EXP 420 P 209 

EXP600P 489 

EXP 800 P 649 

EXP 400 249 

EXP 770 749 



OKIDATA 

Okimate 10 179 

182 214 

192 348 

193 563 

Okimate 20 199 

120 205 

292 CALL 

293 CALL 



C. ITOH 

1550 SP-^ Call 

D1040 Call 

Prownter Jr Call 

Prowriter8510 SP-t- . Call 



LEGEND 


1 vy«ji IIU 

P351-^ 


.1 149 


1080 Call 

1380 258 

1385 289 

808 148 


P341P 

P341S 

351 sheet feeder... 

321 P/S 


969 

999 

529 

495 



JUKI 

Juki 6100 339 

RS 232 Serial Board 55 

5510 349 

Color Kit 105 

6100 Tractor 119 

6100 Sheet Feeder 209 

Juki 6300 757 



CITIZEN 

Premier 35 469 

MSP-10 285 

MSP-15 385 

MSP-20 325 

MSP-25 485 

120-D 179 



DIABLO 

D25 549 

D801F 2395 

P32CQ1 699 

P-38 1749 

635 1029 




COLOR RIBBONS NOW AVAILABLE!! 



NX-10....CALL 



STAR MICRONICS 

NX-IO(NEW) CALL 

NB-15 NEW) CALL 

SB-15{NEW) CALL 

NL-10(NEW CALL 

SG-15 367 

SD-10 319 

SD-15 438 

SR-10 469 

SR-15 578 

SB-10 589 

Powertype 297 



BROTHER 

HR-15XL-P 359 

HR-15XL-S 359 



MONITORS 



ZENITH 

ZVM 1220 89 

ZVM 1230 89 

ZVM 1240 149 

THOMPSON 

365 12 RGB CALL 

TEKNIKA 

MJ-10 149 

MJ-22 249 

MS-305RGB 309 

PANASONIC 

TR-122 MYP 12" Amber TTL 139 
TR-122M9P12" Green TTL. 139 

TX-12H3P 12" RGB 369 

DT-H103 10" RGB 349 

NEC 

Multisync CALL 

HITACHI 

MM-1218 12" Green 99 

MM-1220 12" TTL Amber. .129 
CM-1406C 13" color 

w/ cable 179 

CM-1409 13"RGB 305 

CM-1216D 12" RGB 385 

CM-1455S 13" 720x350. .525 
CM-1457A13"RGB 

720x460 679 



MODEMS 



SUPRA 

Supra 300 39.95 

Supra 1200 149.95 

DIGITAL DEVICES 

Pocket Modem AT Call 

CompuServe 18.95 



INTERFACING 



MICROBITS 

MPP-1 150 (Atari) 45 

MPP-1 150 XL (Atari) 49 

Microprint (Atari) 35 

ATARI 

850 109 



DRIVES 
INDUS 

GT Atari 179 

ATARI 

1050 129 



DISKETTES 



5V4" DISKETTES 

MAXELL 

SSDD 4.99 

DSDD 12.99 

VERBATIM 

SSDD 9.50 

DSDD 12.99 

BONUS 

SSDD 6.99 

DSDD 7.50 

SUNKYOUNG 

SKCSSDD 11.99 

SKC DSDD 13.99 



3.5" DISKETTES 

3M 

SSDD 16.99 

DSDD 25.95 

MAXELL 

SSDD 16.99 

DSDD 23.99 

VERBATIM 

SSDD 16.99 

DSDD 24.99 



DISK NOTCHERS . . $7.95!! 



ATARI 

1050 129 

SF314 219 

SF354 175 

130XE CALL 

65XE CALL 

520st CALL 

520st monochrome. CALL 

520st color CALL 

1027 printer 145 

1040st(NEW) CALL 



BRODERBUND 

(Atari) 

Printshop 28.75 

Graphics Lib I, II, III. .18. 75 

Paper refill 12.95 

Karateka 19.75 

Printshop comp 24.75 



SUBLOGIC 

(Atari) 

Flight Simulator 29.95 

Night Mission Pinball.. 18.95 
Scenery Disks EA 14.95 



UNISON WORLD 

(Atari) 

Printmaster 24.75 

Art Gallery 18.75 

FIREBIRD 

(Atari) 

The pawn 26.75 

Star glider 26.75 



ACTIVISION 

(Atari) 

Hacker 15.75 

Mindshadow 15 75 

Ghostbusters 15 75 

Great Am Race 15 75 

Music Studio 22.75 

Space Shuttle 15 75 

SSI 

(Atari) 

NAM 24,75 

Mechbrigade 34. 95 

Antietam 29 95 

U.S.A.A.F 34.95 

Col. Conquest 24 75 

Ambush 34 95 

MICROLEAGUE (Atari) 

Baseball 24 95 

GM disk 24 95 

Team disk 14 95 



ACCESS 

(Atari) 

Leader board 24 75 



INNOVATIVE CONCEPTS 

Flip-N-File 10 2.49 

Flip-N-File 25 Lock . 10.95 
Flip-N-File 50 Mini . 10.95 
Flip-N-File 50 Lock . 15.95 
Flip-N-File ROM . 7.99 



ACTIVISION 

(520 St) 

Borrowed Time 29.75 

Music Studio 34.75 

Hacker 26.75 

Little People 29.75 



QUICKVIEW (520 St) 

Zoomracks 49.95 



HABA 

(520 St) 

Writer 35.95 



VIP 

(520 St) 

VIP Professional 109 

VIP Lite 65.95 



TOLL FREE 1-800-233-8760 



In PA 717-494-1030 
Customer Service 71 7-494-1 670 



MM)«fCatdj 



NEW HOURS! 

Mon-Thur9AM-8PM 

Fri 9AM-6PM 

Sat 10AM-6PM 



or send order to 
Lyco Computer 
P.O. Box 5088 

Jersey Shore, PA 
17740 



RISK FREE POLICY 

In stock items shipped within 24 hours of order. No deposit on CO D. orders. Free 
shipping on prepaid cash orders within the continental U.S. Volume discounts availa- 
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3% for priority mail service. Advertised prices show 4% discount tor cash, add 4% 
for fVIasterCard and Visa. Personal checks require 4 weeks cltaranc^ before shipping. 
We do not guarantee compatibility. We only ship factory tresh merchandise. Ask about 
UPS Blue and Red label shipping. All merchandise carried under mar'jfacturer's 
warranty. Return restriction applicable. Return authorization required. All items subiect I 
;o change without notice. 



ICIRCLE #147 ON READER SERVICE CARD| 



NEW HOURS! 

Mon-Thur9AM-8PM 

Fri9AM.6PM 

Sat 10AM-6PM 




Bits &? Pieces 



continued 



-128:P0KE T,144:M0L=PEEKtTJ-144 
HH 110 POKE T, 160 :M0H=PEEKCT1 -160: POKE T, 

176 : YLO=PEEK tTJ -176 : POKE T, 192 : YHI=PEE 

KCT)-192 
JB 120 POKE T,80:HHI=PEEKCT}-80:P0KE T,64 

: HLO=PEEK CTJ -64 : POKE T, 48 : MHI=PEEK CTJ - 

48:P0KE T,32:ML0=PEEKtTJ-32 
VH 130 POKE T,80:HHI=PEEK(Tl-8O!flMPM=tHHI 

>7J :HHI=HHI-8*flMPM!flP=tHHI>3J : HHI=HHI- 

4«AP:aP$= POKE 182,M:READ DAY$ 

HX 140 POKE T,16:5HI=PEEKCTJ-16:P0KE T,0: 

SLO=PEEKfT) 
TJ 150 IF AMPH=e AND AP=1 THEH APS="PM" 
55 170 POSITION 4,3:? DAYS;" ";M0H;M0LJ" 

/"';DHljDLO;"/";YHI;YLO;" '■; 
tM 180 ? HHI;HL0;":";MHI;ML0;":";5HI;SL0; 
;AP$;" 

LH 200 GOTO 100 



Listing 3. 
BASIC listing 

ME 10 REH KICICKKKICKKKKKKKKKKKKKK 
KH 20 REM * ATARITIHE * 

m 30 REM *by Lee Brilliant MDK 

1^ 40 REN KKKKKKKKKKKKXKXKICXKXM 

aU 100 DIM BUFFS tSOOJ:? "IS" 

HA 110 FOR LINUM=0 TO 24:CKSUM=0:? "CHECK 

ING DATA LINE ";LINUMK10+1000; 
KC 120 FOR D=l TO 20: READ N : CKSUM=CK5UM+N 

: BUFFS CLINUMK20+D) =CHR$ (N) : NEXT D 
RF 13 READ N;I F NOCKSUM THEN POP :? "[33 

Q |>nfa=<;l;li];1";ST0P 

fita 140 ? :TOTAL=TOTAL+CKSUM:NEXT LINUM:IF 
T0TALO51165 THEN ? "BS^ERROR IN CHEC 

KSUM DATA":5T0P 
IE 150 ? "MN5ERT FORMATTED DOS DISK. ANY 
FILE":? "NAMED AUTORUN.SYS MILL BE OU 

ERMRITTEN" 
BE 160 ? :? "PRESS RETURN TO WRITE FILE : B 

REAK TO":? "AB0RT":P0KE 764,255 
HM 170 IF PEEK 1764)012 THEN 170 
OB 180 POKE 764,255:0PEN ttl, 8, 0, "D : AUTORU 

N.SY5":? ttl;BUFFSCl,483) :CLOSE ttl:END 
UE 1000 DATA 255,255,252,28,200,29,173,48 

,2,201,172,208,7,173,49,2,201,29,240,3 

,2527 
AS 1010 DATA 32,241,29,216,160,4,162,6,32 

,123,29,133,203,10,24,101,203,170,189, 

180,2247 
m 1020 DATA 29,153,201,29,232,200,192,7, 

208,244,200,200,162,10,32,159,29,169,1 

5,133,2604 
FY 1030 DATA 204,153,201,29,200,162,8,32, 

123,29,41,3,32,162,29,162,12,32,153,29 

,1796 
EC 1040 DATA 200,200,169,26,133,204,162,5 

,32,123,29,133,203,41,3,32,162,29,32,1 

53,2071 
LH 1050 DATA 29,32,153,29,200,200,165,203 

,41,8,208,18,169,17,166,203,224,4,208, 

2,2279 
EH 1060 DATA 169,32,32,140,29,169,29,32,1 

40,29,76,98,228,138,10,10,10,10,141,0, 
. 1522 
CS 1070 DATA 211,32,149,29,173,0,211,41,1 

5,96,202,24,105,16,153,201,29,200,96,2 

34,2217 
FX 1080 DATA 234,234,96,165,204,153,201,2 

9,200,32,123,29,32,140,29,32,123,29,32 

,140,2257 
0¥ 1090 DATA 29,96,112,240,66,201,29,129, 

0,0,51,53,46,45,47,46,52,53,37,55,1387 
EX 1100 DATA 37,36,52,40,53,38,50,41,51,3 

3, 52, 241, 29, 246, 30, 173, 48,2, 24, 105, 138 

1 



illO DATA 3,141,178,29,133,203,173,49, 
2,185,0,141,179,29,133,204,169,172,141 

,48,2232 

1120 DATA 2,169,29,141,49,2,160,0,177, 

203,200,192,0,240,13,201,65,208,245,16 

9,2465 

1130 DATA 172,145,203,200,169,29,145,2 

83,169,54,141,0,2,169,30,141,1,2,169,1 

92,2336 

1140 DATA 141,14,212,96,72,169,78,141, 

8,2,169,30,141,1,2,173,200,2,141,24,18 

08 

1150 DATA 208,169,10,141,23,208,104,64 

,72,169,54,141,0,2,169,30,141,1,2,173, 

1881 
HH 1160 DATA 198,2,141,24,208,173,197,2,1 
41,23,208,104,64,162,0,138,157,201,29, 

232,2404 
Wl 1170 DATA 224,40,208,248,173,2,211,72, 
41,251,141,2,211,169,240,141,0,211,104 

,141,2830 
Wf 1180 DATA 2,211,160,252,162,28,169,7,3 
2,92,228,96,8,0,32,103,30,32,147,30,18 

13 
Ml 1190 DftTA 169,205,141,231,2,169,30,141 
T ,232,2,96,173,142,30,133,10,173,143,30 

.133,2385 
im i200 DATA 11,173,148,30,133,12,173,149 

, 30, 133, 13, 172, 99, 228, 174, 108, 228, 169, 

7,32,2214 
JH 1210 DATA 92,228,169,252,141,231,2,169 

,28,141,232,2,108,10,0,165,12,141,148, 

30,2301 
OQ 1220 DATA 165,13,141,149,30,169,144,13 

3,12,169,30,133,13,32,103,30,165,10,14 

1,142,1924 
QH 1230 DATA 30,165,11,141,143,30,169,161 

,133,10,169,30,133,11,76,150,30,226,2, 

227,2047 
GI 1240 DATA 2,205,30,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,8,0,0 

,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,237 







Listing 4. 






Assembly listing. 


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•- ASSEHBLE 

LDA DLIST iHAS DLI CHANSED 

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■START VBI 
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iDAV OF WEEK 

I X3 FOR OFFSET 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 111 



Software Discounters 

of America open Saturday 



For Orders Only— 1-800-225-7638 
PA Orders— 1-800-223-7784 
Customer Service 412-361-5291 



Open Saturday ^^ 

• Free shipping on orders over S100 in 
continental USA 

• No surcharge for VISA/MasterCard 

• Your card is not charged until we ship 



ABACUS BOOKS 

ST Gem Prog. Ref. 
ST Graphics & Sound 
ST Internals CALL 

ST Logo poR 

ST Machine LOW 

Language PRICES 

ST Peeks & Pokes 
ST Tricks & Tips 
ACADEMY 

Typing Tutor 520ST ... $23 
ACCESS 

Leader Board Golf 520ST $25 
Raid Over Moscow (D) . . $25 
ACCOLADE 

Fight Night (0) $19 

Hardball (D) $19 

ACTIVISION 

Borrowed Time 520ST . $33 

Great American Cross 

Country Road Race {D) . $16 

Hacker (D) $16 

Hacker 520ST $29 

Little Computer 

People 520 ST $33 

Mindshadow(D) $16 

Mindshadow 520ST $33 

Music Studio 520ST $39 

Space Shuttle(D) $16 

ADVENTURE INT'L. 
Fantastic Four 520ST ..$16 

Spiderman 520ST $16 

AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL 
COMPUTER 

Biology (D) $14 

French (D) $14 

Grammar (D) $14 

Science: Grades 3M(D) $14 
Science: Grades 5/6 (D) $14 
Science: Grades 7/8 (D) .$14 

Spanish (D) $14 

ARTWORX 

Baker St. Detective 

520ST $14 

Bridge 4.0(D) $16 

Bridge 520ST $19 

Compubridge520ST ...$19 

Cycle Night (D) $12 

Mail List 520ST $14 

Peggammon(D) $12 

Strip Poker (D). . . ." $21 

Strip Poker 520ST $25 

Female Data Disk 1 .. .$16 

Male Data Disk 2 $16 

Female Data Disk 3 ... $16 
BATTERIES INCLUDED 

BGraph(D) $25 

Degas 520ST $25 

HomePak520ST Call 

Paperclip (D) $39 

Paperclip w/Spell laoXECall 

Thunder 520ST $25 

Time Link 520ST $33 

BRODERBUND 

Ch, Loderunner(D)- ..$19 

Karateka(D) $19 

Print Shop (D) $26 

Print Shop Graphics 

Library#1,#2, #3(D).$16Ea. 
PS Companion (D) $23 

CBS 

Addition/Subt.(D) $16 

Dr. Sauss Puzzler (D) ... $7 
Decimals: Add/Subt(D) $16 
Decimals: Mult/Div(D) . $16 
Ernie's Magic Shapes (R) . . $7 
Fractions: Add/Subt (D) . $16 
Fractions: Mult/Div (D) $16 

Math Mileage (R) $7 

Movie Musical Madness (R) $7 

Mult;Div(D) $16' 

S.H. Hide N Seek (Rl ... $7 
TimeboundIR) $7 



CENTRAL POINT 

Copyll520ST $25 

DATASOFT 

Alternate Reality (D). . . $25 

MindPursuit(D) $19 

Never Ending Story (D) .$19 

TheGoonies $19 

DAVIDSON 

Math Blaster (D) $33 

Spell It (D) $33 

Word Attack (D) $33 

DESIGNWARE 
All Titles Available . . . Call 
ELECTRONIC ARTS 
Age of Adventure (D) 
Archon 2 (D) 
Chessmaster 2000 (D) 
Financial Cookbook 520ST 
Movie Maker (D) 
Music Const. Set (D) 
One-on-One (D) 
Pinball Const. Set (D) 



HIPPOPOTAMUS 

Backgammon 520ST . . $25 
Computer Almanac 520ST $23 
Hippo Concept 520ST . $59 
Hippo Disk Utilities 520ST $33 
Hippo Ram Disk 620ST $23 
Jokes & Quotes 

(not for Kids)520ST . $23 
ICD 

PR. Connection Call 

RamboXL $27 

US Doublet 

w/SpartaDDS $49 

INFOCOM 

Ballyhoo (D) $25 

Cutthroats (D) $23 

Deadline (D) $29 

Enchanter (D) $23 

Fooblitzky(XUXE) $25 

Hitchhiker's Guide 

to the Galaxy (D) $23 

Infidel (D) $25 



Kissed 520ST $25 

Logo 520ST $33 

Major Motion 520 ST . . $25 

M-Disk520ST $25 

Mi-Term 520ST $33 

Mighty Mail 520ST $33 

Personal Money 

Manager ST $33 

Soft Spool 520ST $25 

The Animator 520ST ... $25 

Time Bandit 520ST $25 

MICROLEAGUE 

Baseball (D) $25 

Box Score Stats (D) ... $16 

General Manager (D) ...$25 

1985 Team Data Disk (D) $14 

MICROPROSE 

Crusade in Europe (D) . .$25 

F15 Strike Eagle (D) ... $23 

Kennedy Approach (D) . . $23 

Silent Service (D) $23 

Silent Service 520ST . . $26 



PEACHTREE 

Acct. Payables (D) $39 

Acct. Receivables (D) ... $39 

General Ledger (D) $39 

PENGUIN(POLARWARE 
Crimson Crown 520ST . $14 

Oo-Topos 620ST $14 

Sword of Kadash 520ST $14 

The Coveted Mirror 520ST $14 

Transylvania 520ST ....$14 

PROFESSIONAL 

SOFTWARE 

Fleet System 2 WP w/70.000 

Word Spell Checker (D) $37 
PRYORITY 

Gateway 520ST $33 

OUICKVIEW 

Zoom Racks 520ST ... $49 

REGENT 

Regent Base 520ST $65 

Regent Word 

w/Spell520ST $33 



Supra 300 AT Moaem 



Works on Atari 400. 800. 

