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Full text of "Amiga Shopper Magazine Issue 16"

r 



EXPERT ADVICE • TOP TIPS • BEST BUYS • 



MORE FACTS^*^^^ 




Does Hotlinks make laying out pages with 
Pagestream a doddle? DTP: page 81 



ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 • £1.50 • YOUR DEFINITIVE GUIDE 



I 



JUII'M 



ow to use your Amiga to add top-notch 
titles to your home videos, ..Video: page 73 



Got Gajits' Sequencer One? - then you 
should check out Hit Kit MIDI: page 122 



I 



s easier than you think to program a 
neural network on your Amiga, ..Al: page 44 



L 



Save on phone bills ~ set up your own 
Amiga bulletin board!........Comms: page 86 



All the latest low-cost and no-cost software 
PLUS where to get fonts PD: page 141 

WANTED! 

" your problems 
We just love ^em! 

Nothing's too tough for 




A 




JljJjjJjijlJ 
Beginner or expert - 



Your unmissable collection of 
' essential Amiga advice 

3D Graphics, Printers, Music, BASIC 
Hard disks. Scanners, Accelerators... 



we've got the solutions - Tbe tOO 200 StOftS Oil p16 




HOW 10 GET 10 GRIPS WnH 



Jtm 



uiure 



Your guarantee ot value 



770961 "73002S 



08 




Commodore 




The new compact a600 from Commodore 

Built-in TV modulator 
' Workbench & Kickstart 2 
I Enhanced chip set 
' 1MB of chip RAJM 
j IDE hard disk controller built-in 
^ Credit card size RAM & ROM slot 

A600 i399 

A600 with 20MB £499 
, A600 with 40MB i599 
' A600 with 80MB i699 

^k600 IVIennory Cards 

. New RAM boards for the Commodore A600 APOA 

, IVl isce 1 1 a neous 



%^ 



IMew PC880B 

Now with X-Copy Professional! 

Power Computing have teamed up with Cachet 
of Germany to bring you the ultimate in disk 
backup systems, 

The new PC880B disk drive can be used directly 
with the X-Copy Professional 'Cyclone' software 
without any extra cables or interfaces. 
j^- This gives you the the power and reliabilit>' of the 
proven 'Cyclone' backup sofrware with the conve- 
nience of the PC880B floppy drive, 

, So now you can have two backup systems 'Blitz' 
■ and 'Cyclone' available at the touch of a button! 
^ And the PC88flB still has our unique switchable 
^,. anti-virus mode, preventing all write accesses to 
K^ the bootblock of your floppy disks! 

If you all ready own a PC880B, and the Cyclone 
copier, a hardware upgrade is available to take 
; your drive up to the latest specification. 

^ New PC880B with Blitz & X-Copy *90.00 
[Jf New PC880B (Cyclone compatible) i75.00* 
|Q|S Cyclone hardware upgrade for existing PC880B 
V owners £15.00 

' *Thi.s drive is jVLiilLihlc i>nlv lo KtGlSTERED owners oi X-Cupv 

a-, 

Ci ProfcsAioniil. You musl provide prt>of t)f purfharic ot X-Cupy 

PC880 Disk drive £49-95 



PC501+ RA,IVI Card 

I Our RAM board is designed specially for the new 

! A500+ computer and coines with 1MB of K/\M on Ixard 
to expand your memory to 2MB of chip ll\M. Plug in 

■ and go operation (fits into trapdoor). 
'^., Gives you a loLil of 2MB of chip RAM £49 
te 32 chip RA.M card £59-95 

8 IVl B for any A500 




-^ Plugs into side slot 
^ Fully auto config 

Full thni'port 
j^ Expand 2MB-8MB 



N 



2MB 
8MB 



£129 

£299 



4MB £189 

1 X 4Zip £19.95 






2IVIB for any 



A.500 

'Sa'/ Economy 2MB RAM externally cased 
■M 16-Chipaxl DIP) 



Nothru'port £99-95 



Board 



\ 

) 10 Maxell disks, optical mouse, Zipstick £45 
, Power Mouse £15 

Optical Mouse £29.95 
' Replacement optical mouse mat £9-95 

A500 Plastic dust cover £9 

Maxell multi colour branded disks (Bos of ten) £9-95 

Floppy disks bulk £POA 



Blitz Amiga 

Back up disks at lightning speed 
Stops all external drives from clicking 
Contains anti-vims from Ix'ing written into the 
bootblocker £20 



^ PC881 A500 Internal drive £40.00 
^ PC882 A2000 Internal drive £45 
%^ A500 Internal anti-click board £9.95 

Spacial upgrade 

offer! 

g% If you consider your scanner system to be inferior 
^^ to the Power Scanner, we will happily upgrade 
your .software and interface for only £49.95 

( Power .Suanner i.s t:c)mp-jlii)te with mtjsl .seanninj^ heads.} 



ta 



1 .5IVI B RAM 

I Plugs easily into your Amiga 
i Fully supports 1MB chip RAM 
Fully compatible with Fatter Agnus £79 

j (Kictaait 1.3 anJ above, not compatible with AiO0+) 

' fYnur Amig;-] nfc;cjs to lie opened, this may effect your warratity) 

IMB wi-th Thru'port 

Expand your A500's memory to a total of 2MB withoLtt 
disposing of your existing 51 2K upgrade. Works witli 
"^ 1MB of chip RAM, simple internal fitting. £49.95 

512K IMA miisl be 4 chip type, or not exceeding 'km in length.) 
(Your Amiga neeJs to he iipeneii, this may cfrect your warranty) 



^ 



^J^j A500 RAM Card 

"""j^ il2K RAM expansion with battery backed dock and a 
te^ fi'ee disk paclced with useful software C4 chip Rj\M) £29 
IM 51 2K RAM card without cltKk £24 
<feSi| 16 chip RAM card with clock £24 
"^ 16 diip RAM card wititout clock *19 

(A5t)0+ compaltble) 



^^ 




2MB £129 



Aries RAM 

A 1 5OO/A2 0OO 

4MB £169 6MB £209 8MB £249 



^W 



"feiit^^S^ T'''^; ^"^ 



Send your order to Power Computing Ltd, Unit 8 Raikon Road, Woburn Road Industrial Estate, Kempsum, Bedford MK42 7PN 
Ring your credit card order through on 0234 843388 {10 lines) or Fax on 0234 840234 Technical helpline 0234 841882 

All prices include VAT, clc!ivt.-ry and art- suhfcl to change, .Specific-ations bk subject to change witiiout notice. Next day dcliverj'-Jt^i JO (U.K. mainland only), all lt:adeniark.s acknowledsed 



DIstrilHilDr for Power Cojnpuliitg in ll^ly, D.R.K ,SI{L 00142 t^rnia. 
Via Uua-io l>i liuiminsfj'm. 2J Tel (061 ^IMlSl.'lSJ fas "^w™/* 



Power ComputluR France. 1^ ISkI Vnliain.' 7^tlt I, l^lis, FrjnCL' 
"I'd ( 1 1 ijiJUlfi'* Id liws) Ivis 1 1 1 l.l.iWUlS 



ftiwer Computlnfj C.SJL. il SiMli "vili Sin.T.1. Suite 000, l'tiilaileli>lii;i. PA 1911* 
Tet 21^ n2 OOSO Fas 111 Vll lllll. 



.%n rv 



/* VC' .. .^c»\e53ii*A,> A* ;>r^ „>* vp^vo>.«st^' 



WELCOME 



mm. 


9' 


AT A GLANCE 


0UIDE 




To help you find what you want 


quickly and easily, this is a cross- 


referenced list of all the products 


and subjects covered in this 




montii's Amiga Shopper. The 


subjects covered in Amiga Answers 


are detailed on page 45; the many 


PD programs covered on page 146 


are listed there. The page numbers 


given are for the first page of the 


article in wiiich the product 


s 


mentioned. 




A570 


139 


A600 


13 


Amiga Answers 


47 


AmigaDOS 


92 


AlWOS 


98 


Artificiai tntelligence 


42 


Bulletin boards 


86 


Buying advice ' 


151 


CD-ROM 


137 


CDTV 


137 


Comms 


86 


Competition 


154 


Desktop publishing 


81 


DTP 


SI 


Education 


7S 


For sale 


140 


Graphics 


16 


HAMA 290 genlock 


76 


Hit Kit 


126 


Hotlinks 


61 


Letters 


13 


Listings 


70 


Mail Order 


135 


MIDI 


122 


Modems 


86 


Music 


122 


Neural networks 


42 


News 


7 


PageStream 


61 


Product Locator 


152 


Professional Calc 


131 


Programming 70.108 | 


Public domain 


141 


Reader ads 


140 


Scala 2,0 


139 


Shareware 


141 


Shades 


61 


SID 2.0 


141 


Smoothtalker 


76 


Spellbound 


78 


Subscriptions 


114 


Talking Shop 


13 


User groups 


112 


Video 


73 


Word Processors 


16 


Are there any products or 


subjects you'd like us to 


take a look at? Well, 


just 


drop a line to: 




Amiga Shopper, 




30, Monmouth Street, | 


Bath BAl 2BW. 





WELCOME 




espite last month's somewhat surprising 
I news that Commodore had decided to 
' cease production of the A500 and 
concentrate on a new range represented 
byXUe entry-level A600, there's still no news on 
what might fill the gap between that machine and 
the A3000. Commodore has always refused to 
speculate on new machines before they're 
launched - even to the point where the first you 
hear about them is someone ringing in to say that 
they've just bought one in Dtxons or wherever! But 
they will go so far as to intimate one is on the way 
and it seems pretty certain, talking to developers, 
it's a replacement for the A2000. 

ff you look at the letters pages this issue you'll 
soon see what the majority of readers think about 
the decision. Throughout my replies I've tried to 
stress that I personally believe all is not doom and 
gloom. Neither Commodore, its developers nor 
third party manufacturers and publishers are likely 
to dump a machine range that's sold 1.2 million 
units in the UK alone. That the A500 is no longer 
the state of the art is unquestionable - it's just 
that its replacement leaves a lot to be desired. 



Commodore would have 

been much better off 

delaying the decision to 

cease production of the 

A500 until a new 

machine with a faster 

processor had been 

brought to market. That 

way it could have saved 

a considerable amount 

of face. As It is, it has 

lost credibility. 

So, in this big meanwhile, what's a poor A500 

owner to do? Hang on in there! Buy the new chip 

set so you're assured of future software 

compatibility, wait for someone to release an 

adaptor which'll let you hook up forthcoming A600 

peripherals... and relax! 



\ 



j\fisu S|oMir 



m^mam 



HARD DRIVING 

There are thousands of Amiga programs which are 
available for little more than the price of a disk. And 
many more which allow you to try the software free 
before you buy. Each month \n Public Domain World 
we examine the best of these programs and explain 
how to get hold of them. 

This month our resident PD sampler, Ian Wrlgley, 
scans through his latest batch to focus on SID 2.0 
the great hard disk manager and samples a whole 
bunch of new fonts. Public Domain World or... 

cor baby that's nearly free... 

as we call it, starts on page 141 



13 PAGES DEVOTED EXCLUSIVELY TO 
ANSWERING YOUR QUESTIONS 

Every month In Amiga Answers our panel of experts 
answer more genuine reader questions than any 
other Amiga magazine. And for be^nners our easy 
Expert Tips will help you get to grips with your 
Amiga, and understand the other features in this 
month's issue. 

We answer questions every month on 
Workbench • The CLi • Comms • Programming • 
DTP • Video • Business software and more. 



THE ANSWERS START ON PAGE 47 



FOR A FULL LIST OF CONTENTS, TURN THE PAGE 



This maiazine comes from Future PuWtshing, a 
company founded just seven years ago, but which 
now sells more computer magazines ttian any 
other pubfisher in Britain. We offer; 

Better advice. Our ttties are packed with tips^ 
suggestions and explanatory features, witten by 
the best ii> the business. 

Stronger reviews. We have a cast-iron policy of 
editorial independence, and our reviews give clear 
buying recomntendations. 

Clearer design. You need solid information, and 
you need it fast. So our designers highlight key 
elements in the articles by using charts. 



Your guarantee of value 



diagrams, summary boxes, annotated 
photographs and so ori. 

Greater relevance. At Future, editors operate 
under two golden roles: 

• Understand your readers' needs. 

• Satisfy them. 

More reader interaction. We draw strong^ on 
readers' confribuhons, resulting in the liveliest 
letters pages and ti>e best reader tips. Buying one 
of our magazines is Ske joining a nationvnde user 

group. 

Better value for money. More pages, better 
quality: magazines you can trust. 




Tbe home of Britain's finest computer magazines; 

Amiga Shopper • Amiga Format • Amiga Power 

* Public Domain ■ Commodore Format 

•PCW Plus* PC Plus 

ST Format • Your Sinclair • Sega Power 

Amstrad Action ■ F^ Answers • PC Formal 

Mountain Biking UK • Needlecraft • Classic CO 

• Cycling Plus • Photo Plus • Total! 
and millions of other top-sellers in the pipeline 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE T 6 • AUGUST 1 992 



LOWEST PRICES GUARANTEED! 




CORTEX Va Mb RAM 

EXPANSION 
for the Amiga A500 

Essential A500 upgrade- 1Mb Amiga IS 

^s— •«-',^^— '^ 
AS01 ■ Lower power iMbil DHAm Ldiw 

■Fatter AOfiLis' compatible tot IMD onij 
S-Xpro«te enable/disable swrtoh- 

Sabl^inorwitbo..bane^-backad 

clocW calendar module- 

CLOCK £22.95 



£17.95 



\ 




GVP 8Mb RAM EXPANSION 

lor the 
Amiga A1500/A2000 

Fully implemented aut°-'=°Jffi 
. Zero wait states • Uses 1M x 9bit 
Q^X 2.4. or 8Mb configurations. 



2Mb £159.00 




ROM SHARERS 

E.en,ial.f.-de.era,l^^^^^^^^ 
(Winers f"™'f(]fKi*start HOMS • 

RdM sockets to allow for r jfcJHLUl 

future expansion. BTi TTf 

fts above but witti rJt; t:H 

2 position sliile switdh K 11 Ff CM 

KICKSTART ROMS 




i 



CORTEX 8Mb RAM EXPANSION 
for the Amiga A500/A1000 

The ONLY RAM upgrade approved by Commodore UK • 
Fully compatible with A500 plus for 10Mb maximum RAM • 
External fitting (Warranty remains intact) • Through port 
(covered by blanking plate) • Fully implemented auto- 
configure • Zero wait states • Compatible with A590 and all 
major hard disks • UsesIM x 8bit or 1M x 9bit SIMMs • 
Complete with its own power supply unit (UK, US, or 
EURO} • FullyAIOOO compatible • RAM test software. 



2Mb I 4Mb I 8Mb 

£185.00 1 £241. 00 1 £353.00 



CORTEX 1 Mb 

MODULE 
FOR A500 plus 

Gives 2Mb CHIP MEM • 
f-unctional equivalent to A501 
plus ' Ultra low power design • 
LOW component count for 
maximum reliability • Available 
populatedtoV^MBorlMB 



1/2 Mbl 1 Mb 
£25.95l£39.95 



GVP IMPACT SERIES 2 
HARD DISK WITH RAM 

(A500HD8-t-) 

52Mb Hard disk system with up to 
8Mb of RAM ■ Factory-fitted 
Quantum Pro-drive, 11ms access 
Uses 1M X 8bit SIMMs (see RAM 
CHIPS section for prices) ■ Game 
switch (hard drive disable) and power 
supply. 



^^«^■ 



240Mb 
£359.00l£499.00l£799.00 



Other GVP products availble: call for prices 




EXTERNAL FLOPPY-DRIVE 

High-quality silent mechanism • 
Tnrouqh-port • Enable/disable 
switch. 



ENHANCED CHIP SET 
(E.C.S.) UPGRADES 



£36.95 



£34.95 



8372A 

Fatter Agnus 
8373 
Super Denise 




£47.95 



MegaChip 2000 with Super 
Agnus (allows 2Mb to be 
fitted to A500/15On/?nnfli 



A500/1 500/2000) 

SeeXICKSTART ' 

RO/iflS' for ROM 
upgrade. 



£199.00 



GVP 

Full range available including new mini-slot 

AT-Emulator. 

NB. Price promise applies! 



RAM CHIPS 




PRICE PROMISE 

Cortex will match any genuine price olfered by one of our U.K. competitors on 

goods thai are in sKtxk on a iiite-for-iike basis. This offer appiies at the time of 

purchase only and does not apply to prices offered in saies of banknjpt stock, 

clearance or ciosing down sales. 

2 YEAR GUARANTEE 

Ail product bearing the Cortex brand name carries a 2-year gjarantee. Other 

products in this advertisment cany a 1 year guarantee. 

Ail prices include VAT and postage & pacliaging. All products shipped same day 

where possibie. Allow 14 days lor delivery if ordering by cheque. Make cheques/ 

P.O.'s payable to CORTEX.. 



1Mx8bitSllWMS(fof 
Cortex.GVPelo) EACH 

4M X 8 bit SIMMS (for 
GVP etc} EACH 

256KX4M DIPS (for ASM, 
2091 ICD etc) EACH 

1MxlbftDIPs(forolder 
A2000 cards) EACH 

1Mx 4 bit sialic- column 
mode 2Ps (for A3000} 

EACH 





DEPT AS, CORTEX DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY LTD, BRITANNIA BUILDINGS, 
46 FENWICK STREET, LIVERPOOL L2 7NB. • 24 HOUR SALES 

TELEPHONE: 051-236 0480 24 HOUR FAX: 051-227 2482 



CONTENTS 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 



AMIGA SHOPPER 
Issue 16 August 1992 
Editor: Andy Storer 
Deputy Editor: Cliff Ramshaw 
Layout Sub-Editor: Diana Taylor 
Productiort Editor: Alison Harper 
Consultant Editors: Jeff Walker, 
Mark Smiddy 
Contributors: Jason Hoiborn, Paul 
Overaa, Gary Whiteiey, Ptiil Harris, 
Ian Wrigiey, Pfiilip Gladwin, Jolyon 
Halpti, Toby Simpson, Wilf Rees 
Guest Composer: J S Bach 
Ad Manager: Margaret Clarke 
Senior Ad Sales Executive: 
David Eckett 

Production: Ricfiard Gingell 
Production Teciinlcians: 
Simon Windsor, Chris Stocker, 
Jerome Clough 

4ssfst3nf Fublistjer: Stuart Anderton 
Circulation Director: Sue Hartley 
Promotions Manager: 
Michele Harris 
Group Publishing Director: 
Greg Ingham 
ABC audited circulation: 
July-December 1991: 
45,209 copies/ month 
Printed by Redwood Press 
News Trade Distribution - 
UK: Future Publishing 0225 442244 
Worldwide: MMC Ltd 0483 211678 

This magazitve is copyright © 1992 
Future Publishing Ltd. No part of this 
magazine may be reproduced without 
written permission. We welcome 
contributions for publication but regret 
that we cannot return any submissions. 
Any correspcndencR will be considered 
for publication unless specifically stated 



30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA12BW 

Tel: 0225 442244 : Fax: 0225 446019 

E-mail: amsliopper ©clx.compulink 

Advertising 

Rayner House, 23 Higher Hillgate, 

Stockport SKI 3ER 

Tel: 061-474 7333:Fax: 061-476 3002 

Sudscffpt/ons 

The Old Barn, Somerton TAll 7PY 

Tel: 0458 74011 

So how about ' ' 

subscription then chaps? - 

want you to do Is send us tt.. .... 

actor who the glille, who staned in the 
HollrwDod movie referred to (n these pages, 

tell in love with In that Dim. Yo — "-— 

Just send It In to: *l go into a s 
thinking about her in that chiffon diess', 
Shopper, 30, frton mouth St, Bath, BAl 2BW. 
Rrst out the hag wins 02 free issues . 
— ■ — ' ■--* ■-■- -■ 35 NP Wilson - 



News 



7 AtnigaDOS 



98 



If the demise of the A500 wereti't enough, we now hear 
rumours that Nintendo plans to buy Commodore! 



Talking Shop 13 

A500 R.I.P. SPECIAL 

You respond to Commodore's decision to 
cease production of its most popular Amiga... 
nnd there's flak flying left, right and centre! 



Artificial Intelligence 42 

The third part of our new series revealing the secrets of 

neural networks and practicai At progrannming 




TOP TIPS 16 



The bluest collection of hancty Amiga advice ever 
published with sections full of essential tips on: 

• printers • desktop video • 2D & 3D graphics 

• hard drives • word processors • Workbench 

• RAM expansion • DTP • sound sampling 

• BASIC • comms • accelerators • Shell 

• C • scanning • music composition 

• spreadsheets and Assembler.,. Phew! 

Are these twenty pages you can afford to miss? 



DIY Li$tings 



70 



How to write your own Search and Repiace text utility 
courtesy of reader, and £20 winner. Fu Sang Li 



Video 



73 



How to get the most from a video titiing package PLUS: 

HAMA's new 290 gentocl< put through its paces 



Education 



78 



We show you the best way to present your data, graphs 
and stats PLUS: How to improve your spelling 



Desiitop publishing 

Jeff Walker checks out whether the Hotlinks data 
exchange system for PageStream does the biz 

The world of Comms 

Let the Amiga world come to you! We show you the easy 

way to set up your bulletin board 



Why bother buying an off-the-shelf appointments scheduler 
when yoy can code your own the easy way! 



AMOS 



108 



More tips on better AMOS programming PLUS: how you 
can win a free copy of the forthcoming AMOS Professiona! 



Programming 



108 



Cliff Ramshaw continues his BASIC attempts to beat his 
Amiga at Noughts and Crosses 



AMIGA ANSWERS 47 

A problem shared is a problem solved! 
13 PAGES of your worst nightmares 
diagnosed by our unrivatled panel of 
experts. Absolutely nothing's too tough 
for these guys - just try 'em! 



Expert Tips 1 1 9 

How to choose the programming language for your needs 



MIDI Music 



122 



Can Gajit's Hit Kit add-on for its popular Sequencer One 

package make your music composition a cinch? 



Business 



131 



is Professional Calc from Gold Disk, the successor to 
Advantage, the only Amiga spreadsheet you'll ever need? 



Amiga CD 



138 



Andy Storer looks at a new easy-to-use CDTV authoring 
system which could make you a lot of money 




PfllJIS IDETW 



Public Domain World 141 

Couid all your hard disk problems be solved for free 
with SID 2.m PLUS: where to get hold of oodles of 
fonts - well 281 anyway - for next to nothing 



81 Product Locator 



137 



We rate all the Amiga hardware on the market in this easy 
access, at-a-glance guide to the top products 



87 Win Easy AMOS! 



154 



Yep, we have 15 copies of this programming package to 
give away. All you have to do is answer 3 easy questions! 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1 992 



lUeSeruc 



of Hampshire Established 7 years 



NEW 

Amiga Workstation 
/Expansion System 

Monitor stand with shett for drives etc. 
Strong metal construction made from 
1 4SWG steel epoxy coated Amiga 

°°^^' ^ *-* /-\ 

Special price L. ^ / ■ S3 U 



New Price 



Citizen 224 

24pin Co/our* 

Enhanced 24ptn printer, * optional colour 

with oasy to use control pane^ 
2 year warranty. Pt'ice with cab^e & paper 

Mono £209 
Cobur £219 

Amiga printer driver £5.00 



Midi Interface 

4 channel Midi Interface for Amiga 

£29 

Dr. T's Midi Music Software 

(rat su itable for A500 + 1 £9.95 



All Citizen printers have 
2 year warranty 



Swift 24E 

Enhanced 24pin, Colour printer 
with cable & paper 

£269 



Citizen Swift 9 

with cable & paper 

Mono £1 69 
Colour £1 79 



Citizen 120D + 

with cable & paper 

£119 



Panasonic 
KXP1123 

Probablv the best 24pin mono 
prir«er available. With cable & paper 

£179 



New Price 



HP 

Deskjet Colour 

300dpi colour Inkjet printer. 
Colour laser quatity at 1/10 of the cost 
3 vear warrarty. Price with cable 8i paper 

£529 

Deskjet 500 

HP 300dpi Inkjet printer. Laser 

qualitv at dot matrix price. 

3 year warranty. With cable & paper 

£359 

Printer Drivers 

Citizen Swift Colour ..... 5.00 

Canon BJ-lOe 4.95 

Deslciet 500 Colour 9.95 

Printer Dust Covers 

most types in stocit 
from £4.70 inc VAT 



Hard Disks 



Supra 500XP52M 



for A500 



£299 



Commodore A590 
£249 



20M Hard Disk 
forA500 



GVP Series 2 52M 

forABOO £359 



GVP Series 2 120M 

forASOO £469 



GVP Series 2 52M 

forA1500 £279 



1 M Simm 

Suitable for GVP Hard Disks etc. 
£29.90 per 1Mb 

£29.90 



Floppy Drives 



Cumana CAX354 

The most reliable drive you can buy 

1M external 

L O ^ While stocks last 



Comnnodore 

A1011 1M external 
£49.90 While stocks last 



Roctec 

RocLite RF382C 1M external 

£56 



Canon BJ-IOex 

360dpi Inlcjet printer 
with cable & paper 

£229 



Star SJ-48 

360dpi Inkjet printer 
with cable & paper 

£219 



Star LC200 

with cable & paper 



New Price 



Panasonic/Epson 

KXP1170 9pin 134 

KXP1124i24pin 227 

KXP2180 9pin Colour .... 189 
KXP2123 24pin Colour... 269 

Epson LQ570 24pin 265 

Epson EPL-41 00 Laser.. 680 
Epson EPL-8100 Laser.. 1115 
Prices include VAT cable & paper 



Naksha Mouse 

for Atari ST & Amiga 
with house & mat 

£21.50 



Squik Mouse 

for Atari ST & Amiga 

£13.90 



£179 



Amiga 600HD 

20Mb internal Hard disk & software 

£449 



Amiga 600 

Standard A600 with full software 

£349 



Comnnodore 

1 084SD 

14" Colour Monitor with cable 
dot pitch 0.42 mm 

L ^ 1 y While stocks last 



Philips CM8833 MK2 

Colour monitor with csble 

£199 

UK. 240V mains +F19 game 



GVP Series 2 120M 
£419 



Hard Disk 
for A1 500 



A2286 Bridgeboard 

CBM 286 Bridgeboard for A1 500 

£319 



Amiga 1500 

with full software pack 

£499 



1 /2 Meg Ram + Clock 

£24.95 



A500 PLUS 

Cartoon Classics full software pack 

£329 



Star 



LC20Mono Spin 129 

LC200 Colour Spin 179 

LC2420 Mono 24pin 189 

LC24200 IVIono 24pin 209 

LC24200 Colour 24pin .. 259 
Prices include VAT cable & paper 



Kickstart Upgrades 

Commodore 2.04 full upgrade 79.00 
Kickstart ROM only v2.04 .... 41.50 

Kickstart ROM only v1 .3 29.00 

Phoenix Rom sharer 24.95 

VXL30 25MHz Accelarator ..239.00 
Fatter Angus custom chip ....37,50 
A590 or Supra Hard disk PSU 49,00 



Accessories 

Joystick/Mouse twin extension 4.70 
3M Joystick/Mouse lead .... 3.75 

A500 Printer cable 7.95 

Modulator/DiskExtension 10.95 

23way Plug or socket 2.95 

A500 Dust Cover 4,70 

Mouse Mat (thick soft type! ,, 4.95 

Mouse House 2.95 

1M internal 3,5" drive 49.00 

A500 replacement PSU ,, 39.00 

A590 replacement PSU 49,00 

1/2 Meg Ram NO Clock 23.90 

Rocgen Plus - Genlock + ... 129.00 



SONY 

DISKETTES 

SONY branded 

(llfotlme warranty) 
(1 00% certified error freet 

lOx 3.5" DS/DO 135lpi 7.50 

50x 3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 32.30 

100x3.5' DS/DD 135tpi 59,93 

250x3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 141.00 

1 kx 3. 5" DS/DD 1 35tpi 540, 50 



DISKETTES 

SONY/DYSAN bulk 
(lifetime warranty) 

(1 00% certified error free) 

lOx 3.5" DS/DD 136tpi 5.95 

50x 3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 21.86 

100x3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 39.60 

250x3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 94.88 

Ikx 3.5" DS/DD 135tpi 353,68 

40 X 3.5" Disk box with lock .... 5.49 
100 X 3.5" Disk box vaith lock ..7.50 
Carriage on 50+ disks £3,53 



Naksha Scanner 



£99 



200 to 400dpi, 1 05mm 

width with express-IT 

software 



Phone for our 60 page catalogue 

EDUCA TIONAL AND GOVERNMENT ORDERS WELCOME 

All products have a 30 day money back & 1 2 month warranty. 

Prices are subject to variation without prior notification. 

Established 7 years. 3 minutes from M27 Junction 1 1 , 

Free parking. Open 9 to 5,30 Monday to Friday & 9 to 5 Saturday 

Postage 94p or £3,53 Securicor £6,46 (£5,50 + VAT| 



UlBServB 



[.a-ger items delivered 
by Secuhcor 



Amiga/Shopper Dept. 
40-42 West Strael 
Portch ester Hants 
P01 6 9UW 
Tel: 0705 325354 



UlESerVe Best for 



service 



UJeSerVB Best for 



NEWS 



NEW BOSS FOR 
COMMODORE 




TAKEOVER RUMOURS CAUSE COMMODORE SHARE PRICE FLUCTUATIONS 



Is Kelly Sumner set to take Steve 
Franklin's place as the managing 
director of Commodore UK? 

Kelly Sumner Is expected to ttecome 
the new MD of Commodore UK. 

According to industry rumours 
and as reported in the trade paper 
CTW, Sumner is to take over the post 
that Steve Franklin has filled for the 
iast five years, Franklin is to take a 
management role with Commodore's 
CDTV project, 

We spoke to Keiiy Sumner, but he 
wouid offer no comment on the 
rumours. An announcement regarding 
the change is expected to be made at 
the end of June. Next month's Amiga 
Shopper will carry an in-depth 
interview with the new MD. 

COMMODORE COUP AT 
MULTIMEDIA AWARDS 

Three multimedia titles running on 
Commodore machines won awards 
at the British Interactive iVluIti media 
Association Awards this year. 

The Vistrain police training 
system, first reported in issue 12, 
was winner in the Productivity 
category. Developed by the National 
Computing Centre and the Scottish 
Police Coliege, it uses a Commodore 
PC and Amiga 2000 with genlock to 
teach police officers how to controi 
crowds. 

The Consumer goid award went 
to Cioudscan's CDTV Karaoke Hits 
One. whiie Eurotalk's CDTV title 
Learn French With Asterix was winner 
of the European category and second 
in the Education section. 

The awards bode weii for 
Commodore's multimedia hopes, 
despite the public's current lack of 
enthusiasm for CDTV. 

To counter the lack of interest, 
the company has released the 
Multimedia Pack, a bundle consisting 
of a CDTV, a keyboard, mouse and 
disk drive. Essentially an A500 with a 
CD-ROM, it sells for £599. 




? 



Console giant Nintendo is to make a 
takeover bid for Commodore 
International, it has been rumoured 
on the New York Stock Exchange. 

The rumours began late in 
March, when a prominent analyst 
described Commodore's stock as 
'the single best value in the 
computer industry'. At the time. 
Commodore's share price was 
quoted at $14 3/S. The analyst 
predicted the company's share would 
be at $25 by this time next year. The 
price of Commodore's shares 
immediately began to rise following 
the speculation. 

Commodore executives were 
unavailable for comment, and a 
spokesperson for Nintendo of 
America denied the speculation. The 
rumour had not specified whether it 
was Nintendo of America or its 
parent company Nintendo of Japan 
which was to make the bid, so 
speculation continued. 

Industry sources in Japan told 
Amiga Shopper \.hat Commodore 
directors had met with Nintendo 
executives at Chicago's recent 
consumer electronics show and 
were only weeks away from 



i FOR [ 



An answer to the C programmer's 
prayers comes in the form of the 
Amiga C Encyctopedia. 

The encyclopedia consists of six 
manuals contained on 12 disks, and 
Is compiled by the Amiga C Club, 
based In Sweden. 

The Information contained on the 
first ten disks Is widely available in 
the public domain, but the last two 
are only available by registehng with 
the club. 

In total the encyclopedia contains 
175 fully executable examples along 
with source code. All are compatible 
with Workbench 1,3 and Workbench 
2, and follow Commodore's 
programming guidelines. 

Subjects covered are the basics 
of C and the Amiga, using Intuition, 
using graphics, accessing the 
operating system, using devices and 
using sound. Snippets likely to 
Interest coders are explanations on 
sprites and BOBs, 3D routines and 
creating copper lists. 



signing on the dotted line. 

By the close of business on 26 
March, Commodore's share price 
had risen $1 3/8 to $15 3/4, while 
the share prices of computer 
companies such as IBM, Hewlett 
Packard and Compaq were falling. 

The takeover would offer both 
companies benefits. Commodore 
would gain Nintendo's immense 
marketing power and a huge cash 
injection which could, conceivably, be 
plowed into further research and 
development. Nintendo, already in a 
position of near-dominance of the 
console market, would gain the best 
possible position in the home 
computer market without having to 
develop its own line of machines. 
The Amiga market would almost 
certainly burgeon, creating much 
more interest from third party hard 
and software developers. Perhaps 
the acclaimed Mario Brothers game 
would finally make an appearance on 
the Amiga, 

Nintendo is certainly in an 
acquisitive mood at the moment. It 
has recently paid $75 million for the 
ownership of the Seattle Mariners 
football team. 




in addition to the encyclopedia, 
registration with the club offers 
programmers many other benefits. 

Anders Bjerln, the club's 
organiser, offers to digitise 
members's pictures in colour, as 
well as sampling sound effects. He 
also undertakes to help members 
with their C coding problems by 
. answering questions, giving advice 
and helping during the debugging 
stage. 

The Amiga C Club has been in 
existence for two years, and currently 
has 150 registered members. 
Registration costs £45, for which 
members will receive the complete 
Amiga C Encyclopedia. If you already 
have the first ten disks of the 
encyclopedia, then registration Is 
£30. Anders requests that you don't 
send him cheques. 

Anders BJerin can be contacted 
at: Datra, Amiga C Club, Anders 
Bjerln, Tulevagen 22, 181 41 Lldlngo, 
Sweden. 




Could Mario, the famous computer 
games character, soon be making 
his appearance on the Amiga? 

There has still been no official 
comment from either Commodore or 
Nintendo. 

If there is any truth to it, the 
facts will be revealed in the next two 
months or so. It wouid be impractical 
for the two companies to undergo 
large scale change afterwards, 
during the much busier sales period 
of Autumn. Amiga Shopperw\\\ keep 
you posted on any further 
developments. 



IT'S A SIM 



Famous computer game SitnCtty is 
being used to test artificial 
intelligence software used in urban 
planning. 

Scientists from the University of 
Chicago are using the game from 
California-based Maxis to put their Al 
system through its paces. 

HISOFT AND KUMA AGREE 

HiSoft has become the manufacturer 
and promoter of Kuma's line of office 
application packages following an 
a^eement between the two 

companies. 

HiSoft, weii known for its popular 
range of software development tools, 
will be taking over all of Kuma's 
business oriented software. Existing 
users of Kuma software will be given 
technical support from HiSoft. The 
company will continue the 
development and enhancement of 
Kuma's packages. 

The handing over of its software 
leaves Kuma free to concentrate on 
publishing its expanding range of 
technical books. HiSoft « 0525 
7181S1. Kuma T 0734 844335. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16* AUGUST 1992 



NEWS 



PRINTER 
PROMO 



OKMs offering buyers of its LED page 
printer a selection of free gifts in an 
effort to sell more units during the 
quiet summer period. 

The OLSIO uses Light Emitting 
Diode technology to produce laser 
quality output with less moving parts 
and, in theory, greater reliability and 
efficiency. 

Buyers of the printer before 30 
September can choose one of four 
free gifts or buy an OKI portable 
ptnone for £99 (it normally costs 
£289). Tlie gifts on offer are: an 
Olympus Superzoom camera; a Sony 
Personal CD Player; an OKI car 
phone; and a dual bin upgrade for the 
printer itself. 

The OLSIO costs £1,499. 

OKI o 0753 531292. 



AMIGA IN 
INDIAN STORM 



Canadian-based Integrated Solutions 
has used the Amiga as the centre of 

an Interactive presentation system, 
Initially used to re-create the 
atmosphere of an Indian 
encampment. 

The Interaction System debuts at 
Wanusitewin Heritage Pari<, Canada, 
where it will be used to create a 
SoundScape that helps to 'convey the 
intimate spiritual connection this 
culture feels towards the land'. 

The system is made up of an 
Amiga running ARexx, Geodesic 
Publications' AirLink and The Blue 
Ribbon SoundWorks' Bars&Pipes 
Professional. It is connected to 24 
speakers concealed throughout the 
park and a lighting board to produce 
changes in daylight and storm effects. 

Motion sensors are connected to 
the Amiga so that it can randomly 
choose a 16-bit digital sound sample 
to play through any particular speaker 
when a visitor approaches. The 
overall volume of the sound is also 
varied depending on the number of 
visitors in the park at any one time. 

The most spectacular effect 
created by the Interaction System is 
a storm, for which it uses both visual 
and audio techniques, including high- 
powered sub-woofer speakers to 
shake the floor. Each storm is 
different by virtue of a random 
number generator, although always 
following a natural progression. 

Integrated Solutions can be 
contacted on «■ 0101 306 5652061. 



COLOUR SCANNER GIVES AMIGA ADDED DTP CREDENCE 

NEW COLOUR SCANNER 



A flatbed full colour scanner for the 
Amiga has been released by Epson. 

The Epson GT-6000 is an A4 

scanner that plugs into the Amiga's 
parallel port and will scan documents 
at a resolution of up to 600 dots per 
inch in up to 16 million colours. 

Software to use the scanner has 
been created by ASDG, maker of the 
Art Department image processing 
software. 

The scanning controller software 
comes in two forms. It can either be 
integrated into Art Department as a 
new module, or used as a stand- 
alone program. One of the big 
advantages of the program is that it 
can save scans direct to disk, so that 
scans can be taken by users without 
huge quantities of memory. 




Zone is to distribute Dr T's brand 
new Boom Box program. 

Boom Box is a program for the 
Amiga that simulates a ghetto blaster 
and enables the user to trigger 
samples in real time S la rap or 
house mixes. As well as supplied 
samples. Boom Box will accept 
samples created with other packages. 
A price has yet to be confirmed, but It 
is expected to be in the region of 
£35. 

Zone is also selling Dr T's 
Composer Quest, a musical title for 
Commodore's CDTV, The program 
contains information on music from 
1600 to the present day, including 
colour screens and 60 musical 
performances. Biographies of 
composers can be called up, as can 
definitions of musical terminology. A 
trivia quiz Is also included. Composer 
Quest costs £69. 

The generic editor/librarian XOR 



The release of the 
Epson scanner and 
AS DCs software 
takes the Amiga one 
step closer to 
acceptance as a 
serious machine for 
desktop publishing. 
Commented Keith 
Howell of HB 
Marketing: "It has 
opened up a new 
price point for full 

colour A4 scanning. .. „ ^.. ^ 

The nearest Excellent results from Epson's full colour A4 flatbed 

„ it ^ „„j,„-t „ scanner. Sorry you can't see the colour 

competitive product is ' ' 

considerably more expensive," for a total of £1303.80 by HB 

Epson -B 442 61144. ASDG Marketing e 0753 686000. 
■B 0101 608 2736585. The scanner l-00*< out for a full review of the 

plus ASDG's software is being sold scanner In next month's issue. 




SF 




[ 



has been updated to contain 150 
profiles. It can be used with the KCS 
sequencer to enable real-time editing 
and recording of sound profiles. Some 
of the new profiles Included in the 
latest version are for the Boss SE50 
effects unit, the Wavestatlon A/D, the 
Wavestation EX and the Roland R8 
drum machine. Existing owners of 
XOR can obtain the update from Zone 
for the price of postage and packing. 
The product Itself retails at £219, 
although users of Zone's products 
can buy It for £159. 

Zone intends to run two seminars 
during August and September. Fixed 
dates or prices have yet to be 
announced, although one seminar will 
be for beginners while the other will 
be for existing users of the KCS 
sequencer. 

Zone •= 071 738 5444, Dr T's 
Music Software ■= 0101 617 
4551454, 



DIAMOND SHARES IT OUT 



The Computer dealer Diamond Is 
hoping to float itself on the Stock 

Exchange and Issue shares to the 
public. 

This move follows a suggestion 
for a merger by a technical company 
already listed on the Stock 



Exchange, Since Diamond will be the 
majority share holder, the resulting 
company will be called Diamond 
Computer Systems PLC, 

Diamond recently payed a seven 
figure sum to take over the 
beleaguered Microbyte dealer chain. 



FISHY VIRUS ALERT 

A new virus has been discovered on 
disk 622 of the Fred Fish public 
domain library. 

The disk contains two versions of 
Challenger, a quiz game. The English 
version is safe, but the German 
version when run will copy a trojan 
bomb to either the user's hard disk or 
Workbench system disk, it is believed 
that the virus was created and 
distributed by the author of Challenger 
himself. No current virus checkers will 
spot the infection. 

Its effect Is to print up a message 
on 24 July each year. The computer is 
unusable on this day. 

If you have any worries about this 
virus, contact the Virus Research 
Centre 1*0942 895320. 

«• m Pfifss ••• 

FMG CRASHES 

Commodore's official repair centre 
FMG has ceased trading. 

The company, which repaired all 
of Commodore's machines under 
warranty, ceased trading at nine 
o'clock 17 June. 

Commodore is currently hoping 
to be able to carry out repairs itself. 
If you have a faulty machine under 
warranty, call Commodore Customer 
Sen/ices = 0908 368222, 

A spokeswoman for Commodore 
could make no comment on the 
status of machines already at FMG. 



8 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



lAfordworth 



a tvr iter's dream 

The graphica! nature of Wordworth® makes producing 
documents faster and easier. The WYSIWYG display shows 
exactly how your printed dooiment will iook, different fonts, 
styles and sizes, headers and footers, graphics and so on. 

Commands are grouped under a series of pull-down 
menus, accessible either by the mouse 
or keyboard. Frequently used 
commands have on-screen icons, 
including Help, should you need it. 

Experience the look and feel of 
the new and exdting WB2 (even if 
you use WBl.3). Each document is a 
separate multi-tasking window. 



lAfordworm 




which means you could for example, print one doamient 
while editing another, 

Digita's® innovative Human Interface Protocol® is 
incorporated setting a new standard in speed, style and 
elegance. "\i HIP^ system is intuitive and a pleasure to use." 
— thank you Amiga Shopper, it's nice to be appreciated, 

Graphics have always been the Amiga's strong point. Now 
it's better than ever. Pictures from 
Deluxe Paint can be placed in 
a document, and then sized, scaled 
and dragged (text automatically 
reforatiats around the image). 

Wordworth's enhanced fonts 
will give you the very best printed 
quality. You can also print spedal symbols, such as boxes, 
arrows and so on. Better still, you can mix graphics, 
Wordworth's enhanced fonts, Amiga fonts, Colorfonts and 
your printer's own internal fonts, aU on the same page. 
There's even a driver for Postscript printers. 

You needn't worry about your existing informaKon - 
Wordworth will let you open documents from most word 
processors, including Kindwords, Pretext and Wordperfect 
(you can also maiknerge with Superbase). 

When Amiga Format said "a new word processor that will 
give the rest of the world a run for its money" they weren't 
joking. 





IJiPiiiliiilill^M 


1 


' ' 


i 


1 1 fSSkl 




i ^j^:^.^:;^^^^^:-:^^^ 


-al 



vl4 




Wordworth is written in the UK by Digita, Which 
means you'll be using an English Collins spelling checker 
and thesaurus, and you'll know where to come for 
professional support. 

The only way to really 
appreciate Wordworth is to use 
it. Phone 0395 270273 for more 
information or, write to Digita, 
FREEPOST, Exmouth EX8 2YZ. 

Wordworth cosb £129.99, 
which includes VAT, postage and 
packing; and when purchased from Digita, comes with a 
7 day money-back guarantee. 

If you already own a word processor, for a limited 
period only, you can trade-up for just £S9.99 by returning 
your original disks to Digita with your order. 

Summing up, Amiga Shopper said: 'Tounds-per-feahire 
no other Amiga word processor comes close. Wordworth is 
what every owner of Kindwords would wish they 
had." Dreams become reality with 
Wordworth. 




Machine support 

Written specifically for the Amiga 

Fully suf^rts WB Vl.3 and V2.00 

All medium or high resolution modes 

(mono and colour) 

Requires 1MB of memory 





•fflffli\ 




® 



DIGITA 

INTERNATIONAL 

software thats righv' 



Worrfworth is ^v^ilabte from Jahn MEfuies. V^gin, W H Smith and aU good oannputer retaikrs or \o the 
trade tlrouigb Co3uiinhu&, Gem, HB Maiieting. IBD, Llojt. LdainesoA:, Predsion and SDL 



Digita International Ltd Black Horse House Exmouth EX8 IJL ENGLAND Tel 0395 270273 Fax 0395 268893 

- A member trf Uw Digita groufi - 

r>igita. riw E^i^jra logo, WoTiWorth Mid tihe Wordworth logo are registered ti^demaj^. and H7T* Hmvm Inierfna /"yofpaii'ard sofhran ttul^ r^ht are tr^^JlmwrVs of Digjti Hol^^s Ltd 

All ottwr badcnuriu and their OYfTien are acknowledged. Sold suinlrd: to gtzndacd conditjcrns of ule E & 0£. 



NEWS 



ICD ROM SWITCHER 

ICD has released KIckBack, a ROM 
switcher for all Amiga computers, 
Including the A600. 

KickBack will enable users to 
choose between versions 1.3 and 2 
of Kickstart. It requires no 
soldering; it connects instead via a 
ribbon cable, wtiich also solves any 
conflicts of space with internal 
accelerators and so on. 

A particular ROM is selected by 
holding down the [Amiga] and 
[Control] keys simultaneously for a 
fixed period. After this a tone will 
sound, informing the user that the 
ROM has been switched, and also 
which ROM is now being used. The 
user may also choose which of the 
two ROMs is to be used as the 
default on boot-up. 

KickBack costs £27 and is 
available from Silica Systems 
■B 081 309 1111 and HB Marketing 
■a 0753 686000. ICD is on " 0101 
815 9682228. 



FIRST REAL WORLD APPLICABLE NEURAL NETWORK FOR AMIGA LAUNCHED 

NEURAL NETWORK SOFTWARE 



American-based software house 
MegageM has released a professional 
neural network package for use on the 
Amiga. 

NeumPro 2 uses a three layer back- 
propogation system with up to 256 
cells per layer and up to 131,072 
connections in total. It utilises a 
Workbench 2 look and feel to make its 
application in pattern recognition, 
speech recognition, language 
translation and so on as easy as 
possible. Control from ARexx is also 
possible. 

The system makes full use of the 
Amiga's graphical abilities to show the 
workings of all network operations and 
data objects. 

Data can by input at up to 256 bits 
at a time, in the form of ASCII text. 



mini Office 




HOME OFFICE 
PROGRAM TO 
BE RELEASED 

Eu repress is to launch an Amiga 
version of its popular Mini Office 
home business package. 

Mini Office was originally 
released for the Commodore 64 
computer in 1984. It has been 
updated for the Amiga, and 
consists of an integrated word 
processor, spreadsheet, database, graphics program and set of disk utilities. 

The word processor may be used in conjunction with the database and 
graphics modules to produce mail merges. A variety of graph forms are 
supported, including bar, line and pie charts. 

A price has yet to be confirmed, although it will be between £60-80, 
Europress w 0625 S59333. 

SOUND AND PICTURE COMPETITION 



ei 



There'll be no escaping extra office chores 
with Europress' Mini Office for the Amiga 



Elite Publications is organising a 
three pronged competition for 
creative Amiga users. 

The first of the categories is still 
images, which is sub-divided into 
hand drawn images using packages 
such as Deluxe Paint, hand drawn 
images from HAM art packages, and 
images created with the aid of a 
computer, such as ray-traces and 
fractals. 

The second category is for 
moving pictures, which can be 
submitted as either ANIM files, 
stand-alone demos or on VHS video 
tape. 

Prizes for both of the above 



categories are £300, £70 and £30 
vouchers for purchases from Trilogic 
Computers. 

Sound samples and music form 
the third category of the competition. 
Sound effects, instruments and 
music are permissible. 

Entries to the competition must 
be either in IFF format or on audio 
tape. The best ten entrants will 
receive a TechnoSound sampler and 
have their work released into the 
public domain. 

The closing date for the 
competition is at the beginning of 
September. For further details call 
Elite Publications « 0733 571109. 



arbitrary bit arrays or 
as arrays of pixels. 

The package 
requires a maths co- 
processor to run, and 
a minimum of 1.5Mb 
of RAM, although 
2.5Mb are 
recommended, it is 
available at an 
introductory price of 
$199.95 until the end 
of August, after which 
it will sell for 
$299.95. A demo 
version, wlitch 
doesn't need a maths 
co-processor to run, 
is available for $12. 
MegageM n 0101 805 3491104 



. . j.gr r^ m - -iy,i i »» !■■>■> T,T<"r j 







NeumPm 2 has a graphical front end to facilitate its 
use in real world situations. You'll need a big Amigal 



TITLES FOR VIE 

V^dt^e'aphers may be interested In 


lEOGRAPHERS 

users to add captions and titles to 


a new package from Elite 


their masterpieces. 


Graphics. 


Subjects covered by the 


Videopack is a set of eight 


package include weddings. 


disks containing animations, 


engagements, festive holidays. 


backgrounds, ANIM brushes, text 


sport and children. A minimum of 


brushes and special effects, all of 


1Mb is needed to make use of the 


which load into version III or IV of 


animations. 


Delfjxe Pa/f7t. The package is 


Vidsopack costs £24.99 from 


designed to heip desktop video 


Elite Graphics « 0827 288348. 




Mastering AmigaDOS 2 Volume Two has been 
updated to take Into account the commands 
Included in version 2.04 of the Amiga's operating 
system. 

The book, written by Mark Smiddy, gives an 
alphabetical listing of every command available 
under AmigaDOS, from version 1.2 through to the 
very latest. It includes appendices that deal with 
error codes, viruses, the Interchange File Format 
and the Mountlist. 

Mastering AmigaDOS 2 Volume Two costs 
£19.95 and is published by Bruce Smith Books 
rr 0923 894355. 




Relax 

In front of your Amiga with 
a good book ~ this one's 
packed full of info 



MORE FONTS... 



George Thompson Services has 
released a collection of 
Comptigraphic fonts. 

The collection, the first of many, 
comes on three disks containing a 



use with all versions of Professional 
Page, PageSetter 2, PageStream 2.x 
and Workbench 2.x via the Fountain 
utility. 

The pack costs £9.99. George 



total of 37 fonts. They are suitable for Thompson Services rt 0707 664654. 



10 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



NEWS 



BOOK FOR BASIC 
PROGRAMMERS 

A new book for Basic programmers 
has been released by K&IVl 
Publishing. 

Called Creative Basic, the book 
is by D Martin Evans and consists of 
a variety of functions, procedures, 
subroutines, programs and tips to aid 
tiie Basic programmer. String 
manipulation, dates, numeric 
functions, box drawing, menuing, 
conversions, indexing and full screen 
editing are all covered. 

The programs are written in Turbo 
Basic, and it is claimed by the 
publisher that they will be easily 
convertible to other dialects. 

Creative Basic costs £5 from 
K&IVl Publishing » 0490 2328, 

PRINTERS GOING CHEAP 

Kodak Dlconix 150 Plus printers are 
being sold cheap by Mo^an 
Computers, specialists in surplus 
and excess stock computer 
hardware. 

The pnnters, which retail for 
£345, are being sold for only £150. 
They are portable inK jet machines 
capable of up to 150 characters per 
second. They connect to the Amiga 
via the parallel interface and are 
capable of both Epson and IBM 
emulation modes. Morgan Computers 
» 081 575 0055. 

LEARNIN' GERMAN 




Verstehst du diese Frage? If not 
you'd best get hold of Micro German 
Educational software house LCL has 
released Micro German, a package 
designed to take students up to 
GCSE standard in German. 

With the aid of graphics and 
sound the package teaches written 
and spoken German. It joins LCL's 
Micro range - Micro Maths, Micro 
English and Micro French. 

LCL hopes that the package will 
appeal to business people, as well as 
students, thinking in terms of the 
forthcoming single European market. 
A program to automatically generate 
business letters is incorporated. 

Micro German costs £24 (plus 
99 p postage and packing) from 
educational software stockists or 
direct from LCL b 0491 579345. 



NIKLAUS WIRTH'S LATEST LANGUAGE TO BE RELEASED FOR AMIGA 

MIDSUMMER PROGRAMMERS' DREAM 



Real Time Associates Is to launch 
the first Gommerclal version of 
Oberon-2. 

Oberon-2 is the latest brainchild 
of Nicklaus Wirth, creator of Pascal 
and Modula-2. The main advance It 
offers over Modula-2 is the addition 
of object-orientated features. These 
enable the programmer to treat the 
data, rather than the program itself, 
as the most important feature of the 
application under development. Such 
a methodology is thought to aid the 
rapid production of reliable code. 



The package released by RTA is 
called EXJACY. It is not a compiler as 
such, but rather a set of two 
translators. One Is a Modula-2 
translator, the other an Oberon 2 
translator. Both produce C code 
which must be further compiled with 
a package such as SAS/Lattice C. 
With EXTACY, the programmer is at 
liberty to write part of an application 
in Moduia-2, part in Oberon-2, and 
part, perhaps the Amiga specific 
areas, in C, and then link the whole 
lot together. 



The C code produced by the 
translators is said to be very 
efficient; although the programmer is 
free to optimise or modify the 
resulting C code as necessary. 

A program is currently under 
development that will convert the 
Amiga C include files into Oberon so 
that the system can access all of the 
Amiga's facilities. It will either be 
included with the finished EXTACY 
package or supplied as an update. 

DfMCywill cost £150 from Real 
Time Associates « 081 6567333. 



HUNTING FOR FONTS 



EM Compute rgraphic has Just been 
named as the sole UK distributor of 
American-based Computer Safari's 
collection of fonts. 

The fonts are Adobe type 1, 
which means that they can be used 
directly with PageStream or with 
Professional Page after conversion by 



Professional Page's Fontmariager 

program. 

The first sixteen disks in the 
collection, which each contain three 
fonts, cost £7.99 each, A further 
eight disks are available with 
slightly more esoteric fonts for 
£12.99 each. 



LICfNCEWARE mm [STABLISHED 

A number of UK public domain houses have formed a single organisation to 
deal with the distribution of licenceware. 

Called the Central Licenceware Register, or CLR, the organisation aims to 
distribute all of the currently available licenceware disks under a single label. 
putting an end to the divisiveness usually associated with licenceware. Any PD 
library which is a member of the scheme will be able to distribute the entire 
range of disks. 

Prices are to be fixed at £3,50 for a program based on one disk, £4.50 for 
one based on two. There are currently 17 titles in three categories; educational, 
utilities and games. All disks will be badged with CLR's Hydra logo. Licenceware 
programmers will benefit by being sent £1 for each disk sold.' 

Libraries wishing to join the CLR scheme or programmers wishing to submit 
software for distribution should contact their nearest participating library. These 
currently include 17 Bit Software, Biitterchips, Essex Computer Systems, 
Goldstar EC, Loadcrest, NBS, PD Soft, Start Computersm Valley PD and Virus 
Free PD. 



NEW CHROMA KEY UNIT 



Desktop video enthusiats will be 
pleased to hear of a new chroma 
key unit launched by RocTec. 

The RocKey retails for £351.33 
and, when used in conjunction with 
a genlock, enables users to 
superimpose live video over graphics 
or video, display graphics in front of 
video, substitute the brightness 
portion of a video source with a 



keyed image, embed graphics in 
video and embed video in graphics. 
The product is to be marketed 
by Jessops photographic stores and 
HB Marketing w 0753 686000. 
Jessops wilt be running a 
competition until September 1 in 
which any buyer of a RocTec genlock 
will be eligible for winning a RocKey 
unit. 



In addition to these disks, EM 
Computer-graphics is distributing a 
number of public domain and 
shareware fonts which have been 
sou reed from America and Canada. 

Volume 3 contains 34 fonts for 
use with PageStream only. It costs 
£5, Volumes 4 through 7 each 
contain between 60-80 Adobe type 1 
fonts across five disks. 

Each volume costs £12.50, For 
more information on the above 
contact EM Computergrapics 
•o 0255 431389. 

SAMPLE LIBRARIES 
FOR AMIGA 



Walkabout Music has released a 
collection of sound samples on 25 
disks. 

Each sample is taken directly from 
a studio master at twice the rate used 
in public domain sample disks. The 
disks are divided into different 
categories, including African, Indian, 
Arabic, guitars, strings and brass. 
Each disk costs £2.50, or £19.95 for 
10, with an additional £1 for postage 
and packing. Walkabout Music 
o 072681 3807. 



DIART DATES 

July 19: All Formats Computer 
Fair. National Motorcycle 
Museum, Solihull. 
9 0225 868100. 

September 5: All Formats 
Computer Fair. National 
Motorcycle Museum, Solihull. 
«022S 868100. " 

September 12: All Formats 
Computer Fair. Sandown 
Racecourse, Esher. 
> 0ZZ5 868100. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1 992 



11 



MEMORY EXPANSION 



HOENIX PRODUCTS 



D 





PHOENIX 



m^ 



kft. 



ijifc- ' 




With its ntDdern compact semi portable wedge stiape designr 
the new 600 comes with tlie follDwing features as standard: 

IMh gf RAM ss slaiuiard iKxpanilablel ■ Kickslari/Workbench 2.D5 • 
Suift in TV niDdulator ' standard smart card slot ' Trapdoor 
expansior^ port ^ 2 KJoyscink/moLise pons * Dptiona] internal IDE hard 
drrve " StstG of the ^rlsurlaca mount technology. 

A 600 (inoludes Deluxe PaM+t software tidel.... £369. 99 

A 600 HD {including 20 Mh Hard Drive) £469.99 

■i 'i ■.■ ' K'l'lV I....STOP PRESS....fll'AIL'lBti: NOW I....STOP PBESS 



Phoenix 1Mb upgrade( to 2 Mb) 

AEOO Keyboard switchable ROM Sharer.. 



....£49,99 

,...£29.99 



ALTERNATIVELY! Purchase the A600 as part of our 
Unbeatable Value PHOENIX POWER PACK, which includes 
ouet tIM of qiialiry software and accessories. Probably the 
best bundle around, just looti at what you get! 



FyUv Microswitched Joystick 
50 Capacity 3.5" Disk Box 8mm Mous 
10 Phoenix Branded Dislts with La 



Phoenix Power Pack iwiihAeooi t399.99 

(includes Deluxe Paint + \ software title! 

Phoenix Power Pack (mii, moo hw ..'~""" "" 

NOW BACKED BV A 12 MONTH ON-SITE WflFRANTV! 



Son of Phoenix Power Pack ....?''! ^^ 

Buy the following top quality Items together and save 
even more money on accessories. Comprises of: 100 
Cap. 3,5" Disk Box • 10 3.5 " Disks t Labels - Top quality 
r^/licroswitcfi Joystick • 8mm Moiisemat" Dustcover 



siORftiii.: 




Disk Box 10 Cap 


£1.93 


aisk Box 25 Cap 


£2.99 


Disk Box 50 Cap 


£4.99 


Disk Box 100 Cap 


., £6.99 


STftwtis: 




14" Tilt 'n^ Swivel stand 


£13.99 


2 piece printer stand 


£7.99 


WISCELLflNEOliS: 




Printer cable 1.8 m std 


£5.99 


Mouse Mats 


...£3.99 


Boctec Mice 


£13.99 


Disk tiead cleaner 


£3.9S 


1000 Disk Labels 


£9.9fi 



LL OUR 



aru 




SUPRA 500RX Manufactured out of Albany, 
U.S.A. SUPRA offer the ultimate in Fast Ram 
expansion units. 

Built to the highest technical specifications they offer full auto 
configuration and quick easy fitting to the side expansion port 

B Mb pop to 1 Mb»...,„ £99.99 

B Mb pop to Z Mb* _ „ El 24.99 

S Mb pop to 2 Mb £149.99 

S Mb pop to 4 Mb £209.99 

8 Mb pop to 8 Mb £309.99 

(•Uses 256x4 ZipsI 



PHOENiX ABOO Plus 

2 Meg RAM Uporndc Modules 



PHOENIX RAM 
Modules expand 
your chip RAM up to 
2 Mb using the 
trapdoor expansion 
port. 

Chip RAM is required to 
unleash the full graphics 
capabilities of the Amiga 
500 Plus. Designed and 
built to exacting standards 
In the U.K. all our boards carry a full 2 year no quibble 
replacement guarantee. It's never been cheaper to upgrada! 

PHOENIX 1 Mb Fully populated RAM board„-£39.99 
PHOENIX 1 Mb unpopulated RAM board. £16.99 



PHOENIX Kickstart 
ROM Sharer 



Because some olderl 
games and business 
software will not run 
on the new Kickstart | 
2.04 ROM. 

PHOENIX have designed a I 
sharer for both ROM chip 
sets. Switchable between 1.3 
and 2.04 you can get all the I 
benefits of the latest ASDO I 
Plus without the drawback of I 
losing your old software. Fits I 
all Amiga 500/1500/2000. 

•Kickstart ROM Sharer £24.99 

•Kickstart Rev 3/S ROM Sharer £27.99 

*NEW, Keyboard Switchable ROM Sharer..£34.99 

Kickstart 1 .3 ROM... „..£29.99 

Kickstart 2.04 ROM ....£34.99 

•■(ROM Chips not intiluded) 



VIDEO 



ROMBO-Complete Colour Solution. £99.99! 

Amazing Price Reduction! 

ROCGEN Plus SPECIAL OFFER-ONLY £129.99 

Qjality features aniJ performance. Recommended. 



AMIGA RELEASE 2 



The long awaited 
Upgrade kit for 
1.2 / 1.3 owners 
from Commodore 
has finally arrived 
and is selling fast! 





INST0CI{....£79.99 



EXTERNAL DISK DRIVES 



All drives feature super slim design, enable-di^able switch, 
thru port and come with a 1 year replacemenlguaranteel 

PhaenixDeitixeDrive £49.99 

Roctec Roclite ......£59.99 



Mouse/Joystick Switch £13.99 

Don't damage your Amiga's ports! 

This device saves wear and tear makes switchover RiST, and 

does NOT require power unlike many others. 

Computer/Video Scart Switch.. ..£19.99 

Similar to the It/louse/Joystlck switch. Flip between Video or 
cotnputer signals atthe push of a buttnn. 



AMIGA MUSIC 



Attention all you music I overs I nioenix have put 
logsdier an unbeatable music dea I f or you this s 




When purchasing either 
t of the following Phoenix products 



Stereo Sampler £34.99 



Combines ease of use with state of the art analogue to digital 
conversion technology.linc. FfiEE sample editing software 
+audioleadl __ . __ 

Pro-Midi 2 Interface £24.99 

This fully featured professional quality midi interface is very 

flexible giving semi. patch bay facilities. It has five ports In, 
out, thru and two switchable out/thru. (inc. f REE midi lead| 

Amiga Music in Two Easy St^s-Only from Phoenix! 



DISKS 



Do not confuse these quality disks with others currently 
available on the market, 3.5' 100% certified error free 70% 
clip. All disks come with FREE high quality labels. 

10 £5.99 

K £12.99 

50. £22.99 

100 £40.99 



200... £72.99 

SOO. £174.99 

750. £259.99 

1000 £339.99 




CHIPS 



PHOENIX have bulk buying 
power which means that 
prices freguently change. 
These prices are accurate at 
the time of going to press 
^ .__^^jk^ but please call for the best 
^ ^^)^^H deals. Quantity discounts 
^^■^^^'j are also available on some 
i2L •' ^m chips so please ask. 

AMIGA CUSTOM CHIPS 

Kickstart 2.04 ROM £34.99 

Kickstart 1.3 ROM £29.99 FaMer Agnus 8I72A .£34.99 

NEW Super DeniSB, i34.99 CIA 8S20A £995 

MEMORY CHIPS 

4 Mb X 9 (-70) Simm...£119.99 1 Mb n 4 (-B0) Zip *£34.99 

1 Mb X 9 (-B0) Sinim...;.£29.99 2S6k X 4 (-801 Zip *£29.99 

256k X 9 (-80) Simm .£12.99 1 Mb x 1 DRAM £3.49 

256k X 4 DRAM„ _.£3.49 *11iis price is for 1 Mb of RAM 

These chips cover practically every popular memory 

expansion or Hard Drive system on the market far the 

Amiga ie. GVP, SUPRA, MICROBOTICS, COMMODORE etc. 

RING OUR TECHNICAL HEIPUNE IF YOU NEED ADVICE 



HARD DRIVES 



GVP IMPACT SERIES II Hard Drives, the fastest 
Hard Drive/Controller for the Amiga. 

Features Game Switch, external SCISI port, FAAASTFiOM 
SCISI Driver, GVP's custom VLSI chip and internal RAM 
expansion up to a tregt All units use high speclfica^on fast 
access QUANTUM Hard Drives and come withSyr, guaraBtea. 

A500-HD8+ 52 MEG(Unpopulated) £349.99 

A5D0-HDS+ 120 MEG (Unpuputated) £464.99 

Secies II Hard Disk Controller/RAM caid rNoHOk...£139.99 

Series II ^ MEG Kard Disk and RAM card £279.99 

Series El 120 MEG Hard Disk and RAM card £419.99 

Series II Z40 MEG Hard Disk and RAM card £649.99 

EXTRA MEMORY-Only £27.99 when bought with drivel 




Tel: 0532 311932 



FCC DISTRIBUTION, UNIT 19, ARMLEY PARK COURT, STANNINGLEY ROAD, LEEDS LS12 2AE 

• 

TEL (0532) 311932 U.K. Sales TEL (05S) 310796 Trade^uropean Sales TIL (0532) 319061 TechnKal Helpline 

All prices include VAT. and free U.K. delhrerv. Next day delwery by courier £4.50 

Pl^ise nnake cheques payable to F.C.C. I>istribtition Ltd. 



LETTERS 



DEAD BABIES 

I remember the day that my new 
A500 arrived, nudging the sturdy 
but distinctly uncooi CPC6128 into 
the darl< recesses of the spare 
room. The dining room table 
gradually disappeared beneath 
printers and extra disl< drives, 
cables snaked across the carpet 
into the Hi-Fi, the children were 
given a quick blast of The Simpsons 
and then toid that the Amstrad was 
all theirs now (howls of derisive 
laughter), and my wife packed a few 
essentials and went to stay with her 
mother. 

The world was my oyster! Ail 
those slotsi And best of all, a dirty 
big slot In the side which would 
connect to anything... RAM 
expansions hard disks, PC 
emulators, expresso coffee 
machines... 

But now my Baby is obsolete. 
The A600 takes smart cards, but 
nobody is rushing to make any. The 
A570 will now cost £350 as it 
needs WB2.0. The GOTV software is 
elephant doodoo. Ttie Big Cheese at 
Commodore says that putting faster 
chips in an A500 would tie like 
driving a Ferrari in a no-parking 
zone. PC386S with SVGA monitors, 
stonking great hard drives and 
sound boards can be picked up for 
£7-800, and PC prices are in free 
fall... what's a poor boy to do? 

Commodore has not just shot 
itself in the foot, but seems to be 
intent on stuffing its nuts into the 
food processor too. Punters like 
myself who enjoy being a Railroad 
Tycoon, checking out the odd 
dungeon and flying the F-29 
Turbo nutter will be asking Santa for 
the low risk option of a good PC, oh 
and tiy the way, lob the kids a 
SuperNintendo! 

rviartin Badkin 
Leighton Buzzard 

Don't get too nostalgic though Martin 
will you? - It's not as though 1.2 
million UK Amigas, and the software 
and add-ons for them, are going to 
disappear off the face of the planet. 
I'd say the machine still has a bright 
future ahead of it - look at it this 
vifay; sheer force of numbers is going 
to maintain a healthy market 
provision because developers and 
publishers can't afford to ignore such 
a massive user base. 

WHITHER THE A1 500? 

So that's it then, the A500 range Is 
ofiicially stuffed! Do you ever get 
the feeling that you're having the 
old wossname taken out of you? At 
the same time, I read that 
production of the A 500 Pius is to be 
terminated, I learn that the entire 
range of Amigas is to be 
"improved", and that the price of 



the A570 CD-ROM drive is to be 
hiked up by £100 and that's before 
it's even released! When will it all 
end? 

I have had an A1500 for barely 
three months now but I'm already 
heartily sick of seeing "Not enough 
memory" on the screen, and those 
clunky drives are sending me ga-ga. 
Additional memory is a must and so 
too, if you want to do more than 
play games, is a hard drive. That's 
about £400 right away. 

With the demise of the A500 
Plus, the cost of the add-ons 
for existing machines will probably 
drop to clear stocks, so, does that 
mean that A1500/2000 and 
A3000 owners will have to pay 
more for their add-ons to make up 
the loss? 

Finally, I direct this last 
comment to Commodore. If I knew 
three months ago what I know now I 
may well have gone for a PC instead 
of an Amiga. Think it over! 

Richard Sharp 
Dundee 

I don't think you should assume 
you'll have to pay more for add-ons 
to make up for losses on A500 
peripherals. But if you have any 
doubts then maybe you should buy 
that extra memory now. 



'If i knew three 
months ago what I 
know now I would 

have got a PC 



If/ 



68000 REASONS 

The A600 is a step backwards not 
forwards, if the 500 is obsolete then 
it's because it only has a 68000, 
and what's the 600 got? The same 
thing - absolutely stupid! 

NP Wilson 
Peterborough 

Yes... this is probably the fact which 
A500 owners find most perplexing. 
If the A600 had been launched with 
a 68020/030 or even 040 chip then 
all would have been forgiven and 
Commodore would now be receiving 
rapturous applause. 

The A600 Just doesn't appear to 
be any great leap fonward and as 
such doesn't do much to instill 
confidence in the company. 

If, for my sins. I v/ere appointed 
to the board of Commodore US (and 
hey! - you know where to contact me 
guys...) I would have just put a lid on 
the whole subject until I had a Super 
Amiga about to be launched. 
Because that's what should have 
been done. As it is though... 



Talking 
Shop 



A500 R.I.P. SPECIAL 

Last month we broke the news that the Amiga 

A500 is to be discontinued. Since then, weVe 

been inundated with a flood of letters 

commenting on this err... rather brave decision 

by Commodore to cease production of a 

machine which has sold 1 .2 million units in the 

UK alone. 

Here's the pick of the postbag... 



LUNACY 

The A$00 - one small step for man, 
one... 

CR Thorpe 

Merseyeide 

PCKKET AMIGA NEXT? 

What on earth do those nonsense- 
mongers at Commodore think they 
are doing? Wasn't it only six 
months ago that they were saying 
that the A500 Plus was the 
product, the personal home 
computer? 

You'd better keep an eye on the 
boys at Commodore because by 
Christmas they'll probably 
discontinue the A600 and replace it 
with a pocket Amiga. Don't they 
know a good tiling when they are on 
to It. 

From a very confused but proud 
A500 owner. 

IVIr Anon 

My money is on an Amiga Organiser. 
Only joking... 

THE AMIGA CONSOLE 

So Commodore is dropping the 
A 500 "range" in favour of the A600 
- what a ludicrous move. It would 
seem more viable to me to release a 
cheaper, cutdown A600, (if it has to 
exist) as a superior alternative to 
the ever growing console market 



while retaining the A500 and 
marketing it as an entry level 
"serious" machine. 

Also, why is it recently that 
every time CBM develops a minor 
Improvement to its existing range it 
releases a whole new machine? The 
Amiga is now seven years old and is 
In need of a serious revamp. So why 
not give us a completely new Amiga 
and give us, the users, peace of 
mind and the third party developers 
a break. They are the people who 
have to keep putting the time and 
money into redesigning upgrades for 
every new machine. Surely CBIM 
should support existing Amiga users 
not alienate them. It would serve 
CBM right if third party developers 
refused to acknowledge the A600. 
Thanks for hearing me out. 

Darren Kemp 
Leeds 

We took an A600 apart the other day 
{and not with a lump hammer and 
crowbar \ hasten to add) and lo and 
behold there on the motherboard 
was the legend 'A300'. Now, all 
through 1991 there .were rumours 
circulating of a proposed Amiga 
console with the codename A300. I 
think basically what's happened is 
that CBM has done some furious 

on pom 14 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



LETTERS 



imtliiiMd ham page 1 3 

back pedalling here. It's seen the 
abject failure of the C64 console, 
seen the unassailable world 
domination of Nintendo and Sega 
and realised, in any case, that it's 
impossible to bring out a cut-down 
Amiga at anything like the sub-£i50 
price point of a games console. 
Hence the A600. 

DO THE WRITE THING 

Having just upgraded my three-year- 
old Amiga 500 to a new ASOO Plus, 
I was horrified to read thai 
Commodore is withdrawing support 
for the A500. 

in my opinion, Commodore has 
let us A500 owners down once too 
much. I for one wiil not be 
downgrading to an A600 to stay 
compatible, nor can I afford to trash 
my Amiga system for an A1500 or 
B2000. Therefore, unless 
Commodore at least compromises, I 
for one will not be continuing to 
support its products. For that 
money I can buy a nice 16IVIhz 386 
PC with a 40 meg hard drive. 

1 have written to the managing 
director of Commodore UK, Mr 
Steve Franklin, and the managing 
director of Commodore USA, 
expressing my views, and I would 
strongly urge other users In my 
position to put printhead to paper 
and do tike wise. 

It is time that Commodore 
learned to support Its customers, 
and not abuse them. 

David French 
Salcombe 

You might therefore like to know that 
CO incidentally, or un-coinoidentally 
depending on how conspiratorial you 
are about these things, Commodore 
UK has a new MD - Mr Kelly Sumner. 



% for one^ will not 

be downgrading fo 

an A600 to stay 

compatibles^ 



ON THE OTHER HAND 

The A500, Commodore's entry level 
model for the past few years, was a 
great machine for its time. 
Unfortunately, everything must 
come to an end and in the computer 
Industry lifetimes are often shorter 
that of a hedgehog crossing the Ml. 

Next up the line are the 
A1500/2000 series computers. 
Excellent machines and almost 
infinitely expandable, but I don't 
think that even these will defy the 



grim reaper for much longer either. 

Finally the A3000, the top of 
the range and definitely top of the 
price range Amiga. A marvellous 
machine held back by the fact that 
It costs almost as a much as an 
annual season ticket from Brighton 
to London on British Rail. 

The good thing Is that, at this 
time, only two series of processors 
are widely used on the market. The 
680x0 and the 80x86 CPUs, both of 
which are available to Amiga users 
via accelerators and Bridgeboards, 
which means that current users 
won't be left out. 

As for chip upgraders - well at 
least Commodore released models 
with the ECS and Kickstart 2, which 
saved people who bou^t their 
machines In the last six months 
from forking out on upgrades, and 
those who have old models can buy 
an upgrade and have it fitted quite 
easily and cheaply. Even if you want 
the Super Agnus chip with 2Mb of 
Chip RAM, third party manufacturers 
have made an adaptor for A500 and 
A1500/2000 machines. But 
because of the way the A600's 
motherboard Is made, they will have 
great difficulty In upgrading that. 

As for the 'credit card' slot on 
the A600, 1 doubt If many Items 
that aren't already available for the 
A 500 will be manufactured for it 
until it's known just how popular 
the machine Is, and even then I'd 
t»et my last penny on a third party 
manufacturer producing an add-on 
with the Gayle chip and a 'credit 
card drive' for existing machines. 

Personally, I think that the 
A600 machine is just a bridging 
machine for a better A800 or A2200 
running a 68020 CPU, and won't 
last for long. I believe the 
A1500/2000 series will soon die a 
natural death. 

Hopefully Commodore wilt 
reduce the price of the A3000 
enough to make that the mid-range 
machine and a new A4000 model 
the top of the range. Either way, 
unless Commodore makes a radical 
change to AmIgaDOS and 
Workbench, existing users shouldn't 
be left out too much. Preferably, 
Commodore's 'Power Up', the 
machine upgrade system, should be 
made more comprehensive as to 
allow more users to upgrade with 
better deals. After all. If It wasn't 
for Amiga lovers all over the world, 
there wouldn't be anything to 
upgrade anyway. 

By the way, I'm an A1500 user 
so my machine could be phased out 
as quickly as the A500. Although 
this worries me, I have to look at 
the future, and personally I'd rather 
have a new range of Amigas than no 
Amigas at all. 

Kevin Breldenbach 
Heme Bay 



A good, positive angle there Kevin 
and one which I think is the best way 
to reflect on this whole development. 
It's got to be only a matter of time 
before some enterprising third party 
company brings out an A500 to 
A600 add-on connector. As I said 
earlier, sheer force of numbers will 
dictate it. 



QUICK GOODBYES 1 



I think the A€00 will fail to sell like 
the A 500 did, it certainly isn't an 
Improvement. 

RL Hughes 



I feel this Is a great kick in the teeth 
from Commodore to all one million of 



Its supporters. 



Julian Baum 

Chester 



Commodore needs to take a serious 
look at Sinclair. Watch out! - you're 
heading the same way. 



Leydene 

The A600? I like it, but it should have 
three things, battery power, LAN and 
a screen in a clam-shell lid. 



Graeme Bell 
Glasgow 



Commodore could have warned Its 
users that the A500 was to become 



Mr JA Ettles 



BUT THEN AGAIN... 

I was horrified by the announcement 
that Commodore is to junk the 
A500 and A500 Plus, mainly 
because of Its crass idiocy in 
treating one million owners as If 
they were just a set of sates 
statistics. 

I bought my A500 a year ago, 
not for games, but because it was 
cheap, and went on to discover 
what a great number of things one 
can do with it: designing knitwear 
for my knitting machine with 
DPaint, corresponding with friends 
and business people, desktop 
publishing and the whole world 
of PD programs which Is a 
revelation. 

I don't want a costly all-singing, 
all dancing, high-spec machine to 
do all these bits and pieces, nor do I 
want an A600 which is mainly for 
games. What I want are 



Improvements to the A500 and 
A500 Plus and a bit of continuity. I 
definitely don't want an "end of 
the line" announcement which Is, to 
say the least, a slap in the face for 
one million Amiga owners. 

Commodore has really flipped 
its corporate lid this time around! 

Margaret Haedlcke 

Bridge water 

Somerset 

I think you just have to rest assured 
that third party developers and 
publishers will provide the continuity 
you are looking for l^argaret. But by 
all means have a good moan in the 
meantime. 



''I don't think the 

Al 500/2000 series 

will defy the grim 

reaper either' 



.// 



A BUNCH OF CYNICS? 

) purchased an Amiga A500 Plus in 
November 1991. Never having 
owned a computer before It has 
been a challenge to be able to use 
It in a productive manner. Seven 
months later I have managed to get 
to grips with some aspects of Its 
use. It comes as a great 
disappointment to learn that the 
A500 range of computers Is now no 
longer In production. 

It is my opinion that Commodore 
has tittle commitment to Its 
existing customers. This is 
displayed by the cynical comments 
of Commodore's representative, 
Kelly Sumner, in Amiga Shoppei's 
July Issue. 

Computers are unlike most 
items which are purchased in a 
shop as they rely heavily on 
software and hardware produced 
and supported by Independent 
companies. This could be adversely 
affected by the news that the A500 
range of computers will no longer be 
produced. 

My other concern Is, If in the 
future my computer should require 
repairs, will spare parts be readily 
avaltable'7 

Derek Brown 

Kilmarnock 

Ayrshire 

t dan only Imagine that spare parts 
will always be available if there's 
sufficient demand for them. It's like 
old cars. I have a 1969 BMW which 
is no longer officially' supported but 
you just find that small companies 
turn out 'cloned' spares, mostly at 
significantly cheaper prices than the 



14 



AJMIGA SHOPPER • tSSUE 16 ^AUGUST 1992 



LETTERS 



originals. In any case, J guess 

there's literally tons of A500 spares 
out there - iook at how many Amigas 
need fixingl 
(Oniy Joking - admission 2}. 

MURDER MOST FOUL 

I read with interest your article on 
the death of the A 500 Plus, i have 
quite a few friends with Amigas and 
all of them said that this is the end 
of the Amiga. A lot of third party 
manufacturers are going to eithor 
stop making extras for Commodore 
computers or just produce add-ons 
for the new breed. 

Commodore has constantly 
ignored the people who have 
supported It (and made it vast 
profits) and hampered developments 
by others who could have pushed 
the Amiga forward, by refusing to 
allow its chips to be used - take for 
Instance the few failed attempts to 
produce a lap top by German and 
American firms - these could have 
opened huge new markets but, no. 
Commodore has scuppered every 
attempt to bring such machines 
out. 

Well, as far as I can see, once 
again It's the end user who is left 
out. When the new Plus came out it 
was hailed as the new wonder to 
take the Amiga ^^^^^^^^^ 
Into the 90s. Now 
all those people 
who bought new 
500s or upgraded 
their 1.3s have 
been dumped by 
Commodore. I 
myself have spent 
nearly £1750 on 
Commodore 
hardware In the 
past year and now I 
am seriously 
thinking of selling — — — - 

up and buying a PC, at least I will 
be able to keep up with changes 
thanks to the way the PC is set up, 
ie upgrading a 286 to a 386 is easy, 
just spend £150 and insert a new 
motherboard - no problems. 

If Commodore had any sense It 
would have released a 500 or 1500 
with a faster processor at least a 
year ago ~ the prices of such things 
have been dropping for ages but, no. 
It stuck blindly to the same old 
68000 with the exception of the 
3000. 

The Amiga is now at the same 
stage as the Speccy was two years 
ago and we all know where that Is 
now... and you cannot say that It 
will not happen to the Amiga as 
there are over a million of them In 
the U.K alone and that will keep it 
going. The humble Speccy had sold 
over 3 million in the UK, even before 
the 128 was released and that 
didn't help It. 

The way forward is not by 



alienating people who have invested 
lots of cash and time in 
Commodore's products, but by 
bringing out sensible upgrades with 
as much compatibility as possible 
with older models. This gives people 
the chance to buy upgrades at a 
reasonable price, not bringing out 
stupid things like the 600. Who In 
their right minds is going to develop 
for this? I can just see software 
houses Investing in the smart-card 
port idea when the Amiga scene is 
dying; all they are going to do is 
move into PC and console markets; 
why invest In the smart-card if 
Commodore is going to bring 
another computer out in a few 
months with yet more stupid slots, 
etc? 

To save the Amiga, the people 
say Commodore should trash the 
600 and any machines based round 
it that they might be bringing out, 
and go back to the 500 Ptus/1500 
but stick a 68030 cpu and 68882 
fpu in some of them running at 
25IVIHz/33MHz with a SCSI Interface. 
R.I. P. the Amiga - killed by 
Commodore's inability to support 
end users. 

Born - June 85. Murdered - May 92. 

M Barker 

Hull 



"In short I think 
Commodore is very 
slowiy committing 



suicide 



If 



^^If Commodore had 

any sense it would 

have released a 

500 with a faster 

processor at least a 

year ago" 



I take your point 
about the Spectrum 
but the situation 
here is different, it's 
not as though you 
can significantly 
upgrade a Speccy by 
sticking in a 68040 
card is it? No. The 
Speccy died 
because it wyas 
superseded by 
technological 
' ";■' -" " "■ " '""" advance. With the 
Amiga you can at least transform its 
power beyftnd belief and, with 
emuiation, even run a 386 PC. 

MISUNDERSTOOD YES... 

It seems to me that Commodore 
has completely misunderstood 
where the A500 series now lies In 
the market place, namely that It Is 
an upgradeable affordable machlns 
capable of being used as a simple 
games machine or for more serious 
business purposes after improving 
the machine internally as well as 
externally. 

People are able to Improve the 
performance of the A500 graduatly 
as their pocket allows. 

My A500 for example has a 
Microblotics VXL30 25Mhz 
accelerator board now with Co-Pro, 
an A590 fitted with 40 meg drive 
with two meg memory expansion 
and a SuperRam 500RX 2 meg [ at 
present) also a Rendale Genlock all 
of this added gradually. With the 



scrapping of the A500 you will not 
have a machine in the A 500 price 
bracket that can be turned In to a 
more powerful machine. Certainly it 
would seem impossible to Improve 
an A600 In such a way! 

In short I think Commodore is 
very slowly committing suicide. It 
has developed two flexible 
machines (thanks largely to third 
party suppliers} called the A500 and 
the Plus. There is a huge network of 
companies supporting the A500 and 
it has a large amount of users. But 
it's been all thrown away. 
Wake up !! 

Mr G Scott 
Bognor Regis 

BUT UNEXPANDABLE? 

What on earth is Commodore doing 
switching to SMT (Surface Mount 
Technology). It makes the A600 
virtually impossible to expand to 
any large degree. This will stop a lot 
of people from buying them; for 
instance, small business' which 
need an emulator won't buy them, 
because none of the emulators can 
be plumed In. As a side effect of 
SMT, people with ASOOs could be 
worried about future expansions not 
being made for their machines. 
Also, what happens when 
Commodore releases new versions 
of custom chips? Can you see 
Amiga owners all over the country 
trying to solder a new Agnus into 
the thing? It's difficult enough for a 
professional to do. 

As I see things at the moment 
Commodore needs to do one of two 
things (or both) if they want to stay 
on top. Either lower prices all round, 
(drastically in the case of the 
A3000) or upgrade the machines by 
a large amount so people are 
getting good value for money. I see 
room for four versions of the Amiga. 
The A600 for the games player. The 
A2000 for the serious home user. 
The A3000 for the professional on a 
budget. And lastly, the A4000 
(with a 68040 CPU) for the 
professional who needs sertous 
power. 

Stephen Boddy 
York 

I don't think you shouid assume the 
A600 is unexpandable in the viay you 
refer. It has a pretty decent 25-pin 
edge connector which opens up to 



the outside world of add-ons - it's 
just that CBM has caught everyone 

on the hop and there's none 
available yet. Time will tell... 



QUICK GOODBYES 2 

Why didn't they give the A500 a 
faster processor, new custom chips 
and take notice of the tremendous 
industry support out there? Build on 
success, not kick it in the teeth. 

John Ward 



The only people who will enjoy the 
new A600 are the sort of people who 
think Mario and Sonic are the best 
thing since Space Invaders. 

Ian Shillito 
Uxbrldge 

All in all I think the A600 is a cut- 
down A500 games console not 
worthy of the name Amiga and the 
sooner it dies the better. 

Graham Smith 
N Featherstone 

Now that the A500 is dead, 
Commodore Is bound to kill off the 
A2000 as well. It's OK to say trade-in 
and buy a A3000 but they're 
overpriced and buying a 040 card for 
my 2000 would be cheaper. 

Robert Hart 
Roehampton 



So there you have it... except for this: 

COMMODORE IS DEAD 

Stupid... idiotic... insane... the list 
goes on. There's sure to be loads of 
comment and anger over the loonies 
at Commodore scrapping the 
A500/A500 Plus - suffice to say I 
will personally never purchase any 
product by them ever again. 

Kev Allcock 
Stockport 

Just one of the many tetters that 
seem to sum up "the feeling on the 
street'. Depressing stuff maybe but 
take it from me - there's loadsa life 
in the old dog yet! 



NEXT MONTH 

TALKING SHOP will return to its 
normal format - so get writing on 
anything and everything under the 
Amiga sun and send it to me, 
Andy Storer, at: Talking Shop, 
Amiga Shopper, 30, Monmouth St, 
Bath BAl 2BW. 



AMIGA SflOPPEtt • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



200 TOP TIPS 



HARD DRIVES 




TOP TIPS 

Here if is - the greatest collection of Amiga 
tips ever printed. From programming in 
assembler to word processing^ we give 
you the hints that ensure you get the most 
out of your machine. One basic tip before 
you read on: subscribe to Amiga Shopper 




A hard drive is one of tlie 
most essential purcliases 
for all Amiga users. 
Choosing and using a 
hard drive can be tricky; there are 
quite a few different drives on the 
market, some are excellent, some 
are real stinkers. 

How do you work out which Is 
the best to buy? And once you have 
your hard drive, how should you go 
about using it. And how should you 
make sure your hard drive continues 
to perform flawlessly? 

1 Space - Wori^ out haw much hard 
drive space you really need. 
Remember that each floppy disk you 
install on your hard drive will eat 
av/ay nearly 1Mb of your precious 
storage. 

Don't expect to be able to install 
many gannes on hard drive. Most 
games are copy protected, so checl< 
on the boxes to see if they will allow 
hard disk installation. If you're only 
interested in word processing you 
can probably get away with a small 
40Mb or 50Mb hard drive (the 20Mb 
drives still sold by some companies, 
in particular Commodore, are really 
not worth considering unless on a 
really tight budget). Desktop 
publishing, graphics, databases and 
programming require a little more 
space to work, and if you're going to 



do any multimedia work you're 
looking at big (500Mb+) hard drives. 

2 Plug-In and go - Unless you 
know your SCSI terminators from 
your Rigid Disk Blocks, make sure 
you buy your hard drive and controller 
together and make sure that the 
drive is Preformatted and Installed by 
the supplier. This will mean you can 
plug in and go when you get your 
hard drive home, and you won't be 
frustrated with trying to get 
installation programs working. Under 
no circumstances be tempted to buy 
a hard drive cheap from an auction. 
Most of them don't work, and those 
that do will be almost Impossible to 
link to the Amiga. You may think that 
£50 for an 80MP drive is cheap 
when you buy It, but it's an expensive 
doorstop when you can't run it. 

3 Drive mechanism - Check what 
type of drive mechanism is being 
supplied; most are SCSI, but some 
are XT or AT IDE drives. In general, 
SCSI is the best (as it will allow you 
to add up to six more drives, CD- 
ROMs, tapestreamers or other 
devices to your system), whereas IDE 
will only allow one extra hard drive to 
be attached (and on some 
controllers none at all). AT IDE and 
SCSI drives are more or less the 
same speed, but XT IDE and 




What's so hard about a hard drive? Get to grips with tips 
numbered one to ten and you'll be able to plug in and go! 



MFM/RLL drives are much slower, 
and should be avoided. 

4 Drive standards - Commodore, 
when designing its new 
generation of Amiga hard drives (the 
A590 and the A2091) published a 
specification for hardware 
manafacturers to follow so that 
different drives and controllers from 
different manufacturers could be 
compatible. Fundamental to this is a 
feature called Rigid Disk Block 
(RDS). It means that a small table of 
information about the drive Including 
where the partitions are set up, what 
file system they are using, and their 
names is written to a block on the 
disk. Any controller using the RDB 
system can then look at this block 
and correctly identify and use the 
drive, so a hard disk formatted on a 
Commodore Amiga 3000 can be 



read fine when plugged into the back 
of a GVP Impact 500 controller. This 
may not seem useful, but it means 
that software (such as drive 
optimisers and disk repair programs) 
can be written to function with all 
such controllers. Not all controllers 
support this. GVP, Commodore, 
Supra, IVS, ICD, Nexus and 
Microbotics controllers support RDB; 
some others do not, 

5 Extras - Controllers vary widely 
in extras supplied. Some have 
room for expansion RAM to be fitted, 
often up to 8Mb. With Amiga 500 
oontrollers check how much the full 
8Mb will cost in some (for example 
the Supra and GVP), using 8Mb 
requires expensive lMbx4 chips. 
Other extras to look out for are a 
SCSI through port (for adding 

conMnued on page 1 8 



16 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 






streamline plastic casing for 
perfect fit to your A500 
orASOOPlus 

upgradable HDD capacity 
(40MB and avove) with user 
friendly installation 
supports 2 IDE hard drives 
external SCSI port supports up 
to 7 extra SCSI hard drives or 
other SCSI periphals 
expandable to 8MB SIMM 
memory in 4 easy steps 



game switch ensures complete 

compatibility with game 

softwares 

can be used solely as a 8MB 

RAM expansion 

Augoconfig compatible and 

autoboot with Kickstart 1.3 and 

above 

auto power sensing 

reliable external power supply 

unit included 



ROCHARD RH800C 

EXTERHALHARDmKDRm 
mTHEASOOAHDASiiO+ 



i 



f . . switch on 
►ur Amiga and be 
amazed at the speed 
with which it j 

boots up. 



'.ijl3-.» !.»-:» 



i 



youre 
►king for a hard 
drive for your Amiga, 
this should be high 
onyourhst. 



illGA SHOPPER 

REVIEW MAY 1992 



m 




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52MB 

SC$l,OK 

105MB 

SCSI,OK 




mF^HtK/X/* IMC VAT ■ 



ORDERS CONTACT: 

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BARRY, SOUTH GLAMORGAN, CFS3BE 



ORDERS CONTACT: 

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UNIT 9, ST. RICHARDS nOAD 
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(0446) 421316 (0386) 765500 



DEALERS ONLY CALL: 

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ALPINE WORKS, OAK ROAD, 
CRAWLEY, WEST SUSSEX RH118AJ 

(0293) 538666 




L I M I I ( El 



Dtsigtieil & produced hy The Bureau Imagesetters 0293 77561 1 



200 TOP TIPS 



HARD l>RfVES/2D PAINT PACKAGES 



tMllniMd from page \t 

external drives}, a game switch (for 
disabling the hard disk to load floppy 
based games), and an external 
power supply (essential if you've got 
a hard drive plus Fast RAM). 

6 Through ports - If you've got an 
Amiga 500 and you've already 
got a device plugged Into the 
expansion socket to the left of the 
Miiga, you may have to remove this 
to use tine hard drive. While some 
hard drives and other devices have 
through ports, these are notoriously 
unreliable, and you don't want your 
hard drive to crash while you're in 
the middle of saving something. 

7 Virus alert - Once you have got 
your hard drive up and running 
you should install a virus checker on 
your machine to avoid infection. The 
only types of viruses that can infect a 
hard drive are 'fl!e viruses'. The hard 
drive does not have a 'boot block* in 
the same way that a floppy disk has, 
so viruses cannot Infect it this way. 
Always boot with your hard drive If 
possible; if you have to boot with a 
foreign disk disable the hard drive if 
you can. Another good way to avoid 
viruses is to upgrade to Kickstart 
2.04 - most viruses do not work 
under the new operating system, 
particularly the nasty Saddam virus. 

8 Backing up - Back up your hard 
disk regularly. It Is well worth 
Investing in professional backup 
software (Quarterback 5 and Ami 



Back are two of the best) to do the 
job properly. If you've got a large 
hard disk you will either need a lot of 
blank disks and a lot of spare time, 
or a SCSI tapestreamer, which can 
back up over 500Mb in one go. 

9 Fragmentation - You may find 
that after a few weeks use your 
drive will seem to slow down, this Is 
because the disk is fragmented. 
Files are not always stored in one 
lump on the disk; sometimes. If 
there are no gaps large enough for 
the file to fit in one place, the file will 
be spilt into several 'fragments' 
which are placed on different 
physical areas of the disk (although 
it will still appear as one file to the 
Amiga). 