XL. ancd XE Connputers 

Auto Answer/Auto Dial 

Direct Connect to Pfione 

Line 

Includes AC adapter/ 

Power Supply 

90 Day Warranty 

Connects Directly to 

Computer 



List $49'^ 

Madness Price $34°° 

Sold to the first 85 customers 




Racing Destruction Set (D) 
Realm of 

Impossibility (D) 
Seven Cities of Gold (D) 
Super Boulder Dash (D) 
Prices too low to 

adrerliseH Call 

EPYX 

Koronis Rift(D) $19 

Rogue 520ST $25 

Temple Apshai Trilogy (D) $23 
Temple Apshai 

Trilogy 520ST $25 

The Eidolon (D) $19 

Winter Games 520ST ... $25 
World Champ. Karate (D)$19 
FIREBIRD 

The Pawn 520ST $29 

Star Glider 520ST $29 

FTUSOFTWARE HEAVEN 

Sundog520ST $25 

GAMESTAR 

Baseball (D) $16 

Football (D) $16 

On Track Racing (D) $16 

HABA SYSTEMS 

Check Minder 520ST . $39 

HabaView520ST $39 

HAYDEN 

Sargon3(D) $29 



Planetfall(D) $23 

Seastalker(O) $23 

Sorcerer (D) $25 

Spellbreaker(D) $29 

Starcross(D) $29 

Suspect (D) $25 

Suspended (D) $29 

Trinity 520ST $25 

Wishbringer(D) $23 

Witness (D) $23 

Zork 1(D) $23 

Zork2or3(D) $25 

* All titles in stock for 
520 ST— Call lor prices 
LJK 

Data Perfect (D) $33 

Letter Perfect (D) $33 

Spell Perfect (D) $29 

MARK OF THE UNICORN 
PC Intercomm 520ST . . $75 
The Final Word 520ST . $79 
MICHTRON 
Bulletin Board 

System 520ST $33 

Business Tools 520ST . . $33 

Calendar 520ST $19 

Corner Man 520ST $33 

D.F.T. 520ST $33 

DOS Shell 520ST $25 

Gold Runner 520ST . . $25 



$9 



$59 
$49 



MI'GRAPH 

Easy Draw 520ST $95 

MINDSCAPE 

Bank St. Music Writer |D) $19 
Brataccus 520ST $33 

Crossword Magic(D) $29 
Halley Project (D) $19 

Tinka's Mazes (D) $9 

Tinks Adventure (D) $9 

Tonk in the Land of 

Buddy-Bols(D) 
OMNITREND 
Universe(D) 
Universe 2 520ST 
OSS 

Action (R) $47 

Action Tool Kit(D) $19 

Basic XE(R) $47 

Basic XL (R) $37 

Basic XL Tool Kit (D) $19 

MAC 65 (R) $47 

MAC 65 Tool Kit (D) $19 

Personal Pascal 520ST . $49 
Personal Prologue 520ST Call 
Writer's Tool w/ 

Spell Checker (R) $39 

ORIGIN 

Ultima 3 (Dl $34 

Ultima 3 520ST $39 

Ultima4(D) $39 



SCARBOROUGH 

Maslertype(D) $23 

Net Worth (D) $39 

SIERRA ON LINE 

Black Cauldron 520ST $25 

Hint Books Call 

Kings Guest 1520ST $33 
Kings Quest 2 520ST $33 

Ultima 2(D) $34 

Ultima 2 520ST $39 

Winnie the Pooh 520ST . $19 

SPINNAKER 

Adventure Creator (R) $9 

Alt in Color Cave (R) $9 

Alphabet Zoo (R) $9 

Delta Drawing (R) $9 

Pacemaker (fl) $9 

Fraction Fever (R) . $9 

Kids on Keys (R) $9 

Story Machine (R) . $9 

SSI 

Battalion Commander (D) . $25 
Battle of Antielam(D) $33 
Colonial Conquest(D) $25 
Computer Ambush (D) . $37 

Field of Fire (D) $25 

Gemstone Warrior (D) $23 

Gettysburg (D) $37 

Ka'mpfgruppe(D) $37 

Mech Brigade (D) $37 



NAM(D) $25 

Panzer Grenadier (D) ...$25 

Phantasie(D) Call 

Phantasie5208T $25 

Six-Gun Shootout (D) . . $25 

U.S.A.A.F.(D) $37 

War InRussia(D) $49 

Wizard's Crown (D) $25 

SUBLOGIC 

Flight Simulator 2(D). . $32 
Flight Simulator 520ST . Call 
F S. Scenery Disks .... Call 

Jet520ST Call 

SYNAPSE 

Essex (need 2 drives) . . $25 

Mindwheel (need 2 drives) $25 

Mindwheel 520ST $29 

Syn-Calc(D) $33 

Syn-File(D) $33 

TELLARIUM 

Amazon 520ST $33 

Fahrenheit 451 520ST $33 
Nine Princes in 

Amber 520ST $33 

TIMEWORKS 

Data Manager 520ST . . Call 

Swiftcalc520ST Call 

Sylvia Porter's Personal 

Fin. Planner 520ST Call 
Word Writer 520ST , . Call 
UNISON WORLD 
Art Gallery 1 520ST. $19 

Print Master 520ST ... $25 
VERSASOFT 

dBMan520ST $69 

VIP TECHNOLOGIES 
VIP Professional 520ST .$99 
VIP Prof. Lite 520ST . . . .$59 
WEEKLY READER 
Stickybear ABC S(D) $19 
Slickybear Numbers (D) $19 
Stickybear Opposites(D) $19 
XLENT 
First XlenI 

World Processor (D) 

Megafont(D) 

Miniature Golf 

Const. Set (D) 
Page Designer (D) . 
PS. Interface (D) 
Rubber Stamp (D) 
Rubber Stamp 520ST 
ST Music Box 
Typesetter (D) 
Typesetter 520ST . 
ACCESSORIES 

Astra Disk Drive Call 

Bonus SB. DD $6.99Bx 

Bonus DS. DD . $7.99Bx 
Bulk Disks SS.DD . $59./10O 
Bulk Disks 3'/, Call 

CompuServe Starter Kit . $19 

Disk Drive Cleaner $9 

Disk Case (Holds 50-5 %). $9 
Disk Case (Holds 30-3 Vi). $9 
Disk Case w/Lock 

(Holds 50-5 ''.). . 
Dows Jones News 

Retrieval Kit(5hrs.) 
Kraft Joystick 
MPP300ST Modem w/ 

Omega Terminal 
MPP300AT/1000E 
MPP1 150 Printer Int 
Microprint Printer Int 
Supra 20 meg 520ST 

Hard Disk Drive 
Supra 1200ST 300/1200 

520ST Modem w/Omega 

Terminal $139 

Universal Printer Stand $16 

WicoBoss $12 

WicoBat Handle $17 



$19 
$19 

$19 
$19 
$19 
$19 
$25 
$33 
$23 
$25 



$12 

$14 
$9 

$59 
$39 
$39 
$29 

Call 



P.O. BOX 111327 — DEPT. AN— BLAWNOX, PA 15238 



'Ordering and Terms: Orders with cashier check or money order shipped immediately Personal/company checks allow 3 weeks clearance. No CO D s. Shipping: Continental 
U.S.A.— Orders under $100 add $3: free shipping on orders over $100. PA residents add 6% sales lax AK. HI. FPO-APO— add $5 on all orders. Sorry — no International orders. Defec 
five merchandise will be replaced with same merchandise Other returns sub|ecl to a 15% restocking charge-NO CREDITS' Call lor authorization number: (412) 361-5291 Prices 
subject to change without notice Modem Owners: Type Go SDA on Compusenie's Electronic Mall to see our On-Line Catalog of over 800 software titles lor Atari, Commodore, Ap- 
ple, & IBM. Summer Hours Mon. FrL 9 A.M.-5:30 P.M. EDT • Sat 10 A.M. 5 P.M. EDT 



CIRCLE #148 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



^ 



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.END 




24500 Glenwood Hwy., Los Galos, CA 95030 



■^.^ 



ITARI 

HARDWARE 
SOFTWARE 



THE I 



<ABOUT 

ucui'^fR" SOFTWARE 
,„.nox ^FREE PRICE LIST] 
.1040 SXjJ^ 

''Catalog on disk . . .'. $2.95 

games disk $9.95 

utilities disk $9.95 

Instant shipping (or as last as we can). Mastercard i 
Visa accepted (no extra charge). Shipping & handling 
add 6%. California customers add 6.5% sales tax. Order 
by phone (Mon. - Frl 10 am - 5 pm PST). Order by 
modftm (daily 6 pm-9am) from our online TeleCalalog. 

(408) 353-1836 

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D 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 113 



A 




Page Designer 



XLENT SOFTWARE 

P.O. Box 5228 

Springfield, VA 22150 

(703) 644-8881 

48K and disic drive $29.95 

by David N. Plotkin 

Page Designer [PD] is a versatile new 
package for your Atari from XLent Soft- 
ware. With it, you can design pages for use 
as signs, ads, or anything else requiring a 
custom layout. High-resolution graphics 
and multiple tjfpefaces are simple to incor- 
porate, giving a great deal of creative free- 
dom. 

When you first boot up PD, you're pre- 
sented with a main menu. The first choice 
is to run the PD package itself. When you 
do so, you see a screen which is blank, ex- 
cept for some status notes on the first line. 
Through various combinations of the 
CNTRL and letter keys, you may: load a 
graphics 7.5 or 8 picture from disk; place 
text on the screen in either 40 or 80 col- 
umns; load one of the fifteen alternate 
character sets; clear the screen; swritch into 
graphics mode; or switch between the top 
and bottom half of the page. 

The last option, toggling between the top 
and bottom half of the page, is necessary 
because you can only see half the page 
you're designing on the screen at any time. 

This increases the resolution of the 
page, enabling you to do some very fine 
detail work. You may load a picture to ei- 
ther half of the page. Once it's loaded, you 
can overlay it with text. Putting text on- 
screen before loading a pictm-e doesn't 
work, as the picture will erase the text 
when it is loaded. 

Pictures to be loaded must be in uncom- 
pacted form, thus screens generated with 
the Koala Pad won't work directly. How- 



ever, a choice on the main menu is the one 
to uncompact your Koala Pad file, so that 
it can be used with PD. 

PD supports both a 40-column and an 
SO-column text mode. In the 40-coluinn 
mode, you can use one of the supplied al- 
ternate character sets, or create your own 
from the multitude of commercial pack- 
ages. The supplied character sets include 
such goodies as Serif, Archaic, Adventure, 
Script and Stylish. 

Also included is an alternate "borders" 
character set. This consists of fifty-two de- 
signs which can be useful in making up 
borders (among other things). 

The graphics mode is a sketchpad, 
which can be used to generate simple de- 
signs or to modify pictures loaded from 
disk. It doesn't incorporate many fancy op- 
tions, but does support the basics, such as 
point plotting, line drawing, and some au- 
tomatic shape generation. 

It's handy to have Etnd very easy to use. 
The cursor is controlled by your joystick, 
and moving the cursor up to the top line 
of the screen enables you to select a differ- 
ent option. The sphere-drawing routine is 
especially eyecatching. 

Once you've completed your design, you 
may save it to disk and, of course, print 
it out. PD supports a multitude of printers, 
including the Epson and Epson compati- 
bles. It works well on the Star printers, as 
well as on HP Thinkjet. 

PD comes with a manual, which is, un- 
fortunately, the weakest part of the pack- 
age. The names of the fonts included on 
the disk aren't given anywhere, nor are 
print samples of the different fonts shown. 



The characters which make up the bord- 
ers set are also not shown, making selec- 
tion of the appropriate design a rather 
hit-or-miss affair. The manual could use 
some improvement in these respects. 

All in all, PD is a well written and use- 
ful package. Comparisons to Broderbund's 
Print Shop are inevitable. 

While not as much of a "cookbook" as 
Print Shop, PD offers more freedom in 
page layout. Further, for those who, like 
this reviewer, aren't artists, XLent offers 
four disks of graphics by Jennifer Brabson, 
whose considerable talent CEin be seen in 
XLent's advertisements. At $10.00 each, 
these disks considerably enhance PD's use- 
fulness. 

I recommend XLent Software's Page 
Designer for those whose creativity is cry- 
ing to get out. H 

David Plotkin, with his Master's degree 
in Chemical Engineering, is a Project En- 
gineer for Chevron U.S.A. He purchased 
his Atari in 1980 and is interested in pro- 
gramming and game design, as well as 
word processing. 



PAGE 114 /SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



48K Disk 



GRAPHICS 




4t 



La 
Machine 



Let your computer 
do the work 
in creating 
bit-mapped animation 



by Stephen Alpert 



Originally, I called this program Datamaker. It was sup- 
posed to be a bare-bones effort, not very pretty or fancy, 
but the thing got bigger and fatter. I kept adding "attach- 
ments," as if it were a vacuum cleaner or a food proces- 
sor. So, finally, I rechristened it La Machine and sent it 
to ANALOG Computing. 

The program was written to help me with the enormous 
amount of work required in creating bit-mapped animat- 
ed figures. Consider the figures in La Machine; they're 
4 bytes wide by 30 scan lines high, totaling 120 bytes per 
frame. Assuming we animate this figure over 4 cyclical 
frames, the amount of data to be handled is 4x120=480 
bytes. But the problem blooms when you attempt horizon- 
tal motion of the figure. 

The reason for this is somewhat complicated. Even in 
graphics mode 71/2, the distance on the screen between 
2 adjacent bytes is noticeable. Let's say a figure's on-screen, 
for instance, at hex location $8000, and we wish to move 
it to the right. We could erase the figure at $8000 and 
redraw it at $8001, then continue across the screen in this 
manner. The figure will appear to have moved. 

The problem is that the motion will appear too crude 
and jerky — 1-byte movement is too coarse! How can you 
move less than 1 byte? The answer is, you can't. You must 
make the figure appear to have moved less than 1 byte. 

The basic moves. 

This is accomplished by shifting the figure's data 2 bits 
to the right and drawing it at the same screen location. 
The figure will appear to have moved right 1 pixel. Do 
this two more times, for a total of 6 bits shifted, before 



restoring the original data and putting the figure at $8001. 
You'll get the smoothest possible motion. 

The bad news is that these shifts alter the data, and it 
has to be painstakingly calculated by hand (use a pencil). 
The point: the numbers involved are growing. 

We now have 120 bytes x 4 (counting three shifts of data) 
X 4 frames = 1920 bytes of data to animate and move a 
figure on-screen. That's just for one figure! Think of the 
torture involved if you're using graph paper to draw the 
figures before converting the data into bineiry then hex- 
adecimal, and later doing shift calculations. Also, this way, 
the figures never come out too well the first time. 

Enter La Machine. 

The video game I'm writing is packed with little figures 
like these. So I plug in La Machine, and it really man- 
handles the little guys — swallows 'em up and spits out the 
mmibers! 

The program allows easy creation of shapes in four 
colors. It animates them, sends the data to printer or 
screen, calculates three shifts if desired, and stores and 
retrieves to and from the disk (sorry, no cassettes). 

If you didn't understand all the stuff you just read, stick 
around anyway; you'll get a vast savings in toil and moil. 
Let your computer do some work once in a while. It's good 
for its circuits. 

Listing 1 is the BASIC data used to create your copy of 
La Machine. Refer to M/L Editor on page 7 for typing in- 
structions. You should create the file under the name AU- 
TORUN.SYS. 

Listing 2 should also be typed using M/L Editor. Cre- 
ate this file under the name COMP. The data file this list- 
ing produces must be on the same disk as the file created 
from Listing 1. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 115 



^ 



La Machine 



continued 



La Machine is written entirely in machine language, so 
there are a heckofalottai data statements. If you like to pro- 
gram, or would like to try, it'll be worth the effort. 

Machining. 

Now, let's take a guided tour of La Machine's capabili- 
ties. This will avoid frustration, disgruntlement and a good 
deal of perspiration in most Terrans. 

Boot the disk. Once DOS has loaded, the 62-sector AU- 
TORUN file will quickly load and rim. After a 3- or 4- 
second delay for self-aggrandizement, you'll see one large 
and six small toilet bowls. 

Press the B key. B stands for big. 

The large window (hereafter called the edit window) 
will cmimate through 6 frames. To stop, press either the 
SPACE BAR or the trigger of joystick 1. 

Press the A key. A stands for actual size. 

The toilet will now wave bye-bye, in actual size. This 
takes place in the small window (the animation window). 
Now press the > key a couple times. Each press quick- 
ens the emimation by 1 Vertical Blank Cycle, or yg„ second. 

The delay interval between frames is displayed in the 
text area and changes with each kejrpress. The < key 
slows the animation. You'll find that moving the joystick 
left and right accomplishes the same thing (but not as 
smoothly). Press either the SPACE BAR or joystick trig- 
ger to exit. 

Pound on the SPACE BAR a few times. SPACE BAR 
stands for Space Barn^. 

The editor indicator ball moves to indicate the frame 
now appearing in the edit window. 

Press the 4 key. 

This changes the system to handle only 4-frame anima- 
tion instead of 6-frame. See that the FRAMES number 
changes in the text area, to indicate 4 frames. The 4, 5 
and 6 keys all function in this manner. The only other ef- 
fect they have is that the edit indicator ball always moves 
to frame when these keys are pressed. Set FRAMES back 
to 6 by pressing the 6 key. 

Press the P key. P stands for palette. 

The text area changes to green, indicating palette change 
mode. Press the joystick button repeatedly. A COLOR BAR 
beneath the edit window cycles through the palette, and 
the register indicator ball moves to indicate the shadow 
register involved. The shadow register's hex location and 
the hex value of its contents are displayed. Move the joy- 
stick left and right to change the intensity of the color; 
move it forward and backward to alter the hue. Notice that 
the hex values change, also. Hit any key except P to exit 
this mode. The text mode changes back to gray. 

Press the G key. It stands for get. 
The text area will turn blue to indicate file retrieval 
mode. You'll see a square cursor appear in the file win- 

^Heckofalotta (heck-uv-a-lot-tuh) ad;'. Multitudinous, very numer- 
ous. See "oodles." 

^Space Bam (spayce barn) n. A place to put your cows in space; 
a famous dairy-products chain in the Motorola Nebula. 



dow, in the center of the text area next to the Filespec D: . 
Type COMP and hit RETURN. The file COMP will be re- 
trieved, and a computer with tape drive will appear. There 
are 4 frames of artwork. Not only has the palette changed, 
but the frame number indicator has been set to agree with 
this automatically. This is actually one of the figures ap- 
pearing in my video game (though I haven't decided about 
the toilet). To abort without retrieving a file, press RE- 
TURN without a filename. The text area returns to gray 
after exiting this mode. 

Press the "inverse" key repeatedly. 

You'll cycle through the palette with each press. Under- 
stand that, when no bar's present at all, the background 
color is chosen; you simply can't see it. 

Press the T key. T stands for toggle. 

Each time this is pressed, the words on and o^ toggle 
in the text area, indicating the status of SNAPSHOT. Make 
sure SNAPSHOT is off. 

Now, move the joystick around and notice the small, 
flashing brick moving within the edit window (the joystick 
won't respond to diagonal movements). Pressing the but- 
ton will deposit color on that spot. The color will be the 
same as the COLOR BAR, and you should notice that the 
change occurs in the associated frame simultaneously. 

To change color, use the inverse key. Now, doodle a lit- 
tle; make a mess on the screen. Then press R for recall. 
The frame will return to the condition it was in prior to 
your doodling. If you want, try the same thing with SNAP- 
SHOT on — the mess is permanent. 

Hard copy. 

Don't you hate programs that let you make nice pictures, 
but won't let you have the data? What's the big secret? Turn 
on your interface and printer. 

Press the D key. D stands for data. 

The printer will immediately begin printing the data for 
the frame with the ball next to it only, in 5 x 30 format 
(frames are numbered through 5, not 1 through 6). It'll 
proceed to shift the data to the right by 2 bits and print 
this data. It will shift and print twice more, then stop. You 
may abort at any time by pressing the SPACE BAR. 

If there's no printer on-line, the data will go to the 
screen, instead. I did this as an afterthought, but at least 
it stops after each shift, so you can copy the data or look 
it over. Press Einy key at each pause to continue. You'll need 
to use CTRL-1 to see the first couple of lines before they 
scroll off the screen, though. 

Want to know why it prints in 5 x 30, when the frames 
are only 4 x 30? Well, when you shift bits to the right, you 
bump bits out at the right end and Os in at the left. You 
need a fifth byte to take in the rightmost bits. So, before 
shifting, the right column is always empty — all Os. 

Press the U key. 

Hitting a U instead of a D will yield the data without 
performing the shifts. 

Press the CLEAR key. 

The frame being edited and the edit window will fill 
with the palette color. This can be used to wipe the frames, 
by setting the COLOR BAR to the backgroimd color. 



PAGE 116 /SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



Press the S key. S stands for save. 

The text area turns red. When you've done work you 
want to save, press S and type in a filename of up to eight 
characters and numbers. All work is contained within sev- 
en sectors on the disk -one sector per frame, plus one sec- 
tor for palette and "frames used" information. 

Obey the rules of DOS 2.0; don't start with a number. 
La Machine doesn't allow wild cards or extenders. To 
abort, delete the filename — or, in any case, hit RETURN 
with no filename present. The text window goes gray 
again, when done. 

Press the * key. 

This provides a disk directory, in two columns, which 
comes in handy. Isn't it nice to have everything DOS 2 .0 
compatible? Press any key to continue. 

Now, press the G key again. Type COMP and RETURN. 
After COMP loads, press the 6 key to switch to 6-frame 
animation. Now, move the ball (using the SPACE BAR) un- 
til it's at the second or third frame. 

Press the C key. C stands /or copy. 

The test area turns violet, to indicate copy mode. Now, 
press the SPACE BAR repeatedly. Notice that a ball marks 
the COPY FROM frame, while another moves freely. Take 
the moving ball to one of the blank frames and press the 
1 key. 

The frame will instantly be filled with a duplicate of 
the COPY FROM freime. If you don't want to copy, you may 
abort by pressing any key except 1 or the SPACE BAR. The 
text area goes gray once more. 

Go to the head of the class. 

That ends the tour. . .still awake? How's this: If you'd 
like your own work to appear at boot-up, do some draw- 
ings, then save as described in the tour. When done, re- 
boot your system with BASIC and a DOS 2.0 disk present. 
The procedure is to go to the DOS menu from BASIC, then 
load the AUTORUN.SYS file, using option L (binary load). 
Then retrieve your artwork and press RESET. 

The system will return you to BASIC, whereupon you'll 
put La Machine back in the drive and return to the DOS 
menu, by typing DOS. Select option K (binary save) and 
respond to the prompt with: 

D:AUTORUN.SYS,4300,60C1 ,,4700 

This will save the whole program, latest work included, 
right over the old AUTORUN.SYS file. All commas are 
necessary. La Machine will then boot up with your work 
present. Neat! 

Are you wondering why the animation window is out 
of line with the other frames? Well, originally, the pro- 
gram handled only 4 frames. I put the window where I 
felt like putting it. Later, I decided 6 frames would allow 
greater flexibility. I added two more windows, spacing 
them far enough apart that the ball would fit easily be- 
tween the two rows of frames. Consequently, the anima- 
tion window needs to be moved. Sadly, like many pro- 
grammers, I'm far too lazy to actually carry out such a cor- 
rection. 

Now, what do you really do with La Machine? Use it 
to create characters for your programs. No need to try for 



erfect animation, as in a movie; 4 frames is usually plen- 
ty. Take a look at some video game characters. A lot of them 
use only 2 frames. 

La Machine is best used for "cyclical" animation (ani- 
mation that's continuous, as a circle). This is usually best, 
anyway. Program logic to animate and move the figure is 
then easier, more straightforward. To really benefit from 
La Machine you'll need to do some assembly language 
programming. BASIC will be too slow. 

Start out simply. Motion isn't always necessary; create 
figures that animate in place. Toilet bowls don't need to 
move, for example; people wouldn't appreciate it. 

This can really be a useful program, good for exper- 
imenting with bit-mapping figures, to learn more about 
this technique of programming (which many beginners 
seem mystified by). Player/missile animation is great and 
makes life easier, but there are only four player/missiles, 
and color is a problem. 

The multicolor character mode, ANTIC mode 4, is nice, 
but can be very restrictive. Bit-mapping in mode 7V2 really 
gives you a lot of power and freedom. The price is mem- 
ory, of course, but there's little you can't do in this mode. H 

Stephen AJperf is a free-lance programmer, working on 
a marketable video game for Atari computers. He worked 
as an electronic technician for about seven years, leaving 
the field after discovering that computers would better 
satisfy his technical and creative interests. 

Listing 1. 

1G80 DATA 255,255,0,67,193,96,255,255, 

255,255,234,170,170,171,234,170,7692 

1010 DATA 170,171,234,170,170,171,234, 

170,170,171,234,170,170,171,234,170,64 

66 

1020 DftTfl 170,171,235,255,255,235,239, 

255,255,251,239,255,255,251,239,175,33 

63 

1030 DflTfl 255,251,239,191,255,251,239, 

255,255,251,239,255,255,251,239,255,47 

50 

1040 DftTfl 255,251,239,255,255,251,239, 

255,255,251,239,234,175,251,239,170,23 

64 

1050 DflTfl 171,251,239,170,171,251,234, 

255,254,171,234,255,254,171,234,255,20 

75 

1060 DflTft 254,171,234,176,58,171,234,1 

28,10,171,234,191,250,171,234,191,5916 

1070 DftTfl 250,171,213,117,117,87,213,2 

55,253,87,255,255,255,255,255,255,1209 

1080 DftTfl 255,255,234,170,170,171,234, 

170,170,171,234,170,170,171,234,170,67 

89 

1090 DflTfl 170,171,234,170,170,171,234, 

170,170,171,235,255,255,235,239,255,10 

13 

1100 DflTfl 255,251,239,255,255,251,239, 

175,255,251,239,191,255,251,239,255,36 

68 

1110 DflTfl 255,251,239,255,255,251,239, 

255,255,251,239,255,255,251,239,234,47 

50 

1120 DftTft 175,251,239,170,171,251,239, 

170,171,251,239,0,3,251,234,255,6409 

1130 DftTft 254,171,234,255,254,171,234, 

255,254,171,234,176,58,171,234,128,681 





ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 117 



* 



La Machine 



continued 



1148 DATA 10,171,234,191,250,171,234,1 

91,250,171,213,117,117,87,213,255,6121 

1150 DftTft 253,87,255,255,255,255,255,2 

55,255,255,234,170,170,171,234,170,285 

1160 DflTfl 170,171,234,170,170,171,234, 

170,170,171,234,170,170,171,234,170,65 

16 

1170 DATA 170,171,235,255,255,235,239, 

255, 255, 251, 239, 255, 255, 251, 239, 175, 35 

13 

1180 DATA 255, 251, 239, iSl, 255, 251, 239, 

255,255,251,239,255,255,251,239,250,48 

20 

1190 DATA 191,251,239,234,175,251,239, 

170,171,251,239,170,171,251,239,234,73 

4 

1200 DATA 175,251,239,0,3,251,234,255, 

254,171,234,255,254,171,234,255,709 

1210 DATA 254,171,234,176,58,171,234,1 

28, 10, 171, 234, 191, 250, 171, 234,191, 6066 

1220 DATA 250,171,213,117,117,87,213,2 

55,253,87,255,255,255,255,255,255,1359 

1230 DATA 255,255,234,170,170,171,234, 

170,170,171,234,170,170,171,234,170,69 

39 

1240 DATA 170,171,234,170,170,171,234, 

170,170,171,235,255,255,235,239,255,11 

63 

1250 DATA 255,251,239,255,255,251,239, 

175,255,251,239,191,255,251,239,255,38 

18 

1260 DATA 255,251,239,250,191,251,239, 

234,175,251,239,170,171,251,239,170,53 

6 

1270 DATA 171,251,239,170,171,251,239, 

234,175,251,239,0,3,251,234,255,7103 

1280 DATA 254,171,234,255,254,171,234, 

255,254,171,234,176,58,171,234,128,696 



1290 DATA 10,171,234,191,250,171,234,1 

91,250,171,213,117,117,87,213,255,6271 

1300 DATA 253,87,255,255,255,255,255,2 

55,255,255,234,170,170,171,234,170,435 

1310 DATA 170,171,234,170,170,171,234, 

170,170,171,234,170,170,171,234,170,67 

66 

1320 DATA 170,171,235,255,255,235,239, 

255,255,251,239,255,255,251,239,175,36 

63 

1330 DATA 255,251,239,191,255,251,239, 

255,255,251,239,255,255,251,239,250,49 

70 

1340 DATA 191,251,239,234,175,251,239, 

170,171,251,239,170,171,251,239,234,88 

4 

1350 DATA 175,251,239,0,3,251,234,255, 

254,171,234,255,254,171,234,255,859 

1360 DATA 254,171,234,176,58,171,234,1 

28,10,171,234,191,250,171,234,191,6216 

1370 DATA 250,171,213,117,117,87,213,2 

55,253,87,255,255,255,255,255,255,1509 

1380 DATA 255,255,234,170,170,171,234, 

170,170,171,234,170,170,171,234,170,70 

89 

1390 DATA 170,171,234,170,170,171,234, 

170,170,171,235,255,255,235,239,255,13 

13 

1400 DATA 255,251,239,255,255,251,239, 

175,255,251,239,191,255,251,239,255,39 

68 

1410 DATA 255,251,239,255,255,251,239, 

255,255,251,239,255,255,251,239,234,50 

50 

1420 DATA 175,251,239,170,171,251,239, 

170,171,251,239,0,3,251,234,255,6709 

1430 DATA 254,171,234,255,254,171,234, 

255,254,171,234,176,58,171,234,128,711 





1440 DATA 10,171,234,191,250,171,234,1 

91,250,171,213,117,117,87,213,255,6421 

1450 DATA 253,87,255,255,255,255,6,40, 

66,10,6,6,0,0,0,0,7661 

1460 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1460 

1470 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1470 

1480 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1480 

1490 DATA 0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1490 

1500 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1500 

1510 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1510 

1520 DATA 8,8,8,8,8,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

155,83,5173 

1530 DATA 89,83,155,69,82,82,79,82,32, 

45,32,78,79,84,32,86,722 

1540 DATA 69,82,83,73,79,78,32,50,32,7 

0,79,82,77,65,84,46,549 

1550 DATA 155,32,116,42,173,244,29,201 

,2,240,10,169,53,162,41,32,5065 

1560 DATA 176,49,76,15,33,96,169,41,32 

,202,48,169,0,174,158,21,4380 

1570 DATA 141,158,21,224,78,208,3,206, 

158,21,32,191,48,32,169,21,4512 

1580 DATA 224,0,240,18,224,3,240,4,152 

,76,241,49,169,155,162,41,8266 

1590 DATA 32,176,49,32,146,25,76,15,33 

,66,65,68,32,76,79,65,9974 

1600 DATA 68,32,70,73,76,69,155,76,79, 

65,68,32,70,82,79,77,1689 

1610 DATA 32,87,72,65,84,32,70,73,76,6 

9,63,155,211,41,32,202,4934 

1620 DATA 48,32,191,48,169,35,162,16,1 

57,66,3,32,233,49,76,15,2399 

1630 DATA 33,87,72,65,84,32,70,73,76,6 

9,32,84,79,32,76,79,612 

1640 DATA 67,75,63,155,251,41,162,0,18 

9,162,96,157,0,128,232,224,418 

1650 DATA 32,208,245,162,0,169,0,157,3 

4,148,232,208,250,169,112,133,2009 

1660 DATA 16,141,14,210,169,62,141,47, 

2,169,66,133,240,133,242,169,766 

1670 DATA 98,133,241,133,243,169,0,141 

,48,2,169,96,141,49,2,173,5426 

1680 DATA 209,69,141,196,2,173,210,69, 

141,197,2,173,208,69,141,200,626 

1690 DATA 2,173,211,69,141,198,2,32,15 

5,81,32,145,77,162,81,160,6451 

1700 DATA 36,169,7,32,92,228,169,0,141 

,64,92,169,67,141,71,92,5565 

1710 DATA 169,120,141,65,92,169,67,141 

,72,92,169,240,141,66,92,169,9021 

1720 DATA 67,141,73,92,169,104,141,67, 

92,169,68,141,74,92,169,224,8975 

1730 DATA 141,68,92,169,68,141,75,92,1 

69,88,141,69,92,169,69,141,7039 

1740 DATA 76,92,169,208,141,70,92,169, 

69,141,77,92,169,169,141,27,7552 

1750 DATA 92,169,76,141,31,92,169,209, 

141,28,92,169,76,141,32,92,6037 

1760 DATA 169,249,141,29,92,169,76,141 

,33,92,169,33,141,30,92,169,5909 

1770 DATA 77,141,34,92,76,9,72,2,3,0,1 

,2,3,0,1,2,3701 

1780 DATA 3,8,1,2,3,8,1,2,3,8,1,2,3,0, 

1,2,1988 

1798 DATA 3,0,1,2,3,1,8,4,0,0,85,178,0 

,255,2,128,480 

1800 DATA 6,86,166,246,15,95,252,98,10 

3,188,113,98,103,113,0,169,6704 

1810 DATA 242,133,240,169,97,133,241,1 

69,2,133,242,169,117,133,243,162,3694 

1820 DATA 2,160,0,169,170,145,240,145, 

242,200,192,16,208,245,202,240,6864 



PAGE 118 /SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



Back Issues 




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issues 
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Send your check or money order to 
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ISSUE 23 • Fire Bug • Minicomp • Dark Horse • Climber • P/M Creator/Animator 

ISSUE 24 • Circuit Database • Cassette Compressor • XL-DOS • Bopotrorr! 