When you try and load this file it 
will take much longer (as It has to 
load several small parts). To cure 
this you need to 'defragment' your 
hard drive. To do this you can back 
up all the files on to disks, reformat 
and restore all the files, or use a 
program such as Quarterback Tools 
to defragment the drive (Always back 
up the drive before defragmenting). 

1 i\ ''3*'''6 - l^ost hard drives 
J. \f have autoparking (when the 
power Is turned off the drive heads 
move to a safe place for transit). All 
modern SCSI drives autopark, so 
you'll never have to use the Park 
programs provided with the drives. 
Only elderly A590s need to use Park: 
modern A590s have SCSI drives 
which autopark. 




Virtually every Amiga 
owner in the known 
universe owns a 2D 
paint package. Whether 
you use DPaInt or Photon Paint, 
DigiPaint or SpectraColouf, here's a 
few tips to help you get the most 
from your pixel punching program. 

nHAM - Amiga paint packages 
generally come In two flavours 
- HAM [Photon Paint 2, DigiPaint etc) 
and non-HAIvl {DPaint 3, Express- 
Paint etc). Although several paint 
packages are not starting to bridge 
this gap (notably DPaint 4), which 
type of paint package to buy is a 
difficult decision. Generally though, 
always go for a non-HAM package 
first and move up to HAM later. HAM 
can be a pain to work with, so you'll 
find a non-HAM paint package much 
easier to contend with. 



■| <\ Basic tools - When choosing 
J.M a HAM paint package, check 
that your chosen program includes 
all the basic painting tools. Many 
HAM paint packages are available 
that offer a multitude of power (but 
often useful) extra features, but fail 
to deliver basic painting tools. 
DigiPaint 3 is a good example of this. 
Although it Is arguably the fastest 
and most capable HAM paint 
package avaiiabie, it lacks a fill tool. 
DPaint 4 is a very capable HAM paint 
package but it can be painfully slow. 

"I O Image processsing - A good 
XO companion product to any 2D 
paint package is an image 
processing program such as AS DCs 
Art Department Professional or 
Progressive's PIXmate. These can be 
a godsend when you need to convert 
images between different formats (a 



low resolution picture to high 
resolution, a HAM picture to 32 
colours etc). Unless you're working 
with 24-bit images, PIXmate is the 
best image processing program 
available. It's available from Silica 
Systems on 081 309 1111. 

M Shading - Realistic shading 
effects can be achieved 
quickly and easily within DPaint using 
its excel lent 'Smooth' facility. To 
create graduated shading between 
two colours, create a spread of 
colours between the two colours you 
wish to blend and then 
use the Freehand 
Dotted tool to smooth 
over the border. This 
can be very effective 
when used on 
posterised images, 

■| r^ Colour 

1.%J conversion ~ If 

you need to convert a 
HAM picture to 32 
colours or less under 
DPaint 4, set the 
screen mode to the 
mode that you wish the 
image to be converted 
to and then load the 
HAM Image in as if it 
were a 32 colour 
image. DPaint 4 will 
then convert the HAM 
image to 32 colours for 
you, removing the need 
to use a separate 
image processing 
program. DPaint 3 has 
a similar facility, but it 
cannot handle HAM Images. 

■i /? Stencils - Large unconnected 

J. O areas can be re-coloured 
without affecting other areas of the 
same colour with ease using 
DPaint's stencil function. Simply 
select the Stencil function and then 
mark the colour that you wish to 
recolour, click on 'Invert' and then 
'Make*, You can then recolour the 
areas in question in bulk using the 
filled rectangle tool without messing 
up any of the colours that surround 
them. The Stencil is very powerful 
but few users seem to use it to Its 
full potential. 

'1 ^ Mono dt^tlslng - If you do a 

J. f lot of digitising using a mono 
video digitlser such as VidiAmiga, 
then get your hands on DigiPaint 3. 
DigiPaint 3 has a very powerful 
'Colorize' function which enables you 
to apply coloured tints to any area of 
a monochrome images. The results 
are very impressive Indeed. 

If you can't quite stretch to the 
price of a colour digitiser, then 
DigiPaint 3 provides a quick and 
easy method of adding colour to any 
mono image. 



"I Q Chartging size - If you need to 
J.O resize an image to either low, 

medium or high resolution within 
DPaint. simply alter the page size to 
the same as the screen mode you 
desire, DPamt will then ask you 
whether you want the bitmap 
stretched or compressed to fit the 
new page size. Although the image 
will still be saved in the original 
format, just select 'Cancel' when 
DPaint asks you whether you wish to 
change the screen mode when the 
image is loaded into a screen of the 
desired mode. 




Unravel the mysteries of shading, colour conversion 
and image processing with tips 11 through 20. Never 
tteforo has handling DPaint been this easy 



19! 



(Extra HalfBrlte - Although the 
Amiga's rather obscure Extra 
HalfBrlte mode is usually pretty 
useless, It can be very useful indeed 
for adding shading effects to images 
with DPaint. Say for example you 
wanted an object to cast a shadow 
on to another object within DPaint. 
All you would have to do is to pick up 
the object that is to cast the shadow 
as a brush, select HalfBrlte' from 
the Mode menu and stamp the brush 
down where the shadow is to appear. 
The brush will then be pasted down 
using darker shades of the pixels in 
the background. 



20 



Background and foreground - 

If you need to mix a 
background from one image with the 
foreground from another (both with 
different palettes), reduce both to 
sixteen colours In low resolution, 
load in the first, pick it up as a brush 
and then save it off to disk. Load in 
the second Image then load In the 
first in its brush form and then select 
'Remap Colours*. DPa/nt will then 
automatically mix the two images 
and create a new palette that retains 
both paiettes. 



18 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST T993 




From screen size to mouse speed, you can customise your whole set-up witli 
the aid of the Preferences screen. Printer and serial port (used for modems) 
settings can also be aitered 





uch of the Amiga's 
power goes unnoticed 
by the new user, who 
instead often becomes 
frustrated at Its apparent Inabtilty to 
carry out a simpie taslt. Much of 
this frustration can be avoided by 
learning the ilttle trlcl<s and tips 
that make life easier. 

So off we go with ten tips for 
getting to grips with the Amiga's 
Workbench. Avoid ail that tiresome 
rummaging through countiess 
reference manuals. Read on, and 
become a power user... 

O "I Drawers - These are a 
£l 3. convenient means of filing 
programs and data. Placing 
something in a drawer is a matter of 
selecting its icon, dragging it over the 
drawer and releasing it. A new drawer 
is created by making a copy of the 
existing Empty draw/er. (Select 
Duplicate from the Worl< bench 
menu). This can be renamed and 
placed wherever you like. 

Have an organising principle 
behind your drawers. You might 
choose to place all of your DTP 
software in one drawer, all of your 
programming languages in another, 
and all of your graphics files in a 
third. There may well be drawers 
within each of these, determined by 
each package's requirements. 

f\ f\ The Trashcan - Get rid of an 
£l £i unwanted file by dragging this 
icon into the Trashcan; even a drawer 

and its contents can be deleted this 
way. 

l\fothing is actually removed from 

the disk until you click on the 
Trashcan and then select Empty 
Trash from the Disk menu. Until then 



you can double click on the Trashcan 
and it will reveal its contents in a 

window. 

S\ O Snapshot - This repositions 
£i %y icons and windows. 

If you want to move an icon to a 
different area in its window, select it 
and move it to its new home. Then 
select Snapshot from the Special 
menu, thus storing its new position. 

Windows can be moved around 
the Workbench screen and re-sized in 
a similar manner - to do this the 
window alone must be selected. 

You can Snapshot several icons 
by multiple selection. While holding 
down the [Shift] key, select each icon 
In turn by single clicking on it. They 
should alt become selected. Now 
choose Snapshot; all of their new 
positions will be remembered. 

O Fi Pfsferences - The Preferences 
£t T' program, found in the 
Preferences drawer of Workbench, 
enables you to customise various 
Workbench settings: screen colours 
can be altered with the slider 
controls at the bottom left of the 
screen; the sensitivity of the mouse 
can be adjusted such that a physical 
movement corresponds to a varying 
degree of movement in the screen 
pointer; and the delay between a left 
mouse button double click can be 
altered, as can the key repeat speed. 
You can choose between having 
60 and 80 characters in a column - 
60 columns is easier to read on a 
TV. There is also a choice between 
Interlaced and non-interlaced 
screens. An interlaced screen has 
twice as many horizontal lines in it, 
and as such it can display twice as 
much information. 



WORKBENCH/RAM iXPAHSIONS 

S\ [? initialize - This prepares disks 
M %J for use by the Amiga. Any 
blank disks you buy must go through 
this process before anything can be 
stored on them. If you initialise 
(sometimes called 'format') a disk 
already in use, then all information 
stored on the disk will be lost. 

To initialise a disk, put it in the 
drive, click on its icon once and 
select Initialize from the Disk menu. 

O a Duplicate - This copies the 
^ O entire contents of one disk to 
another. Click on the disk to be 
copied and then select Duplicate 
from the Workbench menu. You will 
be asked to periodically insert the 
source (the disk you are copying 
from) and the destination (copying to) 
disks as the process goes on. 

Duplicate can also be used to 
copy files. Select the icon and then 
Duplicate. 

C\ ^ Copying files without icons - 

^ • This is often necessary when 
copying PD programs to Workbench or 
hard disk. 

If a file doesn't have an icon, the 
only way you can see it is via the 
Shell. Open the Shell and make the 
Dir, Copy and Makedir commands 
resident by typing: 

resident cidir 

and so on. Then insert your PD disk 
I and find out what is on it by typing 
J 'dir'. Transfer each of the listed files 

to your destination disk using the 

Copy command: 

copy dfOiFileOflntereBt J 
Ili^isk: 

Other files will be held In directories. 
If directories with the same names 
already exist on your destination disk, 
then copy the files into those 
directories. Othenwise, make a 



200 TOP TIPS 



directory of the same name on the 

destination disk: 

makedir MyDisk:NevrDi rectory 
and then copy the files across. 

rt Q info - Among other things, 

^ O this Workbench menu option 
can be used to link a project with Its 
parent application. 

If you have a program written in 
AmigaBasic, then you can write the 
name of its application and where it 
can be found in the Default Tool box 
of the file's Info window - in this case 
'Extras 1.3: AmigaBasic', You can 
then use the project by clicking on Its 
icon instead of having to click on its 
application first and loading the 
project from there. 

If you later move the application 
to another disk, you can modify the 
Default Tool box in the project's Info 
window to point to the application's 
new location, 

Sy f\ SetMap - This tells the Amiga 
A *J which national keyboard you 
are using. It is found in the Systems 
drawer. 

Click once on SetMap, select Info 
from the Workbench menu, click in 
the Tool Types [Add] box and type the 
following: 

KEyMAP=gb 

(The first word! must be In capitals.) 
Press [Return] and click on [Save], 
Now run the SetMap program by 
double clicking on it, thus setting up 
your keyboard as a British one. 

Q A RAIH Disk - The RAM disk can 

OvFbe used like an ordinary floppy 
disk, but is faster and its size is 
limited only by the memory available. 

Periodically save your work to 
floppy, because a power loss or a 
reset will erase its contents. 



C 
C 



7 




: 



uying the right RAM 
expansion to suit your 
needs can be a bit of a 
minefield - especially if 
you have one of the traditionally 
more limited machines such as the 
A500 or even the latest A600. If you 
have a bigger model the choice is 
generally more limited - but the 
options are better. 



31 



How much do you need? - 

This depends a lot on the type 



of applications you intend to mn. For 
most jobs, other than playing games, 
consider 1Mb to be the absolute 
minimum. The more complex the 
application, the more memory it will 
require. Incidentally, the size of an 
application does not detemiine its 
RAM requirements - a program just a 
few bytes long could literally grab 
GIGAbytes of RAM in one go. In 
practice of course, this rarely 
happens, but assume most packages 

continued an page 21 







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200 TOP TIPS 




limited power modules 
capable of driving about 
2Mb RAW and a single 
external drive. Internal 
RAM expansions will 
cause extra drain and 
may shorten the life of 
botn the PSU and the 
machine. External units 
are less of a problem 
since most come 
supplied with (or 
support} an extra PSU. 
If you need 2Mb or 



The Cortex 1Mb - so 
easy to Install that the 
instructions are on the 
back of the box 

continued itam page 1 9 

require twice their own 
size (in bytes) of RAM 
and you won't go far 
wrong. 

QOWhatwililt 
O ^ cost? - If one 

thing is certain, RAM is 
never cheap and the 
price fluctuates all the 
time. Interestingly, the 
price (and availability) of silicon is 
often blamed although few RAM 
chips are manufactured from silicon 
and utilise a system of evaporated 
metal oxide. The price of an upgrade 
is determined by two major factors: 
basic capacity and upward 
expansion. The basic configuration 
determines the initial price. The type 
and design of the expansion fixes the 
future cost - this point is especially 
applicable to A500 expansions. 

O O Wi'l 't be compatible? - 

OO Owners of A2000 and similar 
machines should have few problems 
with compatibility between boards 
since the expansion bus system is 
quite well defined. The problem is 
aggravated with the A500 since 
some manufacturers shoehorn their 
internal boards into the memory map 
with software patches. More costly, 
external expansions such as those 
made by Supra, Power and Cortex 
use a well defined standard called 
Autoconfig™ which solves most, if 
not all, the problems. The final proof 
of the pudding is testing it - and 
then it's often too late. If budget 
allows, stick with external boards. 
(One exception to this rule is the 
512K and 1Mb trapdoor cards.) 

O JQ Is power drain a problem? - 

Ot' Again, this is something 
where the bigger machines score 
over their baby brothers. On larger 
Amigas, the internal PSU is designed 
to cope with large RAM expansions 
and other cards. The story with the 
A500/600 is somewhat different 
though. Both these machines have 




The Zydec 512K - one add-on for the A 500 and the 
A500 Plus you definitely shouldn't foi^et 

more, prefer one of these to the 
internal option. 



351 



Four or 16 chips? - In theory 

' at least, RAM is RAM and the 
story ends there. Chip manufacturers 
are always getting more bytes-per- 
inch and therefore, the number of 
chips required to fulfil a certain 
memory requirement drops. An 
interesting aside to this is: as the 
chip count is reduced so are both the 
power consumption and the heat 
dissipation. Also, four chip designs 
are less complex, cheaper to 
produce in large quantities and 
probably more reliable. Given the 
option, the lower chip count is 
usually the better bet. 



36 



Chip or Fast RAM? - This 

question only applies to the 



A500/600 and A3000 machines. 
The first expansion you buy will 
probably be Chip RAM since these 
are the cheapest. (On the A3000, 
you can swap the bits around as you 
add more RAM.) The vast majority of 
applications don't care what sort of 
RAM you have - so long as there is 
enough to go around. Chip RAM is 
gobbled up by screen displays and 
the sound system so this is the most 
important. 

O ^7 S12K trapdoor expansion 
O f with the A500 Plus - As a 

rule this is a waste of money, unless 

the budget is tight. RAM added to the 
trapdoor is automatically mapped for 
the custom chips and the A500 Plus 
supports 2Mb of CHIP RAM. As has 
already been mentioned. Chip RAM is 



the most important for most 
applications, so get as much as you 
can afford. The choice for A600 
owners is much more limited at 
present, and it seems unlikely a 512K 
expansion of this type will be 
produced. Such a device would be a 
white elephant anyway, 

ly Q Through ports - Sideways RAM 

«J O expansions for the A500/500 

Plus come in two groups: those with 
throughports and those without. In a 
perfect world, Autoconfig™ should 
take care of RAM in any number of 
external devices up to the machine's 
theoretical memory limit. In practice 
throughports can be more trouble 
than they are worth: some A590s for 
instance are known to suffer 
problems with the Supra 500RX. 
However, a RAM expansion without a 
through port is a dead end - so if you 
cannot afford a combination unit, 
prefer the design with a throughport. 

O Q '*'' emulators? - Some of the 

O*/ more recent hardware based 
PC emulators such as the new Vortex 
card for the A1500/2000 series 
machines have their own RAM 



anyway. Emulators for the A500/5OO 
Pius are more problematical. Both AT- 
Once and the KCS Powerboard will 
use any Autoconfig™ RAM - the KCS 
system supplies its own RAM anyway. 
If you have a PC emulator, or intend 
to buy one, avoid internal RAM 
expansions - especially those with 
software patches. 

/i f\ Combination units - Combo 

T'" cards, those incorporating 
RAM expansions with accelerators, 
hard disk controllers - you name it - 
are always going to cost more in the 
short term because of the extra bits. 
However, on the A500 at least, 
combinations represent very good 
value for money because they can 
save a lot of incompatibility problems 
in the future. 

However, you should be careful to 
choose a card which will fulfil your 
RAM requirements both now and in 
the future. The A590, for instance, 
only supports an extra 2Mb of on- 
board RAM, This might seem 
attractive initially, but it soon gets 
used up. A1500/2000 owners have it 
easier and there are generally less 
compatibility problems. 







as ic is by far the most 
popular programming 
language. Just about 
everyone who has ever 
begun to program has started with 
Basic. It Is easy to learn, easy to 
understand, and offers far more 
power than many people think. Here 
are some tips to help the would-be 
programmers {and the more 
experienced but lax programmers) on 
their way: 

K "t Design before you code - 

TC J. Always create a logical 
'blueprint' of the program you wish to 
write. You are not aiming for 
perfection. Just something to guide 
you on the way! 

K f\ Documentation - Do produce 
^^ at least skeleton 
documentation while you are 

developing the program rather than 
afterwards. This way the program is 
still fresh in your mind. 

JK O Use comments - It may be 

^O obvious to you now what 
actions your masterpiece performs, 
but it may not be in a couple of years! 
Use comments to divide the program 
into named sections to make the 



program far more readable. See Figure 
1 on page 22 for an example. 

M Clear variable names - 
Nowadays Basic allows the 
use of long variables names, so make 
the most of this facility to create 
helpful, descriptive, code. 

Admittedly code written in this 
style will take longer to type, but it Is 
guaranteed to make more sense than 
the cryptic use of variables named 'A', 
'B' and so on. 

JR ^ Minimize the use of globals ~ 

T'iJ Global variables are variables 
which can be accessed (and changed) 
from anywhere within a program. 
Although they are useful at times 
(error Indicators and program exit 
flags are examples of where global 
variables can be used to good effect) 
it is usually better to create isolated 
procedures which work with local 
copies of any data that is passed to 
them. 

K /^ Keep your code clean - Isolate 

^O any control sequences that 
your program might need so that the 
main body of code is not littered with 
awkward-to-read statments like this 
MIDI/serial-port related fragment... 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE T6 • AUGUST 1 992 



200 TOP TIPS 



BASIC PROGRAMMlHG/mKTOP PUBLISHING 



PRINTtt 1,CHRS(&H90 or J 
channel) +CHR$(note)+CHR$ J 
(velocity) ; 

Embedding these types of control 
sequences will make yoyr programs 
look messy and more difficult to 
maintain. The best idea is to isolate 
the sequences into separate 
subroutines or functions. 

For the above example the 
preliminary user-defined function 
definition... 

TSBF FNKciteOnS(note,cli)=CHR$ J 

(&H90 OR J 

ch ) +CHR$ ( note ) +C[m$ ( 64 ) 

would enable ttie rest of the program 
to send its data by using the more 
readable expression... 

PRINTS 1, J 

Fl]HbteOn$ ( note , channel ) 

K ^ Isolate I/O Code - Try to 
Tt ■ eliminate all I/O and 
machine dependent statements from 
the main parts of code. Instead 
access these facilities indirectly. You 
do not want statements such as the 
following... 

PROKPT$="Please enter a J 

record number" 

COLOUR 1,4 

SAY TRANSLATES (PROMPTS) J 

IMPOT 

This would mean that the program 
was linked to the computer on which 
the program was writtten. The best 
idea is to reference the facilities 
using function calls, subroutines or, 
subprograms... 



REM COLLECT - MATRIX 


COLLECT: 


FOR R0W%=1 TO m 


FOR COLUMN! =1 TO W% 


PRIWT"A ("rROW%;",";COLUMN%;'') . ,, " ; 


INHJT 0{RCm%,COLnMN%) 


A { ROW% , COLUMN* ) =U ( RCW% , COLUMN! J 


NEXT COLUMN% 


INVERSE. L(RCW%,R0W%)=1 'Not relevant to the collection of 


'the matrix - it's just that this 


'input loop is a convenient place 


'to set up an identity matrix. 


NEXT ROW* 


REM — 


Figure 1: Use REM stotements to Isolate, and document, your code sections 


FKSet ScreenColour ( RED ) 


below can be useful... 


GOStJB tIserMeBsage 




GOSDB Collect Input 


REM DO-NOTHING 


REM Get record nuiriber 


DoNothing : 




RETURW 


These are useful if you want to write 




programs that can be easily moved 


Supposing an input value S has five 


to other machines. In these cases, 


different possible states and, 


aim to eliminate all screen graphics 


depending on the value of S, a 


commands, data input or other I/O 


program has to execute one of five 


and 0/S specific references from the 


subroutines. The code could be 


main body of the code and place 


based on an arrangement such as... 


them in a set of isolated subroutines 




at the end of the program. To get 


IF (S >0 AND S <6) THEN OB J 


such a program running on another 


S QOStJB A, B, C, D, E 


machine you will probably have to re- 




write most of those I/O or 0/S 


Where A, B, C, D and E are the 


related cails... but the important 


subroutines which perform the 


point is that you are unlikely to have 


processing associated with the five 


to alter the main body of code. 


values. During development some of 




these may be non-operational (or 


JR QSubroutines which do nothing 
~rO- You might be forgiven for 


non-existent), so you need some way 


of preventing certain subroutines 


thinking that subroutines which do 


from being executed. Suppose you 


nothing serve little purpose. In fact 


wanted to prevent subroutine C from 


routines such as the one shown 


being used in the above example - 



just replace the reference to 
subroutine C with a reference to a 
subroutine that does nothing, like 
this... 

IF (S >0 AND S <6) THEN ON J 
S GOSUB A, B, DoKothing, D, E 

The approach is useful when you 
have a large number of possible test 
values and where not all values 
require a subroutine to be executed. 
One example is the execution of 
routines performed when control 
characters are detected. On the 
basis of detecting keypresses 
related to particular control codes 
you may wish to perform certain 
subroutines but in ail probability you 
will not wish to support all possible 
control characters. Executing a 'Do 
Nothing' routine for all control 
characters that you do not wish to 
support provides an easy solution. 

/i O ^'^" ^^^ ^^^ unexpected - 

T' 17 Your program should be user- 
friendly but don't expect the user to 
be program-friendly. Assume that the 
user will make all possible mistal<es 
as far as use and data input are 
concerned and plan so that your 
programs do not come to a grinding 
halt when a user puts a wrong disit 
into the drive or supplies a wrong 
input value. Programs should provide 
error messages (and helpful 
prompts) to guide the user back on 
course. 

rZ f\ ^^^P '* S'liple - Clarity will 
iJVr pay off. Remember, one day 
you may need to look at (and 
understand) the code you wrote 
years ago in order to make changes. 




Whether you are 
producing the 
occasional single 
sheet flyer, a fanzine 
or even a whole book, you'll find the 
following tips Invaluable for getting 
the very l>est results out of your 
desktop publishing pacltage. 

[J "I Memory considerations - To 

\M -I. conserve memory (and 
increase the speed at which the 
program operates) worl^ on a 2- 
colour non-interlaced screen. 
Professional Page has switches for 
this in its Preferences menu; 
Page Stream users will need to alter 
the Tool Types of the program's icon 



so that C0L0RS=2 and 
IMTERLACE=No. 

Mennory can be further conserved 
by opening the program on the 
Workbench. Alter PageStream's or 
Professional Page's SCREEN Tool 
Type so that SCREEN=Workbench. 
Alternatively, Professional Page 
users can open the program on a 2- 
colour non-interlaced screen and 
then switch the Worl<bench off from 
the Preferences menu, which 
conserves even more memory. 

^ f\ Keeping it fast - 

iJ^Compugraphic fonts, bitmaps 
and structured drawings all take time 
(and memory) to render, so it mal<es 



|ianc3l 




100% 



/. 



7K^^;i 



^/ 



Wi' 



If^ 



25% 



't^r' 






^H''.' .s-r 




mf'' 


□ lock ll. 


ansparent 


^L ' 


□ Hide Contsnti GBox FraHS | 


mbk^ 


T9xt Hrap ; ®Non9 


(fjMidost 


*V%I 


QRfc tangle 


Qleit 


W'^m 


Qlrpss"'^ 


QRiaht 


m^^u 




Exclude 


v{3* 


RttatloR AnsleE^° 








T»p EEEm 






BQt.Esmii 








•• 


HidthES^EI 


Ht.Qioa 

VIlEliTiW 


n," 


Scale: X^JBIJiliH 






] 1 Cancel [ 




1 OK 1 iBitnap Info 







ill 



\ 



V 



/D 



o^ 



</ 




ts DTP a prickly subject? Scaling down pictures and other DTP tips will 
become second nature with the tricks of the trade presented on these pages 



H 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



DESKTOP PUBUSHIHG/SOUND SAMPUHG 



200 TOP TIPS 



sense to cut as many comers as 
possible. 

• Professional Page users - 
Once you have a bitmap scaled to 
the size you want it, X-out the graphic 
by selecting the Hide button in the 
Alter Current Box requester. If you're 
working with a structured drawing, 
make sure Wireframe mode is on, or 
eise you'il have to wait for all the fill 
patterns and line thicknesses to 
render. When some text has been 
imported and requires no more 
editorial changes, hide the boxes 
containing that text so that it gets 
'greeked' instead of rendered. 

• PageStream users - 

You can't hide individual bitmaps, so 
import, size and position all the 
bitmaps you require right at the start, 

then toggle the Show Pictures option 
in the View menu to cross them ail 
out. 

[? O 24-blt pictures - Professional 
•JO Page users do not need lots 
of memory to import 24-bit pictures, 
but they'll need a fair bit to be able 
to print them to a Preferences 
printer. 

The Amiga's printer. device 
supports only up to 4,096 colours, 
so if you are printing to a non- 
PostSchpt printer you may as well 
convert your 24-bit pictures down to 
HAM to save memory, time and disk 
space. Remember that HAM pictures 
can be interlaced, but they must be 
lo-res, so scale the width to 50 per 
cent of the height to keep the aspect 
ratio. 

[^ yj Bitmaps - Amiga bitmaps 
Ott have a resolution of 75 dpi. 
To reduce the blockiness of printed 
output, scale bitmaps down (within 
the DTP program) to at least 50 per 
cent. If your printer's graphics output 
resolution is 300 dpi, 25 per cent is 
the smallest you can go before the 
software has to start removing data 
from the bitmap; if your phnter is 
240 dpi (9-pin) that figure is 31,25 
per cent, for 360 dpi printers (24-pln 
and bubble jet) it Is 20.83 per cent. 

C S Squaring pixels - Screen 
0«J pixels are not exactly square, 
and at some resolutions (like med- 
res) they are positively rectangular. 
You can help the DTP software to 
make a better job of scaling and 
printing them by preparing bitmaps 
beforehand by converting them to hi- 
res interlaced format, 

Do this with Art Department by 
selecting Hi Res and Lace from the 
screen controls panel, and then (if 
necessary) enlarge the Y dimension 
(height) by 200 per cent. Do this in 
Deiuxe Paint by selecting Screen 
Format from the Picture menu and 
selecting the Hi-Res button. When 



the software asks if you want the 
image stretched to fill the page, say 
'Yes'. 

If your bitmap contains too many 
colours for hi-res mode, convert to lo- 
res non-interlaced. 

P? £* Mono printing - If you are 
t/\J printing to a monochrome 
printer then there's not a lot of point 
in using coloured pictures, converting 
them to 16 levels of grey beforehand 
will save time and memory. 

The best tool to do this with is 
Art Department Professional, but 
Deluxe Paint is also able to convert 
to 16 greys, even from HAM, 
although you have to put some work 
in. 

Rrst load the picture and then 
change its Screen Format to 16 
colours. Then bring up the palette 
tool and change colour to black 
and colour 15 to white. Click on the 
black colour, click on Spread, click 
on the white colour. Now select 
Remap from the Color menu to get 
the picture looking normal again, 

[" n Screen frequency - 

O f PageStream users can take 
advantage of the Screen Frequency 
feature of the Edit Coordinates 
requester to get better greyscale 
output. 

If your printer is 300 dpi, make 
the screen frequency figure 75 to get 
the printer to produce 16 greyscales. 
increasing that figure to (say) 100 
will give you a higher apparent output 
resolution (the dots will be phnted 
closer together), but fewer levels of 
grey will be produced. Decreasing the 
screen frequency to (say) 60 will 
allow more levels of grey (handy for 
256 greyscale TIFFs) but the 
apparent resolution will decrease 
as the dots will be printed further 
apart. 

360 dpi printers should have a 
screen frequency of 90 to get 16 
greyscale output, 240 dpi printers 
should have a screen frequency of 
60. 

ff Q ^"'■'wPrint Professional- 
ly O Professional Page and 
PageSetter II users will get much 
better greyscale output If TurtJoPrint 
Pro^ssionat is doing the dithering, 
rather than Preferences. 

If you find that pictures are 
coming out too dark, adjust 
TurtoPrint'a Gamma Correction 
upwards slightly and try again. 

Each picture will be different, so 
you will need to experiment each 
time to get the best results, if you 
have more than one greyscale picture 
on a page, you may have to 
compromise with a happy medium. 

[■ Q *'**'*"" Pfinting - You're 

»J»/ asking a lot for a 9-pin, 24-pin 
or Inkjet printer to give you top 



quality colour output of HAM pictures. 
Each picture, and each pnnter, will 
give different results, but one trick 
you can try in order to get better 
printed output is to convert the HAM 
picture to 32 colours (or fewer) 
before importing into the DTP 
package. 

Again, Art Department 
Professional is the best tool to use, 
but Deiuxe Paint can do a similar 
thing by simply changing the Screen 
Format to 32 colours and letting it 
compute a new palette. The picture 
won't look as good on-screen, but it 
will probably print better. 

gy f\ Using the RAM disk - When 
Owyou are printing a desktop 
published page to a Preferences 
printer you are basically dumping a 
massive picture. 

it takes time for the software to 



create that picture in memory, time to 
transfer it to the printer, and time for 
the printer to print it. 

You can speed things up, if you 
have the memory, by using the CMD 
tool in order to send the output to a 
RAM file Instead of the phnter, and 
then using the Copy command to 
send the file to the printer for 
printing. 

Double click the CMD icon, and 
then 'print' your page or document. 
When It has finished, quit the DTP 
program and open a CU or Shell. 
Type the command 

COPY RAM!CMD_FIIiE TO PAR: 

and the page/document will get 
printed. 

Depending on what you are 
printing, this method can reduce 
printout times by up to 25 per cent. 



"E 




if you can afford it, then dump the sample editor that came with your 
sampler and treat yourself to a copy of AudloMaster 4 



f your samples don't quite 

I come up to scratch, or you're 
confused by the plethora of 
poorly documented Sound 
Tracker programs around, 
read on and gain some handy 
Insights into the world of Amiga 
sound 

/? 1 Quality - The quality of the 
Xj J. samples that are obtainable 
from any sampler will only be as good 
as the source signal that you feed it. 
If you're sampling from a crummy 
tape deck, then the results that you 
get won't be that good. Unless you're 
sampling real world sounds (speech. 



for example) then always try to 
sample from CD. Even the cheapest 
CD players will consistently give you 
much better results than audio tape 
simply because of the cleaner audio 
signal that a CD can output. 

/? n Leads - Another equally 
\J^ important factor to consider 
when you sample from an audio 
source is the quality of the audio lead 
that you use to connect the sampler 
and your audio source together. Many 
samplers come with their own 
sampling lead, but these are rarely 
any good. If you can spare a couple 
of pounds, then take a thp to your 



G 
T 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE !6 • AUGUST 1992 



23 



200 TOP TIPS 



SOUHD SAMPUNG/COmUNKAWNS 



local music technology store and 
treat yourself to a professional audio 

lead. Considering their relatively low 
price (about £5 for 3 metres), these 
leads will substantially increase the 

quality of your samples. 

/JO Microphones - If you're 
UO sampling real life sounds, 
then a decent microphone is a 
worthwhile purchase. Many samplers 
do come with their own microphones 
but I have yet to see a microphone 
that could be described as anything 
other than a total waste of space. 
Once again, a trip down to your local 
music technology store will be well 
worth the effort. Have a chat with the 
salesman - he will be able to advise 
you on which microphone is best for 
you. You may have to pay at least 
£40 for a decent mike, but the 
results will be worth it, 

/J K Stereo and mono - When 

Ot' purchasing a sampler, don't 
ignore mono samplers in favour of 
the trendier stereo units that have 
flooded the market. To be perfectly 
honest, stereo sampling on anything 
other than a Fairlight or a Synciavier 
(two professional samplers with price 
tags to match) is a complete waste 
of time. Stereo samples not only use 
■up twice as much memory as a mono 
sample, but they also restrict you to 




Wave goodbye to the MIDI blues. 
Sampling's a cinch with the tips 
numbered 61 to 70 

sampler, it may be worth your while 
ditching the sample editing 
software bundled with the sampler in 
favour of one of the stand alone 
sample editor programs now 
available on the market. These may 
cost you anything from £50 



T[fiERl|^+-Oct4MED-ProfM5iOMl*(v3,00) 




VQL^REK 




CItRNNGLS' -■ 



ilFllTER El E2 E3 ST£ SPEED- 033/ B3 

i PLfly am coht, sohg 

[t!!?iiiLililiBL-"-L- fL«V BLOCK D COHT. SLOCK 



triLES fflSC 

VOL /i7--#9 
INSTR MIDI SVHTH 
BLOCK TRilNS SMPtD 
EDIT RfllJGE SLIST 



— mm-2 mm— umm mm— e 



662 — 86681— 88B88F-2 76881— 8868efi1 49868— 6888S— 88688— 88866 



897 — 8ee„, 

889 — 8688^ 

819 — er" 



— eeeef 11 49688— 



99eeaF-2 78968— eesaSFH 4688a— 889661— 



nen m\iV ££882721 



\m 



IIIIIIHIIlllllllllllNIIIIHII 



1 1 1 1 H i n r r i Tr r rrrrri I t't T niT i » 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 r i f 



Choosing a Sojnd Tracker utility can be confusing unless you know what to 
look for. OctaMED shown here Is one of the most fully featured available 



a maximum sampling rate of just 
29 KHz. Very few packages support 
stereo samples, so you're uniiltelyto 
ever find a use for this facility. If the 
sampler produces good quality mono 
samples, then that's the one to go 
for. 



65 



Editing software - For the 

best results from any 



upwards, but they're streets ahead 
of any of the bundled paci<ages 
available. 

The current top two sample 
editing packages on the market are 
SunRize Industhes' Audition 4 and 
Oxxi/Aegis' AudioMaster 4, Both 
of these packages are available 
from HB Marketing on 0753 
686000. 



/J £* Sampling - if you 
viOare serious 
about your sound 
tracking sessions, then 
an absolute must is a 
sound sampler. 

Although most 
trackers come with a 
I wide selection of 
sampled instruments, 
owning a sampler will 
allow you to grab your 
own instruments adding 
a bit of individualism to 
your tracker tunes. 

If you can, always 
go for a Sound Tracker 
which has sampling 
facilities built into it. 
This will enable you 
to grab instruments, 
edit them and use them 
within your tunes 
without ever having to 
leave the comfort of 
your Sound Tracker. 

£* ^ Commercial software - 

O • Although virtually all Sound 
Tracker utilities are the same, there 
are commercial trackers available 
which are worth checking out. One 
such program is OctaMED 2 (soon to 
be upgraded to OctaMED 
Professional), a fine commercial 
tracker written by Teijo Kinnunen, the 
author of the PD tracker clone MED, 
OctaMED 2 costs just £20 and is far 
superior to the PD trackers. It offers 
score editing and the ability to play up 
to 8 samples simultaneously. For 
serious tracking, OctaMED 2 is a 
must, 

£* Q Construction - Song 
O O construction is one aspect of 
Sound Trackers which confuses many 
people. Songs are built up within a 
Sound Tracker by linking together the 



patterns that you define. Somewhere 
within your Tracker will be two 
controls marked 'Song Position', 
'Pattern' and 'Song Length', 

Song Position is simply a counter 
which dictates your position within 
the Song, Pattern defines which 
pattern number should be played for 
the current song position value and 
Song Length tells the Tracker how 
many Song Positions there are in your 
song. 

£*f\ Modular format - When 
\J *y choosing a Tracker, always 
check that the program can load and 
save modules in standard 
SoundTracker format, 

SoundTracker modules are a 
standardised file format for Tracker 
songs which will enable you to load 
and play your songs within other 
Tracker packages and even 
programming languages such as 
AMOS without having to convert them 
first, AMOS now includes direct 
support for SoundTracker format 
modules, so a Tracker that can save 
in this format is far more useful, 

^ f\ P''*^^* ''^■'^ ~ l^ahy older 

# \j Tracker utilities were tied to a 
system of preset lists containing a list 
of sampled instruments that the 
program new about. Although these 
could well be spread across several 
disks, there was no way of loading a 
sample that was not in this preset list 
without exiting the program and 
editing the preset list from within a 
separate program. 

Always check that the Tracker 
that you choose is not tied 
exclusively to a silly preset list. 
Most modern Trackers allow 
instruments to be loaded from any 
device including hard disks (some 
early trackers didn't support hard 
disksl). 




Modems open up a 
whole world of fun: 
exciting boards, free 
software, new 
friends and big telephone bills. 
Communications is notoriously 
expensive but with Amiga Shopper 
by your side, you'll be able to save 
money, and get more out of your 
modem with our top tips. 

^ "I Use Mercury - The easiest 
f X way to save money during 
comms work is to cut down the size 



of the telephone bill. Apart from 
buying a faster modem the simplest 
way of doing this is to subscribe to 
Mercury, For under a tenner you get 
about 20 per cent off non local calls - 
well worth a try, 

^ ty Keep a log - Use the log 

i £i facility of your comms package 
to keep a record of your visits to each 
BBS, There are a couple of reasons 
for wanting to do this. Firstly, It 
enables you to go back over any 

confiiiued on page 26 



34 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1992 



Computers Unlimited 



25 MHz 80386SX PQAT Emulator 
for Amiga 2000/3000/3000T. 
PC/AT Slot Support. 
Max. 1 6 MB 
PC/AT RAM 




Up to 

4MB 

for Amiga. 

MS-DOS 

IDE Hard Dislc 

Interface and 

HD Floppy Disk 

Controller* (2,88 MB). 



Golden Gate' 



A Golden Gate is the 25 MHz 
80386SX PC/AT emulator for 
Amiga 2000/3000/30O0T, As a 
bridge-slot-board it closes the 
gap between the Amiga's PC/AT 
(ISA) slots and the Zorro slots, 

A ISA expansion boards like 
EGA/VGA graphics cards, LAN 
controllers, I?AM expansions or 
SCSI host adapters are 
accessible under MS-DOS. 

A Golden Gate's PC/AT RAM 
expansion can be configured to 
a max. of 16 MB (SIMMs). Up to 
4 MB of this RAM are available 
under AmigaDOS. 512 KB RAM 
are already installed. 

A Golden Gate uses RAM 

expansions and Commodore 
compatible hard disk 
subsystems in the Zorro slot. 

A Golden Gate's IDE interface 
supports AT bus hard disk 
subsystems under MS-DOS. 

A Golden Gate supports flicker 
fixing cards and accelerators. 

Authorized Dealer: SILICA SYSTEMS 

Mail Order Hotline: 081-309 II II 

tendon Shops: 08 1-580 4000/ 07 1 -629 1234 

SidcupShop: 081-302 8811 



Golden Gate integrates the 
internal and external 360 KB 
and 720 KB Amiga floppy disk 
drives. 

*With the optional 82077A 
floppy disk controller up to 
three Internal and external HD 
floppy disk drives with 1 ,2 MB; 
1,44 MB and 2,88 MB can be 
used. 

With a standard Anniga monitor 
and no further graphics card the 
following video emulations are 
available: CGA with 16 colours, 
EGA/VGA monochrome 
graphics, Hercules, Olivetti and 
ToshibaT3100. 

Windows 3 runs unrestrictedly 
in the enhanced 386 mode and 
the protected mode. 

Golden Gate runs fully as a task 
on the Amiga. 



VORTEX COMPUHRSYSTEME GMBH 

FALTERSTRASSE 51-53 • D-7101 FIEIN 

TEl 4971 31 /5972-0 • FAX 4971 31 /5S063 



Golden Gate is compatible with 
Kickstart 1.3 and 2.0. 

With the optional 80C387SX 
arithmetic co-processor the 
performance can be increased. 

The Amiga mouse is emulated 
as a serial Microsoft mouse 
The Amiga keyboard works as 
a PC keyboard. 

The serial interface can be used 
as COM1/COM2; the parallel 
interface as LPTl under MS-DOS. 

Golden Gate offers sound, RTC 
and CMOS RAM, 

An external option connector for 
future expansions is integrated 

Yes, I would like to get more 
information about the vortex 
PC/AT emulators. 



^ 



80286 
ATonce 



80386SX 
Golden Gate 



With the installation the guaranty mieht be vraded All rompany or product names ate trademarte or registered trademark of their respective holders Golden Gate and Albnce aie registered 
tiademaiKs ot vortex Computersysteme GmbH Disttlbuted in the UK by: SDL. 10 Ruxley Comer Industrial Estate. Ed^ngton Way. Sidcup. Kent, DA14 5SS, Tfel 081-309 5000, FSx. 051 -300 5440. 



200 TOP TIPS 



COrniAUNKAWHS- 




D 



Inspired by the comins tips and you 
don't have a modem - well, lucky for 
you, a Hyundai modem Is one of the 
bargain buys on our mail order pages 

(otilliuMd f rtml poga 24 

problems you had and see what the 
reasons were. If you had trouble 
downloading a file for instance, you 
can Chech to see if you spelt the 
name wrong. Secondly, you can use 
the log file to read messages you 
didn't have time for, or to go bach 
over a conversation with the sysop 
and write down that telephone 
number. 



■ \1( 



I 



Know your software - Your 

communications software has 
been designed to provide you with 
the facilities to get the most out of 
your comms worh - use it! Get to 
know what facilities are there, and 
how they worh. 

Things lihe the scrollbach facility 
in NComm are particularly useful. A 
few minutes spent learning how your 
package works will pay off the first 
time you need to show the sysop a 
piece of a message you just read or 
you want to write down some 
information offline. 

^ Jj Know your BBS - Every 
4 ^ minute you spend on-line is 
another minutes worth of charges. 
Become aquainted with the boards 
you call regularly. Take a look 
around, even at areas you aren't 
interested in at the moment, and try 
to remember where all the 

L interesting things are hept. Learn 

I how the file search facilities worh; it 
will make it easier when you need to 
find that elusive file. 

You can use your log files to go 

' bach over the board off-line, 
especially if you are loohing for 
something in particular. Once you 
know where it is you can go straight 

' to it when you get on-line, saving 



time and, more 
importantly, money. 

Download the 
file lists and heep them 
for later, it is much easier 
to find a file off-line when 
BT aren't involved. 



75: 



Off-line readers - 

If you are a 
member of a conferencing 
system such as CIX or 
Compuseme, or you enjoy 
reading the messages on 
your local BBS then get 
yourself an off-line reader. 
Offline readers allow you 
to read all the messages 
you want in the comfort of 
your own home, without 
the shadow of the phone 
bill hanging over you. 
Although the 
download size for an off- 
line reader can be pretty large, often 
a couple of hundred hilobytes of 
data, the savings are well worth it 
and it will pay for itself within a few 
days of using it. 

If you don't read the messages 
on your BBS, you're missing out on 
an important aspect of comms, the 
chance to mahe new friends, and 
find out things you never knew you 
didn't know. Give it a go - you don't 
know what you're missing. 

7 /? Scripts - If your 
f O communications program 
offers you a script facility, use it. A 
good script can save a lot of time, 
and also protects you against 
accidents such as you forgetting your 
password. 

As you are using a board, think 
about how scripts could be used to 
automate processes other than 
logging on. Downloading files is 
one particular case in point, where 
the same information is entered 
every time the operation is 
performed and a prime candidate for 
a script. 



^^ Stay friendly - Remember, 
f f when you are calling a BBS 
you are a visitor on another persons' 
computer. That person has hlndly 
spent a lot of their spare time and 
money to create somewhere for you 
to call, they don't want you messing 
about. 

Follow these guidelines and you 
won't upset anyone; 

• Be polite. People don't call bulletin 
boards to be insulted or offended. 



The Connections Interdial modem - 
another favourite. No more muddles 
with modems when you've followed 
our top comms tips 

Bear this in mind when you are 
leaving messages. 

• Upload files. To be successful a 
board needs to heep a steady flow of 
new files. Most sysops will try and do 
this anyway but If every caiier 
uploads a couple of files a weeh, the 
sysop'sjob is made easier and the 
board becomes more successful. 
You'll also be given higher security, 



ISvsteH Iransfw Con Translate Screen Plicnp Dial 
jstart ASCII CjFtia>«|3J| 





more time on-line, and be allowed to 
download more software. 

• Follow the rules. Read and abide 

by the rules of the BBS. It's not 
difficult and it will save a lot of 
hassle, 

• Don't drop the earner unless you 
absolutely have to. The most 
annoying thing for a sysop Is a user 
who can't be bothered to log off. 
Hanging up in the middle of a 

session can cause 
problems, sometimes 
even tahlng the board 
off-line. 

• Don't hassle the 
sysop. Don't keep paging 
the sysop If you have a 
problem - leave him a 
message. Even the most 
fnendly sysop will get fed 
up of being continually 
paged, and a message 
will save you money as 
■vveii. 






NComm Is one of the most popular comms packages. But remember 3 
package is sometimes only as good as Its user 



Always hang up - 

Always hang up 
when you leave a board. 
It doesn't happen often 
but sometimes a bug in 
the bulletin board 
software will cause it to 
not drop you off the line 
when you exit. You will 
then end up there sitting on the line 
clocking up a huge bill. 

The most well known example of 
this is a bug In CIX which after 
logging you off and telling you to 
hang up, sometimes places you back 
at the login prompt. On a multi- 
tashlng machine such as the Amiga 
it is all too easy to swap to the 
Worhbench screen and begin playing 
with the software you've 
downloaded, leaving the comms 
pachage sat at the CIX prompt. 

70 '^""'^ leave it alone - Comms 
■ */ packages are wonderful, 
scripts are wonderful, off-line readers 
are even more wonderful. 
Unfortunately they are far from 
perfect. No matter how good you 
think your scnpt is, you should never 
leave it running when you aren't 
around. 

It Is easy for a stray bit of line 
noise to upset the script completely. 
When this happens, one of two 
things will go wrong. 

The most lihely scenario is that 
the scnpt will just stop and stand 
there clochlng up on-line charges 
until the BBS times out and throws 
you off. Worse though is the scnpt 
that wanders off on its own through 
menus it was never supposed to 
see, trying to download files and 
leave messages to people who don't 
exist. 



26 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUI 1 6 • AUGUST 1992 



COIi/mUNiaWHS/UilHG THESHiU 



200 TOP TIPS 



Q f\ Support your sysop - Bulletin 

OV/ boards are usually run on a 
voluntary basis. 

The system operator gives up liis 
free time, and very often a 
substantiai amount of money, to 
provide you with a service. Apart from 
respecting his wishes, uploading files 
and generally being a nice person, 
there are pienty of ways you can 
encourage your sysop. 