• Race in Space • Unicheck 

ISSUE 25 • Weather Forecaster • Androton • Miner Jack • BASIC Tutorial Part 1 

• Adding BASIC Function Keys 

ISSUE 26 • BASIC Tutorial Part 2 * Robot Raid • Graphics Overlay • Popcorn 

• Magic Palette • PuLse in Action! 

ISSUE 27 • English Error Messages in BASIC • Instant Renumber • MicroCheck 
Part 1 • Adventure at Vandenberg • Screenmaker 

ISSUE 28 • MicroCheck Part 2 • TwoGun • Cascade • Monthly Mortgage Calculator 

• Demon Birds • MicroDOS XL 

ISSUE 29 • RAMCHECK • Revive Dragonlord • XL Expansion Connector • Cheep Talk 

ISSUE 30 • Loan Shark • Z-Plotter • BASIC Burger • ANALOG TCS Guide 

• Boulder Bombers 

ISSUE 31 • Unicheck • R.OT.O. • Lunar Patrol • ATASCII Animation • Lazer Type 

• Atari Clock • Personal Planning Calendar 

ISSUE 32 • Supereversion • DOS III to DOS 2 conversion • Color the Shapes 

• Home-made Translator • Cosmic Defender • 520ST 

ISSUE 33 • An Intro to MIDI • Note Master * Syntron • BASIC Bug Exterminator 

• Assemble Some Sound • C.COM • Mince (ST) 

ISSUE 34 • Dragon's Breath • Multiple Choice Vocabulary Quiz • Elevator Repairman 

• Assemble Some Sound Part 2 

ISSUE 35 (also on disk) • Hide and Seek • Printers Revisited • Bonk • Turtle 1020 • G: 

ISSUE 36 (also on disk) m Sneak Attack • Maze War • Nightshade • Solid Gold 
Input Routine • Rafferty Run 

ISSUE 37 (also on disk) • Speedski • Index to ANALOG Computing (15-36) • Master 
Disk Directory • Halley Hunter • Bank Switching for the 130XE 

ISSUE 38 (also on disk) • Color Alignment Generator • Incoming! • DLI Maker • Air 
Hockey • ST Color Palette 

ISSUE 39 (also on disk) • Super Pong • Unicheck (updated) • C-Manship Part 1 

• Program Helper • Adventurous Programming Part 1 • ST Software Guide 

ISSUE 40 (also on disk) • Clash of Kings • Micro-Mail • Koala Slideshow Program 

• Adventurous Programming Part 2 • Mouser 



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La Machine 



continued 



1838 DATA 27, 165, 240, 24, 165, 40f 144,2,2 

38,241,133,240,165,242,24,105,1188 

1848 DATA 48,144,2,230,243,133,242,160 

,0,76,29,72,169,241,133,248,1438 

1850 DATA 169,97,133,241,169,2,133,242 

,169,98,133,243,169,124,141,240,4068 

1860 DATA 71,160,0,173,248,71,145,248, 

173,249,71,145,242,206,248,71,4878 

1878 DATA 248,25,165,248,24,185,48,144 

,2,238,241,133,248,165,242,24,1886 

1880 DATA 105,40,144,2,230,243,133,242 

,76,93,72,169,0,141,8,72,5660 

1890 DATA 169,6,141,239,71,169,32,141, 

240,71,174,8,72,189,258,71,9519 

1988 DATA 133,248,189,1,72,133,241,162 

,0,168,0,189,181,89,145,240,707 

1910 DATA 232,200,284,239,71,288,244,1 

65,248,24,185,48,144,2,230,241,1982 

1928 DATA 133,248,206,240,71,288,226,2 

38,8,72,173,8,72,281,7,208,9174 

1938 DATA 191,169,8,141,8,72,32,166,77 

,32,61,74,32,177,77,32,2132 

1940 DATA 33,78,162,0,142,57,92,32,133 

,80,32,48,89,76,105,78,2536 

1950 DATA 174,42,92,189,117,90,133,242 

,189,237,90,133,243,160,0,177,2120 

I960 DATA 242,57,43,92,153,253,91,200, 

192,4,208,243,238,42,92,174,2151 

1970 DATA 52,92,13,255,91,13,254,91,13 

,253,91,157,133,91,160,0,7239 

1980 DATA 238,52,92,232,224,120,208,26 

8,148,42,92,140,52,92,174,41,8024 

1998 DATA 92,189,3,92,133,248,189,9,92 

,133,241,169,4,141,239,71,9921 

2088 DATA 169,38,141,248,71,162,0,160, 

0,189,133,91,145,240,232,200,2589 

2010 DATA 204,239,71,208,244,165,240,2 

4,105,40,144,2,230,241,133,248,2971 

2020 DATA 206,240,71,208,226,96,174,41 

,92,189,64,92,133,246,189,71,673 

2030 DATA 92,133,247,160,0,185,133,91, 

145,246 , 200,192, 120, 208, 246, 96, 4505 

2040 DATA 169,244,141,48,92,169,255,14 

1,242,2,32,61,74,173,242,2,8027 

2050 DATA 201,255,240,6,169,4,141,48,9 

2,96,173,132,2,208,8,32,4590 

2060 DATA 133,80,173,132,2,240,251,173 

,120,2,201,15,240,220,201,14,921 

2070 DATA 208,19,174,57,92,189,208,69, 

24,105,16,144,2,41,15,32,1175 

2080 DATA 47,74,76,132,73,201,13,208,1 

9,174,57,92,189,288,69,24,6787 

2890 DATA 105,240,176,2,9,240,32,47,74 

,76,132,73,201,7,208,39,5505 

2100 DATA 174,57,92,189,208,69,72,41,1 

5,201,14,208,9,104,41,240,6529 

2110 DATA 32,47,74,76,132,73,165,2,141 

,253,91,104,41,240,13,253,8795 

2120 DATA 91,32,47,74,76,132,73,261,11 

,208,21,174,57,92,189,208,8693 

2130 DATA 69,72,41,15,201,8,268,11,184 

,41,248,9,14,32,47,74,1688 

2140 DATA 76,132,73,24,105,254,141,253 

,91,104,41,240,13,253,91,32,8633 

2150 DATA 47,74,76,132,73,157,208,69,3 

2,102,89,173,120,2,201,15,5622 

2160 DATA 208,249,96,160,0,162,3,189,2 

08,69,72,41,240,24,106,106,6887 

2170 DATA 106,106,168,185,113,93,24,16 

5,224,141,97,92,104,41,15,168,6299 

2180 DATA 185,113,93,24,105,224,141,21 

7,92,189,27,92,133,246,189,31,181 

2190 DATA 92,133,247,160,0,173,97,92,1 

45,246,173,217,92,200,145,246,4761 

2200 DATA 202,16,196,96,174,41,92,189, 

64,92,133,246,189,71,92,133,9548 

2210 DATA 247,169,66,133,244,133,242,1 

69,98,133,245,133,243,169,4,141,2933 



2220 DATA 241,71,169,30,141,242,71,162 

,0,160,0,177,246,72,41,192,8797 

2230 DATA 74,74,74,74,74,74,157,253,91 

,232,104,72,41,48,74,74,5553 

2240 DATA 74,74,157,253,91,232,104,72, 

41,12,74,74,157,253,91,232,9947 

2250 DATA 184,41,3,157,253,91,165,246, 

24,185,1,288,2,238,247,133,859 

2260 DATA 246,162,0,160,0,189,253,91,1 

68,185,53,92,157,253,91,232,2812 

2270 DATA 224,4,208,241,169,4,141,240, 

71,162,0,160,0,189,253,91,9942 

2280 DATA 145,244,165,244,24,105,40,14 

4,2,230,245,133,244,206,240,71,3967 

2298 DATA 268,235,169,4,141,246,71,165 

,242,24,165,1,288,2,238,243,1188 

2300 DATA 133,242,133,244,165,243,133, 

245,232,224,4,208,208,206,241,71,6673 

2310 DATA 240,3,76,161,74,165,242,24,1 

05,144,144,2,230,243,133,242,2926 

2320 DATA 133,244,165,243,133,245,169, 

4,141,241,71,206,242,71,240,3,2478 

2330 DATA 76,161,74,96,44,33,0,45,33,3 

5,40,41,46,37,0,0,6807 

2340 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,0,8,6,6,6,0, 

8,6,2348 

2358 DATA 6,54,37,56,51,41,47,46,8,18, 

14,16,8,0,0,0,4493 

2360 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,6,8,6,6,6,6,6,0,6, 

0,0,2360 

2370 DATA 6,6,6,8,6,6,6,0,0,0,0,8,6,8, 

6,0,2370 

2380 DATA 6,6,0,0,6,8,6,0,6,6,8,8,34,1 

21,8,51,5332 

2398 DATA 116,181,118,181,6,33,188,112 

,181,114,116,6,8,17,25,24,9638 

2400 DATA 21,0,8,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,0,0,6,6 

,8,8,2421 

2410 DATA 0,6,6,6,6,8,8,8,6,8,6,8,8,8, 

8,8,2418 

2420 DATA 0,6,6,6,6,8,8,6,6,6,6,6,6,8, 

8,8,2428 

2438 DATA 6,8,8,8,6,8,8,6,6,6,8,8,8,6, 

8,8,2438 

2448 DATA 8,0,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,8,0,0, 

6,0,2440 

2450 DATA 0,0,0,0,6,8,8,6,6,6,8,6,0,6, 

8,0,2450 

2460 DATA 0,0,0,8,6,6,6,6,0,8,6,6,6,0, 

6,8,2468 

2478 DATA 8,6,6,6,6,6,8,6,8,8,8,6,6,6, 

6,8,2470 

2480 DATA 6,0,6,6,8,8,8,8,6,6,6,8,8,8, 

0,0,2480 

2490 DATA 0,0,6,6,8,0,0,0,6,6,0,0,0,8, 

6,0,2490 

2500 DATA 8,6,6,8,8,8,8,8,8,6,6,8,8,8, 

8,8,2586 

2516 DATA 6,6,8,8,8,6,8,6,8,8,8,0,0,0, 

0,0,2510 

2520 DATA 0,6,6,6,6,6,8,8,6,6,6,8,6,8, 

6,6,2528 

2538 DATA 6,8,8,8,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,6,8,8, 

8,8,2538 

2548 DATA 6,8,6,6,6,8,8,8,8,4,18,35,24 

,26,8,16,4138 

2550 DATA 22,6,6,8,81,82,82,82,82,82,8 

2,82,82,82,82,82,2899 

2560 DATA 82,69,0,0,0,22,0,38,114,97,1 

09,101,115,8,8,8,9118 

2578 DATA 6,4,18,35,26,26,6,18,24,6,84 

,8,124,128,172,161,2872 

2580 DATA 128,173,161,163,168,169,174, 

165,128,124,0,0,0,0,0,0,973 

2590 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,4,18,35,21 

,26,0,20,4205 

2606 DATA 18,6,6,8,124,0,36,26,52,40,3 

7,34,47,55,44,0,7422 



PAGE 120 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



2610 DAm 0,124,0,0,0,128,128,128,164, 

165,172,161,185,128,128,0,8613 

2620 DATA 0,4,18,35,22,26,0,16,33,0,0, 

0,124,179,244,229,4955 

2630 DftTA 246,229,128,161,236,240,229, 

242,244,124,0,0,0,0,0,4,4021 

2640 DATA 16,22,0,54,34,35,0,0,0,0,0,0 

,0,0,0,0,3296 

2650 DATA 0,0,0,0,90,82,82,82,82,82,82 

,82,82,82,82,82,3022 

2660 DATA 82,67,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,0,2876 

2670 DATA 0,51,110,97,112,115,104,111, 

116,0,47,46,0,0,0,0,8469 

2680 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,2680 

2690 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,169,78,141,152 

,96,169,75,141,153,6788 

2700 DATA 96,169,0,133,20,96,165,20,20 

1,180,208,250,169,161,141,152,3552 

2710 DATA 96,169,76,141,153,96,96,174, 

41,92,189,15,92,133,244,189,631 

2720 DATA 21,92,133,245,169,1,141,239, 

71,169,6,141,240,71,162,0,8685 

2730 DATA 160,0,189,79,92,145,244,232, 

200,204,239,71,208,244,165,244,8487 

2740 DATA 24,105,40,144,2,230,245,133, 

244,206,240,71,208,226,96,174,5679 

2750 DATA 41,92,189,15,92,133,244,189, 

21,92,133,245,169,1,141,239,1742 

2760 DATA 71,169,6,141,240,71,162,0,16 

0,0,189,85,92,145,244,232,1648 

2770 DATA 200,204,239,71,208,244,155,2 

44,24,105,40,144,2,230,245,133,2473 

2780 DATA 244,206,240,71,208,226,96,16 

9,0,141,36,92,141,37,92,169,8205 

2790 DATA 56,141,40,92,169,144,141,7,2 

12,169,14,141,192,2,169,56,7767 

2800 DATA 141,0,208,162,0,169,240,157, 

34,148,232,224,4,208,248,169,4577 

2810 DATA 2,141,29,208,141,27,208,96,3 

2,233,77,174,41,92,232,236,1734 

2820 DATA 212,69,208,2,162,0,142,41,92 

,32,126,74,32,177,77,173,6173 

2830 DATA 1,92,240,28,201,40,208,9,32, 

126,74,32,234,72,76,90,5996 

2840 DATA 79,201,54,208,14,32,177,82,1 

73,51,92,240,3,32,96,73,5526 

2850 DATA 76,90,79,201,45,208,25,174,5 

1,92,208,9,238,51,92,32,6662 

2860 DATA 217,80,76,90,79,162,0,142,51 

,92,32,217,80,76,90,79,5381 

2870 DATA 201,39,208,6,32,133,80,76,90 

,79,201,33,240,154,201,21,8757 

2880 DATA 208,6,32,227,82,76,90,79,201 

,63,208,6,32,44,83,76,4524 

2890 DATA 90,79,201,58,208,6,32,63,84, 

76,90,79,201,11,208,6,5214 

2900 DATA 32,63,84,76,90,79,201,18,208 

,16,162,100,142,48,92,32,5513 

2910 DATA 221,86,162,4,142,48,92,76,90 

,79,201,62,208,19,169,66,7171 

2920 DATA 141,48,92,32,103,87,169,4,14 

1,48,92,32,35,88,76,90,3225 

2930 DATA 79,201,61,208,19,169,164,141 

,48,92,32,103,87,169,4,141,6564 

2940 DATA 48,92,32,165,88,76,90,79,201 

,10,208,6,32,122,73,76,4790 

2950 DATA 90,79,201,24,208,8,169,4,32, 

9,81,76,90,79,201,29,4136 

2960 DATA 208,8,169,5,32,9,81,76,90,79 

,201,27,208,8,169,6,4682 

2970 DATA 32,9,81,76,90,79,201,7,208,6 

,32,193,81,76,90,79,5285 

2980 DATA 173,132,2,208,61,173,36,92,2 

4,42,42,170,189,237,90,133,8977 

2990 DATA 245,189,117,90,133,244,24,10 

9,37,92,144,2,230,245,133,244,2673 



3000 DATA 162,4,160,0,173,2,92,145,244 

,165,244,24,105,40,144,2,7266 

3010 DATA 230,245,133,244,202,208,237, 

32,234,72,173,51,92,240,3,32,9732 

3020 DATA 96,73,174,120,2,224,15,240,5 

8,224,6,240,54,224,10,240,1179 

3030 DATA 50,224,5,240,46,224,9,240,42 

,224,14,208,3,76,251,79,9460 

3040 DATA 224,13,208,3,76,52,80,224,11 

,240,27,173,40,92,24,105,5690 

3050 DATA 4,170,236,38,92,240,12,238,3 

7,92,142,0,208,142,40,92,7721 

3060 DATA 32,111,80,76,105,78,173,40,9 

2,24,105,252,205,39,92,48,6988 

3070 DATA 242,170,206,37,92,142,0,208, 

142,40,92,32,111,80,76,105,5851 

3080 DATA 78,174,36,92,240,248,189,101 

,91,133,246,173,132,91,133,247,4669 

3090 DATA 160,0,169,0,145,246,200,192, 

4,208,249,202,189,101,91,133,3537 

3100 DATA 246,173,132,91,133,247,142,3 

6,92,160,0,169,240,145,246,200,4377 

3110 DATA 192,4,208,249,32,111,80,76,1 

05,78,174,36,92,224,29,240,9602 

3120 DATA 246,189,101,91,133,246,173,1 

32,91,133,247,160,0,169,0,145,291 

3130 DATA 246,200,192,4,208,249,232,18 

9,101,91,133,246,173,132,91,133,3862 

3140 DATA 247,142,36,92,160,0,169,240, 

145,246,200,192,4,208,249,32,3530 

3150 DATA 111,80,76,105,78,169,0,133,2 

0,173,120,2,201,15,240,10,6374 

3160 DATA 165,20,201,8,240,4,208,241,2 

08,235,96,32,151,89,169,8,142 

3170 DATA 141,242,71,174,57,92,232,224 

,4,208,2,162,0,142,57,92,7354 

3180 DATA 32,141,89,169,242,133,244,16 

9,117,133,245,160,0,189,53,92,1416 

3190 DATA 145,244,200,192,16,240,3,76, 

170,80,165,244,24,105,40,144,9099 

3200 DATA 2,230,245,133,244,206,242,71 

,208,225,32,206,80,189,53,92,2546 

3210 DATA 141,2,92,96,169,0,133,20,165 

,20,201,10,208,250,96,169,315 

3220 DATA 255,141,242,2,169,116,133,24 

4,169,77,133,245,160,2,173,51,1128 

3230 DATA 92,240,14,185,61,92,145,244, 

136,208,248,173,241,2,208,251,6813 

3240 DATA 96,185,58,92,145,244,136,208 

,248,173,241,2,208,251,96,72,4500 

3250 DATA 32,233,77,162,0,142,41,92,32 

,177,77,104,141,212,69,170,9211 

3260 DATA 189,113,93,24,105,224,141,19 

1,76,96,32,68,81,169,255,141,746 

3270 DATA 252,2,206,66,81,174,66,81,20 

8,11,162,20,142,66,81,173,7724 

3280 DATA 10,210,141,192,2,76,98,228,1 

5,120,173,252,2,201,255,208,4132 

3290 DATA 6,169,0,141,1,92,96,201,54,2 

40,66,201,40,240,62,201,1085 

3300 DATA 21,240,58,201,45,240,54,201, 

39,240,50,201,33,240,46,201,1838 

3310 DATA 63,240,42,201,58,240,38,201, 

11,240,34,201,62,240,30,201,1504 

3320 DATA 18,240,26,201,61,240,22,201, 

10,240,18,201,24,240,14,201,405 

3330 DATA 29,240,10,201,27,240,6,201,7 

,240,2,169,0,141,1,92,5872 

3340 DATA 96,169,171,141,0,2,169,81,14 

1,1,2,169,255,141,14,212,8914 

3350 DATA 96,72,138,72,173,47,92,174,4 

8,92,141,10,212,141,23,208,8901 

3360 DATA 142,24,208,104,170,104,64,32 

,152,82,173,40,92,72,169,0,6078 

3370 DATA 141,0,208,169,2,18,10,10,10, 

170,169,12,157,66,3,32,2346 

3380 DATA 86,228,169,2,10,10,10,10,170 

,169,6,157,74,3,169,0,3406 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 121 