When you first visit a board, let 
the sysop l<now what you thought. Be 
constructive though, simply saying 
that yoii didn't like it is no use. The 
opposite is true as well, just saying 
that you liked the board isn't much 
help. Try and offer at least some 



suggestions as to why you liked it, 
and any areas that could be improved 
on. 

Report any problems you may 
have to the sysop. Particularly things 
that could be considered "bugs". For 
instance, if a particular menu option 
doesn't worl<, let him i^now so that he 
can fix it, 

Rnally, if the board has a 
membership scheme, and it's not too 
expensive, join it. Not many boards 
do have a scheme but supporting 
those that do is well worth the little 
cost. [Mot only do you get increased 
access but it encourages the sysop 
to do more with the board, something 
that benefits everyone. 



iwiiiimiiin 



another disk, and AmigaDOS will look 
there instead for the required 
directory. 

Getting a list of the files held in 
the Joyce directory, held in the Irish 
directory, ail on the disk ModemLit, 
would be done as follows: 

Dir ModemLit ! Irish/ J(^ce 

It is possible to specify which files 
you want to list by the means of a 
wildcard. 

Represented by the '#?' 
characters, a wildcard means 'any 
characters'. The Dir #? command 
will behave exactly as normal, but 
the Dir #?.iff will only list those files 
whose names end with '.iff*. 

MCD - This command changes 
the current directory (the one 
which will be listed with a simple Dir 
command, and which Is named as 
part of the AmigaDOS prompt). 

Followed simply by a '/' 
character, it will move one level up In 
the directory hierarchy. Followed by a 
':', it will move to the root directory 



Some operations on the 
Amiga are made so much 
easier by using the Shell. 
Some operations just can't 
be done any other way. Using the 
Workttench is all very well, but it's 
only once you click on that Shell 
Icon that you can really get your 
hands dirty and find out exactly 
what Is going on. 

Here we provide a brief 
Introduction; If you need more 
Infoimation don't foiget our regular 
Cracking The Shell column by 
Mark Smiddy, which covers just 
about every conceivable use of 
AmigaDOS. 

Q "I Files - A file is a collection of 
O J, information stored on a disk. 
It could be a program, or simply a 
group of data for use by other 
programs. 

Each file has associated status 
information stored with It, which 
records such things as when the file 
was last altered and whether or not it 
is a program file. All of the Shell 
commands are held on disk as 
program files. 

Q i\ Directories - These are the 
0*rf Shell equivalent of Workbench 
drawers. They are arranged in a 
hierarchical, tree-like fashion, and 
may contain further directories and 
files. Take a look at the above 
diagram for an Illustration of this 
Idea - often it's easier to think 
pictohally. 

At the top of the hierarchy is a 
directory termed the 'root'. It is 
denoted by the ':' symbol. The root 
directory of another disk is specified 
by the disk name followed by a 



root (Modern Lit:) 



I 

English 



lode 



Arrerican 



Irish 
(ModernLit:lrish) 



French 



Ysats Joyce 

[ModemLit: I rish/Joyce 



Ulysses 

(ModernLpt:lrish/Jc)yc©/UlysseE 



Directories are organised In a hierarchical structure often called a 'tree'. In 
fact, the shape is more like an upside down tree, with the root at the top. The 
AmigaDOS path to the directories Is shown in brackets 



colon. A directory further down the 
hierarchy is specified by supplying Its 
name after the colon. If the directory 
is not immediately 'below' the root, 
then any Intervening directories must 
also be named, each of them being 
separated by a '/' character. 

Q Q Dir - Dir Is an AmigaDOS 
Q%J command that produces a 
listing of all the files held In a 
directory. Normally, the listing is 
given for the current directory - the 
one named In the Shell's prompt. 
Any directories held within the 
current one are marked '(dir)'. 

It is possible to get a listing of 
files in a different directory by using 
that directory's name (and those of 
any others between it and the current 
one, all separated by the '/' 
character) as part of the command. If 
the directory is above the current one 
in the hierarchy, then the '/' 
character must be used Isefore the 
directory name to instruct AmigaDOS 
to look one level up. Alternatively, 
the ':' character tells AmigaDOS to 
look from the root directory on the 
disk. Precede this with the name of 



of the current disk. 

A directory name can also be 
specified with CD, but if it is anything 
other than directly below the current 
directory in the hierarchy, then a path 
to it must be specified. 



85 



Makedir - This creates a new 

directory inside the current 



The name of the new directory is 
specified as part of the Makedir 
command, but must be separated 
from it by a space. The newly 
created directory will initially be 
empty. 

Q C Copy - The copy command, 

Ovf funnily enough, copies files. 
Following the command comes the 
source file, then, after a space, the 
destination where the copy should be 
placed. 

Both source and destination can 
be specified with full AmigaDOS 
paths. If the name of the destination 
file is omitted, then the source file 
name Is used. In this case, wildcards 
can be used to copy several files 
with only a single command: 



ccjpy grabs t#?. iff article: 

Q ^ RAM; - This Is the RAM disk, 
O ■ behaving like an ordinary 
disk although much more quickly 
and with the information held in 
memory. 

If you are using a single drive 
machine, it is useful to copy often 
used commands into RAM: so that 
you won't have to insert the 
Workbench disk whenever you use 
^ne of these commands, thus 
saving time and irritating disk 
swapping. 

The RAM: disk can also be used 
as an intemiediary store when 
copying groups of flies from one 
disk to another on a single drive 
system. 

Q Q '-'''' ~ ^^'^ '^ ^" advanced 

OOform of the Dir command. As 
well as listing the files In a directory, 
it will display the status information 
and size of each file. 

The command has many other 
possibilities. Its output can be sent 
to another file by use of the 
command To following it, followed 
Itself by the name of a destination 
file. 

The options available are far too 
complex to go into here in such a 
short space - refer to Cracking The 
Shell each month for more details 
and handy tips. 

OQ Startup-sequenco - This Is a 
O*/ text file containing a number 
of AmigaDOS commands. 

The startup-sequence is a type of 
file which is known as a script. It 
behaves in a similar manner to a 
program when run. 

Each of the commands in the fife 
are executed In turn, as if a user 
were typing them one by one at the 
keyboard. Think of it as a way of 
creating your own AmigaDOS 
commands by joining together 
existing ones. 

The startup-sequence is a 
specialised script which is executed 
every time the Amiga is switched on 
or reset, it performs various set-up 
flinctions, such as telling the Amiga 
which nationality of keyboard to use, 
and where to look for certain, often 
used files. 

It is possible to modify the 
startup-sequence, although it's 
advisable to make a back-up first, 
using the Copy command (only ever 
do this with a copy of your 
Workbench disk, as tampering may 
stop your Amiga from booting up 
altogether). 

Q /\ Ed - Ed is the AmigaDOS text 
Uvr editor. It is like a very simple 
word-processor, and is mainly used 
for creating and altering script files 
such as the startup-sequence. Just 
type Ed at the prompt to use it. 



c 

7 






AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1992 



27 



200 TOP TIPS 



CMOOSIHG AH ACCUiRATOR 



ib^^LiS^T^^T^^S^~ 'iirshu -til 'inyjiv-^ii'i i'Mj&il'i ) LUfimjia imf S 



i'il'fltf/tilBi! S'Lliiil 



jkmiilttfjl iteilih fifjiJI 




The program above is used to rate the speed of your accelerator compared to 
standard Amiga set-ups, just so you can be sure your machine realty Is fast 



[n^ (^cte; ON muKi Mede: Ofi 

iaja Cai3»:6H tSursI ModelWF J!£j^lMi, 




V 







ext to a hard disk, your 
accelerator could be the 
most expensive add-on 
that you buy for your 
Amiga, and in some cases they can 
be more expensive than your Amiga 
itself. Consequently, with the huge 
jungle of different ones you can get, 
it is vital that you get the right one 
for you. 

The accelerator market can be 
very confusing, not only because of 
the range of models, but also due to 
the range of prices. The cheapest 
ones start at under £1S for a 68010 
chip, and if you have the money it is 
quite possible to spend over 
£1,500. With this In mind, I shall 
attempt to untangle this and make 
that decision a little less of a 
headache. 

f\ 1 Do you really need one? - 

tj ±. Accelerator cards are for 
running high powered applications, 
such as DTP or ray tracing, much 
faster. If you just use your machine 
for occasional word processing, 
games and perhaps some AMOS 
programming, it is unlikely that you 
need a fast accelerator card - your 
money would protialaly tie better 
spent on a large hard disl< or other 
hardware add-ons. 

/\ f\ Consider your needs - You 

»/ M can save a lot of money at 
this stage. If you do a lot of ray 
tracing and other processor intensive 
graphics work then you definiteiy 
need a good FPU (Floating Point 
Unit), either a 68882 or a 68881. If 
you are on a tight tjudget and are 
buying your accelerator to generally 



speed up your Workbench and 
programming environment, you 
probably don't need to w^orry about 
such gadgets as Memory 
Management Units, or possibty 
floating point co-processors, and it 
might be better to consider getting a 
faster, or better processor instead. 

C\ ^ Hard disk controllers - Quite 
»/ O a fevi/ of the A1500/2000 
accelerator cards come with built-in 
fast SCSI hard disk controllers. 
These are vi^ell wonU considering if 
you do not already own a hard disk 
card - they v^ill be considerably 
faster than ordinary plug in cards as 
they are specially optimised to work 
with the faster processor and faster 
32-bit RAM. 

Q « 32-bit RAM - From the 
5/ r» 68020 upwards, the 
processor is 32-bit, This means that 
it can access a whole 32-bits (4 
bytes) of data In one go. All current 
Amigas except for the A3000 series 
have 16-bit RAM, which means that 
whatever the processor is, 68020 
■030 and '040 included, they can 
only ever get 16 bits, 2 bytes in one 
go - half their potential performance. 
By spending a iittle more money on 
your accelerator card, you can get it 
with some 32-blt Fast RAM on board. 
if your programs are running in this 
32-bit fast RAM they will run at the 
full potentiai of your processor. You 
realiy want 2Mb or more 32-bit RAM, 
preferably 4Mb. If you are not able to 
afford fast 32-bit RAM on the card, 
think about getting a card that has 
the facility for you to add some at a 
later date. 



Q ^ MMUs and the 

Programmers and 
developers buying 
accelerator cards need 
to watch out for the 
68030EC and 6S040EC 
chips. The EC stands for 
'Economy': to save cost 
on the chip Motorola 
removed the MMU 
(Memory management 
unit.) The MMU is vital 
for Virtual Memory 
operating systems, such 
as Unix, in which part of 
your hard disk wili act as an 
extension to your available RAM. The 
Amiga operating system does not 
currently support Virtual Memory, but 
if you intend to buy or use Amiga 
Unix, then you must avoid the EC 
chips. Likewise developers may find 
the MMU useful, as it is able to trap 
and report illegal memory accesses. 
Amiga developer programs, such as 
Enforcer, are invaluable for large 
Amiga applications development, 
because, if your program does 
something naughty, it reports it down 
Uie serial port so you can see what 
happened and where the fault was. 

Q /? MHz-age and MIPS/MFLOPS 
»/ O - There are two basic 
performance figures that will show 
you how fast an accelerator card is. 
These are MIPS and MaOPS, MIPS 
stands for Miilions of Instructions 
Per Second, For a normal 68000 
chip this is less than 1. A 25Mhz 
68040 could manage over 20 MIPS, 
which would make it as fast as 20 
A600S. M FLO PS stands for Millions 
of Roating Point Instructions Per 
Second, 

There are a number of things 
that affect both these figures. One is 
the MHz {Megahertz), or clock 
speed, of the processor, the other is 
the availability and speed of 32-bit 
RAM. As a reference, a standard 
stock A600 runs at 7.14Mhz, and a 
stock A3000 at 25Mhz. 

To get the best from 68040 
cards you really need fast 32-bit RAM 
(wth 60 or 40ns access time). You 
would be well advised to steer clear 
of slow 68020 cards, as for very 
little extra money you can get the 
68030 chip which is far superior. 

f\ ^ 68000/68010 options - 

*/ fl These are the cheapest of the 
accelerator card options. In the case 
of the 68010 upgrade, it simply 
involves buying a £15 68010, 8 or 
lOMhz version, from an electronic 
components supplier, removing your 
existing 68000 chip and replacing it 
with the 68010. It is a plug In and go 
option. You will notice a small 
increase of speed, of up to 20%. 
There are also several 68000 
upgrades, whereby a small card fits 




The G-Force 040 Accelerator speeds 
up your machine, just as these 
accelerator tips accelerate your 
learning curve... 

in your existing 68000 socket and 
doubles the dock speed of the chip 
to around 14Mhz. These cards cost 
around £200, and their value is 
doubtful. If you are going to spend 
this amount of money it may be 
better to wait for a cheaper 68020 or 
*030 card. 

Ck Q. ^**^ 68020 - The 68020 was 

y O the first of Motorola's full 32- 
bit microprocessors. It Is capable of 
reading a full 32-blts of data at a 
time if it has access to 32-blt RAM. 
The chips have an on-board cache, 
which enatjies the processor to work 
much faster on loops and other tight 
code by storing infonnation In its own 
internal ultra-fast RAM. 

The 68020 Is available in clock 
speeds from 16 to 33Mhz. (Although 
the 33Mhz version of the chip Is 
brand new.) The 68020 does not 
ship with a MMU as standard; the 
Commodore card has a seperate 
MMU chip on the card, but if you 
want a 68020 with an MMU from 
another manufacturer, you wit! have 
to check. 

OQ ^^^ 68030 - The 68030 has 
%ftJ the MMU built into the 
processor, although the EC version 
of the chip has omitted this. It is 
faster than the '020 chip, having had 
its instruction speeds sped up. 

A 68030 clocked at 25Mhz will 
run about one and a half times as 
fast as a 68020 at the same speed. 
Cache sizes on the 68030 are also 
larger than the '020. 68030 chips 
are available at speeds from 16 to 
33Mhz, although 40 and 50Mhz 
versions of these chips are planned. 
A 25Mhz 68030 chip will manage 
around 8-12 MIPS and about 2-2.5 
MFLOPS. 

1 A A The 68040 - Currently 
J. wvFthis is the flagship of 
Motorola's processing chips. 
Technically it is nearly a RISC chip, 
as it is able to execute, on average, 
one instruction every 1.3 cycles. This 
means that a 25Mhz 68040 chip can 



2S 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



PROGRAMMIHGIHC 



200 TOP TIPS 



run at about 21MIPS. This is twice as 
fast as a 25Mhz 68030. 

Another advantage of the 68040 
is that the FPU is built in. This mal<es 
it even faster, as the R=U has been 
optimised to run at high speeds on 
tlie same piece of silicon as the 040 
chip. 

Unfortunately some of the more 
complex Floating point operations 
could not be fitted on, and have to be 



emuiated in software. This is of little 
consequence, however, as the 
68040 chip is so blindingly fast. 
Motorola also produce an EC version 
of this chip, without the twin MMUs. 
68040 chips are current available at 
clock speeds from 25Mhz to 33Mhz, 
giving a maximum MIPS of around 
29. 

Faster 40 and 50Mhz versions 
are planned. 




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;^ii--'ii 


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— Y 










fop C;x>XStjii*tjM--J 




■ 


^iPP^i 


??g!(Us?!r?siJ?ii^sT!y'""'"' 






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imSfl^HJ-r ''-'■•'■•'"■ 








^^^^^^^^^^^^^™ 


m 



The above Mandelbrot generator Is being edited In the LSE screen editor 
supplied with the excellent SAS/Lattice C development program 



Cmay be a brilliant language 
but unlike languages like 
Pascal and Moduia 2, it 
does little to guide or 
force the programmer into adopting 
good coding habits. All Is not lost 
however because the following tips 
should put some of those 'potential 
coding nasties' well and truly out of 
harm's way... 

m Parameter passing - One 
of C's greatest strengths 

is its parameter passing facilities. 
Design code units that make the 
most of this facility. 

When a lot of data is involved 
however parameter passing can add 
a significant overhead so the best 
idea then is to create structures 
which represent the parameters and 
then pass a single pointer to the 
parameter block. 

*! /\ O Brevity - Avoid highly 
-l Vl ^ compressed code styles 
like the plague. 

Despite the fact that C would 
allow this code fragment; 



if (key==HSCAPE) 

( 

CloseFilea { ) ,- 

DiaplayMessage (CLOSING) ; 

WaitToQuitO ; 

} 



to be written along these lines.. 



if (k==E) (CF() ;DM{C) ,-WTQ() ;} 

you'll gain absolutely nothing by 

doing so in the long run. The code 
will not run more quickly and trying to 
understand programs years after 
you've written them in this typw of 
condensed form would be a 
nightmare, 

■1 /XORe-useabre code -Write 

A vIO functions that are 

generally useful. Re-used code 
rapidly becomes bug-free code and of 
course using pieces of existing code 
in this way reduces the effort 

required to write your programs. 

'1 /\ JQ Public domain compilers - 

J. V^ Without detracting from 
some of the excellent work that 
people put into public domain 
software you should be aware that in 
using a public domain compiler you 
may not be able to place so much 
dependence on the compiler itself. 
Rightly or wrongly professional 
programmers tend, in the main, to 
assume that a program which 
compiles without error is syntacticaffy 
correct. To suggest that they use a 
compiler where this might not be the 
case would be extremely 
disconcerting to them. Public domain 
software, especially something as 
large and as complex as a compiler, 
is unlikely to ever achieve the 
reliability and stability of a 



commercial product. If you are using 
a public domain compiler it is 
probably wisest to take extra care in 
this area so that you assume as little 
as possible about the errors the 
compiler can catch. 

"I /\ Pf Re-useable modules - 

X Xlij Modularize and compile 
units that are generally useful. In the 
same way that individual functions 
are more useful when written in a 
general way so also are precompiled 
modules that have a well defined 
interface and this of course takes us 
into the world of the ADT (abstract 
data type). 

The philosophy underlying the 
ADT is basically simple: by defining 
the important, ie useful, properties of 
an abstract data structure, and 
defining which operations will be 
allowed, we can build an ADT 
description. When translated to real 
code this 'blueprint' becomes a 'data 
structure' building block which can 
be used to solve problems. 

By way of an example let's take 
a fairly simple ADT type, the queue. A 
queue is a set of objects logically 
arranged in Rrst- In-First-Out (FIFO) 
order. The type of operations which 
can be usefully associated with 
queue structures are well known... 
we need some means of initializing, 
adding items to, and retrieving items 



how intermediate macros calls have 
been used to enable me to work with 
any size of queue object using just 
CreateQueue(t), AddToQueue(s,x). 
RemoveFromQueue(s,x), KillQueue(s) 
and QueueEmpty(s) function calls... 

"I /\/>:Library functions - 

X \J \J Maximise the use of 
standard library functions. The effort 
which has gone into the Amiga 
system routines, Lattice/SAS and 
Manx compiler C function libraries 
(and many oth^r third-party libraries} 
is considerable. With the new AI\ISI 
standard now firmly established all C 
compilers support the ANSI specified 
core routines and, when you have a 
choice of functions to use, the best 
idea is to opt for these ANSI forms 
because it means your code will be 
that much more portable. 

"I /\ ^ Keep It simple - Code in 
X Vf f the most obvious way 
possible to start with: In the early 
stages of program development 

there is little to be gained by worrying 
about run-time efficiency and so 
forth. Your main aim should be to 
write code which is a clean, and 
easily understood, representation of 
the design or algorithm that you are 
trying to implement. Go for obviously 
recognisable variable and procedure 
names and develop your program in 



LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 



/* Queue ACT header */ 
typedef void QUEUE; 

/* Tlieae macros are used to create a slightly more friendly 

interface to the user. They just remove the need for explicit 

sizeofO, casting and address talking operations in the 

applications code */ 

#define CreateQueue(t) CreateQ(sizeof (t) ) 

#define AddToQueue ( s , x ) AddToQ(s, (UBYTE *)Sl(x)) 

#de f ine Remo veFromQueue ( s , x ) RemoveFromQ ( s , ( UBYTE * ) & [ x ) ) 

Sdefine KillQueue(s) KillQ(s) 

#define QueueEmpty (s) QEir5pty(a) 

/* These are the prototypes for the underlying; queue access 

routines which do the real work */ 

QUEUE *CreateQ(tlLONG unit_size) ; 

void KillQ (QUEUE *descriptOrj)) ; 

BOOL AddToQ{ QUEUE *descriptOrj), UBYTE *data_itera) ; 

BOOL RemoveFromQ (QUEUE *de5Criptor_p, UBYTE *data_iteni) ; 

BOOL QErrip ty ( QUEUE • des cr ipt or_p ) ; 

An ADT queue header that provides simple user-interface functions 



from, the queue in the proper FIFO 
order. 

There's not the space to go into 
internal coding details but that's not 
particularly important anyway. What 
is important is that you should aim to 
create a programmer-friendly 
interface so that the module can be 
used without the programmer 
knowing how it is implemented. The 
header file given in Listing 1 shows 



a way which allows each new routine 
to be tested as it is written (the so 
called 'incremental testing' 
approach). Once you've got the 
program running then by all means 
make any improvements, or use any 
additional coding tricks, that you feel 
are necessary. 



108 



Nesting functions - 
Development of routines 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1 992 



20 



200 TOP TIPS 



PROGRAMMING IH C/HAND SCANNING 



using the 'nested function' approacln 
is good in theory but in practice, 
when many nesting levels are used, 
the parameter passing overhead ttiat 
can buiid up can be significant factor 
as far as execution speed is 
concerned. To get speed increases 
just eliminate the unessential 
internal calls whilst leaving the 
function's main parameter interface 
intact. 

■| /\0 Assembler patches - 

M. \j*J Remember that if you use 
assembler patches you can, with 
ANSI C get the compiler to check 
your usage of the patch by creating a 
suitable prototype. If, for example, 
you've get a piece of assembler code 
which represents a GetMextTextLineO 
function that expects to b^ given a 
pointer to a line of text and returns a 
pointer of the same type you can 
force the compiler to checi< your use 
of the assembler function using a 
prototype like this: 

TEXT *GetNextTextLine (TEXT J 
*textline__p) ; 



no: 



I Pointers - The use, or 
' rather misuse, of pointers 
can cause programmers serious 
problems and because of this it's 
wise to adopt a convention of naming 
pointer variables using a_p suffix. 
This obviously doesn't stop potential 
misuse, but it is a useful reminder 
that a pointer variable is being dealt 
with, tt therefore goes some way 
towards helping reduce the likelihood 
of inadvertant misuse. A fatal, and 
common, pointer slip involves non^ 
initialization. The programmer 



declares and uses a pointer variable, 
but forgets to set it to a suitable 
initial value (or perhaps sets it to an 
incorrect value). 

With the Amiga many system 
structure pointers are used. When, 
for example, an Intuition Screen Is 
opened the OpenScreen() system call 
returns a pointer to an Intuition 
Screen structure. This type of system 
call code: 

global_Bcreenji= ( struct J 

Screen J 

* ) OpenScreen { SNewScreen) ; 

in most cases would function 
correctly, ie the OpenScreen{) call 
would set the global_screen_p 
pointer variable to the appropriate 
Screen structure address. 

The trouble is that, although the 
code itself is correct, it's not 
possible to guarantee that this line 
of code will always work. 

Why? It is because the Amiga's 
system routine OpenScreen() may 
itself fail - if your Amiga is already 
using most of its RAM then 
OpenScreenO will not be abte to 
allocate memory for a new Intuition 
Screen. 

The system tells you this by 
returning a NULL (zero) pointer rather 
than a valid Screen structure 
address. The result? If you did not 
check for a 'non-NULL pointer' value 
your program would crash the 
moment you made use of the 
global_screen_p variable. It is 
because of the possibility of system 
call failures that ail Amiga system 
calls should be tested to see that 
they have been successful. 



sing a hand scanner to 
transfer images to your 
Amiga can sometimes 
seem like a trial and error 
process. But follow these handy 
hints tielow and you'll find that 
you're getting superb scanning 
results every time. 



ou 

^^™*^ process. E 



o 
o 

(Nl 



111 



suitable picture to scan. 
The quality of the scan will always 
depend on the quality of the original 
[mage. 

It's not true that black-and-white 
photographs produce better results 
than colour ones; what's important is 
the amount of contrast, A good 
quality, bright and colourful 
photograph taken in strong light will 



scan better than a black-and-white 
photograph of the same thing. 

1"! () The right surface - Always 
J. M scan on a flat surface. If 
the surface on which the image is 
printed is uneven, slippery, or too 
small for the scanning head to roll 
over it smoothly, place a sheet of 
clear plastic or acetate over the 
image before scanning. If you 
haven't got a clear sheet of plastic 
then buy one of those clear A4 paper 
sleeves that stationers sell, and slip 
the image inside it. 



113 



Lighting - Avoid scanning 
near a strong light source. 



and measuring the brightness of the 
light that is reflected, you must make 
sure that there are no bright lights 
shining on the image or the top of 
the scanning head. Changes in the 
ambient lighting level can also affect 
the scanner's performance. 

If you are scanning from a book 
with thin pages, there is a chance 
that light emitted by the scanning 
head will be absorbed by dark 
images on the reverse side of the 
page. When this happens, turn the 
brightness wheel up and scan again. 



adjust the brightness control with 
software that scans in real-time is to 
move the scanning head on to the 
darkest part of the image and roll the 
head backwards and forwards over 
this area while gradually decreasing 
the brightness until the dark area 
just appears black. 

Touch-Up users will have to wait 
between scans for the software to 
process the image, but the principle 
is the same. 



114' 




Resolution - Scan at the 
"maximum resolution 
possible. This will usually be 400 
dots per inch (dpi), which will 
produce a large bitmap that can be 
scaled down to get the best possible 
resolution from your particular 
printer. 

Amiga biUnaps {\f¥ ILBMs) have 
a resolution of 75 dpi, no matter how 



116; 



> Moving the head - Move 
I the scanner head at a 
constant speed. Always remember 
that a single, slow and smooth pass 
of the head over the image is better 
than a series of small jerky ones. 
As the head passes over the 
image it is taking in an awful lot of 
information and passing it on to the 
computer. If you drag it too quickly it 
won't be able too keep up with you 
and the resulting scan will either be 




Because the scanner works by 
shining its own light on the image 



tf the Image is too wide to scan upright 
software to rotate It by 90 degrees 

large or small the picture is. 

Scaling not only changes the 
printed size of the picture, it changes 
the output resolution. Note that we 
are talking about output scaling here, 
not scaling or resizing a brush in an 
art package. 

Halving the output size of the 
picture increases the resolution by a 
factor of two, to 150 dpi - the image 
still contains the same number of 
dots, but they are being printed half 
the size. Reduce the picture to 25 
per cent of its original size and the 
resolution soars to 300 dpi. This is 
handy if you have a 300 dpi printer, 
such as a laser or inkjet, but not if 
you have a 24-pin dot-matrix or 
bubble jet pnnter, which have output 
resolutions of 360 dpi. To cut a long 
story short, 360 dpi printers get the 
best results when images are scaled 
down to 20.8 per cent. 



scan it sideways and then use the 



corrupted, have bits missing, or 
appear 'squashed' on-screen. 



117! 



1't tf Brightness - 



■ For your first 
' practice scan, set the 
brightness wheel to the lightest 
setting possible. The best way to 



' Pressure - Don't apply too 
much downwards pressure 
on the head. The height at which the 
scan head rolls over the paper has 
an effect on the image brightness. 
Pushing the head down on to the 
paper excludes ambient light from 
getting in underneath the scanning 
head, adding to the illumination of 
the picture, and consequently the 
amount of light reflected from it. 
Result? It makes it darker. 

So if you press downwards too 
hard you will muck up the brightness 
setting that you carefully adjusted. 

11 Q Dragging - Drag the head 
X O in a straight line. Use a 
straight edge to drag the edge of the 
scanning head against, like the spine 
of a thick and heavy book - a 
telephone directory is Ideal. The 
book needs to be heavy so that it 
doesn't slip if you accidentally push 
the scanner against it too heavily. 



30 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1992 



HAND SCANNING/DESKTOP VIDEO 



200 TOP TIPS 



Leaning on the book with your elbow 
gives it extra stability. 

11 Q Keeping It straight - If you 
J. */ find that the head is sttll 
not scanning in a straight line then it 
probably means you are pressing 
down too hard. There are two 
solutions, either ease up on the 
pressure you are appiying or get 
another heavy book and piace its 
spine on the other side of the head, 
parailei to the first book. This makes 
a guiiy aiong which you can puii the 
scanner without any chance that the 
head will wander. 



120 



Probiems of vwidth - If a 

picture is too wide to scan 



but not very high, scan it sideways 
and then rotate the IFF by 90 
degrees. This is illustrated in the 
screen grab on page 30. Only the 
Date! Hand i scan software is not 
capable of rotating scans in this way. 

If the picture is too high to use 
this trick, then try scanning the image 
In two parailei strips and then joining 
them together. 

Scanning two parallel strips is 
quite difficult but not impossible. Use 
the spine of a heavy book or even a 
ruier to guide the scanning head. Try 
to appiy the same amount of 
downward pressure on the head for 
both scans and ensure that the 
ambient lighting ievel remains the 
same. 





esktop Video can have a 
variety of meanings, 
including using your 
computer to produce and 
display graphics and animations, 
digitising, video titling, multimedia 
presentation and video production, 
either on or off the deslctop. For me, 
there are three main Ingredients 
which contribute to DTV success. 
These are liardware, software and 
application, which, when mixed 
together in the right proportions, 
make for good productions. 

1 Q "I Quality - Whatever your 
M.£l A. DTV production, quality 
should always come first. This 
doesn't mean buying broadcast 
equipment - it means using what you 
have to the best of its ability. But if 
you are recording to VCR it does 
mean using the highest quality video 
tape you can afford, since skimping 
here will invariably let down even top 
quality computer output, 

1 QQ Planning -Think about 
M.^£t your projects. Prepare 
alternative strategies. Brainstorm, 
Doodle. Fool around with your paint 
program or titling software. Work up 
a storyboard. Determine what you 
can do with the equipment available 
and that what you require can 
actually be achieved. You may need 
to decide how to put an animation 
together from various component 
parts - some pictures here, some 3D 
work there, and some words from 
somewhere else. You will often have 
to find a work-around to achieve what 
you want and familiarity with 
production techniques and 



equipment will pay dividends here, 

*| O Q Experiment - Don't be 
J. M O afraid to experiment. If you 
have a few spare minutes and you're 

tempted to get blasting with your 
favourite shoot 'em up, try out a few 
ideas with Deluxe Paint instead. It 
can be just as much fun working up 
an idea successfully, knowing that at 
the same time you are adding to your 
repertoire and knowledge. The more 
strings you have to your bow the 
more ideas and techniques you can 
contribute to a production. 

1 Q A Software - Learn the full 
Jl£i^ capabilities of your 
software. And be prepared to buy 
what you need to do the job. If you 
need high quality titling there's no 
point in using a lo-res PD program. If 
you want animation you'll need a 
program which does what you want. 
We all have our favourites - I 
personally like Deiuxe Paint, Sca!a 
and Broadcast Jitter 2 for good 
quality video work, but if your needs 
are lesser there Is plenty good 
software now available, 

I O f? Colours - If you plan to 
J. ^O work on video, colours can 
be crucial. The lower the standard of 
video format you are working on. the 
worse the colours may be affected. 
Watch out for deeply saturated 
colours, especially deep blues and 
reds, as they tend to look very 
smeary, particularly when transferred 
to VHS. Try to record your graphics 
direct to the master video tape to 
avoid the extra "generations" caused 
by editing. Don't forget that there is 



a marked difference in quality 
between crisp RGB and any 
composite video signal. 

1 Q /^ Good grabbing - if you 
M.£l\J plan to grab images from a 
video camera it's best to mount it on 
a tripod or copy stand to avoid 
camera shake. Have plenty of diffuse 
lighting to illuminate your subject 
evenly - fluorescents are good for 
this. Avoid hot spots, as these will 
tend to "burn-out" the digitised 
image. If you have a black and white 
camera you will need to use the 
colour filters provided with your 
digitiser to capture colour images. If 
you are using a colour camera or 
VCR you'll need an electronic colour 
splitter to separate the video signal 
into the red, green and blue 
components required by the digitiser. 
The VCR must also have a rock-solid 
freeze frame or you'll find that the 
grab is all shook up and looks rather 
nasty. Digitise in the highest 
resolution you can, as you can 
always convert images down the 
scale, but they won't look good if you 
need to convert then up. 

"I O ^ Presentation - In the early 
l^£t i days of the Amiga, DTV 
was confined to simple slide shows 
of IFF images. Now it's possible to 
put sound and vision together and 
play some very complex sequences 
back, thanks to programs like Scala, 



them on self-running disks for 
distribution, 

1 (^ Q The big picture - When 
X ^ O working for video 
applications it's very important to 
use an overscan screen format for 
your graphics. Most good software 
has overscan support these days, 
though there seems to be no 
agreement as to what the overall 
dimensions should be. 

Why overscan? Well, if you 
output a standard Amiga screen to 
video you'll notice that it doesn't fill 
the full TV screen. Overscan screens 
are significantly larger than this 
standard size, and therefore cover 
the entire monitor area, A typical 
example would be an overscan size 
of 704 X 566, while the normal 
screen size would be 640 x 512, 

"I O f| Fine words - If you are 
Lrntv doing video titling you'll 
need some typefaces. Many 
programs come with a reasonable 
selection to get you started, and you 
can use the ones that came with 
your Amiga, but inevitably you will 
need more. 

There are many sources of 
commercial fonts, and a lot of PD 
ones. Choose large typefaces 
wherever possible, as they can be 
shmnk down for more ffexibility and 
they will look better in hi-res modes. 
Better still, go for Color fonts or anti- 



T 



^ ^ 

The dark area represents 
a standard Amiga screen. 

The dashed line is the 
edge of a TV screen. 

The light area is an over- 
scan ima^e. It reaches 
past the TV boundary. 



k 




Screen size Is a very important thing to bear In mind when 
getting into desktop video ~ see tip 128 



AmigaVision and The Director, 
amongst others. Whole productions 
can be generated from your Amiga, 
with the control being handed over to 
software, and with their built-in 
transitions such programs can save 
the cost of putting everything 
together in a video studio, for all you 
need now is enough memory and 
storage space to hold all the 
components of your presentation. 
Then you can lay them straight to 
video-tape or you could even provide 



aliased fonts. These will impart 
added slickness to your titles. Or, if 
you don't need too many letters on 
screen, design your own titles 
screens with your favourite paint 
software. 

"I O r| Watch TV - Television is a 
A O vf free sou rce of DTV 

knowledge in your own home. Watch 
business, news and sports 
programmes, current affairs, wildlife 
and Saturday morning kids shows. In 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 •AUGUST 1992 



31 



200 TOP TIPS 



DfS/frOP VIDEO/MUSK COlAPOStTION 



fact, watch everything you'd normally 
watch, but be more aware of how the 
professional directors on TV do 
things. You'ii be able to pick up quite 
a few ideas this way and adapt these 
to your own taste, 

TV doesn't have all the answers 
but it can teach you plenty about 
presentation techniques. Watch the 



way they use colouf and layout, what 
kinds of text work well, and what 
kinds of backgrounds are used. 
Notice how information is usually 
presented cleanly and simply, and is 
easy to quickly digest. Borrow from 
TV, use ideas you like. You may not 
get the quality the BBC gets, but 
you'll be on the right track. 




omposition 



The great thing about using 
your Amiga to create music 
is that the whole job 
becomes significantly 
easier and almost everyone can 
achieve good results from the 
moment they start. Here are some 
goodies to help all you budding 
rock-stars out there to get the most 
from your musicai endeavours. 

m Section it off - Create 
song sections that are 
meaningful rather than incorporate 
everything into a large single 
sequence. 

Plan your songs using 
beginnings, ends, verses, choruses, 
J.:., iMci'iiKTiiia iinwrin 



I 




Some of SuperJAIVTs internal sound editing facilities 



and so on and label sequences so 
that their purpose is obvious. If, for 
instance, you have a song that has a 
number of different verse sequence 
variations then call them versel, 
verse2 and verse3 and so on. 

Most sequencers allow songs to 
be created in this way and being able 
to build the final song by linking the 
various sections together makes it 
very easy to alter arrangements. 



Re-useable libraries - 

Build libraries of your 

favourite riffs, drum parts or even 
control sequences, in a form which 
allows re-use with the minimum of 
effort. In fact whenever something is 
created which you think is likely to be 
of use in the future... isolate the 
track/tracks of interest and save 
them separately from the main 
composition. You can even store 
single bars of completed songs of 
various styles containing bass, 
drums, keyboard data and anything 
else other than the main melody line. 
If you collect fragments based on 
common chord types (major, minor, 
7ths, diminished and so on) then 
you'l! be able 
to piece 
together 
backing tracks 
very easily 
indeed; read 
in the 

appropriate 
style library's 
chord bar, 
protect the 
drum part from 
transposition, 
and then 
transpose that 
bar to give the 
required chord. 
Clone as many 
of those bars 
as needed, 
then read in 
the nert library fragment and repeat 
the process ad infinitum. Lazy? 
Mever, after all.., you still have to do 
the transposition and copying 
operations yourself! 






I MIDI channels - 

' Standardise the use of 
your MIDI channels so that you get 
used to seeing particular instruments 
on particular channels (eg channel 1 



for drums, 2 for bass, 3-6 for other 
Synth modules and so on). This type 
of consistency has a number of 
benefits: firstly, it makes it easy to 
recognize sequence data, and this 
leads to fewer silly mistakes when 
editing. Secondly, it eliminates the 
need to physically alter the 
receive/transmit channels of the 
equipment itself when working with 
your own, previously arranged, 
material - this again makes life 
easier. 



134 



Voice doubling - 

Sequencer users can do 



and used as the basis of your own 
compositions (again using either midi 
or internal IFF sounds). 

■| Q '7 Tricky ideas - When you 

X O i are stuck for ideas or your 
songs are beginning to sound 
monotonous use a few standard 
tricks to add some variation. 

Having created a reasonable 
melody or chord progression in one 
part of the song try things like 
reversing the theme, mirror imaging 
the first part of it, or adding a third 
harmony to the melody line - 
these types of alterations will all 




Manage your music making with ease - tips 131 to 140 give a sequence of 
notes guaranteed to tighten up your tunes 



an awful lot to thicken up poor 
sounding synthesizer voices. 
Doubling, where you take a track and 
duplicate it, and then change the 
voices so that two different voices 
play essentially the same notes 
(perhaps after slightly time-shifting 
one of the tracks) can Improve things 
no end, IFF sound users can, 
memory permitting, do the same 
thing. 

■| Q C Choosing your key - If you 

X O iJ are struggling with 
physically playing the keyboard then 
stick to keys, such as C and A minor, 
that are easy to play in. 

You can always transpose the 
final song to the required key when it 
is finished. Don't be embarrassed 
about this approach - a great many 
professional musicians who are not 
primarily keyboard players, but 
because of their need for MIDI 
facilities have to be able to 'get by' 
on the synthesizer keyboard, do 
exactly the same thing. 

1 Q C ™"" *''« format - Get into 

i O O the habit of storing your 
data in MIDI file format. 

A great many music programs 
can read MIDI file data and even non- 
MIDl users can benefit from the 
advantages, SuperJAM users for 
instance can create song 
accompaniments based on IFF 
sampled sounds and can store the 
note details of the SuperJAM 
generated composition as a MIDI 
file. Such files can then be read into 
sequencers like Sequencer One Plus 



help make the duplicated sections 
sound more interesting. With 
sequencers sometimes merely 
changing the voices, or using the 
'doubling' technique mentioned 
earlier, will be enough to bring 
additional musicai interest back to 
the piece. 

Third harmonies incidentally are 
easy to generate: With songs written 
in a major key and just the basic 
chords of the key being used you can 
just duplicate the melody line, 
transpose it upwards by four 
semitones (thus creating a whole 
track of major third harmonies), and 
then flatten the internals which need 
to be minor thirds. 

1 Q Q Control messages - It is 
X O O best to use short 
introductory sequences to set up 
your MIDI instruments rather than 
embedding lots of program changes, 
tempo changes and so on, in the 
early parts of the first music section. 

This eliminates possibly 
unnecessary duplication of control 
messages when the first real music 
section is copied but best of all you 
not only always know where to look 
to find the initial program change 
data but you can edit it, or replace 
the whole sequence, very easily 
indeed. 

It's common to use a one bar 
sequence containing the high-hat 
(playing once on each beat) plus the 
program change events which set up 
the synthesizers, drum-machines, 
delay units and so on. 

continued oit page 14 



32 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1 992 




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p^ Viruses, diskswapping, clicking drives, disks which I 
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■ Mk °^ ^^^ Amiga user? 

^_ At Power, we want to tell you just where you can 
V^ stick your disks and worries. In faa we'll you. The 
^^slot in this picture belongs to our PC880B, the first 
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nique Tnie feel' real time scan mode - 



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Now you can back up at lightning speeds using 
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ware, (even if the disk is atari or PC) and if your 
I computer has a virus the PC880B will stop it being 
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j though you can still save files as normal. 

" When you do not want these features, switch them 



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jjti Memory & 68000 CPU can mn with doubled clock 

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Optical 512K shadow RAM on extra memory bank 
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stantly if you are scanning the innage ttx) quickly J-;^ off and the PC880B wil sit quietly, without click 



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kmiga can only display 16 greyscales 

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1^ We have noticed how pricey unintelligent drives 
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The Power Kickstart ROM switch fits into any A500 

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Supra 

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£ 

Make cheques payable to Power ComputJng Ltd 

Fill in your order form and send it to; 

Power Computing Ltd 

Unit 8 Railton Road 

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Kempston Bedford MK42 7PN 

Ring your credit card order on 0234 843388 
or fax on 0^34 840234 

All prices include VAT, delivery and ait .subject to ehange. 

Specifications are subjecl to chanf;e without iwice. 

Next (lay delivery' M.StI (U.K. uiainlatid only). All iKulcmnrks iitknowledged 



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200 TOP TIPS 



MUSK COMPOSITION/WORD PROCESSIHG 



1 



H 



fmn page 131 



■| O Q Sysex messages - Avoid 

X O*/ the use of embedded 
sysex messages in your song 
sequences because in thie main 
they'll mal<e the data difficult to port 
(hawing said that, a few generally 
recognised sysex messages do 
exist). 

When you get to the stage where 
you have hundreds of arrangements, 
then the last thing you'll want is to 
have to edit all of them just because 
you've changed one or more pieces 
of your MIDI equipment. 

The best idea is to start as you 
mean to go on and, if you are 
intent on making regular use of 
sysex facilities, isolate the sysex 
data into a separate 'control 
sequence' so that, If the occasion 
arises, It is at least easy to replace 
or eliminate. 



1 y^ /\ Cheait the beat - There is 

A ^\j a lot of non-copyright 
MIDI/music material around in the 
public domain and very good some of 
it Is too. Similarly lots of synths, 
sequencers, and drum machines 
come with any number of pre- 
programmed demo tunes or drum 
patterns. Providing you do not steal 
something clearly marked as 
copyright there's nothing to stop you 
borrowing Ideas from the examples 
you hear. Either write it out as a MIDI 
file or, if it is an external unit like a 
dnjm machine then just link it to your 
sequencer and record the output. 
Remember though that you will need 
to maintain proper bar divisions so 
it'll be necessary to set the external 
unit up so that It generates MiDI 
clocks and set the sequencer to 
'external sync' so that it uses the 
externally generated clock data 
rather than its own internal clock. 




ft 



K 



A 





O 

e 



word processor is 
probably one of the most 
sought after Amiga ap- 
plications. Just about 
everyone has a need to write. It may 
1^- be nothing more than personal 
notes, or letters to the bank 
manager. But it may be you have 
ambitions as a professional writer, 
or that you have to compile 
attractlve-loolcing business reports. 
The costs and facilities of word 
processors vary considerably. It's 
therefore important to have a clear 
Idea of your needs, and of what the 
various packages supply, before 
parting with your cash. Here's ten 
pointers to bear in mind: 



on. if your printer is fairly basic, with 
only one or two fonts, then control 
codes aren't that important, but if it 
has lots of fonts built-in for you to 
play with, then you'll want a word 
processor which enables you to send 
control codes to it to make use of 



'I' and 'w' in this text. The standard 
Amiga font is not proportional - all 
letters take up the same space on 
the screen. Some word processors 
will enable you to use proportional 
fonts on-screen, and send these to 
your printer. However, these tend to 
be slower - updating a screen 
containing a proportional font Is a 
mucfi more complex process than 
one with an ordinary bitmapped font. 
Whether you need this facility 
depends on how professional you 
want your output to look. Again, if the 
quality of your documents is really 
important, it might be an idea to look 
at a system comprising of a basic 
word processor and a DTP package. 
None of the word processors 
currently available will support a 
printer's built-in proportional fonts. 

1 A y& Number of documents - If 

M. 'kT' you're doing nothing more 
than writing letters, you're unlikely to 
need more than one document open 
at a time. If, however, you are 
involved in creative writing, the 
facility to cut text from one document 
and paste Into another can be 
invaluable. 

Just about every word processor 
will enable you to have more than 
one document open at once, but 
different packages set different 
limits on how many can be open. 
Available memory will often be a 
limiting factor. Bear In mind that 
programs which make use of colour 
and graphics In documents will use 
much more memory for each opened 
document as well as running 
progressively more slowly. Being able 



yiuitiL Intevdiriwn 



141 



Graphics - Not all word 
processors support 
graphics, and of those that do, some 
offer better facilities than others. 
Before Investing in a word processor 
with graphics facilities, decide 
whether you really need them. 
Remember that the phmary purpose 
of a word processor is to help you 
write. If graphics are important to 
your work, you may be better off with 
desktop publishing, which will give 
you far better control over graphical 
output. 



helpI 



HHBOJ 



HSftiN 



Jlxl 



'ir HIE thinb of )pp«iirin»s is t ttmliif, mt hijiil say Ikjil 
pjinUrs seircli ftr Mssigts uliieh tniis Ik* fr(piii«r; sejsjjes 
llkich COM Frih Ihe b»l< >( the visible, hi this, noL becMsc 
9)1 piinlers in Pliiltnisls, bul b«caust Liicy look so har^, ' 
Throujliotil Ibis very varitd boob, anJ especially hIim Hriliiq on ; 
arl, Jihn krycr iwilts us Lo achnoNltdie Ibe akstliilts aid 
imiflrsals iibicb, hi imisls lie bdiind Iht surfjses of Ihinjs, 
Ht joesfl'l hn a jreal deal lo say akoul Lbese aksthles, mi 
asks us Lt be center^ uilh lems like Ike essenliil, Iht 
inwsilile, He sacreJ or Ibe real, as if Ibe mis Lk«sel»«, 
floaliny free cf any discernible Ikeoltyg tr nelipkysics, m 
aisaer Iht lusslitns Ihty raise by Iht sinple urytncy (tilh iihicl 
Iheii art eLlered. For ht Lhey cin'l: and gel I found tyself 
hufrjin; Ihrough Ibese essays, ealiny Iheit «>, as if 1 reill) 
belitvtd Ikes could fetd Lke hunger Lhcy cftaltd.l 



142! 



Control codes - These are 

layout instructions which 
are sent to the printer. They do 
|things such as change fonts, sizes, 
switches from bold to Italic and so 



is one of the most popular and professional Amiga word 
, but is It really what you require? Perhaps you need DTP? 



Wordworth 
processors. 

them. If you need to send control 
codes, be sure that the package you 
have in mind supports them - most 
don't. 

1 Jj Q Proportional fonts - These 
1 riO consist of letters which 
are of different widths, such as the 



to type faster than a word processor 
can display is a real irritation. 