* 



La Machine 



continued 



3398 DftTft 157,75,3,169,91,157,68,3,169 

,92,157,69,3,169,3,157,6237 

3400 DATA 66,3,32,86,228,152,48,80,169 

,162,141,48,2,169,96,141,8296 

3410 DATA 49,2,169,162,141,198,2,141,2 

00,2,169,12,141,197,2,169,8801 

3420 DATA 0,133,240,169,129,133,241,16 

5,17,157,72,3,169,0,157,73,7803 

3430 DATA 3,169,93,157,68,3,169,93,157 

,69,3,169,5,157,66,3,4428 

3440 DATA 32,86,228,152,48,6,32,118,82 

,76,58,82,169,255,141,242,1254 

3450 DATA 2,173,242,2,201,255,240,249, 

169,2,10,10,10,10,170,169,8034 

3460 DATA 12,157,66,3,32,86,228,169,0, 

141,48,2,169,96,141,49,6022 

3470 DATA 2,104,141,40,92,141,0,208,32 

,102,89,96,160,0,169,93,6775 

3480 DATA 133,246,169,93,133,247,177,2 

46,24,105,224,145,240,200,192,17,4880 

3490 DATA 208,244,165,240,24,105,20,14 

4,2,230,241,133,240,96,160,0,1112 

3500 DATA 132,240,169,129,133,241,169, 

0,145,240,200,208,251,230,241,165,9568 

3510 DATA 241,201,133,208,241,96,6,169 

,120,141,41,83,169,16,141,42,7704 

3520 DATA 83,169,66,133,240,169,98,133 

,241,160,8,173,2,92,145,240,1809 

3530 DATA 200,192,16,208,249,165,248,2 

4,185,40,144,2,238,241,133,248,4253 

3548 DATA 286,41,83,288,228,32,234,72, 

96,169,0,141,8,208,141,241,1584 






NX10 CAU 

SG15 369.95 

SO-10 321 95 

SO-15 441 00 

SR-10 469 00 

SR-15 582 00 

SB-10 565 00 

NB15 CALL 

Powertype 299 95 

m LE«ND »4 95 

1080 205 95 

1380 259 95 

1385 295.00 

CP.VII CALL 

.„ OKIDATA 

Okimale 10 170 95 

Oklmale 20 210 00 

182 219 95 

192 349 95 

PANASONIC 

KX-P1080 209 00 

KXP1091 231 95 

IU-P1592 cm 

KX-P1595 Call 

l«-P3131 259 95 

KX-P3151 425 00 

MSPio '''T'^^" 259 00 

MSP15 359 95 

MSP20 335 95 

MSP25 499 95 

120D 189-95 

SEIKOSHA 

SP-IOOOlCenuonicsl 185 95 

EPSON 
Call lor current pricing on all Epson 
models. 



Karatoka 18.95 

Priol Shop 27.95 

Print Shop Companion CaN 

Graphics Lihraries I. II. i III aa. 16.95 

MICROPROSE 

F-15 Strike Eagle 20.50 

Silent Service 20.50 

Kennedy Approach 20.50 

OSS 

MAC 65 48.95 

Action 48.95 

Basic XL 38 95 

Basic XE 48.95 

Tool Xits 18.95 

SUBLOGIC 

Right Simulator II 31.95 

Jet Call 

Night Mission Pinball 20.50 

SYNAPSE 

Synlile 31.95 

Syncalc 31.95 

ST SOFTWARE 

The Pawn 30.95 

Prinlmaster 28.95 

Sun Dog 25.95 

Hex 29.95 

Inlocom Games 29.95 

Degas 25.95 

VIP Protessional 113.95 

PC Intercom 74.95 

Cash Flow 59.95 

Switchboard 29.95 

Habawills 24.95 

Habawriter 32.95 

Checkminder 46. 

Hippo-C 36. 



ATARI 

1050 139.9! 

Happy 1050 289.9! 

Happy Enhancer 139. 9S 

US Doubters 54.95 

DT Duplicator 119.95 

DT Doubter 54.95 

Indus GT 194.0( 

SF314 205.9! 

SF354 169 95 

Haba 10 Meg Hard Call 



DISKETTES 



PRECISION 5'/4 3Vi 

SS/DO S8.50 - 

DS/DD 11.75 - 

NASHUA 

SS/OO - 29.9S 

DS/DD - 32.95 

Aa DtthBim Otv 1 LiMm Warmev 

INNOVATIVE CONCEPTS 

F-N-F25/Lock 12.51 

F-N-F50 12.50 

F-N-F50/Lock 16.50 

DnkNolchers 3.99 



MJ-10 .™*'.""... 175.95 

MJ-22 254.95 

ZENITH 

ZVM 122 74.95 

ZVM 123 74.95 

AMDEK 

300G 117.00 

3aOA 127.00 

310A 145 

Color 700 469 

Color 710 539.00 

ATARI 

SM124 174.95 

SC1224 335 95 

NEC 

1201 139.00 

1205 89.95 

1260 79.95 

SAKATA 

SC100 159.00 

THOMSON 

CM365 269.95 

14" RGB Color Composite Amber t 
Green Switch 

CM366 139.9E 

14" Color Composite 

220 l^^ 179.95 



IMfD Modflffl 

100% Hayas CooipalMa ... 199. 
Avatex 300/1200 95.9! 

XM301 ^T*?! 39.95 

MpplOOOE S2.9S 

MPP1200STSAT 199.95 

OMIIJOOST 1BS.9S 

300/1200 100%HayM CampatlUi 



WHITE 20 LB 

2500 Shte. La;. Edge 26.95 

1000 Shts. Laz. Edge 16.95 

SOOShts. Laz Edge 11.95 

ASSORTED PASTELS 

2500 SMs. Laz. Edge 44.95 

100 Shts. Laz. Edge 26.95 

500 Shts. Laz. Edge 16.95 

Mating Labats lOOOQTY 9.95 



POINTER RIBBONS 

AND 

DUST COVERS AVAILABLE 



v: 



ORDER TOLL FREE 1-800-351-3442 

CUSTOMER SERVICE AND PA RESIDENTS CALL 1-717-322-7700 



e Of (Ids 







c mmenMi U S A APO & FPO O'Op". .idO S^ per hunflrwi Pnonlv m.iiUOti SIO oei Hundred AMofeiqn otflfl's.idtl 8% 'oi shipDinq UPS shioomg add $4 w nunO'ed 
t.iMCaisl S'lppi nii'id'ed WeMCn.tsi PA lesiflenls ^Od 6% S-tles Wi Fiee snipDing for PA residents OtOe's Dv romtwnv and personal ctierks held 3 weeks Deleclive 
piortur.ls reiiu'tK imni return ,iiiil>o'i/.ilion De'erliirt o'Ofliiris wiM be teoWred o' tePiU'ed srro'dinq to wfln.iniv No us«l « rKOnditnoMl producls SOM. P'ices and 
.tvrfiur nlity Hip si it)|e< t in ch^ntie *iltiniil imtire 

"Where Prices are Bom, Not Raised." 

H/7E HOUSE 
COMPUTER 



f.O. Box 4025 
Williainsport, PA 
17701 



VISA 4% . MASTER CARD 4%, AMERICAN EXPRESS 5% 



CIRCLE »152 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



PAGE 122 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



3710 DATA 169,15,141,176,82,169,255,14 

1,242,2,32,7,84,96,173,176,9854 

3720 DATA 82,24,105,1,201,16,288,234,1 

69,1,76,236,83,173,176,82,1250 

3730 DATA 41,15,170,189,113,93,24,105, 

224,141,59,77,173,176,82,41,8796 

3740 DATA 240,24,106,106,106,106,170,1 

89,113,93,24,105,224,141,58,77,9097 

3750 DATA 173,120,2,201,15,208,249,96, 

169,83,141,98,86,169,0,141,9625 

3760 DATA 8,208,76,80,84,162,80,142,98 

,86,162,0,142,126,86,201,9452 

3770 DATA 11,240,3,238,126,86,169,255, 

141,242,2,169,8,141,35,92,9301 

3780 DATA 169,96,141,14,212,169,1,10,1 

0,10,10,170,169,12,157,66,4897 

3790 DATA 3,32,86,228,169,1,10,10,18,1 

0,170,169,8,157,74,3,3576 

3800 DATA 169,0,157,75,3,169,98,157,68 

,3,169,86,157,69,3,169,7000 

3810 DATA 3,157,66,3,32,86,228,48,159, 

32,62,86,32,126,74,32,4260 

3820 DATA 234,72,32,96,73,169,133,133, 

246,169,91,133,247,162,0,160,2592 

3830 DATA 0,140,96,92,140,127,86,172,1 

27,86,177,246,72,41,240,74,1402 

3840 DATA 74,74,74,168,185,113,93,157, 

97,92,104,41,15,168,185,113,9025 

3850 DATA 93,157,217,92,232,238,127,86 

,238,96,92,173,96,92,201,4,1246 

3860 DATA 208,213,169,0,141,96,92,142, 

67,81,138,74,74,170,202,189,1277 

3870 DATA 131,86,72,41,240,74,74,74,74 

,168,185,113,93,157,161,86,242 

3880 DATA 104,41,15,168,185,113,93,157 

,191,86,174,67,81,224,120,208,2907 

3890 DATA 156,169,30,141,242,71,169,4, 

141,96,92,162,16,169,100,157,9670 

3900 DATA 68,3,169,86,157,69,3,169,13, 

157,72,3,169,0,157,73,5632 

3910 DATA 3,172,41,92,185,113,93,141,1 

11,86,172,35,92,185,113,93,9270 

3920 DATA 141,121,86,169,11,157,66,3,3 

2,86,228,169,113,157,68,3,7139 

3930 DATA 169,86,157,69,3,169,11,157,6 

6,3,32,86,228,169,3,157,7275 

3940 DATA 72,3,169,128,157,68,3,169,86 

,157,69,3,160,0,185,97,7149 

3950 DATA 92,141,128,86,185,217,92,141 

,129,86,200,169,32,141,130,86,1016 

3960 DATA 152,72,169,11,157,66,3,32,86 

,228,104,168,206,96,92,208,1209 

3970 DATA 221,169,4,141,96,92,173,242, 

2,201,255,240,3,76,217,85,2715 

3980 DATA 152,72,74,74,168,136,185,161 

,86,141,128,86,185,191,86,141,2282 

3990 DATA 129,86,169,155,141,130,86,16 

9,11,157,66,3,32,86,228,104,7992 

4000 DATA 168,206,242,71,208,168,173,9 

8,86,201,83,208,3,32,80,86,8889 

4010 DATA 173,126,86,240,10,238,35,92, 

173,35,92,201,4,208,33,169,9606 

4020 DATA 255,141,14,212,169,1,10,10,1 

0,10,170,169,12,157,66,3,3928 

4030 DATA 32,86,228,173,98,86,201,83,2 

08,5,104,104,76,0,71,96,6590 

4040 DATA 169,30,141,242,71,169,2,141, 

78,92,160,0,140,127,86,162,9033 

4050 DATA 0,174,127,86,24,126,133,91,2 

32,126,133,91,232,126,133,91,1792 

4060 DATA 232,126,133,91,152,170,126,1 

31,86,206,78,92,208,227,169,2,2262 

4070 DATA 141,78,92,200,192,30,240,9,1 

52,10,10,141,127,86,76,11,5776 

4080 DATA 86,76,167,84,162,0,138,157,1 

31,86,157,191,86,157,161,86,1352 

4090 DATA 232,224,30,208,242,96,169,25 

5,141,242,2,173,242,2,201,255,6757 



4100 DATA 240,249,169,255,141,242,2,96 

,83,58,155,155,155,14,70,82,8769 

4110 DATA 65,77,69,35,32,48,155,14,83, 

72,73,70,84,35,32,48,2261 

4120 DATA 32,32,32,155,0,7,48,48,155,0 

,0,0,0,0,0,0,7089 

4130 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,4130 

4140 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,48,48,48,48,48 

,48,48,48,48,9324 

4150 DATA 48,48,48,48,48,48,48,48,48,4 

8,48,48,48,48,48,48,678 

4160 DATA 48,48,48,48,48,48,48,48,48,4 

8,48,48,48,48,48,48,688 

4170 DATA 48,48,48,48,48,48,48,48,48,4 

8,48,48,48,48,48,48,698 

4180 DATA 48,48,48,173,41,92,141,49,92 

,141,50,92,169,255,141,242,2942 

4190 DATA 2,173,242,2,201,31,240,84,20 

1,33,240,7,201,255,240,241,7317 

4200 DATA 76,38,87,173,41,92,205,49,92 

,240,3,32,233,77,238,41,9867 

4210 DATA 92,173,41,92,205,212,69,208, 

5,169,0,141,41,92,141,50,7746 

4220 DATA 92,32,177,77,169,255,141,242 

,2,76,235,86,173,49,92,141,1479 

4230 DATA 41,92,205,50,92,240,3,32,233 

,77,173,50,92,141,41,92,8074 

4240 DATA 32,177,77,32,126,74,169,255, 

141,242,2,96,173,49,92,170,1180 

4250 DATA 173,41,92,141,50,92,142,41,9 

2,32,126,74,173,50,92,170,7940 

4260 DATA 142,41,92,32,234,72,32,96,73 

,76,38,87,96,160,8,169,6673 

4270 DATA 0,153,2,77,136,208,250,169,1 

28,141,2,77,169,2,10,10,5963 

4280 DATA 10,10,170,169,4,157,74,3,169 

,0,157,75,3,169,111,157,7730 

4290 DATA 68,3,169,93,157,69,3,169,3,1 

57,66,3,32,86,228,160,7774 

4300 DATA 2,140,127,86,162,32,169,1,15 

7,72,3,169,0,157,73,3,5035 

4310 DATA 169,92,157,68,3,169,93,157,6 

9,3,169,7,157,66,3,32,4458 

4320 DATA 86,228,173,92,93,201,155,240 

,84,201,126,240,54,201,48,48,2461 

4330 DATA 233,201,91,16,229,201,58,48, 

4,201,65,48,221,172,127,86,342 

4340 DATA 153,81,93,56,233,32,153,0,77 

,238,127,86,173,127,86,201,1621 

4350 DATA 11,208,5,169,10,141,127,86,1 

69,128,172,127,86,153,0,77,8650 

4360 DATA 76,180,87,172,127,86,192,2,2 

40,176,169,0,153,0,77,206,475 

4370 DATA 127,86,172,127,86,169,128,15 

3,0,77,76,180,87,172,127,86,9843 

4380 DATA 153,81,93,169,0,153,0,77,96, 

173,84,93,201,155,240,117,2073 

4390 DATA 169,96,141,14,212,169,2,10,1 

0,10,10,170,169,12,157,66,5514 

4400 DATA 3,32,86,228,169,2,10,10,10,1 

0,170,169,8,157,74,3,4192 

4410 DATA 169,0,157,75,3,169,81,157,68 

,3,169,93,157,69,3,169,7575 

4420 DATA 3,157,66,3,32,86,228,48,45,1 

60,0,140,127,86,185,64,7942 

4430 DATA 92,157,68,3,185,71,92,157,69 

,3,169,121,157,72,3,169,8063 

4440 DATA 0,157,73,3,169,9,157,66,3,32 

,86,228,238,127,86,172,454 

4450 DATA 127,86,192,7,208,216,169,2,1 

0,10,10,10,170,169,12,157,6576 

4460 DATA 66,3,32,86,228,169,255,141,1 

4,212,96,173,84,93,201,155,3306 

4470 DATA 240,126,169,96,141,14,212,16 

9,2,10,10,10,10,170,169,12,5063 

4480 DATA 157,66,3,32,86,228,169,2,10, 

10,10,10,170,169,4,157,5471 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 123 