1 K [^Spelling checker -All but 

X ^O the cheapest word 
processors come with spelling 
checkers. A spelling checker is a 
pretty useful utility, but It should 



never be relied upon one hundred 
per cent to correct your text. Also, 
don't forget that word processors 
from American manufacturers will 
have American dictionaries, In which 
many words will be spelt 'incorrectly'. 

Some of the better word 
processors have several dictionaries 
against which they can check your 
work. With these programs, text will 
be checked against a dictionary of 
commonly used words before a 
larger (and therefore slower) 
dictionary is consulted. This Is useful 
if you have large documents to 
check. 

Another thing to look out for is 
the facility to create more than one 
user dictionary (in which you can 
enter your own words, unrecognised 
by the computer's dictionary). Having 
more than one user dictionafy means 
you can store sets of esoteric words 
relating to different subjects. 

If you Intend to create large 
documents, another good facility is 
the ability of the spelling checker to 
go through the whole document 
before querying any words. That way, 
you don't have to wait for requester 
after requester to appear as the 
checker churns through your text and 
all the Instances of the same word 
mis-spelled several times throughout 
the text will be corrected with only 
one entry from the user. 

•| Jj /J Thesaurus - Not rnany 
A T'O packages include a 
thesaurus, but then again not many 
people need one. Computer 
thesauruses tend to be pale 
shadows of their bookish 
counterparts. Don't let the inclusion 
of a thesaurus in a package sway 
you overmuch in Its favour. 

■| JR ^ Columns - Some 

X ^ I packages enable you to 

format your text in several columns 
across the page, which can be handy 
for producing newsletters and the 
like. However, if you Intend to make 
a great deal of use of this facility, 
and you require a good deal of 
flexibility in the formatting of your 
text, again you might be better 
advised to look at a DTP package. 
The multi-column facilities of word 
processors are OK, but basic. One 
thing to look out for is the ability to 
insert column breaks in your text, 
giving you greater freedom in 
deciding which text goes where. 

1 K Q Contents - The ability of a 
X TtO word processor to form a 
list of contents or an index based on 
user-selected words can be a boon 
when producing a report or technical 
documentation. 

X 4 */ These are short sections 
of text that get printed at the top and 



34 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



WORD PR0aSS0R$/3D MODELUNG 



200 TOP TIPS 



bottom of every page. They are 
useful for just about anything beyond 
simple letters. Look out for the 
facility to use different headers and 
footers for left and right-handed 
pages. 

"I ff /V Mail merge - This is the 

X tJv ability of a word processor 
to take name and address 
information from a database and 



place it in a document. This is handy 
if you intend to use your word 
processor for business and will be 
writing a lot of standard letters 
(those in which the main text is the 
same for each recipient). Look out 
for the facility to choose names and 
addresses from the database 
according to user-specified sort 
criteria (only sending letters to 
people in London, for instance). 




3D programs have been 
appearing for the Amiga 
since it was ftrst 
launched. One early 
offering, Vtdeoscape, has since 
evolved Into Lightwave, the 
powerful software which Is the heart 
of the Video Toaster's 3D system. 
Other programs, such as Imagine 
and Real3D, have also been 
developed extensively over the 
years, though some, particularly 
Sculpt 3D, have almost faded away. 
As Amigas become ever more 
powerful, 3D software continues to 
push at the boundaries of reality. 
But whatever the power, 3D 
requires sustained input from the 
user. Here are ten tips to help you 
towards virtual reality. 

"I [? "I Speed and time - 3D work 
J. *J X is very time and memory 

intensive. 

Some serious software now 
requires at least 1Mb of Chip and 
2Mb of Fast RAM just to get started. 
I'd advise you to add as much RAM 
as you can - you'll need it. Also add 
a largish hard disk, because you'll 
need somewhere to keep your 3D 
objects and textures, as well as your 
renderings. And, especially, add an 
accelerator, the faster the better. 
Otherwise you'll quickly become 
frustrated with the snail's pace that 
your Amiga seems to work at. Of 
course, while none of these items 
are obligatory, any serious 3D work, 
particularly in 24-bit, will really 
benefit from any or all of the above. 
A tape streamer might also come in 
handy for those large sequences of 
images which will ultimately be 
transferred to video-tape. 

1 ^ (^ Is ray tracing necessary? 

A. tj M - The answer is often no. 
Although many images do look 
prettier when raytraced, it can be a 
waste of precious rendering time and 
the final product may benefit only 



marginally over a non-raytrace 
rendered image. Weigh up the 
benefits of including shadows, 
refraction and true reflections. Use 
reflection mapping instead if your 
software allows, as a simple two or 
four colour reflection map can make 
a major difference. 

"I ^O Keep cool -3D modelling 
A iJtJ and animation requires 
high levels of concentration and 
patience. And even then the failure 
rate can be high. Conceptualising a 
3D solid and translating it into a 
wireframe representation in a 3D 
modeller can require some bold 
leaps of imagination. Be prepared for 
a long learning curve. Patience, 
practice and regular saves will help 
keep you out of the 3D straight 
jacket. 

"I [? ij Sleep on it - Don't waste 
J. »J^ precious computing time 
rendering frames. Let your Amiga do 
the hard work while you take a well- 
earned resL Even with multitasking, 
3D rendering can be very time 
consuming, with frames often taking 
many hours to complete on norv 
accelerated machines. So while you 
dream about reality, let your 
computer handle your virtual dreams 
and have them ready for you in the 
morning. 

■| J? [■ Get converted - Instead 
X OiJ of building your object 
from scratch it is often simpler to 
take a 2D image and convert it to 3D 
with a program like Pixel 3D or Race 
Trace. Some recent 3D software, 
such as Imagine, have built-in 2D 
converters, though they can be a 
little flaky. It's amazing how much 
time and trouble you can save by 
digitising or painting a company logo 
and converting it for that flying logo 
extravaganza. Don't forget that it's 
also possible to use a file format 
converter to transmute an object 



from one particular format to 
another. Two programs spring to 
mind for this - Interchange and, once 
again. Pixel 3D. You'I! wonder why 
you wasted all that time before, 

■| [?/? Tape or disk? -How you 
X O O output your work depends 
on your needs. In most cases the 
choice will be between video-tape or 
computer disk. The best quality will 
obviously be obtained by saving all 
images and animations on disk and 
playing them back on an RGB 
monitor. But for many purposes this 
is either impractical or downright 
impossible and video is usually tine 
prefen-ed method, with animations 
either being played back directly to 
tape via a quality RGB encoder or 
genlock or by single frames being 
recorded consecutively to an 
accurate, time-code equipped VCR. 
The frames will usually be of 24-bit 
quality and the VCR will be a 
professional modef. 

■| ff ^ How many bits? - 24-bit 
X.ij i devices undoubtedly 
provide the best-looking output, but 
they are expensive, with the 



up is, or where your current position 
is in relation to 0,0,0, then you are 
quickly lost! Understanding of the 
notional 3-dimensional space witiiin 
the software is a must. If you aren't 
sure about something, pencil and 
graph paper. Lego bricks, or 
whatever you need to bring you back 
to the real world can be a big help. 
Setting a notional scale for the world 
is also extremely helpful. As 3D 
software space has no absolute 
dimensions you should impose your 
own measurements. Think in metric, 
or feet and inches, but stick to one 
system and you'll have a better 
sense of scale. 

ICQ Lighting - In most cases 
X OI/ at least two light sources 
are desirable to get a good image. 

Use a mixture of ambient 
(environmental) and lamp source 
lighting. This will at least give you a 
crude representation of lighting in 
the real world. In other cases 
multiple lights are needed. 

When you light a scene, think 
about how light might enter in reality. 
One light source is often the 
brightest (the Key light) and the 



C 
C 

H 



T 




Tactical tips for taking your 3D modelling into another dimension. As you can 
se« from this picture, some superb effects can be achieved 



cheapest costing around £600 and 
offering little other than video output. 
While 16, 32 or HAM colour formats 
all have their place, they aren't 
always acceptable for quality 3D 
applications. Some programs 
produce animations in proprietary 
formats for playback directly to tape 
or monitor, though the size of these 
is limited by on-board RAM. Another 
option is to use DCTV, which can 
play animations back in high-quality 
DCTV format. Whilst there is a trade- 
off in quality against 24-bit, DCTV 
anims are pretty space-efficient and 
provide a way of getting close to 24- 
bit motion playback. 

"I f? Q The world - Understanding 

XOO the 3D world is 
paramount, if you don't know where 



others fill the scene with dimmer 
light. Less ambient light will give a 
moodier feef to your image. 

1 A O ^^*'*'*^ dashing - Often it 

X vJvr really isn't necessary (or 
practical) to go to extremes in 
modelling ail the minute details of an 
object. If your software supports 
surface mapping you should make 
use of it as it is a very useful 
feature. For example, you want to 
build a row of houses for the 
background of an animation. By 
using surface mapping to apply a 2D 
IFF image of a house front to one 
side of a simple cubic shape you not 
only avoid some extremely time- 
consuming and difficult modelling, 
but also reduce memory usage 
dramatically. 







AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



35 



200 TOP TIPS 



PRINTERS 




m, 





10 

1 



1 





Judging by the vast numbers 
of printer queries which 
appear again and again in 
our Amiga Answers mali bag, 
printers pose a few problems to 
many of you. That's why we've 
devoted a massive 20 per cent of 
out tips to printers... 

"I /J ■< Plugging it In - Never, 

1. O X ever, plug a printer cable 
into the printer or the Amiga while 
the printer or the Amiga is switched 
on. Some tech-heads wiii teii you 
there is no probiem with doing this, 
that there is no power travelling 
along the parallel cable so no 
damage can be caused, but this not 
always the case (see tip 162). If you 
are using a serial pnnter this tip is 
especially important because there 
almost certainly will be power 
travelling along the serial cable, 

■| /Jrt Parallel port - The Amiga's 
J. O A parallel printer port is not 
completely standard, it sends power 
along a couple of lines that standard 
parallel ports don't use. This is so 
that peripherals can take their power 
from the parallel port rather than a 
separate power supply, Digi-View 
does this, and so do all Amiga sound 
samplers. 

A standard (IBM PC) parallel 
printer cable does not have these 
lines connected, and this is the type 
of lead you need to connect your 
printer to the Amiga's parallel port. 
There will be no need to alter such a 
cable in any way, it will work 'straight 
out of the box'. But avoid leads that 
are made out of ribbon cable, it is 
likely that all the lines in such a 
cable will be connected, and you will 
end up frying the printer, the Amiga, 
or both. 

"I /JO Serial port - Connecting a 
X OO serial printer to the 
Amiga's serial port is a black art. 
While the Amiga end (obviously) 
remains the same, the connections 
at the other end will be of the pnnter 
manufacturer's invention, You will 
need a special lead; you certainly 
won't be able to walk into a shop 
and ask for "a serial lead to connect 
my Amiga to such-and-such a 
printer". A lead will have to be made 
up specially, and for this you will 
need details of the printer's serial 
port. These details should be in the 
printer manual, and you'll need to 



give this and your Amiga manual to 
somebody who knows what they are 
doing. 

If the serial lead is wired wrongly, 
you will at the very least (and 
instantly) blow up your Amiga's serial 
port. 



164 



Bargains - Resist every 
temptation to buy an old 



Amiga. Don't accept printed output 
from under the counter as proof that 
it works, you want to see it working 
for yourself. 

if the retailer's response to any 
of these questions sounds at all 
nen/ous, assume that the printer will 
not work properly with the Amiga 
because there isn't a specific printer 
driver for it. 

Repeat this process with as 
many retailers as it takes until you 
find one that knows what it is talking 
about. 

1 /? C Claiming youf rights - 

X OOwhen buying a new 
printer, make the retailer write "For 
text and graphics use with the 
Amiga' on the receipt. 

When you find out it doesn't work 




Don't settle for anything less than print perfection - test out our tips and see 
your printing Improve In leaps and bounds, whatever your printer 



printer at a knock-down price at an 
auction or car boot sale unless you 
know for certain that there is an 
Amiga printer driver for it. You will 
need to know what popular printer 
the knock-down printer emulates in 
order to find a driver, if you're lucky 
these details will be in the manual 
under the 'specifications' section, 
otherwise you'll 

need to phone the ^^^^ammmm 
manufacturer and 
ask. Then comes 
the frustrating task 
of finding a driver 
that works with 
that emulation. 

If you buy an 
old, manual-less 
serial printer at an 
auction you have 
almost certainly 
thrown money 
down the drain. 



properiy you can return it and ask for 
your money back because the printer 
does not do the job you bought it for, 
as written down by the retailer on 
your receipt. This is your statutory 
right as a consumer. 



167 



Profusion of Ps - If you 

are getting Ps or other 



''Resist every 

temptation to buy 

an old pnnter at a 

knockdown price at 

a car boot sale," 



weird characters 
printed at the top of 
the first page of 
every printout, check 
that you have a 
current version of 
'printer. device' in the 
DEVS directory of the 
disk you booted 
from. 

Open a CU or 
Shell to full screen 
size and enter the 
command line: 



1 /J [? Compatibility -When 

X OO buying a new printer, ask 
the retailer if that model of printer 
will work 100 per cent perfectly with 
the Amiga. Ask which of the supplied 
Workbench Preferences printer 
drivers you should use. And then ask 
to see the printer working in both 
text and graphics mode with the 



TYPE DBVS SPRINTER. DEVICE HEX 

Press the spacebar once to halt the 
listing before it scrolls out of the 
window. About half way down the 
page, on the right-hand side, you'll 
see a version number, followed by a 
date. Your version should be at least 
35 point something, and dated 1988 
or later. The version of printer.device 



distributed with Workbench 2.04 is 
V35,603; the version distributed with 
Workbench 1.3.2 is V35.563; with 
Workbench 1.3 it was V35.562. All 
these versions should work OK. 
The version of printer.device 
distributed with Workbench 1.2 was 
V33 (Revision 132), and is the one 
that is causing some programs to 
pnnt out strange characters at the 
top of pages when used with 
Workbench 1.3 or later. 

1 /? Q Epson emulation - if you 

X O O are getting strange results 
from an Epson compatible printer 
and an Epson compatible printer 
driver that are supposed to work 
together perfectly, check the printer 
manual to see if the pnnter has an 
IBM emulation as well as an Epson 
emulation. If it does, check the 
printer's dip switches to make sure 
they are set for Epson emulation. 
This may sound like an obvious tip, 
but printers that the manufacturer is 
aiming at the "professional" (ie PC) 
market almost always come set-up 
for IBM emulation. 

"I /?||\ Ribbon Ink - Never use 
X OI/ Quink or stamp pad ink (or 
anything else like that) to re-ink a 
monochrome pnnter ribbon. And for 
heaven's sake don't let anybody 
convince you that it is OK to use 
WD40 or any other type of 'duck' oil. 

Proper nbbon Ink contains a 
special type of lubricant that not only 
helps the pins in the head move in 
and out, but also transports the large 
amounts of heat generated by the 
pins away from the printer head. If 
the pins get too hot they become 
brittle or soft and are liable to snap 
orbend a little bit and get stuck. The 
classic symptoms of this are very 
noticeable horizontal white lines on 
graphics dumps, and bits of letters 
going missing in text printouts. 

There is proper stuff available, 
called Re-inK, that will re-ink between 
20 and 100 nbbons, depending on 
the size of your ribbon. It costs about 
£12 per "future friendly" spray can. 
For more details call the Re-inK help 
line on 0202 666155. 

1 ^rt Reflil kits - Inkjet printer 
X I v/ owners can save money by 
buying re-fill kits instead of new 
cartridges. There are various 
companies selling these kits, 
Systems Insight (0707 276913) for 
example, which cost about £20 and 
normally include a syringe and 
enough ink for about five re-fills. 
Colours are also available. 

m Technical line - if you are 
having bad problems with 
your printer, it is always worth calling 
the manufacturer's technical help 
line. These lines tend to be quite 
busy, so you may have to call quite a 



36 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



PRtNURS 



200 TOP TIPS 



few times, or hang on the line for a 
while, until you can get to talk to 
somebody. 

In my experience I have found 
the following companies to be 
especially helpful, and most of them 
know quite a bit about the Amiga and 
Amiga applications: Star (■» 0494 
471111), Citizen (« 0895 272621), 
Canon (= osi 773 3173), Brother 
(= 061 330 6531), and Facit (« 
0634 868000). 

1 'yO ^'"S niee - Strictly 
M. 9 £l speaking, printer 
manufacturer technical help lines are 
for the use of printer dealers and 
distributors, not for customers, but if 
you catch them on a good day and 
you throw a few compliments around, 
you'll be surprised how helpful they 
can be. If you steam in with the "it's 
your legal responsibility" approach, 
or explain to them that "this phone 
call is costing me a fortune", expect 
to be politely requested to take your 
problem to the dealer from which you 
bought the printer. 

■| ^QDeksjet owners- DeskJet 
J. # OsOOC owners will be 
pleased to hear that the latest 
version of TurboPrint Professional 
comes with a DeskJet 500C driver. 

If you've already bought 
TurboPrint Professional and want an 
update you will need to contact 
IrseeSoft direct. The address is on 
the back of the manual. 

If you own a DeskJet 500C and 
are considering buying TurboPrint 
Professional, do ask the retailer, 
before you buy, if this is the version 
that comes w/ith the DeskJet 500C 
driver. 

1 ^ Jj PostScript support - if 

■I. # ^ you are considering buying 
a laser printer, think long and hard 
about vifhether to buy one that 
supports PostScript. 

While the cost of the printer will 
be slightly more, there are enormous 
advantages to using PostScript over 
LaserJet emulation, not the least of 
which is the fact that there are no 
proper LaserJet II or III Amiga printer 
drivers yet. 

"I ^ P? PostScript software - 

■L f O Before buying a PostScript 
printer keep in mind that the 
software you are using must also 
support PostScript, and that if you 
want to use the printer to create A4 
desktop published pages then 2Mb 
of phnter memory is a realistic 
minimum. If your A4 pages use lots 
of downloaded fonts {as opposed to 
the 35-ish fonts that will be built into 
the phnter), then you will need more 
printer memory. 

Also, make sure that the 
implementation of PostSchpt inside 
the printer is a modern version and 



100 per cent Adobe standard, 
aren't. 



■ If 



■| ^ /J Colour separations • 

J. I O you are outputting 
PostSchpt colour separations, 
remember that the screen 
frequencies (lines per inch) and dot 
angles are extremely important. 
Professional Page users should note 
that the default values supplied In 
the Output PostScript requester are 
not "suggested" or "tried and 
tested" values, they are simply 
arbitrary numbers. 

Screen frequencies and dot 
rotation angles must be discussed 
with the bureau which is doing the 
films for you, othenwise you'll end up 
paying for wasted films and time on 
the imagesetter. 

If the bureau doesn't understand 
what you are talking about or says or 
implies that "it doesn't matter", go 
to another bureau toot-sweet. 

1 lyy Page width - The 

X f I PostScript page width is 
vety important. If you specify a width 
of PostScript page wider than that 



which the bureau's imagesetter can 
handle, most imagesetters will 
happily accept the input... trundle, 
trundle, trundle... but will output 
nothing. However you will still have to 
pay for the time on the imagesetter 
because it was your mistake. 

The maximum width of film 
imagesetters can take differs 
depending on the 

model of ^^^^^^^^^ 

imagesetter being 
used. You must ask 
the bureau what 
width of PostScript 
page you should 
use. Remember that 
if you want cropping 
and registration 
marks, these marks 
will be printed in the 

area between the 

edge of the physical 

page and the edge of the PostScript 

page. 



^Xatch them on a 

good day, and 

you'll be surprised 

how helpful 

manufacturers can 

be/' 



and plate - and that's as well as the 
four plates for the cyan, magenta, 
yellow and black separations. 

Don't assume that the bureau 
knows or understands about the 
Pantone colour system. Ask 
beforehand or you'll end up having 
an argument about whose fault the 
'mistake' was. 

And unless you 
^^^n^^^^have deep pockets, 
ask about the cost 
of using Pantone 
colours before the 
bill gives you a heart 
attack. 



17Q' 



I/O. 



Pantone colours - 

' Professional Page users 
should note that each Pantone 
colour used requires a separate film 



PRINTER DRIVERS 



This is a list of popuiar current printers for whicit there are Itnown printer 
drivers that work perfectiy and take fuil advantage of the printers' 
faciilties, in cases where tlie software tiiat Is doing ttie printing allows, it 
is certalniy not a complete list, but we get more letters alraut these 
models of printers than any others. 

None of the drivers in this list come with Workbench. Citizen Print 
Manager \s available from Citizen (o 0895 272621), all the others are on 
various Jamdisks, available from JAM on a 0895 274449. 

Note that at the time of writing there are no proper Amiga printer drivers 
for the Hewlett-Packard DeskJet Plus, DeskJet 500, DeskJet 500C, LaserJet 
Plus, LaserJet II, LaserJet IIP, LaserJet III and LaserJet HIP. If this fact annoys 
you, phone Hewlett-Packard {w 0344 360000) and give Its technical boffins 
an ear-bashing, then phone Commodore (« 0628 770088) and give the 
people there an ear-bashing too. 

It should also be noted that Canon, Star and Citizen have gone out their 
way to ensure tbat there are Amiga printer drivers for at least some of their 
cur-ent models. 



PRINTER MOOEL/S 

Canon BJ-lOe/lOex 

Canon BJ-300/330 

Canon BJC-SOO 

Canon LBP-4/8 

Citizen printers 

Commodore 1550C 

Epson FX-850/1050 (or emulation) 

Epson LQ-850/1050 (or emulation) 

Epson LQ-1000/1500 (or emulation) 

Epson LX-S50 {or emulation) 

NEC 24-pins 

Panasonic KX.P1123/1124 

Star LC-200 

Star LC24-10/15 

Star LC24-200 

Star SJ-48 

Star XB24-10/15 



DRIVER NAME 

CanonBJlO 

CanonBJ300 

coming soon 

CanonLBP 

Citizen Print Manager 

Star9Plus 

Star9Plus 

EpsonQPIus 

Star24Plus 

StarQPIus 

Nec24Plus 

PanasonicPlus 

Star9Plus 

Star24Plus 

EpsonQPIus 

Star24Plus 

Star24Plus 



Printer 
trouble - 

if after telling an 
application to print 
something, nothing 
happens and then 
after about 30 seconds a 'Printer 
Trouble" system requester appears 
on your screen, this means the 
phnter driver has been trying 
desperately to send data to the 
printer, but the printer has not sent 
back a message saying that it has 
received that data. 

This could be due to several 
things... Is the printer switched on? 
Is there paper in the printer? Has 
the paper jammed? Is the printer on- 
line? Are you using a proper printer 
cable? Is the printer cabfe plugged 
in? Are you using the correct printer 
driver? 

'I Q /^ Opening the printer 

JL O " device - If when trying to 

print you end up with a "Cannot 
open printer device" system 
requester, this (normally) means one 
of two things. Either some other 
application that you are multitasking 
is using the phnter (and therefore 
already has the phnter device open), 
or some required system files are 
not where they should be. Luckily 
both these problems are easily 
remedied... 

This mostly happens when you 
create your own 'boot-up' disks and 
forget to copy the 'printer. device' or 
'parallel. device' file into the DEVS 
directory of the boot-up disk, or 
you've forgotten to copy the printer 
driver into DEVS/PRINTERS on the 
boot-up disk. 

The answer to this problem is to 
work backwards. Instead of creating 
a boot-up disk from empty, copy the 
Workbench disk, remove the files 
and directories that you do not need, 
and then copy your application on to 
the copy of the Workbench disk. Do 
note, however, that unless you know 
precisely what you are doing, you 
should leave the DEVS, L, LIBS, S 
and SYSTEM directories exactly as 
they are. 

oinllniied on poge 40 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



37 







THE ALL-TJ^^I^AMIOA 600 PACK 'Exduiive to Fulureworld* 
^^f^f^ V»ry lototl Amiga FMrivriiisi 



* On-site maintenance 

* Kickstorl/Workbench 2.05 

* Biiill-in TV/Modulator 

* Smart Card Slo^ 

* IDE Hard Disk Controller. 
(Oprional 20Mb internal hard diik) 



A600P«iek 

A600Jinc DPainI [II & game] RRP £399.99 
Astra Ten Games Pack RRP £229.78 

GFA Bosic RRP £49.95 

TOTAL RRP £679.72 
But yeurt for an unbelievable £399,99 



A600 HD Pocks As above bul feoluring 20Mb HarrJ Disk TOTAL RRP £779.72 

But yours for an unbelievable £499.99 
NB: HD VERSION DOES NOT INCLUDI DPIII OR GAME 



ALL OUR A500 PLUSES COME WITH A MASSIVE 2 MEG OF RAM 



£349.« 
Rp£29.9S 

tw£24.« 

i«p£7.w 
Rw£6.w 

iut?£6.w 



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Only version 3"='™"'^" ' ,_,, 

IWEGUPGMDI BOARD, „^,,^..„AM , 
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rhp15.9b 

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PROFESSIONAl MUSIC PACl 



A500 

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But yours for on unbelievoble.. 



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MUSlcv 1 , "^^^ -"-o'l. 

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^'^^'■OR MADE DUSTCOVER 



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But yours for an unbetievoblE 



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i.'-'^-J'/i- 



200 TOP TIPS 



Smm UP A SPREADSHEET 







-ssHiHSHSBmBHHiHiiiiasNeiiBiaiMBSieaiiiMiRiiaBiiiMaBBamiHeeB 



The above shows a series of sin waves rotated through 180 degrees - the 
message to be learned from this is to keep it as simple as possible 



nnS 



Settin 





Vf 

X 



1 



o 

N 



evising a spreadsheet for 
any particular application 
Is one of the most 
arduous tasks a beginner 
can be faced with - but with some 
careful planning, it need not be as 
complex as you might Imagine. 

m Basics - To begin with, 
you must have a basic 
idea of what the sheet is meant to 
do. Most spreadsheets can be 
configured in countless variations - 
but it is important to iay down a few 
ground ruies before starting out. 
Three things are required: 

• What values you have available. 

• What results you wili require. 

• The formulas required to turn A 
into B. 

The actual maths involved in the 
calculations will be handled at great 
speed by the sheet, but it can only 
follovi' the rules you enter into it. If 
you start viitU the prerequisites 
described above, you will find 
designing the sheet wili be a breeze. 



182 



most common jobs a 
spreadsheet is called upon to do is 
to add up the entire contents of a 
column or row: you might want to 
add up a column of numtiers for 
example. The most obvious way to 
do this is add each individual cell in 
turn, viz: 

■ A1+A2+A3+A4+A5+A6 



However, most spreadsheets will 
allow you to add up a sequential 
sehes of cells such as this with the 
SUMO function. Cell referencing 
techniques may change 
@SUM(A1..A6) or =SUM(A1:A6) for 
instance, but it means the same 
thing. 

1 QQ Add Up 2 -The tip 
J. OO described above uses a 
technique called "cell relative 
addressing" or "cell relative 

referencing". This just means the cell 
addresses are not fixed and if you 
want to add an extra row between, 
say A3 and A4, the formula: 

@SUM(A1..A6) 

will change to: 

@SUM(A1..A7) 

The extra row is accounted for 
automatically in this calculation and 
all others affected. This is, of 
course, one of the advantages of 
using a spreadsheet. However, the 
benefits of using "absolute 
referencing" should not be ignored. 
in this case cell references always 
point to the same cells. You would 
use this in a cashflow (for instance) 
to calculate the difference between 
the total income (BS) and total 
expenditure {B20) plus the balance 
carried over (A22): A20-A8+A22 

if you should add an extra row or 
two, the relative references will be 
corrected by the sheet, so the 



formula might change. Adding a row 
at A12, would change this fonnula 
thus: A21-A8+A23. 

■| Q Jj Cut and Paste 1 - The 
X O ^ fastest way to create a 
basic sheet for simple jobs such as 
a cashflow is to create an entire 
column manually, copy it, then paste 
it into the remaining columns. 

Any column specific (monthly 
headings etc.) alterations should be 
made later. In Procalc the keypress 
A-V is a shortcut for Paste... Relative 
- to automatically resolve cell 
addresses. In Advantage ■^ou must 
use the menu option 
Paste... Relative. The shortcut A-V 
(menu Paste.. .Full) is absolute and 
does not resolve the references. 

1 Q C Cut and Paste 2 - The 
X OO paste function in Analyse 
is more comprehensive than either 
Advantage or Procalc. In this system 
you can copy a single cell to a range 
of cells - Analyse will resolve all the 
cell references automatically. Follow 
these steps: 

a) Click on the cell (fonnula) to copy, 

b) Press /RC. (Menu: Range... Copy). 

c) Press Return to confirm the 
selection. 

d) Move the cursor where you want 
to copy TO... 

e) ...and press "." to hold the first 
cell. 

f) Move the cursor to mark the entire 
block. 

g) Press [Return] to complete the 
operation. 

The same technique can be used to 
copy a row or column. Select the row 
as described above. Move to the first 
column/(row) you want to fill and 
press ".". Move the cursor to block 
out the entire selection and press 
Return. The copy and paste areas 
need not be the same size. 

1 Q /^ Baste charting - Most 
X OO systems offer a large 
number of complex graphics - but for 
most purposes a bar or a line chart 
will be quite sufficient. Automatic 
systems such as Advantage and 
Pmcatc, while easier and faster to 
use suffer from labelling problems. 
Therefore, either keep the label 
names short, or, reduce the amount 
of data shown on the graph. If you're 
printing graphics on an impact 
machine, keep them simple to save 
wear on your print head and your 
nervous system. 

"I Q ^ Automatic chart parsing - 
X O f This suffers from two 
major bugbears. First the data can 
be read in one of two directions: by 
row or by column. This can cause all 
kinds of bother when you produce 
say a pie chart and it only has one 



segment. In this case change the 
parsing from Row to Column or vice- 
versa. 

By the same token, automatic 
scale labels are read from the 
respective rows and columns 
above and to the left of the selected 
data. If you need to produce a chart 
of some specific data, copy it 
{values only for speed) and its 
respective labels to a separate area 
on the sheet and take a chart from 
there. 

-fl Q O Formulas - Always keep 
X OO formulas simplel Always 
prefer an internal function to one 
constructed from separate functions. 
This will help keep the sheet's recalc 
time down to a minimum and makes 
it easier to understand. If you must 
use a complex formula, break it 
down into smaller chunks and hide 
the intermediate results elsewhere 
on the sheet. 

You can hide intermediate 
values on some spreadsheets by 
changing a range of cell's pen 
colour to the background colour — 
use this as a last resort though. 
Keep a separate "sheet" of any 
special formulas you devise so they 
can be copied-in whenever they are 
required. 

-| Q f\ Show negative results - 
X O ^ Most spreadsheets have a 
feature to allow you to highlight 
negative values. Advantage and 
Procalc do not: you must use a 
function instead although this is 
more powerful. Assume you have a 
row of results A20...G20 and wish to 
highlight any negative values. The 
following function should be entered 
into any spare cell below in column 
A: SETCOLOR{A20<0,2,3,A20) 
and then pasted relative (A-V in 
Procalc] into all the cells through to 
column G. 

The colours are detennlned by 
the two centre numbers. Also, the 
cell highlighted need not be the one 
checked. A similar technique is 
available using the SETSTYLE 
function. This uses binary values to 
set one of seven available styles — 
consult your manual for more 
information. 

■| f| /\ To Transfer Dala - The 
X */ V simplest way to exchange 
data with other spreadsheets - 
either on the Amiga or other systems 
such as PC and Macintosh - is to 
save the file in Lotus 1-2-3 format. 
Major packages such as Procalc, 
Advantage and The Works all support 
a major subset of the Lotus file 
format and this is generally the most 
effective method. Other methods 
such as DIF are less reliable. If you 
are sending your sheet to a database 
package use CSV (comma delimited) 
if this is available. 



40 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



ASSEmiY LANGUAGE PROGRAlAf/llHG 



200 TOP TIPS 






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witch tha overlay sprite*; off for stttf on yipu 

tnput^, rto outputs. 



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Until SpritKounter^nftXSPRfrFS 

^flurn Spr i l«Caui)trr 



Two Jdeni;i;ai ^e^^tions of code. Which looks best to you? Learn how 
to make your code more productive with tips 191 to 200 

^^rrogramming 



Assembly language 
programming on any 
machine can turn into a 
complete nightmare If 
you are not careful. Programs, by { 
nature, are naturally longer and 
seemingly more complex. But If 
some simple guidelines are adhered 
to, it can be a very productive 
choice of programming language. 
Here are some suggestions which 
you can follow and build on. 

"I f| 'I Development tools - 

X •/ -I. Make sure that you are 
using the righit software and utilities. 
I recommend Hisoft's excellent 
DevPac 3, vifritten to look and work 
well under the 1.3 and 2.04 . It also 
comes with the full 1.3 and 2.04 
Include files as supplied by 
Commodore and a pov^erful 
monitor/debugging tool- Monam. It 
also comes with a linker and other 
utilities with a (Comprehensive 
manual and after-sales support. 

"I #\f) Back-ups - This cannot 
3.9^^ possibly be stressed 

enough. Regular and organised back- 
ups of your code protects you 
against unfortunate incidents with 
your floppy or hard disks. It's so easy 
to save files under the wrong 
filename - In a puff of smoke your 
10,000 line source code file can 
miraculously become a copy of your 
startup-sequence! It's good to use 
automatic or timed back-ups if you 



can, or save files under different 
filenames. Back-up to a separate 
place (another disk or partition) 
regularly if you are working hard on 
your software, 

"I f| O Lai>els and comments - 

J. «/ O Assembly language 
programs are notoriously bad to 
read. They are much longer than 
programs in other languages due to 
their simplicity. It is easy for even the 
simplest utility to grow to over 
several thousand lines, it is 
important that you use sensible label 
names and comment your code. The 
illustration shows two identical 
segments of code, one is well 
commented and labelled. Which one 
would you rather have written? 
Labels such as Loopl, Loop2 Loop3 
and so on are almost meaningless. 
Document routines too, with input 
and output parameters and the 
registers that they corrupt. 

'I Q y^ Program organisation - 

J. 17^ Structure your program. If 
you can, separate your set-up and 
close-down routines, such as 
AliocateMemory and CloseLibraries. 
Keep all routines and subroutines 
specific to a particular subject 
together. For instance, keep all your 
set-up routines in one place. This 
helps you to find your way round 
large source files quickly. If you know 
you need to check something in the 
graphics routines, for example, you 



know that they are together. It makes 
debugging and development easier. 

"I /]| ^ Correct Include files - 
l^tJij Use the correct Include 

files. If you are writing Amiga 
assembly language code, you will 
need to use some of the Amiga 
library routines. It is easy to pepper 
the start of your programs with lines 
such as "CioseLlbrary = -414". This 
is a bad thing to do. Use the official 
Include files, this reduces the things 
that can go wrong with your program, 
and makes debugging easier. The 
same applies to operating system 
labe! names. Try to avoid having 
tables of numbers at the start of your 
program defining things such as 
"CUSTOMSCREEIM". Simply include 
the correct files, and all of these 
things are then defined for you. 

■| Q /? Obey the rules - This 
J. »/ O should be carved in stone 
and stamped on the foreheads of ail 
Amiga developers. Commodore has 
laid down a comprehensive set of 
rules and guidelines for your Amiga 
programming, designed to make your 
programs more efficient and easier 
to write. They are also designed for 
future compatibility with improved 
operating systems and video 
hardware. The primary reason why 
software {games, applications and 
PD products) broke when 
Commodore released Workbench 
2.04 was because of people failing 
to obey these rules. Commodore had 
to spend additional time developing 
Workbench 2 to minimize 
incompatibilities. Amiga development 
is on-going! Obey the rules now, and 
your software will work on future 
versions of the operating system. 

"% f\^ Books and documentation 

A 1/ I - I would recommend you 
have at least one 68000 reference 
manual, not specific to the Amiga, 
talking about the 68000 series Of 
chips, and detailing the individual 
instructions in the processor, 
including descriptions of the 
additional features present on the 
68010, '020, '030 and '040. 
Although the official Amiga 
documentation is expensive, it is 
worth its weight in gold. Programming 
hints and guidelines are present in 
the books, and are written by the 
people who have developed the 
operating system itself. The official 
Amiga documentation will not teach 
you how to program assembly 
language, it will show you how to use 
your assembly language skills to 
their best on the Amiga system. 

1 #]| Q Processor specific code - 
X ^ O Don't use it without 

thought. This one should be under 
the obey the rules tip, but I shall 
detail a couple of things which you 



should bear In mind when starting 
developing 68000 assembly 
language programs. Many 68000 
programming manuals show how to I 
create delays by executing loops lots 
of times. This is very bleak Indeed, 
as a delay routine that takes one 
second under a 68000 may execute 
in a millisecond on a 25Mhz 68030. 
This is another of the reasons that 
software which works fine on an 
A500 fails to function on an Amiga 
3000. Instead, create your timings in 
a non processor-specific manor, such 
as counting vertical blanking gaps, or 
using the CIA timers {preferably with 
the timer device, but if this is not 
possible, remember to ask the 
operating system for a CIA timer 
before you simply use one!) 



199: 



you are trying to do before 
you do it! You may find yourself with 
spaghetti code - which is worse with 
assembly language programs than 
with other languages. It's always a 
good idea to sit down with a pen and 
a piece of paper initially to scribble 
down some ideas, possible screen 
layouts and so on before committing 
yourself to code. The same applies 
to complex or long routines. 
Sometimes it can lead you to 
discover even better ways of doing 
things that you would not have 
thought about otherwise, Pseudo 
code is also a good starting point, 
see the third window in the screen 
shot for an example. This is not real 
code, and is not intended to run - 
it's an easy way of getting the basic 
gist of how a routine will work, and is 
a good starting point for coding. 

^ f\i\ Debugging - it's unlikely 
Stl\J\J that you will be able to 
write a bug-free Amiga application. 
Debugging can be by far the longest 

part of software development if your 
program design and layout is not up 
to scratch. If there is a fault in your 
program, you need to isolate it. 
Reduce the code you need to wade 
through to the smallest possible 
chunk. There are many ways of doing 
this, you could step through your 
entire program, or, more sensibly, 
narrow it down by putting indicators 
at certain points in the program so 
you know how far the code got before 
went wrong. These indicators can 
range from the simplest, such as 
flashing the screen a different colour, 
to printing messages on the screen 
saying things such as "1 got to the 
memory allocation routine OK', or "I 
opened the serial device 
successfully," If you have access to 
another computer with a serial port, 
you may like to refer to the section 
on RomWack in the Amiga Libraries 
book, as this can be helpful for 
finding what went wrong after a 
software failure (Guru meditation).^© 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1 992 



41 



ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 



Can't find 
my way 

home 



In part two of this 
introduction to 
Prolog, Philip 
Gladwin shows 
you OCGs and cuts, 
and naturally, 
processes some 
language. Plus: 
part two of the 
Route Finder 

This month I'm going to 
finish off the discussion of 
Prolog's syntax by looking 
at lists, and at controlling 
backtracking. I'm also going to 
sketch details on writing an English 
language grammar, followed hy 
hints on navigating a node network 
(that's roads and road Junctions for 
the imaginative among you). 

[L,I,SXS] 

The list is the primary means of data 
storage in Proiog. As SBProlog is 
interpreted you don't have to worry 
about which data types you are 
using, so iists can be lists of 
anything: numbers, mixed with atoms 
and variables, or predicates, or other 
iists - even empty iists. Lists are 
indicated by the use of square 
brackets: 

[atom, 1234, foo (bar) ..] - tl^ere 
is a standard way to refer to them. 
We say that a list has a head - the 
first element in the list, and a tai], 
which is a sublist made up of aii the 
other elements in the iist. Rgure 1 
illustrates this. 

How do lists work? Well, if you 



want to add an element E to a iist L 
you push what is already in the iist 
into the tati, and insert the new 
element in at ttie head: [EiL], Simple. 
Deleting an element from a list is a 
little more complicated, and requires 
code. There are two cases when 
deleting an element from a list: if E 
is the head of list L, the result after 
deleting E is the tail of L On the 
other hand, if E is anywhere in ttie 
tail, you should produce a tail with T 
deleted from it. Look at some code 
which does this: 
delete(E, [EITail} ,Tall) . 
delete(E, [XI Tall] , [XINewTall} 
) : - delete ( E , Tail , NewTail ) . 
Try drawing out a trace of what 
happens when you call it with the 
query delete (s, [a, a,d] , Result). 
(Hint- Kfisult should = [a,d] ). 

SBProlog comes with an 
excellent set of library functions, 
including plenty stuff for messing 
about with lists. However, delete is 
not one of them, so you may find the 
above useful. The predicates built 
into the interpreter are indicated in 
the source code by beginning with a 
'$', The library predicates loaded by 
the interpreter - in the same way 
that it loads your source files - are 
not labelled in the same way, but if 



you can't find a definition of a 
predicate in my code then it has to 
be from the SBProlog library. 

CUTU 

The Cut, (written as 'I') is a 
procedural directive used when you 
are sure that the bit of proving you 
have just done should not need to be 
repeated, either because you know 
the result to be true and further 
backtracking would waste time, or 
because if the first alternative is 
wrong then you don't want any other 
alternative to occur. It commits you 
to the line of proof that you are 
already on; if any of the goals on the 



Figure 1: The main method of data 
storage In Prolog... The Ust 

/ >- : 

For the list [•!,' abc, poKarg), Var] 



For the list 



[atK, poi(aig), Var] 
EH/T] 






right of the :- fail then you cannot try 
another version of the goal to the left 
of the :■ . For example: 
LINE la:- b,c,d,e. 
LINE 2 aj- f,g,h. 
LINE 3 b. 
LINE 4 c. 
LINE 5 o. 
LINE 6 d:- X. 
LINE 7 f . 

In the normal path of execution, 
calling the predicate a would make 
Prolog try to prove it by stepping 
through all the goals on Line 1 - so it 
would call in turn predicates i),c,d 
and e. If all of these predicates 
succeeded, the execution would stop 
there, and a would be taken as 
proven. If, as in this case, predicate 
d failed, Prolog would begin to 
backtrack. This is where it gets a 



RUNNING THE PROGRAM 



To load source file into Prolog you ask it to 'consult' it. There are two ways of 
doing this at the I ?- prompt : type either consult (filename) . or use the 
shortcut and type [filename] . When it has looked at your code, run the 
program by typing go. Enter one of the two types of query at the prompt: 
"give nie a route from <node> to <dif ferent nod©>" 
"how do i get £ram <node to «ii£ ferent node>" 
Enter the queries as they appear here - including all the lower case letters, 
the quote marks, and the full stops, but substituting your prefen-ed node in 
between the angle brackets. About 30 seconds later you should have some 
result. You can tell when Prolog has finished, because it will echo 'yes' or 
'no', depending on your query's success, and return you to the I ?- prompt. 



little complicated. The trace of 
execution looks like this: 
/ 7- a. 

call a (line 1) 

call b (Line 3, succeed) 

call c (line 4, succeed) 

call d (line 6) 

call X (no x's, fall) 

d falls 

(backtrack) 

retry c (line S, succeed) 

retry d (line 6) 

call X (no x's, fall) 

(backtriick) 

retry c (no more c's) 

(backtrack) 

retry b (no more b's) 
a falls 

retry a [line Z) 
call f (line 7,succeeft) 
call g (no g's, fall) 
a fails 

NO 
I 7- 

Now look what happens to 
the same trace if you alter 
the code by inserting a cut 
in LINE 1: 

NEWUNElas- to,l,c,d,e. 
The trace now looks like: 
I 7- a. 

call a (newllne 1) 
call b (Line 3, succeed) 
call c (line 4, succeed) 
call d (line 6) 
call X (no x's, fait) 
d falls 
(backtrack) 

retry c (line 5, succeed) 
retry d [line 6) 
call X (no x's, fall) 
[backtrack) 
retry c (no more c's) 
(can't backtrack past I) 
a falls (I has committed you to 
tiie first line, you are not 
allowed to try any other a's, so 
the call to a stops here.) 
no. 
I 7- 

AND SO TO CODE 

Look at the code you have been 
supplied with this month: it is divided 
up into four main sections. The first 
predicate, go, is the controlling 
predicate; you call this one to run the 
program. The other three sections, 
nip, lang and route preprocess your 
input; parse your input, checking that 
it is a question and extracting the 
important information; and find the 
shortest route between the two 
nodes you have requested. Let's 
look at the preprocessor first. 

dbciear initialises the bits of 
Prolog's internal database we're 
going to be using later. 
gat_(iuery/l takes the question 
from the user, and breaks it up into 
a list of words, prepars/l takes 
this list, checks that each of the 
words is in the vocabulary (declared 
in last month's code section), and 
asserts the fact that the sentence 



42 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1992 



ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 



contains each word into the 
database. Note that the character; is 
to be read as 'OR'. 

Moving to the first of the 
predicates in the lang section; s/3, 
let's sidestep for a mornent to look 
at an Artificial Intelligence type 
formalism called a DCG, or definite 
clause grammar. Take a look at 
Rgure 2. You'll recognise (if you read 
the introduction to Al in AS 15) this 
way of representing an English 
sentence as a tree. The DCG is one 
of the most efficient ways of doing 
this, and it happens that using 
Prolog is one of the best ways of 
wori^ing a DCG. Assume that there is 
a sentence stretching between the 
beginning and the end of the list of 
words passed as input to the DCG 
(eg [how,do,i,go,ErQm,aa,to,d]}. 
According to the Prolog rules In the 
Lang section, a sentence (S) is 



until you are looi^ing in the 
vocabulary section to see If there is 
such a thing as a determiner ('a', 
'the') and a noun ('route') to 
concatenate to mate up an NP. 

CRUEL (REAL) WORLD 

The route finding section of the 
program is simplicity itself after all 
this - get_routes/4 finds all the 
routes it can between the two nodes, 
and flnd_Bhortest/3 finds the 
length of each of them, and presents 
you with the shortest. What eise is 
there? Well, of course, this is a 
technique that only works on such a 
small network. Using a full UK map 
and finding every possible route 
between Blacitpool and Grimsby 
would last longer than my lifetime. In 
the real world you would throw in a 
few heuristics, such as working out a 
way of preventing your route being 



Rgure 2: Two sentences to Interrogate your program 




KPT 



[glvel 



[a] 



taijht phrase 
TPP"^ W>P 

[route] TPrep Node DPrep 

t I 1 



Node 



[to] [X] [from] 



m 



Qadv 



[how] 




inX 
toY 



legitimate if it can be proved that 
there Is a questioning verb phrase 
(QVP) and a targeting noun phrase 
(NPT) such that, when concatenated, 
they equal the list given as Input to 
S/3. This is explicitly stated by this 
extract of code: 
a(s,_,_)!- 
(lvp<CfVP>, 
ni)t{HPT,_,_), 
$aCE>end(QVP,NPT,S) . 
(The other S/3 rule allows another 
sentence format to be used - you 
can have as many sentence formats 
as you like.) Of course, Prolog being 
Prolog this process recurs and 
recurs, and so a QVP exists if there 
exists a Questioning Phrase (QP), 
and a Verb, and they can be 
concatenated together to form a 
QVP, Likewise for NPT. Note that Itie 
NPT does something else which, 
strictly isn't part of a language 
parsing process: it uses the Target 
and the Origin nodes for use in the 
Route Section. This process of 
definition and subdefinition occurs 



longer than 2x the crow's flying route 
between the two nodes. Or perhaps 
making a classification of the types 
of routes, and only using routes with 
a fair percentage of A roads and 
Motorways. Real Routefinder 
systems use these methods, and 
then some. The point is that Prolog 
is a nifty way of prototyping your 
ideas. SBProlog may not be a 
serious development tool, but I've 
used Prologs in the IBM world that 
gave blistering performances and 
could be used for real programming. 
All we need Is for an enterprising 
someone to port one over... O 

ooooooooo" 

SHOPPING LIST 



SBProlog 

(Fish Disk 140} 

available from f D Direct 
(Disk PDlf29a| 
tr07B27152S5 



£1.25 




ROUTE FINDER DEMO PROGRAM PART 2 


/* AMIGA SHOPPER ROUTBFXtJDBR 


vp{VP), 


VIS^ FROORAH FART 2 


Sappend(QP,VP,aVP) . 