^ 



La Machine 



continued 



4490 DATA 74,3,169,0,157,75,3,169,31,1 

57,68,3,169,93,157,69,7726 

4500 DATA 3,169,3,157,66,3,32,86,228,4 

8,54,160,0,140,127,86,7025 

4510 DATA 185,64,92,157,68,3,185,71,92 

,157,69,3,169,121,157,72,8539 

4520 DATA 3,169,0,157,73,3,169,5,157,6 

6,3,32,86,228,238,127,9497 

4530 DATA 86,172,127,86,192,7,208,216, 

32,102,89,32,61,74,32,48,5619 

4540 DATA 89,169,2,18,10,10,10,170,169 

,12,157,66,3,32,86,228,6138 

4550 DATA 169,255,141,14,212,96,32,233 

,77,162,0,142,41,92,32,126,7766 

4560 DATA 74,32,177,77,32,234,72,32,96 

,89,32,233,77,238,41,92,9183 

4570 DATA 174,41,92,224,6,208,231,32,2 

33,77,162,0,142,41,92,32,8110 

4580 DATA 126,74,32,177,77,96,160,255, 

136,208,253,96,173,208,69,141,5470 

4590 DATA 200,2,152,0,189,209,69,157,1 

96,2,232,224,3,208,245,173,5636 

4600 DATA 212,69,201,4,48,7,281,6,18,3 

,76,137,89,169,6,32,4085 

4610 DATA 9,81,96,32,163,89,160,0,169, 

84,145,244,96,174,57,92,561 

4620 DATA 32,163,89,169,0,160,0,145,24 

4,189,31,92,133,245,189,27,1998 

4630 DATA 92,24,105,3,144,2,230,245,13 

3,244,96,2,170,170,170,170,3976 

4640 DATA 128,2,0,0,0,0,128,2,8,0,0,8, 

128,2,0,0,7376 

4650 DATA 0,0,128,2,0,8,0,0,128,2,0,0, 

0,0,128,2,8166 

4660 DATA 0,0,0,6,128,2,0,0,0,0,128,2, 

0,0,0,8,6744 

4670 DATA 128,2,8,0,0,0,128,2,0,0,0,0, 

128,2,0,0,7406 

4680 DATA 0,0,128,2,8,0,0,0,128,2,8,0, 

0,0,128,2,8196 

4690 DATA 0,0,0,0,128,2,0,0,0,0,128,2, 

0,0,0,0,6774 

4700 DATA 128,2,0,0,0,0,128,2,0,0,0,0, 

128,2,0,0,7436 

4710 DATA 0,0,128,2,0,0,0,0,128,2,0,0, 

0,0,128,2,8226 

4720 DATA 0,0,0,0,128,2,0,0,0,0,128,2, 

0,0,0,0,6804 

4730 DATA 128,2,8,0,8,8,128,2,0,0,0,0, 

128,2,8,0,7466 

4740 DATA 0,0,128,2,8,0,0,0,128,2,8,0, 

0,0,128,2,8256 

4750 DATA 8,0,0,0,128,2,170,170,170,17 

0,128,66,70,74,78,226,114 

4760 DATA 230,234,238,138,134,138,142, 

34,38,42,46,194,198,202,206,98,3112 

4778 DATA 102,106,110,2,6,10,14,162,16 

6,170,174,66,70,74,78,226,9538 

4780 DATA 230,234,238,130,134,138,142, 

34,38,42,46,194,198,202,206,98,3132 

4798 DATA 102,186,118,2,6,10,14,162,16 

6,170,174,66,70,74,78,226,9558 

4880 DATA 230,234,238,130,134,138,142, 

34,38,42,46,194,198,282,206,98,3152 

4810 DATA 102,106,110,2,6,10,14,162,16 

6,170,174,66,70,74,78,226,9578 

4820 DATA 230,234,238,138,134,138,142, 

34,38,42,46,194,198,202,206,98,3172 

4838 DATA 102,186,118,98,98,98,98,98,9 

8,98,98,99,99,99,99,100,8300 

4840 DATA 100,100,100,100,100,160,100, 

101,101,101,101,162,182,182,102,102,86 

18 

4850 DATA 162,162,162,183,183,163,103, 

103,103,103,103,104,104,104,104,105,89 

38 

4868 DATA 105,105,165,165,165,105,105, 

106,106,106,106,107,107,107,107,107,93 



18 

4870 DATA 107,107,107,108,108,108,108, 

188,188,188,188,109,109,109,109,110,96 

38 

4888 DATA 118,110,110,116,110,110,110, 

111,111,111,111,112,112,112,112,112,18 

4890 DATA 112,112,112,113,113,113,113, 

113,113,113,113,114,114,114,114,115,33 

8 

4900 DATA 115,115,115,115,115,115,115, 

116,116,116,116,34,38,42,46,50,5508 

4910 DATA 54,58,62,66,78,74,78,82,86,9 

8,94,98,102,106,110,114,7694 

4920 DATA 118,122,126,130,134,138,142, 

146,158,154,148,255,255,255,255,234,18 

72 

4930 DATA 170,170,171,234,170,170,171, 

234,170,170,171,234,170,170,171,234,64 

6 

4940 DATA 170,170,171,234,176,176,171, 

235,255,255,235,239,255,255,251,239,66 

18 

4958 DATA 255,255,251,239,175,255,251, 

239,191,255,251,239,255,255,251,239,78 

70 

4960 DATA 255,255,251,239,255,255,251, 

239,255,255,251,239,234,175,251,239,74 

63 

4970 DATA 170,171,251,239,170,171,251, 

239,6,3,251,234,255,254,171,234,1515 

4980 DATA 255,254,171,234,255,254,171, 

234,176,58,171,234,128,18,171,234,8026 

4990 DATA 191,256,171,234,191,250,171, 

213,117,117,87,213,255,253,87,255,464 

5000 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,255,255, 

0,85,47,127,207,31,56,136,98,2851 

5010 DATA 103,108,114,98,183,188,12,92 

,172,197,21,99,105,110,115,99,9677 

5020 DATA 105,169,209,249,33,76,76,76, 

77,0,0,0,120,56,56,0,2724 „ „ , „ „ 

5030 DATA 0,192,48,12,3,10,4,6,6,1,0,0 

,85,170,255,1,3045 

5040 DATA 47,38,38,47,46,6,0,120,240,1 

04,224,88,208,67,67,67,9094 

5050 DATA 68,68,69,69,8,60,255,255,255 

,255,60,0,0,0,0,0,5427 

5060 DATA 0,68,58,42,46,42,4,16,70,70, 

70,70,70,70,70,70,3176 

5070 DATA 53,53,53,70,70,70,70,70,48,7 

0,51,70,50,67,48,70,3449 

5080 DATA 48,67,48,70,49,67,56,70,48,6 

7,48,70,50,67,48,70,3183 

5090 DATA 48,70,50,70,65,69,66,70,70,6 

6,70,70,53,53,53,70,3715 

5100 DATA 53,53,53,70,53,53,53,70,54,6 

5,53,70,54,69,53,70,3354 

5110 DATA 54,65,53,70,54,50,53,70,54,6 

5,53,70,54,69,53,76,3376 

5120 DATA 54,65,53,70,54,69,53,76,54,6 

5,53,78,53,53,53,70,3263 

5130 DATA 65,65,66,70,65,65,66,70,65,6 

5,66,70,70,70,70,22,3633 

5140 DATA 70,70,70,70,70,70,70,53,53,5 

3,55,55,70,70,55,55,3391 

5150 DATA 51,48,55,52,48,48,55,52,48,4 

8,55,52,48,57,55,52,2219 

5160 DATA 48,48,55,52,48,48,55,54,51,4 

8,55,55,65,65,55,55,2686 

5170 DATA 70,70,55,53,53,53,55,53,53,5 

3,55,53,53,53,55,53,2501 

5180 DATA 65,65,55,53,54,50,55,53,65,6 

5,55,53,69,54,55,53,2933 

5196 DATA 65,65,55,53,54,69,55,53,65,6 

5,55,53,56,54,55,53,2816 

5260 DATA 65,65,55,53,53,53,55,70,65,6 

5,70,70,65,65,70,70,4070 

5210 DATA 65,65,70,70,70,70,70,68,58,8 

4,72,69,66,79,87,76,5166 



PAGE 124 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



5220 DATA 155,0,155,49,53,55,32,78,82, 

69,69,32,83,69,67,84,4380 

5230 DftTA 79,82,83,155,155,75,58,48,49 

,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,3649 

5240 DATA 57,65,66,67,68,69,70,0,0,0,0 

,0,0,0,0,0,7137 

5250 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5250 

5260 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5260 

5270 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5270 

5280 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5280 

5290 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5290 

5300 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5300 

5310 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5310 

5320 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5320 

5330 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5330 

5340 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5340 

5350 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5350 

5360 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5360 

5370 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5370 

5380 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,5380 



5390 DATA 
0,0,5390 
5400 DATA 
0,0,5400 
5410 DATA 
0,0,5410 
5420 DATA 
0,0,5420 
5430 DATA 
0,0,5430 
5440 DATA 
0,0,5440 
5450 DATA 
0,0,5450 
5460 DATA 
0,0,5460 
5470 DATA 
0,0,5470 
5480 DATA 
0,0,5480 
5490 DATA 
0,0,5490 
5500 DATA 
0,0,5500 
5510 DATA 
0,0,5510 
5520 DATA 
0,0,5520 
5530 DATA 
0,0,5530 
0,0,5560 
5570 DATA 
0,0,5570 
5580 DATA 



0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,8,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,8,0,0,0,8,8,8,8,8,0,0, 
8,6,8,8,8,0,0,0,8,8,8,8,0,0, 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0, 



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Where Is thai progtam going wrong? 
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ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 125 



* 



La Machine 



continued 



e, 0,5588 

5590 DATA 0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0,8,8,0,0,0,0, 

8,8,5598 

5680 DATA 8,8,0,8,8,8,8,8,8,0,0,8,8,8, 

8,0,5600 

5540 DATA 8,0,8,8,0,8,0,0,0,0,8,8,0,0, 

0,0,5548 

5558 DATA 6,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,0,0,0, 

0,0,5550 

5560 DATA 0,0,0,8,8,8,8,8,0,0,0,0,8,0, 

5610 DATA 0,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,8,0,0,0,0,8, 

8,0,5610 

5620 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0,0, 

0,0,5620 

5630 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,8,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,8,5638 

5648 DATA 8,8,0,0,0,0,112,112,112,78,2 

40,97,14,14,14,14,3724 

5650 DATA 14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,1 

4,14,14,14,14,14,14,7554 

5668 DATA 14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,1 

4,14,14,14,14,14,14,7564 

5678 DATA 14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,1 

4,14,14,14,14,14,14,7574 

5688 DATA 14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,1 

4,14,14,14,14,14,14,7584 

5698 DATA 14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,1 

4,14,14,14,14,14,14,7594 

5780 DATA 14,14,14,14,14,78,8,112,14,1 

4,14,14,14,14,14,14,8674 

5718 DATA 14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,1 

4,14,14,14,14,14,14,7614 

5728 DATA 14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,1 

4,14,14,14,14,14,14,7624 

5738 DATA 14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,14,1 

4,14,14,142,66,161,76,3223 

5748 DATA 2,2,2,2,2,65,8,96,112,112,11 

2,66,0,129,2,2,2948 

5758 DATA 2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2, 

2,2,6822 

5760 DATA 2,2,2,2,65,8,128,8,224,2,225 

,2,0,71,0,0,2530 

• 

Listing 2. 
BASIC listing. 

1000 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,255,255, 

255,245,85,85,87,247,255,255,247,9772 

1010 DATA 247,3,240,55,244,32,192,7,24 

4,0,192,7,244,16,201,135,7978 

1820 DATA 244,0,192,7,244,32,192,7,246 

,3,240,39,247,170,234,183,2061 

1830 DATA 247,255,191,247,245,85,85,87 

,245,85,85,87,245,85,85,87,8458 

1840 DATA 245,106,170,87,245,102,98,87 

,245,106,170,87,245,118,38,87,8448 

1050 DATA 245,106,170,87,245,182,110,8 

7,245,106,170,87,245,98,238,87,1246 

1060 DATA 245,106,170,87,245,85,85,87, 

255,178,178,191,255,178,170,191,4859 

1070 DATA 255,170,170,191,255,255,255, 

255,255,155,255,255,255,255,255,255,40 

69 

1080 DATA 255,255,245,85,85,87,247,255 

,255,247,247,3,240,55,244,0,2704 

1090 DATA 192,7,244,8,200,7,244,16,193 

,7> 244, 128, 192, 135, 244, 0,9011 

1100 DATA 192,7,246,3,240,39,247,170,2 

34,183,247,255,191,247,245,85,7268 

1118 DATA 85,87,245,85,85,87,245,85,85 

,87,245,186,170,87,245,102,123 

1120 DATA 226,87,245,106,170,87,245,11 

0,38,87,245,106,170,87,245,102.560 

1130 DATA 238,87,245,106,170,87,245,98 

,230,87,245,106,170,87,245,85,1942 

1140 DATA 85,87,255,170,170,191,255,17 

0,170,191,255,170,170,191,255,255,9059 

1150 DATA 255,255,255,155,255,255,255, 



255,255,255,255,255,245,85,85,87,7682 

1160 DATA 247,255,255,247,247,3,240,55 

,244,0,194,7,244,0,192,7,7621 

1170 DATA 244,152,193,7,244,0,192,7,24 

4,0,194,7,246,3,240,39,6823 

1188 DATA 247,170,234,183,247,255,191, 

247,245,85,85,87,245,85,85,87,1355 

1190 DATA 245,85,85,87,245,186,170,87, 

245,102,226,87,245,106,170,87,1321 

1200 DATA 245,102,38,87,245,106,178,87 

,245,102,230,87,245,186,178,87,1268 

1210 DATA 245,98,230,87,245,106,170,87 

,245,85,85,87,255,178,170,191,2771 

1220 DATA 255,170,170,191,255,170,170, 

191,255,255,255,255,255,155,255,255,22 

02 

1230 DATA 255,255,255,255,255,255,245, 

85,85,87,247,255,255,247,247,3,6918 

1248 DATA 248,55,244,0,192,7,244,128,1 

92,135,244,16,193,7,244,8,8405 

1250 DATA 200,7,244,0,192,7,246,3,240, 

39,247,170,234,183,247,255,5640 

1260 DATA 191,247,245,85,85,87,245,85, 

85,87,245,85,85,87,245,106,9406 

1270 DATA 170,87,245,102,226,87,245,10 

6,170,87,245,110,38,87,245,186,470 

1280 DATA 170,87,245,182,238,87,245,10 

6,170,87,245,98,230,87,245,106,2892 

1290 DATA 170,87,245,85,85,87,255,178, 

170,191,255,170,170,191,255,170,6515 

1300 DATA 170,191,255,255,255,255,0,15 

5,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,7682 

1310 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1310 

1320 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1320 

1330 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1330 

1340 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1340 

1350 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1350 

1360 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1360 

1370 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0, 

0,0,1370 

1380 DATA 0,155,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,0,1690 

1390 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1390 

1400 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1400 

1410 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,9,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1410 

1420 DATA 0,0,0,8,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1420 

1430 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,6,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1430 

1440 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,6,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1440 

1450 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,155,6, 

24,0,100,5390 

1460 DATA 4,6,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1476 

1470 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1470 

1480 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1480 

1490 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,6,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1490 

1500 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1500 

1510 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,6,0, 

0,0,1510 

1520 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,1520 

1530 DATA 0,0,0,0,155,0,0,0,6,0,0,0,0, 

0,0,0,2305 



PAGE 126 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



it H!. 



Oiv'SUlVIER 



mmmmtm If '^ 



June CES 

&^ 

The 8-bit Atari 



by Matthew J.W. Ratcliff 

At the June Consumer Electronics Show 
(CES), assignments were divided. My task 
was to cover 8-bit Atari news for ANALOG 
Computing, while Art Leyenberger han- 
dled the 16-bit systems for ST-Log. At the 
end of the first day, I noticed that Art had 
three large bags of "ST goodies" (press kits 
and review software). All I had was one 
little bag of 8-bit information. It seemed 
to me then that the 8-bit Ataris weren't far- 
ing so well. I was disheartened, but not 
discouraged. 

With some digging, I did find a lot of 
great stuff for the 8-bit Atari computers. 
Before continuing with the juicy details, 
I'd like to mention a few Interesting trends 
in the 8-bit realm. 

First, a lot of our long-time software sup- 
porters are dropping (or severely curtail- 
ing) 8-bit projects, in favor of ST develop- 
ments. It's interesting to note, however, that 
many continue to support the Commodore 
64 and 128 machines very strongly. 

This is what I found most distressing. 
Discussions with people from Epyx, Atari, 
and Microprose revealed the basic reason. 
The word piracy came up quite often. 

Bill Stealey, CEO of Microprose, stated 
that 'i\tarians are some of the most sophis- 
ticated computer users anywhere," and 
"they are the biggest pirates in the world." 
Sales figures don't lie, folks. 

Bill went on to say, "I know I get about 
one-fourth the units I used to get from a 
new release" for the 8-bit machines. This 
problem has driven many other software 
companies completely out of business — 
or, at least, out of the Atari market. 

Bob Botch, Vice President of Epyx mar- 



keting, said, "Everyone has problems with 
piracy, on all systems that they support." 
The decisions Epyx (or any manufacturer) 
makes to support a particular computer are 
based on the market. 

Right now, Conmiodore and Apple ver- 
sions are their hottest sellers, followed by 
IBM. Epyx has decided to port some soft- 
ware to the ST, to break new ground and 
test the waters for one of the hottest-selling 
systems on the market. Typically, once the 
software's running on the three top sellers, 
all other conversions are a matter of pri- 
orities for their programming staff, based 
on demand. 