*/ 


8 (S, Target , origin) : - 


gor- nip, 1 , 


vp{ve). 


nl,print( ^Ncw finding J 


npt (NPT, Target, origin) , 


route * , *' ) ,nl. 


$Wpend(vp,HPT,s) , 


route. 




rcfUtefR, L} , 


s (a, Target, Origin) :- 


print ('The stsortost route is J 


qvp(QVP), 


along road segmenta : '] , 


iipt (NPT, Target, Origin) , 


prlnt(R}inl, print('*l^is route J 


?append(OVP,NPT,S), 


is '), print (L). 


tp {^TP , Target , Origin) : - 


print ( ' miles long ' ] , nl . 


tpp (TPP , Target ) , 




opp ( OPP , or igin) , 
$appena(TPP,OPE,TP) . 




(Sbolaar:- aliollBhfdb, 1) , 


tp { TP , Target , Or igin ) : - 


alx>lish( target, 19, 


cpp(OPP,Origlii) , 


aioliBh(orlgin,l), 


tpp(TPP, Target) , 


abolish (route, 2) . 


$appenii(OPP,TPP,TP) . 


get_iiuery {Out ) : - 


tpp(TPP,M):- di)(tprerp{TPRBP)), 


print ( 'Enter ytiur QuQry: ' > , 


db{node(»)), 


read(X) , 


$appeiid ( TPREP , H , TPP ) . 


wor<ifl{X, £], [],Oiit). 






yp(VP) :- db(v(v)>. 


nlpi-dbclear. 


db(pro(P)), 


get_<iuery(Out) , ! , 


$append[V,P,VP). 


print ( ' Parsing request ,,,'), 


vp(VP) :- db{pro{P)), 


prepare (Out) , ! j 


db(v{V)), 


s { Out , Target , Or igin } , 




assert (taxget (Target) ) , 


$app9nd{P,v,VP) . 


assert {origin (Origin) ) ' 






/*- — EOOTB •/ 


prepare ( []) . 




prepare( [a|T]}:- 


exi St B_route ( End, End, Route , Route } 


word(H) , 




prepare (T) > 


axiste_ronteOtart,Bnd,i.i8t, J 




Route ) : - 


word(X) :- 


(road ( Seg, Start , Midway ,_) ,' 


( (det ( [X] ) .aBoert (db(det ( [X] ) > ) ) j 


road { Seg , Midway , Start ,_)) , 


(□prep([x]),assect(<&( oprep J 


not Sraemiber {seg, List), 


(Exl)))); 


existB_route (Midway, End, J 


(n {[X]), assert (db{n(EXl)))); 


ESeglList], Route). 


(pro( [X] ) .assert (db (prof [X] ) ) )) ; 




(ga( [X] ) ,asaert {di.{(ia{ [X] ) ) ) ) ; 


£lnd_pos{H, EHI_],Po8,Pob). 


( tprep { [X] ) , assert {fib { tprep J 


f ind_poa {X, EH 1 T] , Pos , Out ) : - 


(1X3)))) J 


Newpos is Pos + 1, 


(v{[x]),aBsert{db(v([x])))); 


f ind_pos {X, T, NewpoB , Out ) . 


( node {[X]), assert {iJb{no<3« J 




(CXI))))). 


£ind_sliorteat (Routes, Route, Len) i- 


words { [ ] ,Word, Carry, Out) : - 


sumfRouteB, ti , Totals) , 


$reverse {Word,Wordl) , 


sort (Totals, [Shortest l_l). 


nanB{Word2,Wordl), 


f indjpOB (Shortest , Totals , 1, J 


^reverse ( [woraa 1 carry] ,Out) . 


Suinber), 


words { [32 iT], word, S, Out) :- 


$ reverse ( Route b , Route Bl ) , 


$re verse {Mord,Wordl) , 


5iittiaieiiiber {Roatel.RCRiteel, J 


Eiaiiie{Word2,Wordl), 


Nuntber), 


words (*,[], [words IS], Out). 


total (Routel, , Len) , 


words(|HIT],Wor(i,S,Out):- 


$ re verse( Route 1, Route) . 


wordB(T, [HI Word] ,S,Out) . 


get_;routoo ( Start , End , Rcautea , J 




Out) !- 


Handles 2 types of ijueries: 


exi 9ta_route ( S tart , End, [ 1 , Route ) , 


"give me a route to Y from x". 


not $iiiember( Route, Routes), 


"how do 1 get from X to Y". 


get_routes(Start, End, [Route J 


*/ 


laouteel,out). 




gat_route a (Start, End, Routes, J 


np{NP):- dt>(det(nBT)), 


Routes) . 


ab{n(N)), 




$appena(DBT,N,NP), 


route:- J 




origin ( [Start 1 ) , target { [ISid] ) , 


npt (MPT, Target, Origin) J- J 


get_routeB (Start , End, [ ] , Houtes) , 


tp (NPT, Target , Qrlgla) . 


f ind_Bbortest (Houtes, Route, Len) , 


npt (»PT, Target , Origin) j - 


assert (route {Route, Len) ) . 


E(P(NP), 




tp(TP, Target, Origin), 


sunif [] , Out, out) . 


$append(Hi',TP,NPT). 


Bum( [K 1 TJ , Begin, Out > s - 




total (H,0, Total), 


ppp(OPP,K)!- db(crprap(OPEBP)), 


Bum{T, ETotall Begin], Out). 


db(aode(N)), 




SappenS { OPKBP , N, OPP ) . 


total(£],Out,Out). 




total ([HIT], Running, Out) : - 


sa>lQP]:- (5b(qa{Qli)), 


road(K,_,_,X), 


db(v(V!), 


Carry is sunning * X, 


$appena{QA,V,QP) , 


total (T, Carry, Out) . 


<lvp{QVP)j- (ip{QP), 





AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



43 



ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 




The ihird part m Philip Glad^^in's 
series helping you to give your 
Amiga a smidgen ofAl 



Last month I gave you the 
concepts you need to handle 
single processing nodes - 
this month we're going to 
use these concepts and begin to 
connect them together Into the 
neural network shown In Figure 1. 
We're going to use nodes which 
have four output channels and four 
primary input channels; notice how 
they send their output directly into 
the input channeis of their four 
nearest neighbours. Notice also how 
the net wraps around, so that the 
nodes on the outside of the net take 
some of their input from the nodes 
on the other side of the net. Figure 2 
gives the complete iook-up tabie for 
the net when it is in a state of 
complete ignorance. Each node 



starts off with undefined output; this 
alters when we teach ttie net 
anything. 

How do we do this? OK - iet's 
start off by giving the net infoimation 
about the letters "C" and "K". To 
teach the net the pattern for "C", 
assume that nodes 1,2,3,4,7,8,9 
put out a 1, and nodes 5 and 6 put 
out a 0. Then, for every node, look at 
its input pattern, and find the column 
in the look-up table which corre- 
sponds to it. If the node is outputting 
a '1' change the '?' to a *1'; if it is 
putting out a '0', change it to '0'. 
Repeat this for the letter "K". 

When you have done this the 
look-up table should look like the top 
half of the table in Rgure 3. Now 
generalise the net's memory. You do 



INPUTS & OUTPUTS 




1 



Figure 1 : Nine node neural net 



EXCITE THAT NOTE 



The next step up in network complexity would be to allow the connections 
between the nodes to have strengths, or weights, between -1 and 0. This 
simulates the fact that in the human brain there are some inputs which 
inhibit the firing of the node, and some that excite its firing. A node, in 
deciding whether or not to fire, will sum its inputs and apply some sort of 
function to the total. This function can be a simple thresh-holding (fire if the 
sum of the inputs is greater than 0} or something much more complicated. 



INPUT 1 





oil 


111111 


INPUT 2 


1 11 


10 


1111 


INPUT 3 


110 1 


10 


110 11 


INPUT 4 


10 10 10 


10 1 


10 10 1 


NODEl 


??????? 


? ? ? 


?????? 


NODE 2 


??????? 


? ? ? 


7 - - - . . 


NODE 3 


??????? 


. 


. . 


NODE 4 


? ? ? ? - - - 


- 


- 


NODE 5 


7 7 7 7. - . 


. 


all?s 


NODE 6 


? ? ? ? - - - 


- 


, Input 2 


NODE 7 
NODE 8 
NODE 9 


? ? ? ? - - - 
? ? ? ? - - - 
? ? ? ? - ■ - 




- 






Input 1 


NODE 


ln^3 


Figure 2: look-up laoie ror a 9-nuuB nei 
before learning 


Input 4 



COLUMN 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


8 9 10 11 12 


13 14 15 16 


NODEl 


7 7 7 7 7 ? ? 


? ? ? ? ? 


? 1 ? 1 


: NODE 2 


7 7 7 7 7 ? ? 


? ? ? ? 


? ? 1 ? 


NODE 3 


?????? 1 


? ? ? ? ? 


? ? 1 ? 


1 NODE 4 


? ? ? ? ? 1 ? 


1 ? ? ? ? 


? ? ? ? 


NODE 5 


??????? 


? 1 ? ? ? 


? ? ? 


NODE 6 


? ? ? ? ? ? ? 


? ? ? ? 


? ? ? 


NODE? 


7 7 7 7 7 ? 7 


? ? ? ? ? 


? 1 ? 1 


NODES 


? ? ? ? ? ? ? 


? ? ? ? 1 


? ? ? 


NODE 9'???1??? 


7 7 ? ? 1 


? ? ? ? 


ungenerallsed outputs for 'C and 'K' 






NODEl 


11111 11 


11111 


1111 


NODE 2 


? ? 1 ? 1 


? ? ? 


1 ? 1 ? 


NODE 3 


11111 11 


11111 


1111 


NODE 4 


11111 11 


11111 


1111 


NODE 5 


1 ? 1 ? ? ? 


1 ? 1 ? 


? ? 


NODE 6 











NODE? 


11111 11 


11111 


1 1 1 i 


NODE 8 


? 1 ? 1 ? 


? ? 1 ? 1 


7 0? 


NODE 9 


11111 11 


11111 


1111 


generalised outputs for 'C and 'K' - nodes 1,3,4,1 and 9 always output 1, 


and node 6 always outputs 

Figure 3: Completed look-up table for a 9 
node net learning 'C and 'K' 





this by allocating as many as 
possible of the remaining '?'s to 
their nearest Hamming neighbour. 
(See last month's article if you're 
confused by this.) When you've done 
this you should have the second, 
usable version of the table, ie the 
net has been taught two patterns. 

From now on the net is ready to 
use. So, put the net into operational 
mode by switching the Teaching 
Input on each node from 1 to 0, and 
you're ready to test its knowledge. 

The point about neural nets is 
not that they work or they don't - like 
the brain they are modelled on, they 
have a performance gradient. They 
can sort of half work, or work most of 
the time. This net is no exception, 
and it performs best on pattern 
completion problems where the 
pattern is close to one or the other 
of the patterns it has been taught. 
Where the test pattern has a 
Hamming distance towards the 
midpoint of the two taught patterns 
then the net can get confused. 

Operating the net is dead easy. 
Type it all in, and get it to pass the 
AMOS irrtemal syntax check. The 



printed code shown is the code 
which runs on my Amiga, so if you 
have problems, check your typing. 

The f rst screen teaches the net 
the patterns you want it to know. 
Clicking on the grid switches nodes 
on and off. When you're happy with 
the pattern, click on "Pattern OK' to 
make the net accept your pattern, 
and clear grid for the next instruction. 

Teach the net the letter 'T', and 
repeat this for the letter 'H'. When 
the net has accepted both patterns 
click on the "Use Net" button. You 
will then see a screen with two 
separate grids. The grid on the left is 
the test grid, where you enter the 
patterns you want the net to identify. 
Try it - click on nodes (1,3,5 and 8) 
and click on the "Go" button. The net 
will identily *at partial image as 
being closest to a 'T'. Click on 
"Clear", and try St again, with nodes 
(1,2,3,4,6,7 and 9). This time the 
net settles on an 'H'. 

It shouldn't take you long to 
realise that the net can settle into 
strange loops and cycles. Next 
month I'll be closing the series with 
an explanation of why this is. ^D 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 



AMOS NEURAL NET PART 2 • AMOS NEURAL NET PART 2 • AMOS NEURAL NET PART 2 



Procedure (SSHEBAIiISE 



Peo 3 ! locate 5,5 : Print 

"Iieaming . , , , " j Pen 2 

11=31 : JJ=101 : KK=32 ! Iili=104 
For N0DE=1 To 9 : Ram For every node 
For T=l To 16 ! Rem Set every J 

untaught col 

If OUTPUTS {NODE, T) =9 

SHORTEST CN0DB,T,1 3 : Rem J 
find the shortest 1 dlst 

x-Param 

SHORTEST [NODE, T,0] : Rsaa J 
find the shortest diat 

Y-Param 

If X<Y ! Rem if cloaer to J 



1-taughts 



0-taughts 



GEK_ODTPDTS ( NODE , T ) " 1 
End If 
If x>Y : Rem if closer Co J 



GEN_OOTPOTS ( NODE , T ) = 
End If 
End If 

Ink 1 : Bar II, JJ To KK,IiL : J 
IBC KK : InlE 2 
Next T 
Next HOEK 
End Pcoc 

Procedure lliilT 



Randcjolze Timer 

Reserve Zone 25 : Curs Off r J 
Ink 3 : ClB : Paper 

I>ESCRIBE_NBT 

SET_TRCJTH_TABLB 
End Proo 



Procedure LEARN 



LEARN_SCREEN 
CELLS 

GENERAIiISE 
End Proc 

Procedure I£&RK_9CREEH 

BiriLI3_ZONES 136, 36, 126, 126, 1, 3, 3] 
BDILD_ZONES[36, 146,126, 166, 10,1, 1] 
BUILD_ZOHESt36, 178,126, 198, 11,1, 1] 
Locate 13,0 : Print "TEACH MOHE" 
iKXJate 5,19 : Print "Pattern OK" 
Locate 7,23 : Print "Dee Nat" 
End Proc 

Procedure PBAR[HODE,K] 



Ink K 






On 


NODE Goto 


A,B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I 


A: 


Bar 


37,37 


TO 65,65 ! Goto LEAVE 


Bs 


Bar 


67,37 


To 95,65 ! Goto LEAVE 


C: 


Bar 


97,37 


TO 125,65 : Goto LEAVE 


Ds 


Bar 


37,67 


To 65,95 : Goto LEAVE 


B: 


Bar 


67,67 


To 95,95 s Goto LEAVE 


F: 


Bar 


97,67 


To 12S,9S : Goto LEAVE 


0: 


Bar 


37,97 


TO 65,125 : Goto LEAVE 


H: 


Bar 


67,97 


To 95,135 J Goto LEAVE 


l! 


Bar 


97,97 


To 125,125 


LEAVE: 






End Proc 






Procedure 


PPBAR[HODE,K] 



On NODE Soto A,B 


C,D,E,F, 


G,H,I 


A: Bar 


157,37 


To 


185,65 : 


Goto LEAVE 


B: Bar 


187,37 


TO 


215,65 : 


Soto LEAVE 


Ct Bar 


217,37 


To 


245,65 : 


Goto LEAVE 


B: Bar 


157,67 


To 


185,95 ; 


Goto LEAVE 


E: Bar 


187,67 


TO 


215,95 I 


Goto LEAVE 


F: Bar 


217,67 


To 


245,95 ! 


Goto LEAVE 


G: Bar 


157,97 


TO 


185,125 


; Goto LEAVE 


H: Bar 


187,97 


TO 


215,125 


J Soto LEAVE 


I: Bar 


217,97 


To 


245,125 




LEAVE: 










End Proc 










Procedure 


ailT_TRDTH. 


.TABLE 





For I-l To 4 

Restore 1*100 
For J=l To 16 

Read trdth_table(i, J) 
Next J 
Next I 
100 Data 
0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,1,1,1,1 : 
Rem top neighbour 

200 Data 
0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1 : 
Rem right neighbour 

300 Data 
0,0,1,1,0,0,1,1,0,0,1,1,0,0,1,1 : 
bottcoi neighbour 

400 Data J 
0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1,0,1 ! 
Rem left neighbours 
End Proc 

Procedure SHORTEST [KOBE, COL, TYPE] 



HAMMING- 4 
For 1=1 To 16 
ST0KE=4 
If COLOI 

If OOTPUTS(NODE,I)-TYPE 
If 
TRUTa_TABLE (1,1) -TROTH_TABIiB (1, COL) 
Dec STORE 
End If 
If J 
TROTH_TaBLE (2,1) ='niUTH_TABI,E ( 2 , C Q L) 
Dec STOKE 

End If 
If 

TRUrajTABLE (3,1) =TRDTH_TABLE ( 3 , COL) 
Dec STORE 
End If 

If J 

TRDTOLTABLB (4,1) .TRDTH_TABI^ { 4 , COL} 
Dec STORE 
End If 
End If 

If STORE <HAlaaHG 
HAKKING^STOHE 
End If 
End If 
Next I 
End Proc [HAHMlllG] 

Procedure teach 



' Finds out wliich row in the J 
truth table the node 

' should occupy hy referring to J 
its neighbours and finding 

' which of them are on 



For C=l To 4 : Rem for every J 
node get the neighbours 

X=CONNECTED(N,C) : Rem X = J 
this node's current neighbour 

If N0DE(X)=1 Then J 
HEIGHB0(JRS{N,C)=1 : Rem if neighbour J 
on then . . . 

If NODE(X)=0 Then J 
HEiaHBODRS(N,C)=0 : Rem 
Next C 

FIKD„TT_COL !N3 
COL=Paraai 

ODTPDTS (N, COL) -NODE (K) 
GER_OnTPnTS <N, COL) =NODE (N> 
TEMP (N, COL) -1 
Next K 
ALLOCATE 
End Proc 

Procedure USE 



Shared CLICKED () 
Do 

Cls 

nSER_SCREEH 

CSER_PATTERH 

Repeat 

CLCK=Mouse Click : J 
ZC^-Mouse Zone 

DELVE 

ontil(CLCK-l and ZOM-ll) orJ 
(CLCK-1 and ZCN-12) 

If ZON=12 Then Edit 
Ci:,EAR_GRID 
For 1=1 To 9 
NODE (I) =9 
Next I 
Locip 
End Proc 

Procedure n3ER_PATTBRN 

Shared CLICKED 

Repeat i Rem this loop gets the J 
pattern from the user 

CLCK=Mouse Click : ZON=MOuse Zone 
If CLCK=1 and zaN<10 and ZON>0 J 
Then CLICK[ZON3 

until (CLCK=1 and ZON-10) or(CLCK=l J 
and ZON-12) 

If ZON=12 Then Edit : Rem option J 
to quit 

For 1=1 To 9 : Rem this loop puts J 
the user pattern into NodeO 

If CLICKED{I)-1 Then N0DE(I)=1 
If CI.ICKED(1)=0 Then NOaE(I)=0 
Next I 
Ind Proo 

Procedure USER„SCREEN 



Reset Zone 

BniLD_Z{»lES[36,36,126,126,l,3,31 
BUILD_Z0NES[156,36,246,126,12,3,3] 
BUILD_Z0NES [106, 146,176, 196, 10,3, 13 
Locate 14,0 : Print "USE MODE" 
Locate 17,19 i Print "Go" 
Locate 15,21 : Print "Clear" 
Locate 16,23 : Print "Quit" 
End Proc 

' End Neural Net Program 



Ink K 



For N=l To 9 ! Rem for every node 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1 992 



45 



MJC 



COMPUTER 
SUPPLIES 



SHpplii'fs of Discount Software since I'JS4 

Educational, Local Authority and government orders 

welcome. European orders please call or write for a 

quotation. All goods subject to availability, prices subject 

to change without notice. E&OE. 

Prices include VAT and delivery by post. 

Cornier delivery available on request. 
Please allow 5 days for cheque clearance. 

TO ORDER: Credit card orders can be 

placed by calling the telephone number 

below - or send a cheque/PO's made 

out to MJC Supplies to: 

MJC SUPPLIES (ASH) 

Unit 2 The Arches, Icknield Way, 

Letchworth, Herts. SG6 lUJ. 

Tel: (0462) 481166 (6 lines) 



NAKSHA UPGRADE MOUSE 



280 DPI quality replacement mouse ■ pack includes 

Mouse House, Mat and Operation Stealth ganne. 

MJC PRICE £21 .95 



NEW - A500 PLUS 1Mb Expansion 



1Mb expansion for the A500 Plus - fits in the trapdoor 

taking your memory to 2Mb ■ no internal fitting 

MJC PRICE £39.95 



i 



SUPRA 500RX EXPANSIONS 



New memory expansion for the A500 ■ 

plugs directly into tiie HD expansion port - 

NO INTERNAL CONNECTION 

SUPRA 500 RXIMb (expani! to 2Mlil £99.00 

SUPRA 500 nx 2Mb (Bxpand to 8Mb) £145.00 

SUPRA 500 RX 4Mb (expand to OMb) E209.00 



NEW - ROBOSHIFT 



Auto sensing joystick/mouse switch box. 
MJC PRICE £13.95 



CUMANA CAX 354 DISK DRIVE 



Quality brand name 3.5' second drive includes thru 

port, disable switch and FREE Virus X Utility 

MJC PRICE £54.95 



NEW ROCLITE RF382C DISK DRIVE 



New super slimline, super quiet second drive. 
MJC PRICE £57.95 (cream only) 



FUN SCHOOL 

probably the best selling Educational Software for the 
Amiga - great sound and graphics and now confornns 
to the National Curriculum iFS3 & FS4) 



Fun School 2 . 8 prDgranis pet pack 

Fun School 2 under 6 .,..£12.95 

Fun School 2 6 to 8 £12.95 

Fun School 2 over 8 £12.95 

Fun School 3 - 6 programs per pack 

Fun School 3 under 5 £15.95 

Fun School 3 5 to 7 £15.95 

Fun School 3 over 7 £15.95 

NEW - Fun School 4 - 6 programs per pack 

Fun School 4 under 5 £15.95 

Fun School 4 5 to 7 £16.95 

Fun School 4 7 to 11 £16.95 

All Fun School programs will work with a standard 
512k Anniga and the new A500 Plus. 



GVP PRODUCTS 



OVP AS0W500 Plu« 52Mh Hard Pi«k! features 

on board Ram expansion to 4/8Mb with high speed 
Faastrom controller. Autobooting, includes excellent easy 
to use installation software. 

MJC PRICE C349.95 

gyp aes PC emulators for use with the A500 
Hard Drive. 286 speed running at 15Mhz. 

MJC PRICE C229.95 



GVP S II Hard Driva (A15O0/20001 : Quality 
Quantum drives running as fast as 1 Irns plus the excellent 
GVP controller board, with the ability to add up to 8Mb 
memory (SIMMS). 

52Mb version £279.95 

NEW . 120Mb version £419.95 

SIMM MODULES - C59.95 par 2 meg 



SUPRA A1 500/2000 MEMORY BOARDS 



SU PR ARAM memory cards witfi space tor up to 8Mb 

SUPRARAM with 2Mb fitted £145.00 

SUPRARAM with 4Mb fitted £195.00 

SUPRARAM with 5Mb fitted £255,00 

SUPRARAM with 8Mb fitted £295.00 

Kind Words 3 - Due soon CALL 

PenPal £54.95 

WORDWORTH v1.1 . Gsnuino UH veision E74.95 

PROTEXT - VERSION 5.5 

Latest version of this best selling word processor for 
those wanting serious processing power, includes 
new 110 000 word dictionary and Thesaurus [1 meg). 
MJC PRICE £99.95 

PROTEXT V4.3 - new low price E39.95 

PRORATA V1 .2 Amiga £64.95 



NEW - ACTION REPLAY III 



MJC PRICE £57.95 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Deluxe Paint 3 Video Tutorial £17,95 

Stereo Master , £29.95 

Techno Sound Turbo £29.95 

Pro Midi Interface £19,95 

Personal Finance Manager £22,95 

MaxiplanPlus £34,95 

Home Accounts 2 £36.95 

DELUXE PAINT 4 ....X59.95 

Hisoft Devpac 3 £47.95 

Hisoft Hi-Speed Pascal £69.95 



AiVIIGA EDUCATIONAL 



KOSMOS Answertiacli Junior Quli - 

includes 750 general knowledge questions 

and a game reward £14.95 



AnswerlMck Senior Quiz - 

as above but for age 12+ . 



..£14.95 



Factfiles - add-on question packs for the Answeriiack 
Quiz: 

Factflle Spelling (6-U) £7.95 

Factflle Arithmetic (6-11) £7.95 

KOSMOS Language TMors: with a vocabulary of over 
2500 words + the ability to add your own - up to GCSE 
level; 

French Mistress £14.95 

German Master £14.95 

Spanish Tutor £14,95 

Italian Tutor £14.95 

KOSMOS Maths Adventure: The latest offering from 
Kosmos covers the National Curriculum maths using a 
series of four gannes. There are four difficulty levels 
and your performance can be kept and printed 
out. (6-14) E17.9S 



ROMBO PRODUCTS 



NEW - TAKE 2 

New Animation package from Rombo 
MJC PRICE £39.95 



VIDI COLOUR SOLUTION 

Vidi Colour package - including Vidi Digitlser, Vtdichrome 

software and free Photon Paint 

MJC PRICE £49.99 



RGB SPLITTER - for use with VIdichrome 

or Digiview. (includes FSUl 

MJC PRICE £49.95 



COMPLETE COLOUR SOLUTION 

Package includes Vidi Amiga, VIdichrome and the RGB 

Splitter for a complete colour digitising outfit. 

NOTE: For best colour pictures you require a video 

camera or perfect still frame VCR. 

MJC PRICE £99.95 

C«nip Col S«lutlon + Take 2. MJC PRICE £129.95 

Rombo prices held whilst stocks last. 



NEW - MEGAMIX MASTER 



New Stereo sampler and digital effects package. 
MJC PRICE E2B.95 



ROMBO prices held whilst stocks last. 



VIDEO TITLING/PRESENTATION 



Big Alternative Scroller £42.95 

Broadcast TItler II £159.95 

Broadcast Font Pack £89.95 

Broadcast Font Enhancer Pack £89.95 



ROCTEC ROCGEN GENLOCK 

Budget priced genlock, includes fader. 
MJC PRICE £S9.95 



AMOS ■ The Creator | 


NEW - EASY AMOS - Powerful hut easy. 

AMOS VI. 2 - The original Language.... 
AMOS COMPILER 


.£25.95 

.£32.95 
.£19.95 
£21.95 


AMOS 3D 





LCL SOFTWARE 

Primary Maths Course (3-12) £19.95 

Micro Maths (GCSE level) £19,95 

Micro French (GCSE level) £19.95 

Micro English (GCSE level) , £19.95 

Reading and Writing Course (3-^) £19.95 

NEW- MEET A0I1 

ADI is a friendly alien being that appears on this latest 
range of educational software from Eu repress (the manu- 
facturers of the fun School range). Each package is 
specifically designed to follow the National Curriculum for 
a particular school year. 

EHGLtSH 11/12: 

Features pronouns, verbs, adverbs, spelling, synonyms, 

and prefixes/suffixes MJC Price £17.95 

ENGLISH 12/13: 

Using dictionaries and reference books, construct 
adverbs, punctuate sentences MJC Price £17.95 

MATHS 11/12: 

Covers geometry, algebra, statistics symmetry, quadrilat- 
erals and number operations .......MX Price £17,95 



Furtlier Inlormatloii on our Educational range is available in our Educational Supplement - on request 



Remember - prices include VAT & delivery 



CONTENTS 
AT-A-GLANCE 

Accelerator 53 

Action Replay cartridge 54 

AmlgaDOS 52 

AMOS 52 

Animation 62, 66 

ARexx 63 

Art Department 54, 67 

Audio Engineer, — S4 

Audio filter 64 

Basic 52, 62, 66 

Brother printer 68 

C 53, 54, 65 

Canon printer 65 

CD-ROM 63 

Chip RAM 53, 68 

Citizen printer 64, 67 

Commodore printer 53 

Database 52, 65 

Deluxe Paint 54, 62 

Denlse 65, 67 

Exponentials 63 

RIcker fixer 67 

Fountain.... 67 

Hard drive 53, 54, 62, 63 

Include fites 53 

Kickstart 64, 67 

Mac 68 

Mannesman printer 53 

Memory expansion 53, 54, 65 

KlessySID 68 

MIcrovltec monitor 63 

NoPalH»s»t. ..„.„....,„...„„68 

OcUMED — ..............64 

PagBStteam 64, 67 

Partitions 62 

PC 54,68 

PC monitor 66 

Prtntf 54 

Proiext .6i 

Rambrandt .53 

Requesters 65 

Sampler 64 

Selkosha printer .....53 

StD 65 

Star printer 52, 53, 54, 64, 65 

TechnoSound Turbo 54 

Trackball 52 



OUR EXPERTS TACKLE YOUR REAL-LIFE PROBLEMS 




• BUY THE RIGHT AMIGA 

• WHICH PC EMUUTOR? 



• POWER FUNCTIONS IN C "^ - 

• PARTITION YOUR HARD DRIVE 

• DTP PAGES '"F""'" 111 

• MAKE A cmzfif nm mmoa disk 

• COMMODORE INCLUDE FILES 



ALL OF YOUR AMIGA 
PROBLEMS ANSWERED 



SO WHAT DO ALL 




Beginners: 
this icon 
will appear 
next to any 
questions which are 
'basic' in content. 

Printers: 
tliis icon 
denotes a 
querv 

about printers, printer 
drivers and so on. 



u 




General: 
this icon is 
used for 
any 

general Amiga-related 

queries. 

Technical; 
any 

queries 
about 
programming witi have 
this icon next to them. 





Caution: 
be sure 
ttiat you 
fully 

understand the answer 
before trying it out. 

Video: this 
icon 

relates to 
any query 
about using your Amiga 
with video hardvi^are. 




ICONS MEAN? 




Danger: 
the answer 
to tills 
question 
could weW invalidate 
your warranty - or youl 

Music: this 
I^^H*)^ icon Is for 

questions 
about 

iVIIDI, sampling, 

synthesizers and so on. 



H 




Hardware: 
this icon is 
used to 
denote 
questions rotating to 
general hardware. 

Programs: 

any 

program- 
specific 
queries have this icon 

next to them. 





Buying 
advice: we 
use this 
icon if the 

question asks us for 

buying advice. 

Comms: if 
your 

question 
relates to 

comms, this is the icon 

that we'll use. 





WHATEVER YOUR PROBLEM WITH THE 

That's the task we have set ourselves In giving you the best 
possible support for your Amiga. We are confident that our experts 
can cope with any technical questions you can throw at them. If 
they don't already know the answer to your problem, they will find It 
out for you. 

We are prepared to deal with any problem you have with the 
Amiga, from general enquiries about AmIgaDOS or Workbench, 
throu^ questions about specific pieces of software and hardware, 
to advice on what you need to buy to do a particular task. If It's to 
do with the Amiga, we will help out. What we cannot do Is offer this 
service over the telephone - do not phone us with your enquiries, 
but write to us at the address below. 

We also cannot enter Into personal correspondence - all 
enquiries will be dealt with In the pages of the magazine. This does 
mean a bit of a delay in solving your problem, but you'll Just have to 
be a little patient and wait for It to appear In print. You won't get a 
personal reply even If you enclose an SAE with your letter, so please 
don't bother. 

Send your question on the forni below to: Amiga Answers, Amiga 
Shopper, Beauford Court, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BAl 2BW. 

The Amiga Answers panel consists of our consultant editors 



AMIGA, WE ARE HERE TO SOLVE IT 

Mark Smtddy and Jeff Walker - and, of course, our resident deputy 
editor Cilff Ramshaw. We will also be calling on the services of alt 
our other contributors, so you won't be able to catch us napping 
whatever the subject of your query. 

Each panelist will be dealing with queries In their own specialist 
area(s) so It would help us greatly If, when writing, you label your 
query envelope with the name of the expert who can solve your 
particular problem, 

Below is a list of areas of expertise, it's a list that we will add to 
and update every month, so you will know who to write to about any 
subjects not mentioned here. 

Gary Whiteley - Video 

Paul Overaa - Programming, music 

Mick Draycott - Hardware, programming, MIDI 

Jeff Walker - Desktop publishing, programming 

MaHf Smiddy- AmIgaDOS, business, CDTV, hardware projects, 

hard and floppy disk drives 

Jasofi Holbom ~ Public Domain, AMOS 

Jolyon Ralph - Programming, hardware, CDTV 

Cliff Ramshaw - The really hard stuff that no-one else can answer 



If you send In a question for the Amiga Answers experts, please fill 
in and include the form below (or a photocopy if you don't want to 
cut up your magazine). And please also make sure that you include 
all the relevant details - version numbers of software and so on - 
so that we have the best chance of helping you. Send your form and 
question to: Amiga Answers, Amiga Shopper, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath 
BAl 2 BW. Sorry, but we cannot personally reply to any questions - even 
if you include an SAE. 

Name: 



HaKi disk; Mb as DH_: Manufacturer . 



Extra RAM fitted - type, size In Mb and manufacturer . 



Details of any other hardware which could help us to answer your question: 



Address: 



Now, use this space to describe your problem, Including as much relevant 
Information as possible. Please continue on a separate sheet If necessary. 



Your machine: 
A500 □ AlOOO □ 

A2000 □ A3000Q 

Approximate age of machine:. 



A1500 Q 



KIckstart version (displayed at the Insert Workbench' prompt) 

1.2 □ 1.3 □ 2.x □ 

Workbench revision (written on the Workbench disk) 

1.2 □ 1.3 □ 1.3.2 □ 2.x Q 

PCB revision (If known). Do not take you machine apart Just to look 

for this! 

Total memory fitted (see AVAIL In Shell foi 1.3 Workbench) 

Chip memory available (see AVAIL In Shell) 

Agnus chip (If known) 

Extra drive #1 (3.5"/5.25'') as DF_: Manufacturer 

Extra drive #2 (3.5"/5.25") as DF_: Manufacturer 



AS 16 



48 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1993 



O^CE 



LEEDS TEL: 0532 63798 

kkkft#w p^x: 0532 637689 



NEW OPENING HOURS 

OPEN MON - SAT 9.30AM-5.30PM 
SUNDAY OPENING 11.00AM-3.00PM 
THURSDAY NIGHT LATE 9.30AM-7.30PM 



WEST YORKSHIRES PREMIERE 
AMfGA AND ATARI COMPUTER STORE 

AUTHORISED DEALERS FOR STAR, CtTtZEN, 
COMMODORE, ACORN, ROMBO <S PHOENIX 



^^ 


^^K^^ 




99 


; E. 



The iVe>v AMIGA A600 



Commodore's new computer/games machine, Buili in keyboard and 
compact in size the A600 will take "Smart Cards". The A600 comes 
with I 2 month on site warranty, workbench 2.0S,Dpalnt HI and 
Lemmings. 

now only £359.99 



The TV^H' AMIGA A600HD 



Same spec as tiie A600 but with a built in 20 meg hard disk for those 
games that run better on a hard disk. We shall be offering larger hard 
drive upgrades for the A600. Please ring for details ana prices. The 
600HD does not come with Lemmings or DPaint III 

now only £459.99 



THE AMIGA A500 PLUS 
CARTOON CLASSICS 



The ASOO has more serious capabificy Chan the 
A6D(> with It greater expandibillty and a large 
selection of high quality third party add-ons 
Complete vi^fth: 

* One Mb af chip RAM Expandable to l(^ Mb of RAM In C&tal 

* The new KIckstart 2.04 

* Workbench 2.04 

* BuiMc in battery backed real time c]oc\i 

* New tmproved user friendly manuals 

This pack also comes with Lemnnings, {die onl/ game ever to gei a 
\00% raUngE) The Simpsons, Captain Planet and Deluxe Paint 3 
die Incredible paint and aniinnaEiari p^cltafe pitjs mause and rrddulator 

now only £339.99// 
or £374.99 for 2Mb version 



MONITORS 



All our monitors are UK spec 



All monitors come complete 
with a free Amiga lead 

WAflNING; Before you pyrthase a monitor make 
sure k has a full UK ^pecEHcatlon. You might be 
buying what you think it a limllar monitor ata lower 
price but it \i likely to be a "'GREY" Import. Th«e 
moolton do not comply with BHtlah safety stand- 
ards uid are not covered by an afrkisi warranty 



THE AMIGA 1500 & 2000 PLUS 



The New AMIGA 
2000 Plus Base pack 

now complete with the latest 2.04 
Kickstart chip and Workbench 2.04 // 

The 2000 Base pack is the ideal upgrade machine for those wanting 
to upgrade from their present Amiga 500 

only £529.99 



Amiga 1 500 Plus Business & 
Entertainment Software pack 

Thesamespecasthe base pack but with Deluxe Paint3, Platinum Worta 
(the best integrated package availablefortheAmiga), Home Accounts, 
Pjuric, Elf, Toki plus die latest Amip FormatTips book (2.04 compatible) 
and Jo/stick. 

now only £549.99 
or £769.99 

with 1085 SDI colour monitor (UK Spec.) 



THE AMIGAA.500 & 1500/2000 
PLUS UELUXE SERIES 



The AMIGA 500 />g/fag 

is an uprated version of the A5O0 Plus with the Phoenix ROM sharer 
and 1 .3 chip because some older software will not run on the A500 
Plus. The ASOO Deluxe h<is been developed so you can choose to run 
either Kkkstart L3 or 2.04 making incompatibility problems a 
thing of the past ! The Deluxe also Comes complete with the 
Cartoon Classics software pack. 

only £4 1 4.99 or £449.99 

for 2 Mb version 



The Amiga 1 500 Deluxe is an advanced 
version of tlie standard AMIGA 1500 Plus 

incorporating the famous Phoenix ROM sharer and 1 ,3 Kicltstart KOM ciiip. 
As Willi the ASOO Deluxe, tliis enables ^ou to switcli between the old and 
new operating system to accommodate older software that can only run on 
the ] .3 operating system. 

only f-Jjir til for base pack version or 
£609.99 for the 1500 software pack version 



GVP HARD DRIVES AND ACCELERATORS 

AMIGA 1500/2000 Hard Drives 

Impact Series II HC8+ Control card only £134.99 

I mpact Series II HC8+ with 52Mb Hard Drive £279.99 

ImpactSeries II HCe+ with I lOMbHard Drive £419.99 

Impact Series 1 1 HC8+ with 240Mb Hard drive £639.99 

Impact Series II HC8+ with 420Mb Hard drive £ 1 1 69.99 

AMIGA 1 500/2000 Accelerator Cards 

G-Force 03O-25MHi with 1Mb 32 bit RAM £549,99 

G-Force 030-40MHi with 4Mb 32 bit RAM £899,99 

G-Force 030-50MHI with 4Mb 32 bit RAM £1269.99 

G-Force 040-28 MHz with 2Mb 32 bit RAM £1699.99 



AMIGAA500 HARD DRIVES 

GVP Series II HD8+ 52Mb £354.99 

GVP Series II HD8+ 105Mb £469.99 

GVP Series II HD8+ 240Mb £734.99 

GVP Combo Accelerator Series 
for the AMIGA ASOO 

A530 Combi 40MHz with 52Mb Hard Drive £699.99 

AS30 Combo 40MHi with 120Mb Hard Drive £849.99 

A530 Combo 40MHz with 240Mb Hard Drive £1039.99 

68882 Co-Processor for A530 £234.99 

GVP memory RAM modules 

Series II RAM 8 RAM cardfor AMIGA IS00/2000with2Mb £149,99 

32 bit 60ns IMb SIMM for Accelerator cards £64.99 

32 bit 60ns 4Mb SIMM for Accelerator cards £179.99 



Pro tar Stereo 
colour monitor 

This monitor uses the same tube as the Philips 8B33 
MK2 and has a similar specification. Hie Prot^r 
comet with a full 12 month replacement guar- 
antee. This must be the best value medium res. 
monitor on the market. Amiga cattle Included^ 
Tilt and swivel stand only i\ 1-99 wtienpur^ 
chased with this monitor. Cover onljr CS-99 

only £195.99 UK Spec 



Philips Brilliance SVGA 

Colour monitor 
with ov^jscgn facility 

The firilliancie monitor has a high quality Super 
VGA resolution ideal for making your AMIGA 
into a proresslonal s/stetn. Iclud«s overscan ^ciU 
\vf^ .28 dot pitch.and tilt/swivel stand. I^onicor 
[:over only £S.99 If purchas.ed^ ac the sam« un\A 

tsoffl VERSION £399.99 

with Flicker Free Video card 

ASOO VERSION £499.99 



Commodore I960 muieisync 
only £436.99 



Commodore 
1 085 SDI Stereo 
Colour monitor 

The perfect complement to your Amiga System. This 
Colour stereo monitor features .5 1 dot pitch thoIu- 
Uon and green screen Facilit)i'. Amiga cable in- 
cluded. Tilt and swivel stand only £ I L'9? when 
pyrchaied with this monitor Cover for moni- 
tor only £5.99 

only £2 1 9.99 UK Spec. 



Philips CM8833 MK2 
stereo colour monitor 

Colour Kcereo monitor. b00*28S line resolution, 
gi'cen screen facility, one years on site mainte^ 
nance^ cable for Amij^a included. Tilt and 
swivel itand only £ll.9"9' w^en purchased 
with monitor. Cover only £S.99 

only £219.99 UK Spec. 

with F 19 Flight Simulator 



Goldstar remote 
control TV/monitor 

superior to a standard TV set with fuH rempte control 

now only £179.99 



F/BST CHO/C£fiEEDs, m: 0532 W 



FrGG Delivery on a.11 products/// 



FAX: 0532 637689 




uimmodore Lynamic Total vision 

CompFete with Hutchinsons Encyclopedia, 
Lemmings and Wetcome CD disk, CDTV is a 
powerful media for both entertainment and educa- 
tion. Capable of handiing up to 540 Mb of data, 
whole encyclopedias can be stored on just one 
compact disc. The COTV is alsoa high quality audio 
CD player. We also stock a large range of COTV 
software all at discount prices 

now only 
£399.99 UK Spec 



Weiv CD Rom for the Amiga A500 -J FIRST CHOICE PACK 



The aidd-on that every one hu been waitingfor. This high quality CD ROM 
curn» your amlssi into a CDTV 



only £279.99 



New CDTV 
keyboard 

Effectively transforms your CO TY into an Amin 
50 you can get oven mor« out of CDTV. With me 

aid ofa standard 3,5" disc drive the CDTV will take moit 
of tlie normal Amigsi sofcware from word proceislrxgta 

entertainmetn 

only £49.99 



New CDTV 
Trackerball 

complete witli 2 [oystick I 

ponsv 1*1 Is Is a must for 
CDTV owners 

only £74,99 



Take :nt 'ii^adacic oul o\ buyiiij^ a compjccr wiLh our eve aopLli:" flHST 
CHOICE Pack. All the Hsentjali required far the Tmz time buyer. Ideal for an/ 
Amiga and great value too! 

Comprises: 
I * Top quality micros'^itched 
Po^erplay Cruiser joystick 
I* Mouse Mat . *v#*/v /\^v 

l*DustCover OPlly £29.99 
I**- 10 Blank Disks 

**lus 3 Ex'tra. games" 



TAR PRINTERS 

All Star printers inc ribbons, free 

std printer cable and 1 2 month 

guarantee 



The Star LC20 

Replacing the bmoiis LCIO, the LC20 is teier 
at ISOcps draft and 4S cps NLQ. It's also 
quieter. The front panel now has push button 
operation repiacirig the old LCIO membrane 
panel. Other spec is similar to LC 1 0. 

now only £1 39.99 -V 



New Star LC24-20 

24 pin quality at die price of many 9 pins. 1 1 Ocps draft, 
^(Hcps in LQ, lAkbufFerexpandaide lo^Sk 1 resident 
i'onu, LCD front display, Auto «fnijlation selection 

only £199.99 



Star LC24-200 

Mono and colour. 222 cp3 draft and 67 cps LQ. lO 
resident fofits. A4 Landscape printing 

only £229.99 mono 
or £289.99 colour 



Star XB24-200 Colour 

The choke of many professional orprisatiors, this printer 
comes wtch one rear on-site malntenarce. 332 cps draft, 
too cps LQ. 29k buf^ vxp to IB9k, A super LQ foncs 

and 1-4 LQ fonts 

now only £379.99 



Star LC200 

Colour 9 pin printer wich 8 resident fonts and a hl^ 
speed Df225cps draft and 45 cps in NLQ. A4 Landscape 
prindnf^ 

now only £199.99 



THE STAR SJ48 
BUBBLEJET 

With Epson LQ and IBM Proprinter emulation. The 
Sj48 is a revolutcion in printer technology. The quality 
is almostas good as an expensive luer pdnteryet ccusts 
less [lian tmany 24 pin printers. Porrahle in sir*, very 
quiet, and faster than mon dot matrix printers at 100 
cps in LQ. Mincer cable included 

only £229.99 

Auto sheetfeeder £52.93 



HEWLETT PACKARD 
INKJETS 



ISt^r printer accessories J Dust covers from 1^4*99, Printer stand JLfst £7,99 when purchasing printer. Mono ribbons from only 0*69 



WW^ 



CITIZEN PRINTERS 

Al! Cl&en printers inc. free printer caWe 
andiomewitiiaftiillywrwarrantyi 



The Citizen Swift 9 
Colour 

Unbeatable value colour printer 4 resident fonts, 
192 cps draft and 48 cps in NLQ. Hi^ly recom- 
mendedr This printer is also as^l^able In a wide 
carri^e (136 column) version 

only £194.99 (80 col) 
or £314.99 (136 col) 



The New 
Citizen 224 

A repkcement for the famous 1 240, the 224 now 
comes with the option to upgrade to a hl^h 
resolution colour printer. If you want 24 pin 
quality, you want to print in colour if necessary 
and you don't v^^nt to spend a fortune, the new 
224 IS an Ideal soJutlon. using the same technol- 
ogy as the Swift 24, the 224 is pasically a cut down 
version. [ 92 cpf draft and 64 cpi letter quality with 
3 built in fonts, 

only £2 1 4.99 (mono) 
or £244.99 (colour) 



Canon BJ I Oex..£ 244.99 
Canon BJ300...£379.99 
Canon BJ330....£5I9.99 



I Citizen printer accessories : Mono ribbons only lA.n, Printer ttands £24.99, auto sheet feeder; IKM, semi auto sheet feeders only 119M fjj^ ^ll canon printers are llK-SEES. 



The New Citizen 

Swift 24e and 24x 

(What Micro Best Buy) 

The best budget 24 pin printer 
has just got better/ 

This must be tlie best 24 pin colour princer for less than 
£3(X). 5I< buffer expandable lo 4CH:, 2\it cps draft, 72 cps 
LQ and multilingual too ! 

only £274.99 (80 col) I 
or £414.99 (136 col) 



you Eo create laser jet equality without the ccut. 
with lOO page auto sheet feeder, printer cable, 3 
page /minute speed and 

3 ye;tr UK warr anpy 

only £359.99 



The HP Deskjet 500C 

The famous deskjK SOO is now available as a 
colour printer, with this printer you can get 
SEunnIng coloor output at laser quality 

now only £569.99 



^wmmmf^mmsmwmmm 



SUPRA MODEMS supra 2400 Plus 



The i\ew super Jast 

Supra-Fax Modem 

V.32 bis (1 4400 baud.'.'!) 

Allows you to send and receive fax messages, 
This new modem from Supna has full 1 4400 
baud Capability. Spec includes V,32bis, V.32, 
V.22bls, V22, V2I,MNP4-S, MNPIO {for cell 
phone comms), V.42, V42bi5, Class I & 2 com- 
mands, 9600/14400 Group 3 Fax. Includes free 
comma software and modem cable 

only £259.99 




EMULATORS 



(up to 9600 BPS) 



Even faster than the standard 2400 modem from Supra wtth auto dial and 
auto receive. %O0bp5 Hayes com(»tible.V42 Bi^ MNP Sand auto adjusting 
facility to maximise transmrssion speeds. Sp^c Includes V22 Includes frft« 
modem cable and comms softwaneJJ 

only £129.99 
Supra 2400 

Get on line with this incredible value fast modem from Supra widi auto dial 
and auto receive. 2400 baud Hayes compatible, V22 Bl^. Includes free 
modem cable and ccHinms soltwarefJ 

now only £79.99 



KCS Power board 

Regarded as one of the best emulators on 
the market, this emulator fits easily into 
the trap door and also acts as a RAM 

upgrade. Highly recommended. 

now oniy £179.99 

Add E1S.0D for MS-DOS 4,01 
A500 Plus compacltkte 

KCS Amiga. 

1500/2000 adaptor 

only £59.99 



New Commodore 386-20 

This is a full PC 3e4'20SX Bridfneboard (not an emulator) 

™"*''"'""°"* only £439.99 

TheNewGVPI6MhzPC-286 

plu^ into an inwmal mini sl&t on the <jVP Series II HD3 + or GVP 
A5» hard disc drives 

only £239.99 
VORTEX AT Once Pius 

emulator turns your Am^ga into an IBM AT compaclble The 
AT-Once Plus can be fitced to either the AMIGA I SO0/2DO0 

or the ASOO.no w With 16 Mhz dock sp«ed/ 

only £214.99 



■H^ 



ACCESSORl 


ES 


1 00 CAPACITY LOCK ABLE BISK BOX 


«.)! 


50 CAPACITY LOCKABLE DISK BOX 

n CAPACITY STACKABLE BANX BOX 


14.» 

iD.)» 


ISO CAPACITY STACKABLE TOSSO BOX_ 
AHIGAASOO DUST COVER ... 


— XH.n 

n.n 


AMISA too COVER.... 


..II. n 


M" M Q NITO R DUST COVER _™. 

1 !■■ M ONITOR DUST COVER. 


.„.-.i*.» 
.a.M 



I AMtCA TO SCART MONITOR CABLES M.M 

I STD I.S METRE AMIGA PRINTER CABLE £4.V4 

I MODEM AND NULL MODEM CAILES ,f9.V1 

HKH QUAUTY AMIGA AS 00 CONTROL CENTRE 
I «tti ntefFil M drlyt itidf, mouse I jofitidi pons, prtjjtd ned 
rcHHmidon,Kmii^u3^e)pu« only £59*99 



AMIGA SOUND 
ENHANCER 



Bjf Omejp Projects this sound enhancer will improve any sound 
tbat Ps played throL^ your Amiga. Hear the Amiga's sound like 
youVe never heard it before! 

only £32.99 



2 '^^^a.y Parallel port 

HtmillliiiiBBHili^ 



Many peripherals Such as printers and scanners share the 
Amiga parallel port causing the user to have to swap bem/een 
the two. Solve this prohtem wich the 1 w^y sharer box 

only £17.99 




I -I 

The Zy-Fi Stereo 
System 

The speakers are optimised with reflex | 

ported cabinets. The 3 way system has 1 
bais, mid range and treble drivers. 

Complete with its own power supply the I 
Zy-Fi system can also be powered by | 
batteries 

only £36.99 



% 



New Rooiite 3.5" 

The new super slim Roclice has recently received the best reriewfor 
disk drives in Amiga Format |^r\|w O^Q QQ 

Cumana 3.5" 

I meg external dnve.ThebestnarT^eindiscdriveanQwatzsuper 
tow price, sail the most reliable. __|,, OO OOl 

now only £53.99 1 

Golden Image 3.5 Tracker 

wltti built in LCD tracker display /»|«|i| l^A 00 



FINALCOPY mw version UU 



Nowftisurandeasierto use, this superb wccpjbiisl'ierfrcmchewricersofPenPaL 
With bulk in oudine form for lop quality output, full graphics imp on; capability (IFF 
and HAM). Features include Thesaurus, spetling checker and detector, automatic 
hyphenation, insert date, time, and page number, scale graphics to any size, crop 
graphics, multiple columns layout, magnified and reduced page view, full post script 
support and much more. 

Highly Recommended OFlly £49.99 
^.^ £ I 04,99 with Cumana 3.5" externaf drive 



AMIGA RELEASE 2 
UPGRADE KIT 



Complete with; 
'Kickstart 2.04 CHIP 
^Workbench 2*04^ Install, 
Fonts and Extras cttsks 
' full Commoctore manual set 

only £79.99 



SCANNERS 



■ 



Aj r«OfTHTierded by CommodDre we believe diis to be one of die best all round rru^uidbiwcs 
packa^ on *e Amiga, k connts wt* Ratinum Scritihle w^p, spell checker, thesaurus, Aralyse { a lotus 
1 H' ccfT^uble spreandsheec with 3D grapfiics), a c^tabase, sidewa^ prrnJng utjliiy and communisLUons 
SDJtvrare pEuS die besE selling Digiu Hame Accounts 



only £44.99.'/ 



DI<3f-VI£W60LD 
MEDIA SYSTEM 



The new tomplete graphics creation 
presentation package fo'^ your Amiga. 
CamcS complete with the ^mpus Digi-Vifew 
Gold, Digi-Paint and Elan Performer 

only £129.99 



WORDWORTHVI.I 



ThE latest version Cif this highly 3C£kimed 
WYSIWYG word publiiher. Comes wiih 
multiple fonts, powerful thesaurus, large 
spelichecker, spee^ synthesis. 

only £72.99 



PENPAL 1.4 



"'"liii bfit 5c-llin^ -.''^.i-d^uDl [h-^i' n';ci'DO-n[es 
r-.nny features fourjd orily in a dtisk LOp pub- 
lisher. Also includes an ta.sy to use database. 

now only £53.99 



PAGESTREAM 2.2 



The latest version of this powerful DTP 
pack^ie that we re-commend. Bener dnan 
abc of DTP packages on a PC and bener 
than most on a Ma,G 

only £t 29.99 



New- INTERSPREAD 



Thts newspH-eadshccLJs h-ighl^ rccCirn- 
mended at at a bargain price, features 
Include graphics presentation, and 
advanced macros 

only £24.99 



New QUARTERBACK V5 



New. completely rE-wntten version of 
this Fast and Famous hard disk backup 
utility. Supports up to 4 disk drives, 
variable compression options and full 
Macro and AP.EXX support. The Best! 

only £39.99 



ID Text Animate now only £?.«« 

Aegts S*jnfx...-r.,.-r„r„ ,„r.,., £39.99 

Ai^ Department Pro 1. 1 £KI».?9 

Am tga Vision M9.99 

Amos Creator £34.99 

Anios Compiler............ £37.99 

Amos 3D £17.99 

Audio Engineer £1 69.99 

Audio Master version 4 £39.99 

Broadcast Titler onlx£l49.99 

CrossDos C I 9.99 

Deluxe Music Costructlon Set. .£54. 99 

Deluxe Paint 2 now only £4.99 

Deluxe Paint 3-.-. now only £12,99 

Deluxe Paint 4 now only £57,99 

Easy AMOS £24.99 

EXPERT DRAW ONLY £49.99 

EXPERT 4D JR ONLY £37,99 

Flexidump printer utlllty..,........,..£3l.99 

DEVPAC J £ST.»9 

Distant Sum £34.99 

Final Accounts -...„..„ _.,„ £29.99 

GB Route Planner .........£29.99 

Gold Disk Office .......,....£64.99 

OF* BASIC 3,S INTSWHETER ..ONLY £1 9.99 

HiSoftBasic ....(54.99 

Home Accounts 2.....„...,..............£37.99 

Imagine VI £189.99 

Opus Directory £29.99 

Pagesetter 1 DTP £42.99 

Pliraiie iJ».l9 

Plstinum Scribble w/p inc spell checker/ 

theilurus,..,.,., ....now only £29,99 

Pro Page professional VI DTP.,£149,99 

Protect 4.3 W^.« now only £39.99 

Pro Video Plus £1)9 99 

Quarterback Tools ., — ..............^.^Ny £44.99 

Sequencer One.............................!l74,99 

Smooth Talker.... £10.99 

TURBO PRINT £49.99 

Vista £29.99 

Vista Pro 2 (1 Mb re<|ulred) ...(«9.99 

Walt Disney Animator £64.99 

XCAD JD £189.99 



THE COMPLETE 
COLOUR SOLUTION 


TTA^ICE 2 




This IS latest an imatior. packd^e for :he ATiig^ 
from Rombo. Features include load and save 
from D, Paint animations and IFF files. S*jp>- 

p=mHAM|r,phics. only £44.99 




As offi cial dealers for Rombo, we are able to offer 
this extellent package at a great price.The com- 
plete CDlour sdJutJori comes with RGB splitter, 
Vidi Amiga, Vidi Chrome, power supply and 
Photon Raint. 

iw onJy £94.99 


1 VIDIAMICSA^ 


High quality digitizing. IrtC Vidi dirom* 
Golourisintg software - ^ ^^ 

now only £59,99 


MEGAMIX MASTER 


This ii a low cost 8 bit, h«gih spec, sampler 
Chat plugs into your printer port. Special 
effects include echo diat can be added in 
real time, fully multitasking and easy to use. 

only £29.99 


RGB SPLITTER 


EnabJes you to Cdoiur Digitise in a sec- 
ond. Replaces red green blue filter set 
Can be used with Digi view or Rombo 

-■^Tow onty £44.99^ 



MICROBOTICS 
ACCELERATORS 



VXL30 25Mhz EC 

only £239.99 
VXL30 40MhzEC 

only £369.99 
I 6888 1 co-pro for above 

only £79.99 

1Mb of 32 Bit RAM 

(fiOns) 

only £214.99 
8 Mb of 32 Bit RAM 
(60fis) only £419,99 




PANDAAL HANDSCANNER 

On test this scanner has proved to be the easiest and most effective scanner that we have 
used to date havii>g compared it to most of the other major hand scanners; on the 
mar4tet.We are able to offer this high quality sca,nner at a fraction ot the normal cost. 
Complete with the latest improved version of Daata'Scan software this scanner Is able to 
pick out text and graphics at up to 40O d.p.i in real i^me. Daata-scan enables you to easily 
manipulate the Image. Scans in real time up to M grey scalesi.ldealfor desk top publishing 
and presentation. 

now only £ 1 04.99 or £ 11 9.99 

with 2 way parallel switcher box 

THE POWER SCANNER 

Highly fated by the review median this scanner comes with the latest version sohvare. With 
bright and sharp grey scale performance and flexible scanned image display manipulation 
options, this scanner muse be rated as a best buy[ Options include Clean up, embolden, 
resile and flip. Highly recommended by the reviews! 

only £94.99 

DRAM & CUSTOM CHIPS 



Kickstart l.3...£29,99 
Kickstart 2.04.£39.99 
Fatter Agnes. .£3 0.99 
Super Denese.£30.99 

4 Mb by 9 Simms (for cvp) 
only CI 14.99 each 
I Mb by 4 ZIPS 

as used in Supra boards. 2 I Mbby^ ZIPS equal I Mb 

only £38.99 per Mb 



256 by 4 DRAM (DILs) 

ideal forAS90&Supr^Harddriive&plus rrta/iy 
other Amiga RAM appllcatiofis 
I Mb by 4 DRAMS for Supra and 
other RAM applications. .£27.99 
QTY 

4+ (SI2K)..now only £3.S9 
8+ (IMb)....now only £3.39 
16+ {2Mb)..now only O.09 
I Mb by 8 or 9 SIMM boards 
now only £29.99 



ROCTEC MOUSE NAKSHAMOUSE 



This is an excellent high quEil- 
ity mouse for the Annii|ra. Fully 
micro-switched mouse. Excellent 
value and highly recommended. 

only £13.99 

or £16*99 MthmouKmit£hdtd«r 



1 III:: iiiiiiOui ..liij Ln::it icJ'i!^ mouise 
comes complete with Operation Stealth. 
mouse mat,, holder and 2 year warrenty. 
Features Include 290 DPI resolution, this 
■5 Still our most popular upgrade mouse. 

only £24.99 



GENLOCKS I Rocgen Plus 



Rocgen Genlock 

with biiilt in mode switch box and auto 
pass thru function, the Rocgen repre- 
sents excelfent value for mone 

only 99,99 



with all the features of the standard 
Rocgen. Alsti includes dual control 
for overlay and keyhole effects^ ex- 
tra RGB pass thru allowing real time 

graph editing, 

only £129.99 



DISICS 



Ail our 3.S" disks are GUARANTEED FOR A LIFETIME and are 

CERTIFIED ftH3% ERROR FREE double sided, double density 
disks are of the highest quality in magnetic media and are 
extensively used hy dupEicatin| houses 



k600 



.MIGAA500PLUS 
RAM MODULES 



QfTY 



F 3.5" 
Bulk 



OR 



SONY 

BRANDED 



10... 
30.. 

50... 
100. 
200. 
500.. 



.,.£4.99 £6.99 

.£ I 4.29 £ I 7.99 



.£21.99. 
.£39.99. 
.£72.99. 
.£169.99. 



£28.99 
.£54.99 
.£99.99 
,....n/a... 
....n/a.. 



1000.. £339. 99 

Sony Branded disks come complete with labels 

Disk Labels....50O now only £6.99 

Disk Labels...! 000 now only £9.99 



m 



These hljh quaiiw HAM modules will take your ASM Plus or the new AMM up to 
2 Mb of chip RAM without invalidating ^ur warranty. 

ASOOP A600 

Unpopulated only £16.99. £29.99 

Populated to SI2K only £29.99......£39.99 

Populated to I Mb only £39.99 £49.99 



PHOENIX ROM SHARERS 



Be^iauie lorr c o :c a- iov.ware wi 'I ,iot run or [ le new 2.i>4 o peratin| lysie m Ph De ms 
have ctes (gnecS a high quality ROiM sharer. Recognised as being the best on the nurket, 
this ROht sharer features a fteKlble ribbon conntctton so that it can be positioned 
anywhere within your ASM PJus or A600. Keyhoarti switchable sharer now 

avaiiabiei All PhoenIx products come complete with a full 1 year 
replacement warranty 



SUPRA RAM 



The ultimate Amiga ASOtJ expansion. Take your ASOO up to 9 Mh {10 Mb with 
the ASOO Plus]. Fits tjnio the side eKpansion por^ Auto confgures with |^ 
software etching. 

Please note that when 256*4 ZIPS are used, the Supra RAM can only be 
populated to a maximum ol ^ Mb. If you use this confguration and want to 
further increase ytsur capacity you must replace the 256*4 ZIPS with I Mb by 
4 ZIPS. 

8Mb pop to 1Mb £94.99 

8Mb pop to 2 Mb using 256Mzip$...£l 19.99 
8Mb pop to 2 Mb using IMb*4 zip$..£ 139.99 

8Mb pop to 4 Mb £194.99 

8Mb pop to 8 Mb £299.99 



now only £19.99 or £29.99 for keyboard switchable version 

Kickstart 1.3 only £29.99 or Kickstart 2.04 only £39.99 



I 



MAIL ORDER ? WHY FIRST CHOICE 1 



Order bf telephone quoting your credit cart) 
rtiirber. If paying by cheque please make 
payable to FIRST CHOICE. In any 
correspondarce please qjote a contact 
phone number and post code. Allow 5 work- 
ing days for cheque clearence 

Mail order Hotline 6 lines 

0532 637988 

Pnces are subject to change wittiouc notice, E&OE. 



* All prices include VAT and Standard Delivery 

* All hardware/computers are genuine UK spec. 

* Free Fast Standard 4 to 7 day Delivery 

* Guaranteed 2 to 3 day Delivery only £2.00 

* Guaranteed Next Day Delivery only £4.50 
"Open seven days a week for your convenience 



SI2K RAM EXPANSION 



Top qualii^ RAM eKpsnsions lo - tic A500 complete with 
battery backed clock arid cn/cff iwitcn. This RAM expan- 
sion will not in anyway invalidate your Amiga wan 

'""^ ' now only £24.99 



pleas! 






DEPTAS,Um8,ARMLEY 

PARK COURT, OFF CECIL 

STREET, LEEDS, LSI 2 2 AE 



NO PROBLEM! 



Welcome once more to Amiga Answers, the 
section of the macazlne ^ere we endeavour to 
straighten out your hassles with that wonderful 
but occasionally stubborn machine, the Amiga. 
Every ntonth we devote more space and apply 
more resources than any other Amiga magazine 
to solving your problems. We receive sontething 
itke 100 queries a week, so the s«rviGe Is 
obviously appreciated. 

It's my Job to co-ordinate the whole thing: 
sorting throu^ the questions and sending them 
off to the relevant chappies for the kind of In- 
depHi answers you've come to expect; and 
compiling them Into the lovingly crafted pages 
which you see before you. 

I call on a wlcte variety of expertise to make 
sure you get the answers you need, which Is why 
Amiga Anaw^ta is so successful. There's Mark 
Smiddy, industiy gunj, AmlgaDOS-tamer and 
business applications wizard; Jeff Walker, 



probably the most knowledgeable Amiga desktop 
pubilslier there Is; and Jason Hotbom, longtime 
AMOS explorer and PD sampler, as well as good 
ail-founder (or should that be all round good 
guyl). 

if It's a question about video, then I'll pass it 
on to Gary Whitetey, our professional 
videographer for whom the word 'genlock' means 
'mixing Amiga graphics with video ftir magtcal 
results' and for whom the word 'snipwirrar 
means nothing at all. 

Programming queries are dealt with by Paul 
Overaa, who's not afraid to cods In any 
tartguage, and who doutiles as a MIDI maestro to 
solve your sequencing slip-ups. 

Our hardware guru is Jolyon Ralph. This man 
knows Just atMut everything about disks, both 
hard and floppy, and what he doesn't know about 
memory lie's probabty forgotten. Communication 
breakitowns are flxednjp by Phil Harris. 



All in ail, a fonnidabie team, supplemented 
by my own not Inconsiderable Amiga suss. L«t's 
face It, If we can't answer your question, It's 
probably one of ttie Mysteries of the Universe. 

This month we put yet mora people In the 
right direction for printer drivers - the most 
common Amiga query there Is. We give Amiga 
buying advice, explain the Intricacies of floating 
point representation, partition a hard drive, arvd 
detail the connection of several monitors. 

The sound Alter Is analysed, using requesters 
from C Is explained, and the delights of Denlse 
are divulged, amongst numerous other things. 

Don't forget to keep sending us those 
problems - we thrive on themi 

Cheers, 



e^i^mJi^ 



AMOS ANSWER 

r-T :| As the Editor of 

li% I Vactor, the 
l^^^^J shareware disk 
I^I^U magazine, I was 
wondering whether it would be 
possitrie to include listings from 
Amiga Shopper in a new section 
devoted to AMOS. 1 am especially 
interested In using the 3D requester 
routine by Chris Hurst and the Time 
procedure by Francois Lionet. 

Anon 

Having checked with Andy (our 
editor), you'll be pleased to learn 
that he has given the big thumbs up. 
Other readers should note however 
that It is always a good idea to 
contact a magazine before re- 
publishing anything that appears in 
print. Every single word that a 
magazine publishes Is copyrighted to 
the author and the magazine In 
question, so legal action could be 
taken if someone re-publlshes any 
part of an article word for word 
without the permission of the 
publishing house In question. We're 
pretty easy going on Amiga Shopper, 
but we still like to know when 
someone wants to re-publish any 
part of the magazine. JH 

BASIC PRINTING 

is It possible to 
detect whether a 
printer Is ort4ine from 
Amiga Basic? 

Frank Dyson 

Elland 

West Yorkshira 

It is possible to detect errors when 
writing to the PRT: device (whether 




explicitly or by using LPRINT) and you 
will find that having the printer off- 
line will generate a normal Basic 
type trappable en-or as this short 
example will show: 

ON EBBOR GOTO TRAP 

LPRIHT "Just a. line of J 

test teatt" 

END 

TRAP: PRINT "Sorry - J 

printer is still not aa line" 

RESUME NEXT 

If you run this program with the 
printer disconnected you'll get, after 
a short delay where nothing appears 
to happen, a system requester 
telling you that there is printer 
trouble. If the requester Is cancelled 
without the fault being rectified then 
the Basic error trap takes over and 
in the case of the above example 
the attempted LPRINT Is cancelled, a 
message telling the user that the 
printer is still not on line appears, 
and the program terminates. As far 
as 1 know there is no way to prevent 
the system requester from appearing 
but the error trap statements can, at 
least, make sure the program takes 
a suitable course of action. PAO 

CROSS WITH FILO-DOS 

W A 'M I have entered the 
lr\. I AmlgaDOS database 
l^^^^J on page 121 of 
IBI^U Amiga SlJoppai'B May 
edition but I can't get it to work, it 
Just says "Command:" at the 
bottom and refuses to do anything 
else. What is going wrong? 

Shane Lambert 

Beverly 

South Humberside 



1 suspect you have misunderstood 
the article. The AmlgaDOS database 
is constructed from several modules 
which were serialised from issue 13 
to 15. The Database listing you refer 
to forms the main menu which calls 
the Individual modules. MS 

TRACKBALL TROUBLE 

HI recently purohased 
an Alpha Data TKB- 
MT-A trackball from 
Gastelner Techno- 
logies. When the trackball is 
piugged-ln, my Nexus/Quantum 
hard disk refuses to auto-boot, 
although the system will boot from 
floppy- 
Can you please help? I am 
capable of and willing to perform 
the minor surgery of replacing leads 
and/or connectors if this Is 
necessary. 

Qraham Darlington 
Hale wood Village, Liverpool 



I have never heard of dodgy 
mice/trackballs crashing the Amiga. 
I have heard of mice that have the 
metal shielding on blowing up 
Amigas by short circuiting the mouse 
port (indeed I did this to my first 
Amiga 2000 *e week after I bought 
it), but this Is not the same thing. 
I'd try replacing the trackball, 
failing that, take your Amiga to a 
repair centre and ask them to take a 
look at your mouse port, JR 

STAR FADES AWAY 

have a problem with 
my Star LC24'10 
printer. Parts of the 
printed text or 
graphics are faded at the beginning 
and end of some lines, more so with 
graphics than text. 

We've taken the printer back to 
the shop, where It has supposedly 
been repaired, it usually performs 
better after a repair, but gets worse 




JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Chip RAM - The area of the Amiga's memory directly accessible by the 
custom graphics and sound chips, St Is used for producing screen 
displays, animations and sound effects. 

Hard drive - Like a floppy drive, but much bi^er and faster. Also, the disk 
cannot be removed, so once the hard drive has been filled, it's either 
time to delete excess files or get another one. 

Include flies - Supplied by Commodore, these provide the offsets needed to 
access system library routines, and the fonnats for all system stmctures. 

244>lt ^aphics - Normally, the Amiga uses between one and five bits (binary 
digits) to store the colour of each pixel (picture element) of a display. 
This means that between two and 32 colours can be displayed. Hardware 
add-ons are now becoming available which use 24 bits per pixel, giving a 
possible 16.7 million colours. 



52 



AMIOA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1993 



-HBHhR. 



again, it's never bean conipletsly 
solved. 

We've had the printer for two 
years; the problem developed after 
one. What causes the fading? 

Mark Fox 

Hazlenrere 

High Wycombe 

This sounds suspiciously like the 
ribbon gear mechanism isn't working 
properly. When you return it to Ihe 
retailer he probably opens up the 
printer and twiddles around with this 
mechanism, which will cure it for a 
while, but not for very long, as you 
have discovered. 

Your retailer won't fix it properly 
because the guarantee has run out. 
The only solution is to pay someone 
to repair it. If the place you bought it 
from won't or can't do the job, then 
phone Star sales « 0494 471111, 
explain the problem, and ask for 
details of Star dealers who will be 
able to repair it. 

But before you do that, try it with 
a new ribbon just In case the one you 
are using Is faulty or worn out. I know 
this might sound like a sales pitch 
for Star, but the only LC24-10 
ribbons I can put my hand on my 
heart and recommend are those 
manufactured by Star itself; some of 
the cheap third-party LC24-10 
ribbons are not worth the plastic 
case they come in. JW 

GAME DECISION 

I wish to purchase an 
Amiga computer for 
the sole purpose of 
playing games. I had 
decided upon an Amiga A500 Plus 
but the arrival of the A600 has left 
me wondering which of the two 
machines would be best suited for 
my purposes. When I purchase my 
new machine, Is It Important to 
specify the Kickstart version? is tfw 
Philips CM8833 compatible with 
both the ASOO Plus and the A600? 
FD Ballby 
Thome 
Doncastar 

If you only ever intended playing 
games, then I'd probably tell you to 
buy an A600, but chances are that 
you'll probably want to do a lot more 
than this once you actually buy an 
Amiga, l\flany people buy Amigas for 
the sole purpose of playing games, 
but most of them eventually realise 
that there's a iot more to computing 
than waggling a Joystick. I for one 
started my computer career playing 
games only, but you'd be surprised 
just how easy it is to get tempted by 
the more serious side to computers, 
especially when they're as capable 
as the Amiga. 

With this in mind, your best bet 
is the ASOO Plus. Although 
Commodore has discontinued the 





machine, third party hardware and 
software vendors will continue to 
support the machine for years to 
come. After all, in the UK alone the 
ASOO accounts for almost 95% of the 
user base. If hardware vendors were 
to ignore such a huge market, they'd 
be cutting their own throats. Even 
when vendors start to produce titles 
for the A600's ROM card slot, you 
can bet that some enterprising 
company will come up with an 
adaptor. Take my advice - buy the 
ASOO Plus instead. 

All new machines come equipped 
with Kickstart and Workbench 2.04, 
so there's no reason to specify the 
Kickstart version. Rnally, the Philips 
CM8833 will work perfectly with the 
A500 Plus and the A600. JH 

HEY BIG SPENDER 

I am In the market for 
a 24-blt display card. I 
have an Amiga 500 
with an SSL A5000 
68020 accelerator and 3Mb RAM. 
I've seen tfte adverts for the 
Progressive Peripheral and 
Software's Rambrandt system 
which utilises the Texas 34020 and 
34082 chip set to produce very fast 
graphic processing, 3D hardware 
shading etc. 

I have a budget of £3-£4000 
and this must also Include a 68040 
processor as well as the display 
card. Could you tell me If 
Rambrandt Is the fastest system 
currently on the market within my 
price range or, would I be better 
looking at other systems? 

DF Edwards 

Harlow 

Essex 

Unfortunately you are going to have 
to include a new Amiga in your 
shopping list If you want a 
Rambrandt. Why? Simply because 
the Rambrandt Is designed to fit 
Amiga 1500/2000/3000 series 
computers as an internal expansion 
system. This also applies to many 
other 24-bit devices based on 
expansion slot architecture, for 
Instance Amiga Centre Scotland's 
Harlequin, G2's VD2001 and GVP's 
IV24. Archos's AVideo24 will fit in 
the Denise slot of your Amiga 500, 
but you'll need an '030 card to run 
TV Paint In fact, an '030 is almost 
obligatory for graphics work at the 
level you appear to be aiming for, 
though your projected '040 will, of 
course, do nicely instead. 

From what I've seen so far 
(which is limited to the Amiga 
St)opper Show) the Rambrandt 
appears to be a very interesting 
device. The selling price will be 
around £2200 when they eventually 
hit the streets, probably around the ■ 
time you are reading this. As 1 said 
last month, the spec looks great, but 



until there is enough software 
support I would hold fire. You may 
also be interested to know that GVP 
Is producing a graphics card which 
attaches to the 32-bit expansion slot 
of their G-Force cards, which is 
rumoured to be excellent, and 
Britain's own G2 should be pitching 
in with its own offering soon. My best 
advice for now is to stick with what 
you have and wait a little while. Keep 
an eye open for the new generation 
of hardware which is literally just 
around the comer. By this time the 
whole lot, including a new Amiga, 
should be well within your budget. 

aw 

MINISCRIBE DRIVE 

HI Have a IVIInlscrlbe 
8425 E8D5I PM 8000 
hard drive. All I wmild 
like to know Is 
the capacity and the Interface type 
- IDE or whatever - and which 
controller you would recommend. 
The drive has an Inspection date of 
20/5/87 and was made In 
Singapore and I have no paper work 
with K. It's to ftt a revision 6.2 
B200D. 

Jtm McCusker 
Letchworth 



I'm not sure about the capacity of 
this drive, although I'd hazard a 
guess and say it is probably a 
massive 20Mb drive. The Interface 
you describe is ST-506, and there is 
no way of connecting this to the 
Amiga 2000, except the Commodore 
A2090A controller, which is no longer 
made and was a piece of junk 
anyway. Sorry I can't help any more. 
JR 

WHICH PRINnR? 

1 am going to be 
buying a printer near 
Christmas, and I want 
to know which would 
be best. My choices are the 





INCLUDING C 

I have recently 
purchased NoithC, 
a PD version of the 
C language. Can 
you [ilease tell me how and 
wrtiere I can purchase the 
Commodore Amiga lnclu<te files. 
5 Bultltude 
Lower Stondon 
Beds 

The header files can be ordered 
for £25 directly from Commodore 
UK at: Commodore Business 
Machines (UK) Ltd., Commodore- 
Amiga Technical Support, 
Bradbourn Drive, Tilbrook, Milton 
Keynes MK4 SAT. 



Seikosha 5P-1900 Plus dot-matrix, 
the Commodore MPS-1270 Inkjet, 
and the Star LC20 dot.4natrlx. 

I was thinking atmut the 
Commodore one, but I read In Amiga 
Answers (Issue 9} that this printer 
is not currently tveing produced. Is 
this true? 

Rnalty, could you tell me which 
printer driver each of the above 
printera require? 

Mark Whitworth 

Yaadon 

Leeds 

If the MPS-1270 Is not fn cunent 
production, this is big news to 
Commodore's marketing people, who 
tell me the opposite. 

The driver Commodore 
recommends for use with the MPS- 
1270 (in IBM or Epson mode} is the 
CBM_MPS1000 driver on the Extras 
disk; however, as the name of the 
driver implies, it Is not a 'proper' 
driver for the MPS-1270 and there 
may be problems with graphics, and 
there might be some features of the 
MPS-1270 that cannot be used. 

The Seikosha SP-1900 Plus 



HEART SURGERY 

HI recently gave my Amiga ASOO open heart surgery and 
suGcessfuity made the modifications necessary to allow the 
machine to use 1Mb Chip RAM. I managed that without a 
hitch, but while I was working, I noticed that near to the 
existing four RAM chips there were another four empty spaces. Does this 
mean I can add another 512K to my machtne in addition to the 1Mb 
already shared with the A601 expansion? 

BBal 

Woh^rhampton 

The Midlands 

This is commonly known as a "gotchya". There is room for 1Mb on the main 
board: two 512 K blocks configured from four 1Mbit chips. The "gotchya" is 
the fact that the A501 occupies exactly the same physical address space as 
those four chips. The answer therefore is, no. Sorry. At better ^icat solution 
would be to get a larger expansion - preferably on which fits on the side of 
the machine - Power Computing has just released two; one of which is a 
budget 2Mb expansion. MS 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



53 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



HAM - Hold And Modify is an Amiga graptiic mode allowing alt 4096 colours 
to be displayed at once, with certain restrictions. 

PC clone - IBM PC compatible computer based on one of the fntel 8067 or 
SOxxx series CPUs, and with similar hardware/software configuration. 

Printer driver - A program tfiat sits inbetween any apptfcations program 
producing output and the printer. It converts any codes describing text 
and graphics format into a form suitable for a specific printer. 

RAM - Random Access Memory, the place in the Amiga where programs are 
stored while they are being executed. The more RAM the better. 

Sample - A digital - computerised - representation of a sound, A sample can 
be sent through a digital to analogue converter (the Amiga has four of 
these) and be heard as sound. Changing the speed at which the sample 
is ptayed back changes the frequency (or pitch) of the sound. 




emulates the Epson FX-S50. It's 
supposed to be a 100% FX-850 
emulation, but then they say that to 
all the girls. If it is 100% FX-850 
emulation, then the best driver to 
use is called Star9Plus, available on 
a £2 Jamdisk from JAM » 0895 
274449. 

If you are considering a Star 9- 
pin printer then I would recommend 
the LC-200, This is the only printer in 
your list for which an Amiga printer 
driver has been specifically written, 
that driver being the afore-mentioned 
Star9Pius one. JW 

MEMORY MATTERS 

I want to add more 
ntemory to my Amiga 
A50D (about 2-3Mb). 
What Is tiie best 
memory expansion available bearing 
In mind that I don't want to spend 
any more than £1407 

Also, I use the PD program 
PrintStuaio to print out Vtata 
landscapes but the printouts are 
rather dark. Surprisingly though, 
other programs seem to print OK. 
What can I do to Improve tiie quatl^ 
of my printouts? I am using the Star 
LC-10 driver to drive my LC-200. 

Paul Chamberlain 

Letchworth 

Harts 

Having used several RAM 
expansions, I personally prefer the 
Cortex (« 051 236 0480) range of 
boards. The 2Mb board that the 
company produces costs £160, OK, 
this is £20 more than you want to 
spend, but it really is worth it. 

Cortex RAM expansions boast an 
impressive list of features including 
a pass-through connector (very 
important if you wish to buy a hard 
drive at a later date) and they come 
witti their own power supplies so 
they won't burden the Amiga. 

If the printouts that you are 
obtaining from the Star are too dari^, 
then check the density setting on 
your Wsts program disk, (f the 



setting is too high, then the printout 
will be rather dark. Under 1.3 
Preferences, go into the Graphic 2 
window and adjust the density 
setting to about 3 or 4. Failing that, 
it might be worth getting your hands 
on a copy of the Star9Plus printer 
driver which is on Jeff Walker's JAM 
disk 5, It costs £2 and can be 
obtained from JAM, 75 Greatfields 
Drive, Uxbridge UBS 3QN. JH 

REAL 32 COLOURS 

l^^^gH i read a review of 
H_*l RealSD some time 
I i?^ I °^'*' ' ^^^^ beginners 
^^^^^J version 1.1 and I am 
having difficulty rendering Images In 
32 colours. I can render to 16 
greyscale and HAM but I am unable 
to render 32 colours. Do I need the 
professional version? 

M Wallman 

Colchester 

Essex 

The short answer to your question Is 
that none of the versions of Real3D 
support 32 colour rendering, only 
HAM, 16 colour greyscale and 24^ttl 
If you want to produce a 32 colour 
image you'll have to render it in HAM 
or 24'bit and convert it. 1^0 u could try 
using DPaint IV to do this by loading 
a HAM image and then changing the 
screen format to 32. Alternatively, 
other programs such as PixMate or 
Art Department are available to 
perform the same tasks. BW 

PC BLUES 

My Amiga A1500 has 
a C5A.MMR because 
I needed the speed 
for DTP and DTV 
work. I have now discovered I need 
to run PC software at home for a 
training course. Would any of the 
current emulators suit my setup? I 
don't want to have to buy a 
separate PC. 

David Sethwood 

Warrington 

Cheshire 




There are several choices for such a 
setup such as the Commodore 
Bridgeboards, Vortex ATOnce and the 
KCS Power PC cards. The choice Is 
up to you, but my personal choice 
has always been the KCS system. 
Although, like ATOnce, it needs an 
adapter for the larger Amigas, It 
remains the most consistently 
reliable system I have used and 
offers the best choice of screen 
modes. However, if you intend to run 
any hi-resolution EGA or VGA modes, 
it may be worth investing in a flicker 
fixer and multi-sync monitor. MS 

SWITCH GLITCH 

HI have bought a 
Golden Image hand 
scanner with Touch- 
Up software. I also 
bought a Centronics switch box so 
that I could switch between using 
my Star LC-200 printer and the 
scanner without having to switch off 
the computer. 

All seemed fine until I took a 
look at some line art that I had 
scanned. It was very corrupt. So I 
tried connecting the scanner 
directly to the computer and the 
oorruptlon problem went away. 
All the cables appear to be 
making good connections, and the 
switch box has no fault. Any Ideas 
on what Is going wrong? 

Graham Crowther 

Pant 

Oswestry 

'd'ou've proved that the switch box is 
the problem, it obviously cannot 
keep up with the speed at which the 
scanner is trying to pass data 
trough the parallel port. 

Solution? Get a better switch 
box. Avoid these big (and cheap) 
switch boxes that look like a rat's 
nest of wires Inside, go for one that 
is made with a printed circuit board. 
JW 

THROUGH-PORT ADAPTOR 

Hi want to buy a hard 
drive. I had settled on 
the GVP lOSMb as 
the Ideal choice but It 
does not have a through-port and 
would consequently need 
unplugging at regular intervals to 
use my Action Replay. 

I know this question has come 
up from numerous people In 
different forms a number of times, 
but It seems noiwdy will give a 
definite answer to the question. 
Most Just duck It and give a totally 
different and unsatisfactory answer. 
I use the Replay a lot now: 
formatting, installing, doing 
directory checks, checking which 
disks I'm stupid enough not to have 
labelled, rippirig pictures and words 
and so on. I found recently that life 
was a lot harder without a Replay. 




Is there a reliable company that can 
make up a lead to connect both 
hard drive and replay to the Amiga 
at once? 

David Lord 
Manchester 

You are in luck. Datel Electronics Ltd 
(« 0782 744 324) does a little 
board which will allow you to plug 
both the replay and hard drive into 
the Amiga at the same time. JR 

SOUND EDITS 

I use TechnoSound 
Y^U^ Turbo to produce 
^ samples, but one 

thing seems to puzzle 
me. I know that to Increase the 
pitch of a sample It has to be played 
at a higtter speed but this also 
speeds up the sample. Aucffo 
Engineer Plus claims to be able to 
alter the pitch without altering the 
playback speed. Could you please 
tell whether this process works well 
or does the quality of the sample 
suffer? Are there any cheaper 
packages available that will do the 
same Job? 

Stuart Wilkes 

Tunbridge Weils 

Kent 

Altering the pitch of any sample will 
effect its sound quality no matter 
whether you're using TechnoSound 
Turbo or the latest Akai l6-bit 
sampler, especially when the pitch is 
lowered. Considering the limitations 
of the Amiga's sound hardware, 
Audio Engineer Plus actually does a 
very good job of altering the pitch 
without effecting playback speed. It 
doesn't wori( too well on shorter 
samples, but for long looped rtiythms 
etc, the results are certainly pretty 
impressive. 

Audio Engineer is rather 
expensive (£200) so no doubt you'll 
be pleased to learn that the software 
is available separately in the shape 
of AudioMaster 4. It costs 
approximately £80 and is available 
from HB Marketing ■a 0753 686000. 
JH 

C POWER 

I have been using 
NorthC 1.3 for a 
number of months 
now, mainly to get 
the foel of intuition. Recently 
however, I needed a power function 
so I used the math.h Include ftle to 
get access to pow(). I've noticed 
that this only has an accuracy of 
five decimal places, as does the 
exp() which I assume Is used along 
with logo to make up the pow() 
function. 

Although math.h uses different 
declarations to the libraries/ 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



You know what you want 

from your computer, that's 

why you 're choosing AMIGA 

. . .NOW YOU'VE CHOSEN THE RIGHT 
COMPliTEli MAKE SURE YOU CHOOSE 
THE RIGHT DEALER 



lyone c;iii be good at selling Amiga or CDT\'. but sadly, that's 
ten where it ends. So, when it's time to choose the best computer, 
* also time to find the best supplier. The one who is not only 
vays competitive, but the one who also gives you the l>esl possible 
igoing sii|)port for ) im and your system, 

>rdon Hara^ood Computers, Pioneers of the 'Complete Pacfi' 
proacli, have specialised in Commodore, from the earliest \1C 20, 
the latest Amiga, for almost a decade... In fact, we've suppUed so 
my, if you ask all your friends, the chances are that some of them 
n tell you already of our excellent sen'icc. 

ir sen'ice means that we'll help you get the most from your new 
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^IM:. 



GORDON 



HAR 



•22 

•If 1 i 



The Closer you look, 
The Better we look 



STOP PRESS...STOP PRESS...STOP PRESS...STOP PRESS 

iMEW 1Mb. AMIGA A600 RANGE 
AT FANTASTIC PRICES 

As this issue of the magazine was going to press, Commotlore announced these new modets 

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The details beiow are provisionai, but rest assured the multi title Powerpiay pack we are puttii 
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PLEASE CONTACT US FOR UP TO THE MINUTE PACK INFORft/lATION AND AVAILABILITY. 




TWO MODELS: A600 FD Single 3.5" 880Kb. Floppy Drive 
A600 HD Single 3.5" 88QKb. Floppy Drive with internal 2QMb. Hard Disk Drive. 



These two latest additions to the Amiga family introduce some stunning new features... 

COMPACT DESIGN: With built-in modulator for smaller INTERFACES: 2 Mouse/Joystick ports, Parallel Centra 
desktop footprint. Serial RS232, External Floppy Drive. Din 

Sli/IART CARD SLOT; For instant software loading and RF TV Output, RGB Anaiogue, Composi 

future estpansion.' Colour Video, Stereo Audio, Smart Card 

COMPATIBLE: With virtualiy all Amiga A500+ software, Memory Upgrade Port. 

1Mb. RAM; Expandable to 2Mb. internally with Real Time Clock.* 

IN HOME SERVICE: Means should a hardware fault develop, a technician will visit your home to service or replace yc 
computer, normally within four working days.. .FREE! 

*/( IS important to note that the sidecar expansion bus & RAM ^_ ^ 

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Existing Amiga owners who have peripherals which connect in 

these ways who wish to upgrade computers, should consider 

whether the new A600 or its recenllY launched partner in (fie 

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Plosse contsci us i) you ','jould Ms /o discuss these 

ii>v7':;:/';!.v;;iC'B 'n more detail. 

A570&A670CDR 

These fantastic CD ROftfl Drives will allow y«J to access the 
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and also play your audio CO collection through your stereo! 
Simply plugs into your Amiga S00+ or A600 for iminediate use. 
['RRP. compatibility and release details yet to be confirmed 
by Commodore UK' ■ Please telephone lor further information] 




Apple™ in Alfreton... 



For the professional U5er, Gordon Harwood provides the outstanding Apple™ Macintosh™ range of most 
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Computers 



9\.ys# 



ew GORDON 

Ic - 31* MEQA GAME 1Mb 



HARWOODS POWERPLAY PACK 1 COMES OF AGE WITH 31* GREAT GAMES & A 

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Amiga Mouse 

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Workbench 2 Disks 

ALL Connecting Catiles 

PLUS.. .All OUR Amigas 

are backed by Harwoods 

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[Please see M details in our 
Ordering Made Easy'panei finsi page} 




"II? 

<;if)j|llllll* 

■lIKiu 

ii'iini 

::!ii:ii 

"H3 



"MlllS 






THAT'S RIGHT HARWOODS HAVE PUT TOGETHER THE 

STARTING WITH POWERPLAY PACK 1 WHICH 

Just took at what you get NOW... 

AMIGA ASOO PLUS COMPUTER WITH A FULL 1Mb. OF MEMORri 
THE SIMPSONS, BART vs THE SPACE MUTANTS - Thats right mani 
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DELUM PAIHT 111 GRAPHICS PACKAGE WITH ANIMATiON 
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ELIMINATOR - A progressive multl stage flying shoot 'em up, on a long winding course, sun/ive if you cani 
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KBYPTON EGG - A classic Breahout game, 60 screens, separated by 6 combat sequences 
LANCASTER - Your mission Is to fly the classic WWII bomber on its dangerous raids over enemy territlory 
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STIR CRAZY (Featuring Bo bo) ■ Bobo & his Inmates are planning a stunning trampoline jump prison escape 
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TIMTIH OH THE MOQH ■ We've been captured by Colonel Jorgen and he's (ring to scupper the moon mission. 
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m 



Ulltllil' '■■illhjttl li: ..(lIHK/ /.'jr- IWiSt /m i,Illt:l\ I'll-llst' SIV 



POWOPIAY PACKS 



Ml mil jHiiks toukiin the mm 
Auw^i .WH} Pirn. 

1 1 ') Aniii'ti'- UKiYslill hv iiraihihli' 



HARWOOD'S 

BRILLIANT 1Mb 

AMIGA 500 PLUS 

'MEGA 31*' 
GAMES PACK 2 

That's right you get 
the fantastic Amiga & 

ALL THE EXTRAS 
detailed in Harwoods 

"Mega31*'Pacl(1 

AI^D you also get... 

THE PHILIPS 

CM8833/II 

STEREO COLOUR 

MONITOR 





See page G lor FULL ; 
dedjte Ql this nmartaUe ; 



Oirrmmjtof secttw] m page 6 
gima fun details taryetirctiolce 
of PHIips Martilors * Montlor 7V^ 



A SPEQAL PACK FROM HARWOODS 
YOU SEE AND HEAR THO^ HAUES 

wrm SUPERB cuRm 



"IT'S THE- 
BUSINESS" 

A TRULY PROFESSIONAL 
PACKAGE SPECIFICALLY 
FOR THE BUSINESS 

MINDED AMIGA USER. 

THIS ONE SHOULD 

FULFILL EVERY AREA 

OF ROME BUSINESS 

YOU'RE LIKELY TO NEEDI 

THE BUSINESS PACK 

FROM HARWOODS 

IMCLUDES ALL THE 

FOLLOWING.,, 
AMIGA 500 PLUS 
WITH 1Mb. MEMORY I 
+ 
PHILIPS CM 8833/tl I 




PROFESSIONAL 
PROFESSIONAt^ 



••M 




Of!...VOU CAN CHOOSE 
A PHILIPS KOfJITOfl TV 

ATNOESTHACOST! 

See page 6 fm FULL 



"'13 
O 

lI'llfH 
""13 

«ii;;;i» 






STEREO COLOUR MONITOR 

S«« Monitor Paml on Riga G for DstlSl^ 

STAR LC200 9 PIN Nl 
FULL COLOUR PRir 

Sm Printar Panalpn Page 5 for DeMk 

1 HOST OF BUSINESS SOFTWftHE S ACCESSOBIES , 

PEN PAL V1.3 (Word Processor}...! Mb. 

SUPERBASE II PERSONAL (Databise) i 

SUPEflPLAN (Spreadsheet)...! Mb. 

T Oatastom, Dnvln' Fors. Pipe Mania. 

A G R EAT TEN Ow^n Quesi, Rock-N-Rotl. E-IMixt. 

GAMES PACKAGE 






Towr Of Sabel, SIswBel!, RVF Homla. 
wtQmd Monster Slain. 



THE SIMPSONS 

CAf^AIN PLANET 

LEMMIHSS 

UELIKE PAINT III 

hkiw «m ANIMATION 

MKHOSWirCHED JOYSTICK 

KlKJiNK 3.5' DISKS 

DISK UBHAHY CASE 

MCKJSEIiWT 

3 TAIUJBED BUST. COVERS 



ADD A CUMANA CAX 3M SECOND OBIVE 

FOR JUST E50 TO HELP RUN THOSE 

BUSINESS PACKS MORE EFFICIENTLY 



WE MEAN BUSfNESS AT A GREAT 
PACKAGE PRICE OF JUST„, 



£8691 



|HARW00D'SGREAT1MI] 
AMIGA 500 PLUS 

'MEGA 31* 'PACK 3 
That's right you get the fentaslic 

Amiga & ALL THE EXTRAS 

detailed In Harwoods 'Mega 31*' 

GamasPackl (far left) AND, „ 

then you also get.,. 