While Bob Botch didn't single out any 
particular system as having the worst pira- 
cy problem, he did indicate that "the cur- 
rent lack of new titles for the 8-bits is due 
primarily to a significant drop in sales of 
the 8-bit Atari line." You'd expect sales to 
be increasing, when some sources say 
about 30,000 XEs per month are being 
sold. Where are consumers getting their 
software, if 8-bit software sales continue 
to plummet? 

Epyx is still supporting the 8-bits, as evi- 
denced by their new release of World 
Karate Championship. Their future de- 
velopments are also entirely dependent on 
sales, and less than half of their software 
titles for the C64 are currently plaimed for 
the XE. 

John Skruch of Atari Corp. explained to 
me that the company is going to disk-based 
software. The idea is to keep costs as low 
as possible and offer the product at a very 
reasonable price. Atari will continue to use 
copy protection, designed to stop the "cas- 
ual copier." The company feels that provid- 
ing quality software, such as Star Raiders 
n and Planetarium, at an affordable $19.95 



will improve sales and discourage piracy. 
John also stressed the importance of docu- 
mentation needed to use these programs 
(most notably Planetarium). Its necessity 
will encourage people to purchase the soft- 
ware, in order to get the most out of it. 

John expressed concern that prices for 
software are coming down, due to compe- 
tition and a lack of demand. This provides 
more value to the end user, but results in 
very slim profit margins . . .which makes 
software vendors even more vulnerable to 
piracy. 

Of coiirse, there's a piracy problem in ev- 
ery facet of the computer industry. How- 
ever, soiKces indicate more than twice as 
many C64s in the home as Atari 8-bits (be- 
fore taking over Atari, Mr. Tramiel did a 
good job of selling those little suckers). 
Since there are so many fewer Atari home 
computers out there, piracy hurts us much 
more. 

It's a simple fact of life. If software de- 
velopers can't make a reasonable profit on 
their product in the Atari 8-bit market, 
they will drop that product. If you don't 
want Atari 8-bit computers to die, buy your 
software — don't rip it off. Does lack of sup- 
port upset you? If you have any pirated 
software in your library, you have no right 
to complain. Enough said? 

New software trends. 

At the other end of the spectrum, I saw 
the Atari name in traditionally-Commo- 
dore software booths. Apparently, the 
Commodore's software market is becoming 
saturated. Due to the similarities between 
the XE and C64 (6502 microprocessor, 
sprites/player-missiles, similar graphics re- 
solutions, and so on), it's relatively simple 
to port software from the C64 to the XE. 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 127 




UI1.6 t^ll<i3 continued 



Many programs are now being offered 
on "flippy" disks, with the C64 version on 
one side, XE on the other. On every flippy 
disk I've come across, the XE version has 
always occupied the "B side," but at least 
we're getting some new software. There are 
some interesting new titles for the XE, 
ported directly from the Commodore 
world, which I'll cover later. 

Also interesting to note: software is no 
longer written by programmers only. Con- 
flict in Vietnam was created by Ed Bever, 
Ph. D. , a historian and former professor at 
Princeton. Many software developers, like 
Epyx and Microprose, have full-time ar- 
tists to develop visual effects for their game 
programs. As this trend continues, soft- 
ware quality will keep improving. Pro- 
grams are more than just the result of a 
hacker's many months of tedious work; 
they're true works of art. 

There has been a push in the ST mar- 
ket away from software protection, primar- 
ily due to the fact that hard disks are finally 
becoming widely available and affordable. 
If a program's protected , you can't usually 
back it up, or install it on a hard disk for 
convenience. As a result, we're beginning 
to see a new form of "protection" for the 
ST and 8-bit computers. 

Many new programs are very "documen- 
tation dependent." As Bill Stealey explain- 
ed. Micro Prose is dedicated to providing 
"more value and more documentation." He 
went on to say, "If a pirate rips off our 
product, he'll miss out on 80 percent of the 
functionality of that game without the 
docs." That's why Conflict in Vietnam 
gives you 110 pages of documentation — 
much more than a game-playing guide, it's 
an informative history lession. 

We've seen the same thing in Infocom 
games for some time now. What started to 
be a unique packaging approach has be- 
come a hallmark of excellence, associat- 
ed with the Infocom name. Infocom's new- 
er products have even more unusual pack- 
aging (3-D comic books and glasses), with- 
out their printed stories and unique para- 
phernalia, you may play an Infocom game, 
but you can't win. 

Awesome hardware. 

ICD, makers of Sparta DOS and the US 
Doubler, have done it again! They were giv- 
en a spot in the huge, bustling Atari dis- 
play area. Several new goodies were an- 
nounced, which will turn your XE or XL 
into a "turbo micro." Enough suspense — 
let's get on with it. 

Hardware hackers have been trying to 
add more and more RAM to the XE/XL 
lines. Some are up to over half a megabjrte 
in the 130XE, for some wild RAMdisks. 
ICD has gone one better, with their new 
Multi Function Input Output Board (MID]. 
This device has from 256K to 1 megabyte 
of RAM. 

But they didn't stop there. The MIO also 



has R; and P: interfaces built in. And, by 
the way, you can plug standard (SASI or 
SCSI) hard disks into it, as well — more 
than 100 megabytes! You can plug in as 
many as eight 16-megabyte hard drives (or 
partition larger drives into smaller logical 
drives) . 

The MID plugs into the 130XE, or the 
600XL (64K-upgraded) or 800XL compu- 
ters. (Sorry, 65XE owners, Atari forgot to 
put in your parallel bus connection.) It's 
a "parallel bus device." This means that the 
ROM software required to drive all these 
hardware goodies is built into the MIO 
board. When enabled, its software "over- 
lays" the Atari floating-point ROM. In oth- 
er words, these neat-o devices cost you no 
RAM. 

You want a printer buffer? Of course! 
The MIO's setup software lets you con- 
figure that 1 meg as RAMdisks, or RAM- 
disks and printer buffer. Up to 512K may 
be partitioned for the printer Spooler. 

If you still aren't satisfied, you'll be 
pleased to know that the MIO board will 
also give your hardware 80-column capa- 
bility. It will be a piggyback add-on board, 
to fit inside the MIO box. The box is about 
the same size as a 1050 disk drive, but half 
the height. The 80-colunm output will be 
in the form of composite video or TTL, the 
latter for IBM-style monitors. 

What are these goodies going to cost? 
The MIO will cost $199.00 for 256K, or 
$349.00 for 1-meg versions. The 80-column 
card will add less than $100.00 to that cost. 
It may be purchased separately and in- 
stalled by the user. 

ICD is now marketing affordable print- 
er and modem cables. These plug directly 
into yotir 850 or P:R: connection and your 
modem or Centronics interface printer. The 
cables sell for a reasonable $14.95. 

A rather unique cable is also planned by 
ICD. At one end will be the 8-bit's SIO con- 
nector, and at the other a Centronics print- 
er coimector. This Printer Connection will 
retail at under $40.00. 

How does it work? Simple: all the elec- 
tronics for this little gem are so small they 
fit inside the cable's connector! No soft- 
ware need be loaded to support it — it has 
all its smarts right in that connector. 

Atari demonstrated an interesting piece 
of hardware, the XEP80, an 80-column 
card for Atari 8-bits. This box has about 
the same "footpriat" as the 1050 disk drive, 
but is about a third as tall. It plugs into 
joystick port 1 or 2. You may plug an in- 
expensive monochrome monitor into the 
rear of the box, right next to its printer con- 
nector The XEP80 has a standard (IBM- 
style) printer connector, to which you can 
plug your favorite Centronics interface 
printer. 

The box is driven by a handler that boots 
from disk, costing you some RAM. It 
hooks into the E: driver, so you can use 
it right away. Without any extra software, 



it will work with BASIC and most other 
prograrmning cartridges. Unfortunately, it 
won't work with AtariWriter. I was in- 
formed that AtariWrit8r+ and Silent But- 
ler are being modified to support the 
XEP80. I expect PaperClip and SynCalc 
(which have closely followed Atari's other 
hardware improvements in the past — like 
extra RAM support in the 130XE) will be 
modified to support it, as well. 

The XEP80 display is fast. It has sharp, 
crisp characters and full screen-editing 
capability. Its 8K of RAM, internal to the 
box, can be used for custom character sets 
or screen flipping. I was informed by ICD 
that they'd do their best to make their MIO 
80-column card compatible with Atari's. 

After being assured at the West Coast 
Computer Faire that Atari was not planning 
a 1200-baud modem anytime soon, I heard 
open talk at CES about such a device. No 
model number or release date has been 
specified, but it will sell for under $100.00. 
Its SIO connector will hook up directly to 
8-bit systems, and it will have a standard 
RS232 port for 850- or P:R:-equipped 8- 
bits or STs. It will support the Hayes stan- 
dard command set for modem cormnuni- 
cations. 

While Atari talked about new hardware, 
Avatex and SmarTeam delivered. The 
SmarTeam 300/1200-baud modem is still 
selling for around $200.00. As stated in my 
review, it has minor communication prob- 
lems at 300 baud. A SmarTeam represen- 
tative told me a simple resistor change 
would fix that problem, but didn't say how 
current owners could get the update. 

The Avatex 300/1200-baud modem is 
currently selling (very well) for under 
$100.00. All reports I've heard indicate em- 
phasize its Hayes compatibility and relia- 
bility 

Atari was still talking about its new SVz- 
inch drive for 8-bit machines, but no re- 
lease date has been set. I think we'll hear 
something more definite at November's 
COMDEX. OSS is developing the DOS for 
it, and Bill Wilkinson cleared up the stor- 
age question for me. He said the disks will 
hold 320K, formatted. 

The new ADOS will be very high speed 
(about twice as fast as the 1050's) and ef- 
ficient. It will support subdirectories and 
many other sophisticated features. Bill also 
assured me that 1050s and these 3 'A -inch 
drives can be on the same system, with no 
problems. 

Epyx showed off a slick new joystick, 
whose cm-ved base fits neatly into your 
hand. With your left hand curled around 
the base, your index finger rests comfort- 
ably on the fire button. The short bat han- 
dle has a positive click to it and a very 
solid feel. No name, price, or exact release 
date has been set, but I'm told it's cinrent- 
ly the hottest-selling stick in England. 

Star Micronics showed several new 
printers at CES. Apparently, the SG-10 will 



PAGE 128 /SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



be discontinued in favor of the new NX-10 
and NL-10 versions. The first has a Cen- 
tronics interface, while the second can 
have parallel (Centronics), Apple lie, IBM- 
PC (still Centronics!), serial (RS232), or 
Commodore 64/128 interface "cartridges." 
They're as simple to install as putting a 
ROM cartridge in the Atari computer 

These printers are rated at 120 charac- 
ters per second draft mode, 30 in near- 
letter-quality. (The SG-10 also has NLQ 
capability.) I like the NLQ of the Epson 
FX85/185 printer; its characters have more 
of a "typeset" look. 

These new Star printers seem quieter 
and are supposed to have a 100-percent 
Epson-compatible mode. They sport new 
cartridge ribbons, too. Although much like 
the ribbons for Epsons, they aren't inter- 
changeable. That means replacement rib- 
bons for the >rX/NL printers will probably 
be harder to find, and mofe expensive. 

I was told by Brian Kennedy, manager 
of marketing services for Star Micronics, 
that all previous reviews of Star printers 
have knocked the printer for "messy rib- 
bon spools." I feel it's one of their nicest 
features, however. If that's your preference, 
then scarf up an SG-10, if you can still find 
one. 

COVOX demonstrated the Voice Master, 
with improved speech recognition capa- 
bilities. I was impressed to see it recog- 
nize the demonstrator's commands, despite 
the din in the Atari booth. Now included 
with Voice Master is Word Editor, which 
lets you edit the amplitude values of your 
digitized speech. 

COVOX is also marketing the Speech 
Construction Set, a full-blown speech edit- 
ing system, with features such as "cut and 
paste" among different voices. This com- 
panion software sells for $39.95. 

Pacemark showed a very interesting 
piece of hardware technology, the Falcon 
ACS box. It's a Centronics printer interface 
unit for multiple host computers (Atari or 
others), with which up to eleven personal 
computers can share one or two parallel 
printers. 

This intelligent box can automatically 
switch between host computers as they re- 
quire printer services. Each is allotted a 
different buffer area within the Falcon, and 
is spooled to the printer as it's available. 
A 4-button control panel and 16-character 
LCD display on the Falcon allow complete 
user control of priorities and printer- 
switching times. The unit is selling for 
$448.95 with 64K, $589.95 with 128K of 
buffer memory. 

Atari showed off its revamped 2600 and 
7800 game machines. The 7800 also sup- 
ports 2600 game cartridges. It still has a 
6502 engine under the hood, similar to a 
130XE, but has greatly enhanced player/ 
missile graphics capabilities. (Up to 100 lit- 
tle monsters can zap around the screen at 
a time.) 



One of the software titles I saw listed for 
the 7800 was Galaga. It's a far superior ver- 
sion of Galaxian, which didn't last long in 
the arcades, and was never very popular 
for the 8-bit systems. I certainly hope Atari 
releases a version of Galaga for the 8-bits. 
Call or write the company to ask for an 
one, if you want it — I do.' 

Zobian Software displayed The Rat (no 
relation to yours truly) , a mouse for your 
8-bit computer. It comes with a graphics 
program and cursor control routine. The 
product faces two major problems. First, 
it should be with a lot of software out for 
8-bits. Second, at $114.95, it costs more 
than most will pay for an XE computer sys- 
tem this year. 

New software. 

A company called Hi Tech Expressions 
demonstrated their new greeting-card soft- 
ware at the Atari booth. Their products, 
which follow the flippy trend, include 
CardWare, WareWithAll, HeartWare and 
PartyWare. 

CardWare creates birthday cards on 
your printer, or animated "greetings" disks. 
At a dirt cheap $9.95, I thought it would 
be a real bargain. But I found the anima- 
tions were simply Movie Maker files. If 
you already have Movie Maker, you won't 
see much new here. There are only three 
printer graphics to choose from. The soft- 
ware isn't user friendly, in that you can't 
cancel selections. Finally, I found the worst 
problem while printing a greeting card. 

I noticed the printer didn't feed much 
between graphic print lines. Close inspec- 
tion revealed that the graphic dump soft- 
ware uses only the bottom four of eight 
printhead pins. "Big deal!" you say? It is 
a big deal. 

I wrote some graphic dump software 
ages ago. Too lazy to map the graphics into 
eight pins at a time, I let it drive only the 
bottom two. Within a couple weeks, all my 
commas looked like periods; descenders 
on lowercase characters were fading out on 
my Gemini lOX. Within a month, my gra- 
phics dumper had literally destroyed the 
printhead (completely threw a pin out). 
The replacement cost $40.00! Using Card- 
Ware frequently could, potentially, do the 
same to your printhead. 

WareWithAll, at $14.95, is a package of 
colorful paper, envelopes, markers and 
more, to help you create unique greeting 
cards. The $9.95 HeartWare is, basically, 
CardWare with a Valentine's theme. Ac- 
cording to the ad, PartyWare can be used 
to create party decorations, start to finish. 
For $14.95, it will make banners, hats, 
placemats, games and more. 

Another company to show off its desk- 
top publishing prowess was Springboard 
Software Inc. They demonstrated some ex- 
tremely impressive alternatives to The 
Print Shop. Unfortunately, an Atari version 
is "not planned at this time." 



The company's number is (612) 944- 
3915. Give them a call if you'd like an Atari 
8-bit version of The Newsroom, Clip Art 
Collections, Certificate Maker, or Rainbow 
Painter. All of these are available for the 
Commodore 64. 

XLent Software had released PS Inter- 
face. A companion to The Print Shop, it 
lets you create fonts, put pictures into font 
characters and interface Typesetter graph- 
ics, as well. 

PS Interface will also convert graphics 
from The Print Shop into Typesetter icons. 
It provides picture disk management fea- 
tures. 

Also coming from XLent is David Plot- 
kin's Miniature Golf Construction Set. A 
public domain version was published some 
time ago. It was very popular back then, 
and this updated and enhanced version 
should do quite well. 

Broderbund had finally released The 
Print Shop Companion for the 8-bit Atari, 
formerly available only for Commodore and 
Apple computers. This program follows 
The Print Shop tradition in user friendli- 
ness and ease of use. The Companion has 
many features its predecessor was criti- 
cised for lacking. 

Epyx annoimced several new products, 
among which were the Movie Monster 
Game, the World's Greatest Baseball 
Game and Championship Wrestling. 
These are all in the works for the Commo- 
dore 64, but the no support is planned for 
Atari equipment at this time. If you want 
them, call or write Epyx (and, if they de- 
liver, buy the programs). 

Their Lucasfilm game Ballblazer was 
never the chartbuster Epyx expected, but 
"sold strongly and steadily for a long time," 
according to Noreen Lavoi, Public Rela- 
tions Manager. If the graphically spectacu- 
lar Koronis Rift and The Eidolon sell well, 
we might see more such excellent products. 

Epyx has combined Temple of Apshai, 
The Upper Reaches of Apshai and The 
Curse of Ra into one package, the Temple 
of Apshai Trilogy. Any of the games may 
be selected at the outset; all are on a sin- 
gle flippy disk. 

Epyx continued support of the 8-bits 
with their new World Karate Champion- 
ship, scheduled for release in July. I had 
an opportunity to play the C64 version at 
CES. Its graphics, haunting oriental melo- 
dy, sound effects and playability follow the 
Epyx tradition of excellence. Rather than 
explaining its play, I suggest you head for 
the local arcade. Plunk a few quarters into 
the Karate Champ machine, and you'll get 
a feel for just what you can expect (it only 
lacks the voice synthesis). 

Mastertronic, billed as the "world's fast- 
est growing software company," had over 
thirty titles for Commodore and has begun 
to port over to Atari. Currently, four 8-bit 
Atari titles are available: Vegas Poker and 
Jackpot, Last V-8, Action Biker and Kick- 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 129 




une CES 



continued 



V 



start. The price, on flippies, is a mere $9.99 
each! 

The object of Vegas Poker and Jackpot 
is self-explanatory; their play is not. The 
brief documentation on the package's back 
refers to function keys. Most 8-bits don't 
have function keys, however, so you have 
to figure out how to play on your own. 

The other three programs above all have 
superb, smooth-scrolUng graphics. In Kick- 
start, two motorcycle riders go head-to- 
head on a split-screen display. The object 
is to beat each other (or the clock, in single- 
player mode) across a racetrack full of 
ramps, water hazards, and more. If you get 
through the first circuit, you know what 
comes next? Right ... a tougher track. 
(This game is reminiscent of Aztec Chal- 
lenge, but far more sophisticated.) 

In Action Biker, you're a cycle rider in 
search of forty items, on your way through 
a 3-D screen of ramps, roadways, walls and 
water hazards. The 3-D effect and motor- 
cycle controls are very well done. 

I'm already addicted to this game. I find 
it amazing that, while scrolling along, you 
can actually ride up and around a ramp, 
and even jump fences. This is an impres- 



sive $9.95 game. And, if you get all forty 
treasures, you enter the iFinal drag race. 

The Last V-8 is a race against time, to 
return underground before your radiation 
shield decays. (I wonder if the name's a 
statement about the current U.S. auto in- 
dustry trend . . . ) In this one, you have an 
overhead view of your high-speed car. The 
controls take a while to get used to, but 
play is very fast. 

I have two overall complaints about 
these games. You can't interrupt and be- 
gin again with a START keypress. This has 
long been standard on 8-bit game software, 
but Mastertronic is a relative newcomer. 

Also, none of their games handles RE- 
SET properly. Rather than stealing the 
Atari RESET vector (so you're returned to 
the title screen), they make you reboot. If 
you get stuck in a frustrating game, you 
have to ride it out. 

Other titles coming from Mastertronic 
include Ninja, Speed King and Elektra 
Glide. In Speed King, race your motorcy- 
cle on world-class circuits against nineteen 
computer-controlled riders. 

Elektraglide is billed as a "fantasy rac- 
ing epic," where you "move at awesome 



speeds through 100 percent high-resolu- 
tion landscapes" on your Harley. Ninja is 
a martial arts simulation with "authentic 
multi combat fight routines." The Commo- 
dore 64 version at CES was lightning fast, 
with excellent graphics. Reminiscent of 
Bruce Lee movies, this promises to be a 
hot seller. 

Several software houses are beginning 
to take the 130XE's extra RAM very seri- 
ously. Paperclip 2.0 now supports the ex- 
tra memory with added buffer space for 
text, plus a built-in spelling checker called 
SpellPack (with a 36,000-word dictionary). 
You may create a supplementary file of 
words, too. 

Not only does PaperClip 2.0 support the 
130XE's four extra 16K banks of RAM, it 
will automatically recognize up to eleven 
more. It'll be great for you hardware hack- 
oholics out there, expanding the 130XE like 
crazy. If you have a registered copy of 
Paperclip, the upgrade will only cost 
$15.00. Contact Batteries Included for in- 
formation on their upgrade policy. 

Precision Software, a well-known com- 
pany in the Commodore realm, has re- 
leased its Superscript word processor for 



ATARI USERS' GROUPS 



N.W. Phoenix Atari Connection (NWPAC) 
P.O. Box 36363, Phoenix, AZ 85067 
Meetings; newsletter: Nybbles & Bytes. 
President: Jeff Wood. 

Modesto Atari Computer Club (MACC) 
PO. Box 3811, Modesto, CA 95352 
Meetings; BBS; newsletter President: Ray Lang. 

Hooked On Atari Computer Keyboard Society (HACKS) 
6055 Cahuenga Blvd., #2, North Hollywood, CA 91606 
Meetings; newsletter President: John Tarpinian. 

Chicagoland Atari Users Group (CLAUG) 

7454 N. Campbell Ave, Chicago, IL 60645 
Meetings; BBS; newsletter President: Pete Pacione. 

Indiana-Michigan Atari Group Exchange (IMAGE) 
RO. Box 1742, South Bend, IN 46634 
Meetings; newsletter President: Stephen EIek, Jr 

Midwest Atari Group, Iowa Chapter (MAGIC) 
PO. Box 1982, Ames, lA 50010-1982 
Meetings; BBS; newsletter: Runes. 
President: Al Henderson. 

Twin Cities Atari Interest Group (TAIG) 

3342 Humboldt Ave N., Minneapolis, MN 55412 
Meetings; newsletter President: Steve Engalsbe. 

The Jersey Atari Computer Group (JACG) 
14 Whitman Dn, Denville. NJ 07834 
Meetings; BBS; newsletter President: William Martin. 



Duncan Area Atari Computer Users (DAACU) 
Rt. 6, Box 313, Duncan OK 73533 
Meetings; newsletter President: Gary Bradley. 

Valley Atari Computer Club (VACC) 

110 Redbud Dr, Beaver Falls, PA 15010 
Meetings; newsletter President: Tom Mahady 

Greenville Atari Computer Enthusiasts (GrACE) 
508 Butler Spring Rd., Greenville, SC 29615 
Meetings; BBS; newsletter President: Gene Funderburk. 

Randolph Area Atari Users Group (RAAUG) 
PO Box 2611, Universal City TX 78148 
Meetings; newsletter President: Dale Johnson. 

Atari Computer Enthusiasts of Salt Lake City 
5522 Sarah Jane Dr, Kearns, UT 84118 
Meetings; BBS; newsletter: CompUtah. 
President: Jay Olson. 

First Atari Computer Club of Spokane (FACCS) 
PO. Box 5121, Spokane, 99205 
Meetings; BBS; newsletter President: Ron Hoffman. 

Packerland Atari Computer Users Societies (PACUS) 

(Three area users' groups) 

339 S. Maple, St., Kimberly, Wl 54136 

Meetings held every month by PACUS, APCUS and 

AAAcus; newsletter PACUS President: Peter Schefsky 

Edmonton Atari Computer Hobbyists (EACH) 

6220-111 Ave, Edmonton, Alberta Canada T5W 0L3 
Meetings; BBS; newsletter President: Rick Adelsberger 



ATTENTION USERS' GROUPS 
If you would like your organization to be listed here, send information (and newsletter, if appropriate) to ANALOG Com- 
puting Group Listing, PO. Box 23, Worcester, MA 01603. ANALOG Computing will not be responsible for errors. 



PAGE 130 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 




lUriG l^ll«»3 continued 



aoOXLs and 130XEs. The 130XE version 
gives you two edit windows; the 800XL, 
only one. 

It supports a 20,000- to 30,000-word, 
user-expandable dictionary. The disk is 
heavily protected (my first copy never 
would boot on my 1050), and backup co- 
pies cost $20.00 each. I suspect this pro- 
duct is too little, too late. It seems to me 
AtariWriter and PaperClip have already 
satisfied the needs of most 8-bit owners. 

Bill Wilkinson manned an OSS both in 
the Atari display area, giving demos of BA- 
SIC XL/XE, Action!, and more. Both BAS- 
ICS continue to sell very well. OSS's so- 
phisticated Writer's Tool has never done 
so, despite all its good reviews, due to its 
late arrival on the Atari market. Maybe 
we'll see it updated to support Atari's 80- 
colurmi card. 

If you want to learn assembly program- 
ming on your 8-bit Atari, I still contend 
that OSS MAC/65 is the world's fastest as- 
sembler on a micro. I highly recommend it. 

Microprose continues to support 8-bits, 
with chartbusters like Silent Service, F-15 
Strike Eagle and Conflict in Vietnam. Si- 
lent Service, with over 100,000 copies sold 
(all versions), is still strong. F-15 Strike Ea- 
gle has been updated with a "Libyan mis- 
sion." Conflict in Vietnam's historically 
accurate simulation teaches you about the 
realities and frustrations of that war. It's 
not just another Rambo-style shoot-'em-up. 

Gimship, a flight and battle simulation 
of the AH-64A Apache helicopter, was due 
out last November, but Bill Stealey said at 
CES it wasn't good enough then. So, at the 
risk of losing over a million dollars in revi- 
nue, it's still in the works. When it does 
hit the shelves, you can bet it'll be a su- 
perb product. 

In Destroyer Escort, you take on the role 
of convoy escort at the helm of a heavily 
armed destroyer, or a more lightly-equip- 
ped corvette vessel. This product is ex- 
pected in the fall. 

Another fall release from Microprose is 
code-named Condor It promises to be an 
exciting flight and combat simulator Al- 
though no particular aircraft model has 
been named, the fact sheet on this game 
shows a silhouette of an F-16 Falcon, the 
newest Air Force jet. 

Incocom introduced several new pro- 
ducts at their BYOB (Bring Your Own 
Brain) party. Two of these will be avail- 
able for the 8-bit models. 

Moonmist, by Stu Galley, is a gothic 
mystery set in a haunted Cornwall castle. 
The introductory- level game is targeted at 
women and men. Unlike other Infocom 
mysteries, this one gives clues if you get 
stumped. The idea is to introduce you to 
the joy and fantasy of interactive fiction 
gaming, while minimizing frustration. To 
ensure plenty of playtime, Moonmist has 
four different solutions for you. 

Certainly the most imique program ever 



created for the home computer is Steve 
Meretzky 's Leather Goddesses of Phobos. 

This 1930 science fiction spoof sends you 
"on an erotic romp through the solar sys- 
tem." It can be played in tame, suggestive, 
or lewd modes, equivalent to G, PG, and 
R movie ratings, respectively. Of course, 
you must be 18 to enter the R-rated level. 

A couple years ago, Steve put the title 
on a product chart just for a laugh. Since 
then, he reported, "hardly a week would 
go by without someone cracking a joke 
about (it)." True to Infocom's unique pack- 
aging style, Goddesses comes with a 3-D 
comic book and glasses, a secret map, and 
a "scratch and sniff card— all integral to 
the game. These should help deter piracy, 
while adding warmth and humor. 

Also shown was Infocom's earlier re- 
lease, Ballyhoo. Here, the circus you've en- 
tered isn't just glitter and glamour; you're 
plunged into a mysterious world of crime 
and corruption. While meeting some of the 
circus's rather unusual personalities, you 
must try to solve puzzles to save the own- 
er's kidnapped daughter 

Artworx exhibited their many afford- 
able educational and action games. The 
Linkword Language Series lets you learn 
a foreign language "in just ten hours." Ver- 
sions include Spanish, French, German 
and Italian, with a second level of Russian 
and French planned for future release. 

Linkword teaches foreign words with 
imagery, associating them with similar 
sounding EngUsh words. An audio tape ac- 
companies each version, to help you with 
proper pronunciation. Each language pack- 
age sells for $24.95. 

Some other 8-bit Artworx titles, for less 
than $25.00 each, include Bridge 4.0, Hole- 
In-One Golf, Monkeynjath, Monkeynews 
(a program to improve reading skills), Peg- 
ganunon (backgammon) and Cycleknight 
(an action-adventure motorcycle race). 

Atari is a bit behind schedule, but Si- 
lent Butler, Star Raiders 11 and Planetari- 
um are finally out for 8-bits. 

Silent Butler, a personal and home fi- 
nance program, was shown at the 1985 
CES in 1985, but, as of this writing, is still 
not available. Now that the 80-column card 
is almost a reality, I expect the Butler is 
being held up for 80-column support. 

Main Street Publishing is marketing 
classic Atari software, at an average price 
of only $6.00. If you're a relative newcomer 
to the 8-bit realm, this would be a great 
place to stock up on software at superb 
prices. 

Microcomputer Games, a division of 
Avalon Hill, annoiinced eight forthcoming 
titles. Only two are planned for 8-bit mo- 
dels at this time. 

Spitfire 40 is a World War II aircraft 
game and flight simulator, with a $35.00 
price tag. Guderian is a WWII simulation 
of the German blitzkrieg, due this October 

Datasoft continues to support Atari 8-bit 



computers with several new titles. Yie Ar 
Kung Fu is expected by the end of the year, 
another in the growing base of karate and 
kung fu simulation games. 

Three graphics-assisted adventure 
games coming from Datasoft include 221 
Baker Street (a Sherlock Holmes who- 
done-it). Mercenary (with 3-D mazes and 
flight simulations) and GunsUnger. 

A unique software product this year 
(maybe the most unusual hardware, for 
that matter) was shown in its very early test 
version — the SpartaDOS X cartridge. It's 
to be a 32K ROM piggyback cartridge for 
the 8-bits. It will plug into the computer 
directly, and any program cartridge will 
be able to go on top of it (and be stacked 
on the RTIME cartridge, a computing tower 
of power). 

The complete 13K of SpartaDOS 3.2d 
will be incorporate many of the most use- 
ful command files. Among some of the car- 
tridge's unique features: a combination 
menu and command processor. If you 
need the menu, you'll simply press RE- 
TURN at the prompt of the command 
processor The menu will pop up, and all 
SpartaDOS commands may be executed 
from here. To help you learn the DOS, any 
menu selection will print to the screen — 
as you'd have entered it into the command 
processor. 

The DOS works with ICD's MIC board, 
of course, and had no problems relinquish- 
ing control to any cartridge piggybacked 
on it (even the OSS super cartridges). It 
will support the SVz-inch drives coming 
from Atari, as well as the high-speed I/O 
feature on Indus GT drives. 

This promises to the the fastest DOS ever 
built for the XL/XEs. At a price of $79.95, 
it's expected in September 

At CES, I had an opportunity to inter- 
view the men from ICD. In that article 
(next issue), you'll find many more tech- 
nical details about the SpartaDOS X car- 
tridge and the other new products coming 
from ICD. 

The end. 

This year's CES saw many new products 
for the 8-bit Atari computers, with new 
companies providing some software. ICD 
and Atari Corp. are overwhelming us with 
powerful new hardware. 

Things are faring well for 8-bit owners, 
overall. Just remember, if you want con- 
tinued support, buy the software. It's a 
matter of survival for the best 8-bit com- 
puters ever built! H 



ANALOG COMPUTING 



SEPTEMBER 1986 / PAGE 131 




]ME 



DCHannmii^ 





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PAGE* 



117 
121 
114 
102 
113 

157 
118 
104 
125 
119 
144 
128 
131 
149 
156 
108 
115 
150 
140 
134 
135 



110 
103 
127 

147 
109 
123 



Abacus Software 50ST, 83ST 

Access Software 58ST 

Allen Macroware 35 

Alpfia Systems 3 

American TV 28 

ANALOG Computing 84ST, 92, 119, 132 

Batteries Included OBC 

Bayview Software 54ST 

B&C Computervision 10, 14 

Beckemeyer Development Tools 65ST 

CAL COM, INC 54ST 

Canoe Computer Services 99 

Central Point Software 66ST 

Commnet Systems 72ST, 82ST 

Compucat 113 

CompuServe IBC 

Computability 16, 17 

Computer Creations 37 

Computer Games Plus 113 

Computer Garden 94 

Computer Mail Order 77ST, 90 

Computer Palace 80ST 

COVOX Inc 22 

Delphi/ANALOG Computing 92 

Electronic One 24 

Happy Computer 5 

InSoft, Corp 66ST 

Jesse Jones 48 

Lyco Computers 110 

Magna Systems 23 

Megamax 61ST 



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101 
111 
122 
141 
146 
124 
136 
143 
137 
142 
120 
139 
153 
130 
133 
126 
105 
154 
148 
106 
112 
132 
129 

116 
152 
146 
155 
107 
145 





63ST 




IPC 


MicroCube 


25 


Micro Illusions 


59ST 


MicroMiser 


94 




109 




65ST 




81ST 


New Horizons Software 


96 




82ST 




96 




56ST 


Protecto 


86, 87, 88, 89 


Reeve Software 


125 


Regent Software 


70ST 


Rosetta Stone Software 


75ST, 82ST 


Serious Software 


65ST 


Sierra Services 


9 




125 




112 


Sourceflow 


14 


Southern Software 


27 


T.DI 


72ST 


Terrific Peripfierals 


.TOST 




69ST 


Wedgwood Rental 


47 




122 


World Trade 


106 




125 


Xetec 


14 


XLent Software 


101 



This index is an additional service. While every effort is made to provide a complete and accurate listing, the publisher cannot be responsible for inadvertent errors. 



^"AcjM ■ """^^^mc 






/rS ALL 
IN THE DISK 



NO 
PROGRAMMING 









Since issue 1, ANALOG Computing 's disl< subcrip- 
lions have eliminated the need for you to spend hours 
typing in programs from ttie magazine. All of the pro- 
grams in the magazine are on the disk version. A 1-year 
subscription (12 issues) is $130.00; a Vs-year (6 issues) is 
$72.00. To subscribe on disk, send your check or money or- 
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19043. For faster service, call our toll-free U.S. order line: 
:...n .-, ,.- <>..„ ,:„ .-,., „^ji 800-662-2444} 



PAGE 132 / SEPTEMBER 1986 



ANALOG COMPUTING 




USE The brains Your Amm 

wasnT Born WTTft 



Right at your fingertips 
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Our Atari Forums involve tiiousands 
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The Atari 8-bit Forum provides the 
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Devoted exclusively to users of the 
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The Atari Developers Formn is the 
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CIRCLE #156 ON READER SERVICE CARD 



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CIRCLE #157 ON READER SERVICE CARD