I THE SUPERB PHILIPS CM8«33/l!i 

STEREOCOLOUR MONITOR 



Oi^monMr'sertfod 
0f\pag66gh/gs 
UiteMsloryiM 
choice of Pfii5;s 
UcnUat Si Monitor TVs 



" 





THE SUPER STAR 
LC 200 COLOUR 
PRINTER... 



PACK THREE 



OB...YOU CAN CHOOSE 
A PHILIPS MONKTOH TV 

AT NO EXTRA COST! 

Sec page S for FULL 
details oE this remafkablo 

FflStTewHanttorTV 



Featuring.., 

■IflSMO ^Jufl CofourG Pin NLQ Dot Matrix Pfinter 
with a FREE Dust Covsr and cable to your Amiga. 



l^fKio"^"^'' 



£799.95 

wmm (m MT ,4^ making 



HARWOODS LEARN & PLAY 



PHIMARYf-.J'iNlORPACKA 
Getyourcfiildrenofftoiisrtghl 
compullng sl^rt with "im software 

learn and play Compenoiurn 6 pack.., 

IflLtHUflM m\L wu'fui 4 r+oM6EHS. 
GAMESETSMtTCH, 

WH«TIS(r?-WH£BEISII? 

AdtvB, fflHilrftq youig nilnb 1111 kM Itc tun 

Dl ttese III MBkHig but Ktaatlonl niB. 

Yw ctlAdnn iirtitiltiy wool «en milse 

Iftd ttHir %s»f)^ IWB tnuunl 1^ 

HDMEJSSt 

l[feal IHHIK storags syslHn. Ksori hatuhoU lists, 

stiHkrrt nxwb pt& Ei^ Id use ^ Itittuir ctHttrcb, 

PfllKUlY MATHS COURSE 

Around 24 imdulB Ht Ids Cdnss fniin a jis dU 

rtflli up b] Qcondsnf M. FdIws N.C. 

FtEMiNt: k mwm. cdurse 

24 motft* Cflunt, THf^tnu ivtrn Ife cmfutsr 
anif baote. fcrwlv EllOBJS 4 tt« tfySKic 

A GREAT EDUCTICfflAL PACK 

FORYOURCHILOHENATA 

FRACTION OF THE NORMAL COST 




HARWOODS LEARN & PLAY 



GCSE/'C LEVEL PACK B 

GCSE examination iev&i $tudi^ on your 

Ami,Q3 computer that's fun i 

MICHQ ENGllSIf, MICRO FBEKCH AMD 

mm MATHS 

A Ht c4 tiiTH conpMa s#toeDn tifiurses to laC^ krrd 
ii*Bt] an also l» wd Inr (Hlsffl wjrti, Wi programs 
Hlh«re ID the lUlKHVl CuniciJlum skI were dHlflneil' 

apif IeW 71 sdiKts bv prafwEoiui !Bthf ra. 
Mt:t. -reni;'i jrn;v:« 'fh! spEKh'lc l"fllp yjur KCEni! 

h tant^lic vi'on] pr«e»or 'a# all ^^ tool^ vg<j'J rised 

Id cr*ahs atetw wTittw wrt ldǤi lor time woili, 

projKt! tic. Of ro' ttffi lamills fetters. TEOd UTaps 

wlonuiislbf around graphbs, Enwt as vai typti 

mcbtl^ a tmltt-ki datatesc and Rmitb Uk^. 

H.0ME8ASE 

Honvbee b ttv fdul Momtetloa siDfiQi priioririt tor 

^jogs li,e housetiokl l^,£faiaflt[nl&G.iiilcr«i(Bn's 

BdJcatJDnal prniEch. hc-cbJiVWKW ^fflhlwttOfC 

ccntrols .and clHr conpTBtHn^ reksanu iruniufe.. 

A GREAT EHJCTTONAL PACK 

FORYOURCHflDHENATA 

FRACTION OF THE NORMAL COST 





GORDON 




Co^pi 



ALFRETON DERBYSHIRE 

The Closer you hok 
The Better ive look 



■l-llllllltV k-l-IUM f/JV 



■ r <:ihio i ill ^liilii^ iji'i- Jrirtu jm «liii h /Vi'iim 



* ^T^m^°^ 



COTV ACCESSORIES 



RsassraK for 




IMAGINE, IF YOU CAN, THE CONCEPT OF 
A NEW, MORE POWERFUL AMIGA... 

...WITH 1 MEGABYTE OF MEMORY, AND A COMPACT DISK DRIVE OF ALMOST INFINITE 

SIZE. A DISK DRIVE SO VAST, IT CAN STORE HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF DIGITS OF 

DATA. THIS DATA COULD BE, SPEECH, ANIMATED PICTURES, OIGITISED STEREO 

SOUND, COMPUTER IMAGES OR WHOLE ENCYCLOPAEDIAS.... AND MORE. 

IMAGINE THIS. AND YOU CAN START TO GRASP THE CONCEPT OF CDT\''. 

THE irnEGRAL COMPACT DISK DRIVE. IS THE KEY TO THE POWER OF OQVJ. ITS STORAGE CAPACITY IS EQUIVALENT 

TO AROUND A QUARTER OF A MiaiON FULL PAGES OF TBfT. THIS WHEN IHTE6HATE0 WITH TWE 1 MB OF INTERNAL 

AMIGA CIRCUttflY, CREATES A SYSTEM, WHICH FROM A CO DISK, CAN GIVE YOU ACCESS TO AN UNIMAGINABLE 

SPECTHUM OF REAL WORLD IMAGES, NEVER SEEN COMBINED BEFORE. THESE VIVID IMAGES, WITH WORDS AND 

SOUNDS, GIVE YOU A WHOLE NEW DII^ENSION IN HOME EDUCATION, ENTERTAINMENT & INFOHMATiON TECHNOLOGY. 

AND... DONT FORGET, THAT COTV CAN PLAY IN SUPERB QUALITY, ANY NORyAL AUDIO MUSIC CD, AND IT CAN 

ALSO PLAY THE NEW CDtG DISKS, WHICH GIVE DIGITAL SOUND AND ON SCREEN GRAPHICS. 

ON CD DISKS NOW AVAILABLE. THERE ARE EDUCATIOtWL PACKAGES, ENCYCLOPAEDIAS PACKED WR^H 

REFERENCE INFORMATION, STUNNING GAMES, MUSIC SYSTEMS AND MANY OTHER NEW AND VARIED 

SUBJECTS, INCLUDING WHOLE WORLD ATLASES OR EVEN THE COMPLETE WORKS OF SHAKESPE^E, 

EACH ON ONE CD DISKIII CDTV ■ NOTHING LESS THAN REVOLUTIONARlf 

FREE CDTV STARTER PACK!!! 

WHEN YOU CHOOSE YOUR CDTV FROM GORDON HARWOOD, NOT ONLY DO 

YOU GET OUR LEGENDARY SERVICE, BUT WE GIVE YOU A CDTV STARTER PACK, 

TO GET YOU EXPLORING YOUR NEW WORLD - STRAIGHTAWAY. 
THIS INCLUDES A SUPERB SELECTION OF CD DISK TITLES INCLUDING THE WELCOME 
TUTORIAL & HUTCHINSOMS ENCYCLOPAEDIA, PLUS ... FIVE GAMES, SHERLOCK HOLMES 

& THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES, SIM CITY, CHAOS IN ANDROMEDA, A TOWN 

WITH NO NAME, AND THE ACCLAIMED LEMMINGS, WORTH IN TOTAL ALMOST £200.00. 

IN ADDITION IS THE INFRARED REMOTE CONTROLLER, AND ALL THE HARDWARE 

NEEDED TO GET YOU CONNECTED. 



ALL THIS FOR JUST £499.95 






CDTV IS THE SAME SIZE AND STYLE AS MOST VIDEO HEOORDEIS, SO IT CAN SIT UNOBTRUSIVELY ABOVE OR BELOW 

YOUR HOME VJ AND/OR HI-FI. AND WITH ITS INFRARED PEMOTE CONTROLLER, FT CAN BE OPERATED FROM YOUR 

ARMCHAIR. BUT PERHAPS MOST IMPORTANTLY, IF YOU ARE A COMPUTER ENTHUSIAST, REMEMBER THAT INSIDE 

P/ERY CDTV, IS AN AMIGA, JUST WAITING TO BE USED. SO LATER ON, YOU'LL BE ABLE TO BUY THE OPTIONAL 

KEYBOARD AND DISK DRIVE, TO GET INTO THE WORLD OF AMIGA COMPUTING. PRINTERS, DIGITISERS, 

GENLOCKS AND OTHER ACCESSORIES,CAN ALL BE CONNECTED TO GIVE ACCESS TO MANY OTHER EXCITING 

FACiUTIES, AND ALSO MANY OF THE EXISTING SOFTWARE PACKAGES AVAILABLE FOR THE AMIGA COMPUTER, 

NEVER BEFORE HAS THERE BEEN SO MUCH POTENTIAL FROM ONE NEW STUNNING SYSTEM, PACKED WFTH 

TODAYS TECHNOLOGY.! 

CAU. IN AND SEE US FOB YOUR PERSONAL DEMONSTRATION, OR PHONE US FOR YOUR 
FREE DETAILED CDTV INFORMATION PACK 



AN B9 KEY QWERTY KEYBOARD £49.95 

INFRARED MOUSE WITH BATTERY SAVER. £49.95 
INFflAR£DTRAa<BAU.,WITHTHEOFTION £79.95 
OF DIRECT CONNECTION TO EXTEND BATTERY UFE. 
DUPUCATES FUNCTIONS OF 2 BUHON MOUSE & 
INCLUDES TWO 9 PIN PORTS FOR STD, JOYSTICKS 
FOR HOLDING CD WITHIN DRIVE £9,95 

CD 1401 MEMORY CARD PERSONAL RAM CARD CONTAINING £79,95 

64K OF MEMORY FOR STORING DATA OR AS A 
BOOKMARK FACILITY WITHIN CDTV 

;D 1«S memory card a larger personal ram card £249,95 

CONTAINING 512K OF MEMORY FOR STORING 
DATA OR AS A BOOKMARK FACIUTY WITHIN CDTV 
3.5" FLOPPY DRIVE WfTH SBOK CAPACITY. £99.95 
MATCHING BLACK FINISH . SUPPLIED WITH 
AMIGA WORKBENCH DISKSfMANUALS StC. 
PAL BASED VIDEO INTERFACE CARD FOR £149,95 
SUPERIMPOSING CDW IMAGES OVER A VIDEO SIGNAL 
PROVIDED BY ANY STANDARD VIDEO SOURCE 
CDTV COMPATIBlf AND STYLED IN £69.95 

MATCHING BLACK. 
Many Amiga Aocsssofles S Pwipterals (e.g. Printere, Disk Drives, Software etc.) are 
compaiibie with CDTV. Pleass phone us for rampatabilSy [nfomation. 



CD 1220 KEYBOARD 
CD 1252 MOUSE 
C012flOTRACK8ALl 



CD 1400 CADDY 



C8M FLOPPY DRIVE 



;D1301 GENLOCK 



ROCUTE 3.5* DRIVE 



HARWOODS AMIGA 

PRO-GEN 

NEW LOWER PRICE 




lO-GEN Amiga Genlock 

T^e Pro-gen AMIGA Genlock allows you to mix you( Amiga display wUh ary PALvkteo 
slgnai whether it is fran a VCR, Laserdisk player or a Camcorder. In fact any item of 
vfdeo eqiiipment which outputs a PAL comptisite video signal .Combined with the Amiga 
coniputer the PrcnGen gives you the fftciWes ot a special elfects & video tilling suite. 
Take your own films & give Ihem a professieral look it/ OVERLAYING TITLES or by 
SUPER IMPOSING YOUR OWN GRAPHICS created in packages like Photon Palnl 2.0 
or Deluxe Paint Pra-Gerr is suppf ed wih micro illusions superb Ptioton Paint 2.0 package. 

FREE Photon Paint 2.0 Software 

A powerful Lo^d-Hi resolutioii hoW and modify (HAM) paint program, Willi overscan 
(NTSC/PAL) arid special effects for your Amiga Computer including all ttie following... 
Contour Mapping: drap«s a brush over a 3D 'landscape'. Pixel intensity values decide 
the peaks and valleys, while a special^ deve'oped ray-tracing algorithm maps the image 
precisely. Surface Happing; around 3D objects, both geomelrir; and free hand drawn. 
Lumfnanoe: sets tlie light source and intensity. Shado«ln(|: automatically wHti corrtrcl of 
size and offset. Brush Control-, twist, tilt, resize, flip, rotate, bend, adjustable transparency, 
stretcti Etc etc. PLUS LOTS MORE! A great program allowing use of 4096 colours. Choice 
of honz/vert page print, negatives, anti-aliasing, dilhered print, adjustable brihglness etc. 

How it works: | \ — i | STOP PRESS 

PHVaBL. NOW inClUOH AVHW 
veRSAI«£ MU.T1 CONHimfrVllKO 
TO QEHOCKCUHCCnNO CMIE HT. 
Tffi MPWS PRCHSai TO BE USQ) 
SHWCKTmAYWITH MOSt POfWH 

VIDEO axmajT, vimnur iHE USD 

TO MM KMITHE OOHSCT com- 

EClMS C*eiK Tlffi XH CW AtSD SE 

USD 10 COWeCT IN OT}En WA«.. 

l|.VCflTDVCR«. 

* m TO START YOU OF RISm FFO« 

TIC MCHpn VOU lyei THE eOHII 




NEW 
LOWER 



Photon Paint 2.0 ON LY £99.95 



Mode Switch-box for Genloclcs 

Features include 

■Compatible VWlti The Pro-Gen And Rendale 88CK 
-Supplied With Genlock Extender Cable Worth E9.9S 
-Sv*ltch-box Switches Between Foreground, Back- 
ground, Video And Computer Ndodes. 




'hmim' ft'OH.v (()■(' iiniihlih Imhjtvl I'l 



AMIGA DRIVES & MEMORY 



Cumana CAX354 3.5" 



.V Features Induds 

,V Long connBding cable 

;< IKb, (880K FormatlsO) CapacI 

,v Enable/Disatle Switch 

,V ThroughiMrt 

,v Access Light 

> Compatible with AmigaSM/l OOO 

IMOffiOOOWOOandCDTV 

WWSUPPLIQ)WrrHAFREE 
3.5' Disk Head ClNMir to nuimaln 
your new drive Jh tlf^top' condFtlon. 



£57.95 




■> Capacffiss of 52 to420Mb 
,\ Connects to sidecar bus on L/H 

side of ASM/ASM Plus 
■Jt Autobootemtti KicJtstart 1.3.(2.0, 

tiDDt «iable;disable swildi 
•i Sockets for up to 3 Mb of RAM 
if SCSI Port ekm up to 7 other 

cievices to b^ connacted 
-^ Supplied with easy to use software 
-i 2 Yaar Warranty A Dadicatad PSU 
■,'( Mini slot for future axparsior 
,V PC-AT Emulator planned to be 

avaiiatiia for 1992 



■ ( GVP AMIGA A500 HARD DRIVES | 

1 RAM 1 CAPACITY 


1 GVP AMIGA 1500/2000 HARD DRIVES i 

RAM 1 CAPACITY 


CALL FOR MEfWtORY 

UPGRADE PRICES IF 

YOU ALREADY ARE 

A GVP OWNER! 




^YMWAjmmmmmzimmmvmm 


0Mb. 


£349.95 


£459.95 


£729.95 


OMb, 




... .:: 


£639,95 ,: 


2Mb. 


£419.95 


£529.95 


£799.95 


2Mb. 


£359.95 


£479.95 


£709.95 


£1239.95 


4Mb. 


£489.95 


£599.95 


£869.95 


4Mb. 


£429.95 


£549.95 


£779.95 


£1309.95 


8Mb. 


£629,95 


E739.95 


£999.95 


8Mb. 


£559.95 


£679.95 


£899.95 


£1429.95 





















All our packs contain the new 
Amiga A500 Phis. 

flj Amiiicis may si ill he availaljle 

to special onler. please eminire) 





EDUCATION SOFTWARE 

OOKT JIST PLAY GAMES WHEN VOU 
CAN LEARM WITH YOUR AMIGA TOOl 

MICRO MATHS - 24 ea^ to uss programs liirGCSE(V'Level) £18.35 

re^fisicnofsrfftuiliQn 

MEGA MATHS - A 9 terat st«p by slop tuition ooursa. For matum £20.95 

t>eginrt&fs, 'A' LevbI sttfdas & Mk;ro Mattis userB 

MICflOFRENCH-GCSE Fmu^ tuititin or revision ootne. Omn £1 8.95 

tfflb sfK'^eji L wnttsn Frsncfi 

MICRO ENGLISH - Complete sBlt'tuilkin programs lo GC3E level, 

PRIMARY MATHS . A9S! 3 lo 12, Complete 24 Prog. Course. 

SPELLSOaK-Ages4loe. Developed viith tlia tio^ of a Prinary 

School hfead Teacher to aid spelling skii^. 

HOMEBASE - Home storey prog., idsaj lor ttwso hoiEsehoid Ibts, 

ehildiens educational projects, student notes etc. Easy to use "Pusn Button' 

controls and a extensive r^erenoe manitai. 

COMPEHDIUM SIX PACK- 6 Great Educatonel ?m^. tor cfildrwi £29,95 

egad 4-1 2yBars ol age. Each is designed to keep your cnikls InAerBst Mtiil&t 

tne^ learn. KiUS TYPE - Large characters & cci^jrftji grapfiics tielps creation 

of levies. WEATHER WATCHER . Collect S analyse data using gtaplis elc. 

even animate your own wealticf ma^l CALENDAR QUIZ - Quiz tias^d iaaming 

of tiiiie related events. WOHDS AND NUMBERS . Pul words i scentences in 

tie oorrect enter or group numliers. GAME, SET ( HATCH . EarV learning of 

sltapes colouis, numtKis, coins, sequences and including a 'reaction fmei'. 

WHAT IS tn WHERE IS IT? - Learn names & iocalinits ttf Britsii csunttes. 



£18.95 

m\ 

£19,95 



HARWCK)DS AMIGA 
. 1Mb PRO-RAM PLUS 

t ADO MORE POWER TO YOUR AMIGA 500 PLUS 
WITH A FULL 1Mb. MEMORY UPGRADE!!! 
1Mb. RAM expansion tor the Amiga 500 Plus 
Gives a total of 2Mb. of RAM 
Easily fitted without any dismantling in 
the trapdoor expansion slot underneath 
Amiga. DOESN'T Invalidate your warranty! 
Low power consumption 2 Yr Guarantee! 

A GREAT NEW OFFER FROM HARWOODS 



dk- 



£40.00 



0.5 Mb PRO-RAM 



Compatble with Amiga A500 and 5tX! Plus 
Gives ASOD a total oM Mli Memory + Clock 
Gives 50C Plus a total of 1 ,5Mb Memory 



£2^!?95 




AMIGA SOFTWARE 



Music-X: Tha ultimata software for professional MIDI sequencing. Ttie software indudes a config- 
urable librarian and a synthesisar patch editor. All you nead to recraata a song can be recalled fraiti 
one performance file including sequences, MIDI routing, sync setup, koytjoard maps 4 synthesiser 
or drum machine patch libraries. NEW LOW PRICES - £*S.95 or just £69.95 with midi^fnterface! 
MIDI INTEflFACE (5 Port): In, Out, Through plus 2 switchable ttiru'/out. Inc. 2 cables. E24.95 
AMOS: AMOS allows you to aooass the power of the Amiga with ease. 5O0 different commands 
mate AMOS a sophisCcated dei'eiopment language. The AMOS animation language allovre you to 
create complex animation sequences. 300 page manual and over 80 e^tampte programs £49.95 
Amos Add on Modules: (BOTtt require Amos prog.] 
Ama« Compiler £29.95 Amos SO !:S4.95 



"m 



■\ 




SuperBase 4: Most powerful database available for the Araiga.Connb^es the ease of use of Super- 
Base 2 with a versatile programming languap so that you can t^lor your data to your own specific 
needs for dub/buslnessllitirary records etc. £229.95 

Lattice C: An ideal tool for the C programmer yvhether enperienced or a nmnce. The best way to 
create applications for Itie Amiga. Fully supports Motorola chipset. Nearly 300 functions optimised 
to help the user write the tightest possible code. Iitdudes screen editor. Most Amiga C books are 
based around lattice. (Requires either 2ftappydrivesOFiaharddisl<drive) £1 99.95 

Deluxe Paint IV: Latest version of the Amigas first, and sUII the b«st, paint and animation package, 
now including HAM mode. (1 Mb. minimum memory or more recommefided) £79.95 

VIdl, The Complete Colour Solution: VIdl with flGB Splitter, Frame Grabber & Digitser. Grabs 
moving colour video into 16 grey scale frames (up to 16 frames in 1 Mb. Amiga) and digitises from 
still colour video source in up to 4096 colours in less than 1 second! Requires home VCR or video 
camera for grabbing. Requires video camera or VCR with perfect pause for digitising. Now comes 
wifti Photon Paint 2.0 ABSOLUTELY FREE OF CHWIGEI!! £149.95 

STER EOM ASTER: High quality 'stereo' sampler (best for sampling instmmants etc.] £39.95 

THE ABOVE IS JUST A SMALL SAHPIM mm OUR EXTENSIVE HANGE OF mOUSANOS OF SSHOUS. EDUCATION MD RECRE4TTCW 
7/71ES. WE CANT USr THEM ALL HERE SO PiEASE CALL US IF YOU CANT SEE THE PROGRAM ray REOUJRE, ITS PROBABLY IN STOCKI 



Pen Palvo 

WORD FROCESSOK/DiVTABASE 

Wifli Pen Pal you can mix text, 4096 
colour graphics & data in ways no other 
w,i^ can! "Ifshandlii^of gr^^hics is 
unsurpassed: Pen F*al is the ouly word 
piDcessur I tested that will |-^"': 
automatically wr^ _. \ 
text round giafbks,. / ^^' 
Amiga Wortd, I 
Jaty'90 ...;- ^ 



£79.95 "^ 

PEN PAL complete r-, ■_, 
W!TH512KAmis(i\ 1^1 
RAM Expansion { \ 




GORDON 




ALFRETON DERBYSHIRE 

The Closer you look, 
Tfje Better we look. 



1-miiiiiA'lcniiniivtinisltihicii 



PINTERS 



FREf 

flccEssomcs 



All prtntera in our range Include b standani Centranics^arallel Port 
for direct connection to Amiga, PC'a, Atari STs, Archlmadeg etc. 



We supply a connection catile to YOUR computer F Fi E 



El 



plus a Qualiw Dust Cover with ALL Dot Matrix Printars 



Fl 
FREE 




NEW CANON BUBBLEJET BJIOex PRINTER 
NOW IN STOCK 
ONLY £244.95 



£134.95 



CmZEN 120D+ 9 PttJ MONO - Up to 120/25 cps 

Ul Very reliable iM cosi printer with interetiangable Inteffatss fOf , 

Cteit(oniC5;RS23E'ssrial type {C64 etc.) LI FuH 2 Year manufadurefs ^imaitf 

NEW FASTEfi STAR LC20 9 PIN MOKO - Up to ISOT! cps 

Replai;8irent forounrostpofiiJlarMpm Dot-Malitx at a su|ief low price 

LJ Uultlpla font otifions eaaly accesaSils D Slmuitaneous, conUnuctJS sikI singb 

tai frortt panSI sheet slafaieiy 

a Btcallaitpapetharatlmg facilities LI 2« x 240 dpi Gfaphies 



£154.95 



£199.95 



STAfl LC200 9 PtN COLOUR PRINTEB - 185/40 cps 

Ttiid is l^ia ofid in our pscksl 

J eOCoiumnDotMatrix Q Mlixopaperfeed.MaK. papsf width 1 1 .7' 

D 240 dpi - 8 Pin COLOUR O Supplied with coioui S mono ribbons 

_J 16KSirffei.BResidert Fonts CI Pap^r part( with auto anflle sheet ioailing 

J Push/pull traiitot&rear/boltoni tote a Programmabls from tat :panal. 

■Ji Heveise paper feeds □ 12 monlh warranty 

CmZEN SWIFT 9 PIN COLOUR ■ 160/4Clcp« — ■ 

New super tilgh sp«c 9PJn mloiir printer 

3 8K Buffer 4 Fonts □ 240x240 dpi CoiOurOfaplilcs 

_j Push and pull tractor buHt^n a Best taid quality in oiirSPin range 

_1 Feed for iahsls/imiiti part stafionacy Q 2 Year (^itaen wananty 

STAR SJ48 INKJET PfllNTEfl 



£199.95 



New super h^ quaHly bubbis ink iet printer 
3 B4Nozaeinkjet 
LI Emulates EpsorLOmd IBM 
Proprinter for fall compatlbilily 
Q Complatewttti AC adaptor 

STAR LC2*200 24 PIN MONO - 22M5 cps 

Mono version of LC24/200 Colaur, same spec except for a emaJer TK batter 

STAR LC24/200 24 PIN COLOUR ■ 22afK cps 

Colour varskm of lie LC24-2(X) Mono. 



£239.95 



LJ Larse2eK Buffer 
Q 360 X 360 dpi ne^ laser print quality 
ll^l Optional Ni-Cad battery for mdna free 
operation 



£239.95 



£289.95 



_J BDColiinin Dot Matrix 

JJ 360 dpi -24 Pin MONO 

_J 30K Buffer (e«)arHfel]le) 

J 10 Resilient Fonts 

_] Front Pane) Pitt*iSelBclion 

_l Push'pali tractor 4 r^i/bottom feeds 

_l IlBverse paper feed 



a Paper park wiltiaulo single sheet kiading 

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GORDON HA RWOO D COMPUTFRS 
DEPARTMFNf EEH -4 NEV 
ALFRFTON. i 

TEl. 0773 f«h. 



JARGOH BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Basic - Beginners' All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code is a high-level 
programming language, much favoured by micro-computer users. It 
combines a fair amount of power with ease-of-use. 

C -A compiled language designed primarily for systems programming. Itv/as 
used to write mucli of the Amiga's operating system, and is used in the 
writing of many Amiga applications. 

Format - A process of preparing a floppy disk so that it can be used by the 
Amiga. With Workbench 2, floppies can be fomnatted with the Fast Rling 
System to make them operate quieter, but with more likelihood of errors. 

Partition - Part of a hard drive separated off from the rest. As far as 

Workbench, AmigaDOS and the rest of the world is concerned, a partition 
is a disk in its own right. Problems do come to the fore when you try to 
copy data between two partitions on the same drive. 

Priiitf - A standard function supplied with C which enables prog-ammers to 
send output to the screen. 

Trancendental function - A mathematical function associated with 

logarithms. Each transcendental function has its opposite, such that if 
tiie log of a number is taken, and the anti-log taken of the result, the 
final number will be the same as the initial one. 



ctntimml (rm pogt M 

mathffp.ti file I can only assume 
that the mathtrans SPPow() Is 
being used as the disk with the 
libraries on Is called tor when the 
program Is first run. 

According to the documentation 
supplied the mathtrans llt)rary Is 
opened when one of Its functions Is 
used and so manual opening Is '' 
unnecessary. I have done this to 
use the SPPowO function directly 
but tiiere Is no difference In the 
solution. Is my problem unique or ts 
the mathtrans SPExp() library 
function really that badf 

David McKone 

Chester-Le<St reet 

County Durham 

The ffp (fast floating point) libraries 
are based on a Motorola format 
which uses 24 bits for the mantissa. 
Ignoring the accuracy of the 
algorithms used to compute the 



FINDING THE BOOK 



Fl 



Amiga Sftopper 
recently mentioned 
a boolt called HISoft 
Jl Basic but I've not 



been able to find It In any 
bookshop. Can you please tell me 
where I can get a copy from? 

HS Sherglll 

Uttleover 

Derby 

I think the simplest thing to do is 
write directly to HiSoft. Its address 
is HiSoft, The Ofd School, 
Greenfield, Bedford MK45 5DE. 
The book, incidentally, costs 
£14.95. PAO 



various transcendental functions, the 
representation error will be 1 in 24 
bits, ie about one part in 'two times 
ten to the power seven'! You would 
therefore expect errors from around 
the eighth significant figure onwards. 
This is much better than you have 
found and your problem lies not with 
the accuracy of the ffp routines but 
with your use of the NorthC printfO 
function. 

If, for example, you try to print 
the value of e/100 using the 
following program: 

#include <8tdio.li> 

iinclude (math.li> 

mainO 

{ 

double x; 

printf{"%f \n",eixp(x)/10O.0)f 
) 

you will get a result with six decimal 
places, 0,027183, where only the 
first five are correct, if however you 
try to calculate a value that is one 
hundred times greater than e, using 
this modified program: 

Slnclude <stdlo.h> 

#lncl-ude (math.h? 

mainO 

< 

double x; 

x=l; 

prliitf("%f \ii",100*exp{x))j 

} 

you will get a result of 271.828188 
which, as you'll doubtless know, 
gives a value of 100 times e correct 
to eight significant figures. 

These results suggest that, like 
most other printf() implementations, 




the NorthC version defaults to 
floating point number display 
containing six decimal places with 
the last figure rounded. 

The NorthC documentation 
su^ests that floating point 
formatting has not been 
implemented but a few experiments 
along the lines of the above pieces 
of code showed quite clearly that it 
is. If, for Instance you modify my first 
example so that It uses a ten digit 
floating point format string, ie use 
"%10.10f \n" rather than "%f \n", 
you'll find that instead of 0.0271S3 
you'll get a result of 0.0271828184 
which is 'significantly' better (sorry, 
couldn't resist that one) than the 
results of the first program would 
lead you to believe. 

The bottom line then is that 
when using printf() to display these 
ffp values you just need to modify 
your format strings so that the 
appropriate number of digits are 
printed. PAO 

FRAME RATE FIX 

To help me work out 
the number of pre- 
and post-roll frames 
of my video gear I 
made up an animation using 
DPaintA on my Amiga 500. 1 
produced a sequence of -100 to to 
+100 pages, twice, and 
interspersed it with 200 blank 
fl-ames. 

Transferring this anim at 25 
frames per second resulted In every 
Sth frame doubling up. Only by 
running at 30 FPS could I achieve a 
25 FPS video run correctly. I wonder 
whether my A500 Is running slow or 
are all ASOOs the same due to some 
bug In the NTSC to PAL system. 
Secondly, when I attempt to 
transfer a sound sample captured 
on my Mastersound sampler to 
DVideoS or Disney Animation Stuiilo 
I get a "Not an SMUS file" error, if 
all programs are IFF, what's going 
on? 

Fred Wells 

Leeds 

WYorks 

I'm fairiy sure that this is no bug. 
What you're seeing is either the 
product of your Amiga just not being 
able to push data through fast 
enough, or (and this is my favourite 
theory) that the maximum 30 FPS in 
DPalnt4 is a hangover from the NTSC 
version. 

As you know, NTSC frame rate is 
30 FPS, and the software is 
American. Port it over to PAL, and 30 
FPS probably equates to 25 FPS in 
reality- as you have discovered. You 
should also be aware that the larger 
screen formats, especially hi-res 
overscan in 16 colours, will run 
increasingly more slowly as they are 
more memory intensive. 



For your information, SMUS is an 
oldish IFF format developed for 
musical scores. It never really 
became widespread, but programs 
such as DeluxeMusic and Music-X 
can save, though not load, in this 
format. DeluxeVideo can play back 
SMUS files, which is where your 
problem originates. 

However, the sound samples 
which Mastersound saves, though 
still in an IFF format (either *SVX or 
RAW, I think) are not in SMUS 
format. IFF (Interchange RIe Format) 
is more a philosophy than a format, 
as graphics are also saved in IFF 
ILBM format, but you can't load 
these into most music software, for 
instance. 

My reading of your trouble is that 
you are trying to load a sound 
sample (as produced by 
Mastersound] as a Tune Track In 
DVideo, which only accepts SMUS 
files - hence the error message. 
What you should be doing Is Playing 
the sample as part of a Scene. 

1 suggest you try opening a 
scene, adding a new track, then 
defining It as sound, loading one of 
your samples and then playing back 
the scene. All should now be well. 

aw 

HARD UP GRADE 

' i ^ My GVP hard drive 
JjL I came supplied with a 
single partition 
confl^red for use 
with Workbench 1.3. 1 have since 
replaced the machine with an A500 
Pius and would like to re-conflgure 
the drive with two partitions and 
Workbench 2. 1 do not have 
anything Important stored on the 
drive, but since the thing cost over 
£400 I do not want to blunder about 
on my own. 

JL Jones 
BIrklnhead 
IVIerseyslda 

The first stage of the process is to 
reformat the drive using the 
Faastprep utility supplied by GVP. 
This will allow you to set up the 
number and size of partitions: two 
equal-sized ones are a good start. 
The formatting procedure is quite 
painless and you should have no 
problems following GVP's excellent 
manual. You can manually copy all 
the Workbench 2 disks from the 
Shell using the following command 
on each: 

oqpy from dfO: to dhO: all 

If all else fails ask your local 
specialist dealer. NASCR (National 
Association of Specialist Computer 
Retailers) members in particular, are 
specialists in this sort of area and 
should be able to get you going for a 
minimal fee. MS 




62 



AJHIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



HARD DISK HARD TIME 

HI have recently been 
given a Rodlme 40Mb 
hard disk Qust the 
drive and no other 
circuits) and I would like to know If 
It would be possible to connect this 
to my A&OO. If 80, could you give 
nw details of how this could be 
done? Would I require a HD 
controller or would i be able to 
make an interface for the hard disk 
myself? 

A Qosling 

Wythenshawe 

Manchester 

Without knowing more details on the 
Rodime time (Rodime went out of 
business last year, so the company 
won't be able to help you) It's 
difficult to say what type of drive it Is 
or how to connect it. If it's a SCSI 
drive you can link it up to almost any 
Amiga SCSI controller (such as the 
Amiga A590 hard drive). If It's any 
other type, you're probably better off 
losing it somewhere. JR 

CASE FOR COMVERSION? 

HI have a 2Mb A500 
Plus and I am thinking 
about up^adlng the 
machine with a GVP 
hard drive for the Amiga 2000 using 
a Checkmate expansion case as the 
price seems to Just about balance 
out against the ASOO GVP drive. Do 
you think tiiat this is wise? 

is the Checkmate 1500 system 
compatible with most A2000 cards? 
Can I mount the new A690 CD-ROM 
drive Inside the 1500 case? Does 
the A690 have a SCSI Interface? I 
believe that I can also use ASOO 
cards inside the ISOO. is this 
conect? 

Martin Fleming 

Paisley 

Scotland 

I'rn afraid, Martin, that your 
calculations may be a little incorrect. 
The Checkmate Digital 1500 Is still 
being sold for around £200 and the 
A2000 GVP hard drive controller with 
52Mb drive is £300. However, the 
price of the ASOO GVP drive (which 
can be connected directly to the 
ASOO without any ejrtra hardware) Is 
just £380, Add the price of the GVP 
A2000 drive to the Checkmate drive 
and you'll actually end up spending 
£120 more for a system that is no 
more capable than the standard 
A500 GVP system. 

Even if the prices did balance 
out, I think you'd be unwise to go for 
the Checkmate 1500, Having owned 
one myself for a couple of years now, 
I have never been particularly 
impressed. The overall quality of 
constnjction is rather low to say the 
least, with many of the parts failing 



to connect altogether. If you really do 
want a replacement casing, then why 
not check out Checkmate's HIQ 
Tower system, a much better (and 
better built} replacement casing for 
the A500 based around a PC 
compatible tower system casing. 
Failing that, sell your A500 and buy 
an A1500 instead (you should be 
able to pick them up for about £500 
these days). 

The bog standard Checkmate 
1500 system isn't compatible with 
any A2000 cards - this is an 
optional extra which adds to the 
price of the whole system. As it 
stands, the 1500 can handle a 
single A2000 card which can be 
either a standard Zorro II card or a 
video card (a genlock, for example), 
tf you want to add extra A2000 
cards, then you're stuck. Checkmate 
had planned to produce an 
'OverRider' box which allowed a few 
more A2000 cards to be used, but 
this never actually arrived (it became 
vapourware, as the techies say). 

Although the 1500 can handle 
the A590 hard dhve, it cannot handle 
the A690 CD-ROrvi drive simply 
because you need to be able to 
remove the CD-ROM 'caddie' every 
time you wish to load a new piece of 
CD-ROM software. 

Because of its age, the 1500 
has not been designed to handle any 
device that uses removable media 
other than the standard Amiga floppy 
drives. I'm sure Checkmate will build 
this facility Into the HIQ tower, 
however. JH 

FATHER AND SON 

Son writes; 
i have acquired a 
Microvitec Cub 
monitor and MIcrollne 
80 printer. Which cables would I 
nsed to connect to my Amiga 500 
Plus and are they available? 

Colin Swift, age 11 
and... 

Father writes: 

in Amiga S/iopper dated December 
1991 you state that the MIciovltec 
Cub can be used with the Amiga 
500 Plus. My son's queries 
regarding the use of the monitor and 
printer stem from the fact that I am 
unable to obtain any information 
regarding their compatibility. Can 
you help? 

L Swtft (no age given) 
Nottingham 

As long as the Cub you have has a 
TTL input (6-pin DIN : l=Red, 
2=Green, 3=B[ue, 4=Composlte 
sync, 5=Ground and 6=Not 
connected) connection you'll be OK, 
Then you'll need to get hold of a copy 
of Amiga Shopper 3 (page 113) 
where electro-doctor; Smiddy takes 
you step by step through Axing your 





TALLY MAN BLUES 

My Mannesman Tally MT81 printer keeps double spacing. I 
have tried all the drivers on the Extras disk, with various 
setting of the dip switches - IBM/ Epson emulation, 
linefeeds on/off for example - all to no avail, 
rang Mannesman Tally but the person I spoke to wasn't very 
Interested. The g!ri said the printer has to be In IBM mode. Help. 

Neil Croft 

Herringthorpe 

S Yorks 

With dip switch SWl-1 switched on (that's block 1, switch 1) the IV1T81 
emulates an Epson FX-S5, and so it should work with either the EpsonXOId 
or EpsonX(CBM_MPS-1250] drivers. 

The double linefeed is being caused by the Amiga sending a linefeed 
and the MT81 providing its own linefeed, so SWl-2 should be off to prevent 
this. 

After changing dip switches you must switch the printer off and on again 
for the changes to be recognised. JW 



Amiga to a TTL-equipped Cub. This 
involves a small amount of internal 
tinkering to make the Cub work with 
the Amiga's 4096 colours, rather 
than TTL's eight, but this should be 
easy enough for most folks. If you 
don't fancy making the lead yourself 
you should contact Meed mo re Ltd 
o 051 521 2202, which supplies 
both kits and the ready-made article, 
along with additional notes - in case 
you can't contact the Amiga 
Stopper's back issues department 
tt 0458 74011. 

Before you can decide what 
connector you need for the MIcrollne 
80, an oldish 9-pin printer made by 
Oki, you'll have to establish whether 
It Is configured as a parallel or serial 
printer, since it was onginally 
available in both formats. 

iMert you'll need to select a 
printer driver to control it, but I'm not 
sure that there is a specific driver 
available for the 80. As I was told, 
this printer doesn't have any 
facilities for emulating Epson or IBM 
printers, as most modern printers 
do, so it isn't possible to use a 
standard EpsonX-type driver. 
However, there should be a printer 
driver called 0kidata_92 in 
Devs/Prlnters on your Workbench 
Extras disk which you need to copy 
into the Devs/Prlnters drawer of your 
boot disk. 

After you've done this open 
Preferences/Printers and select 
Okidata_92 from the Printer Drivers 
list and Parallel (or Serial) for the 
Printer Port setting. If the printer is 
using a serial port you may also 
need to make some adjustments to 
the Preferences/Serial settings. You 
should find the required settings in 
the manual (if you have one). If not, 
a call to Oki technical support 
■B 07535 31292 may be necessary. 

You will probably have to make 
other adjustments to get everything 
exactly right but you should now at 
least be able to get started. GW 




EXPONENTIAL DECAY 

Having written a 
simple ARexx script 
to generate a data file 
with X and y co- 
ordinates I need to calculate 
fractional exponents. All ARexx 
returns Is Error: 48 (severity 10). 
This basically Is telling me that I 
cannot perform an exponential to a 
fractional index. Is there any way 
around this? I know that In the 
mathsleeedoubtrans.llbrary there is 
a function called lEEEDPEXP, but I 
do rtot know how to access external 
libraries from ARexx. Can you help? 
Andrew Porter 
Rotherham, South Yorkshire 

You'll find all the technical details of 
external library ARexx interfacing In 
the AReioc User's Reference Manual. 
This can be obtained from the Amiga 
Centre Scotland (a 031 5574242) 
but there is incidentally a 
RexxMathLib library on Rsh disk 227 
which has been designed to make 
various high-level math functions 
such as sin, tangent, log, exp etc, 
easily available from ARexx. PAO 

FAST FORMAT 

a) I am considering 
getting an expansion 
based RAM pack such 
as the Supra 500RX, 
but I am worried about compatibility 
problems. Can this sort of RAM be 
switched off? 

b) How long will It be before Pius 
owners can buy programs confident 
they will work? 

c) Are there any PD DTP programs 
for the ASOO Plus? I'm having a lot 
of trouble finding PD that wortts on 
the Plus and I'd be grateful If you 
could ntentlon this. 

d) How can I format my disks using 
the Fast Filing system? 

Stephen Richards 
Bamsiey 
S Yorks 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST • 1993 



63 



^m^ 



a) This is a case of horses for 
courses. Some external expansions 
sucli as tlie 500RX have disable 
switches, others don't. Generally 
speaking such things are an 
unnecessary gimmick becaus« all 
software should support expanded 
RAM and the vast majority does. 

b) How long is a piece of string? 
Every enhancement brings with it 
change and Incompatibility. Time and 
time again, Commodore insists that 
developers follow strict rules to 
maintain upward compatibility; time 
and time again, programmers ignore 
the rules and problems arise. This 
should never happen; it does though. 
One exception affects the CDTV 
since the 1.3 Kickstart {which used 
to be considered sacrosanct insofar 
as the CDTV was concerned) is 
gradually being replaced tiy 2.x. 

c) There is one called Tex, but this is 
very difficult to use. A much better 
system (Goid Disk's PageSettei) was 
given away with issue 34 of our 
sister magazine, Amiga Format 
Don't leave it too long though - back 
issues are in short supply. You may 
iike to know, our PD columnist, Ian 
Wrigley also uses an A500 Plus so 
anything which runs on his machine 
should be work fine on yours. 

d) You can do this from Shell using 
the following command to format a 
disk in the internal drive; 



fozmat drive d£0: 
empty ffs 

Even so, fast filing system Is not 
recommended for use on floppy 
disks because of its inherently lower 
redundancy, MS 

DTP Snil IN BITS 

I wrote to you 
recently concerning 
missing lines of 
graphics during 
output to my Star LC24-200 using 
PageStraam 2.1. Your reply 
suggested a memory Insufflclency, 
and to conflnn this by printing ait a 
lower density. 




JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Bit - A binary digit, with a possible value of zero or one. 

Byte - A collection of eight bits. A byte is the smallest unit of memory that a 
computer's processor can access. 

Ktelutart - The most basic and centra! part of the Amiga's operating system. 
These days it is held in ROM, so that it is immediately present when the 
machine is switched on. AlOOOs have Kickstart on a floppy disk 
meaning that on power up this disk must be inserted before the 
Workbench disk. 

ROM - Read Only Memory Is used to store essential programs, such as 
Kickstart and many of the library routines. These do not have to be re- 
loaded each time the Amiga is switched on because ROM retains its 
contents without power. No new information can be written to ROM, 
hence the name Read Only. 

Startup^equence - A program which Is executed every time the Amiga is 
switched on and after every reset. It sets up the system so that it is 
usable from Workbench, and may be customised by those who have 
unusual hard or software requirements. 



Tills I did, and tKe output was 
OK. So I put it down to the above. 

However I do require the higher 
density output so I twu^t a GVP 
HD8 hard drive plus 4Mb of memory. 
This has not solved my problem - 
only one page has been created and 
It Is not that large (A4], with little 
print on it. 

I have printed out on maximum 
density to a Citizen S^iin with no 
problems, so I surmise a printer 
RAM buffer problem. However t 
don't have problems with Deluxe 
Paint III or other applications. Could 
I have an on-ttoard RAM problem? 

Peter Clark 
WIgan 



I don't understand what you mean by 
"only one page has been created", 
but let's take this opportunity to 
learn a bit more about how DTP 
programs print pages to 
monochrome dot-matrix printers. 

Keeping it as simple as possible, 
what they do is print a graphics 
dump of an enormous bitmap, which 
has to be created in memory first, 



DO, DO 

Hlf have ntted my Amiga with a ROM switcher to enable me to 
use both 1.3 and 2.x KIckstarts. However, although the 
machine works fine under 1.3, tt refuses to autoboot my 
Vortex hard disk when I switch to Kickstart 2. CouM this be 
a prtMem witti the personality module whicii was r«laased before 

Kickstart 2? 

A Mackarlll 

Swansea 

South Wales 

The Vortex system is getting a bit old now, but It should (theoretically) 
automount and autoboot under Kickstart 2 if it works OK with Kickstart 1.3. 1 
have only come across this once before with an ancient A590 which showed 
a similar malady on the A500 Plus. You could try contacting Vortex 
Systemas, GmbH, at Falterstrasse 51-53, D7101, Fleln Germany, to see if it 
has a more recent version of the ROMs, MS 



either all in one go or in smaller 
strips If memory is tight. If you are 
printing an A4 page at 360 by 360 
dots per Inch, the full bitmap will be 
(8.27in * 360) dots wide by (11.69in 
* 360) dots high, which is 2,977 
dots by 4,208 dots. 

Now, if each dot on the page 
requires one bit of memory, this 
means we need 2,977 by 4,208 bits 
of memory to hold the complete page 
In memory - which works out at 
12,527,216 bits; and as there are 
eight bits to a byte, this calculates to 
1,565,902 bytes; and as there are 
1,024 bytes to one kilobyte this 
works out to be l,529K (about 
1.5Mb). 

If we were printing at 'half' that 
resolution, 180 by 180 dots per 
inch, that same page requires 1489 
+ 2104 dots = 3,132,856 bits = 
391,607 bytes = 3S2k. 

Your 9-pin Citizen, which has a 
top resolution of 240 by 216 dots 
per inch, requires 1984 * 2525 dots 
= 5,009,600 bits = 626,200 bytes = 
612K. 

Now I'm not saying that the 
above description is exactly how 
PageStream prints its pages - only 
the developers will know that - but it 
serves as an example of how 
doubling the output resolution 
requires four times the memory, not 
twice the memory. 

It doesn't matter what's on the 
page, by the way, a completely blank 
A4 page requires the same amount 
of memory as one covered in text 
and graphics. The blank page is Just 
a bitmap composed of lots of 'white' 
dots. 

5Mb of memory should be plenty 
for PageStream to render a full A4 
page at 360 by 360 dots per inch, 
unless there is something else using 
up that memory. Compugraphic fonts 
eat memory, the larger the font the 
more memory required, and because 



of the way PageStream works, 
bitmap (IFF ILBM) pictures take up a 
lot of memory as well. If your 
document has many pages with text 
and graphics on, all these pages are 
taking up memory even though you 
can't currently see them. I'd guess 
that you'd start having output 
problems if your document had four 
pages filled with Compugraphic 
fonts, and a couple of coloured 
bitmaps on each page. 

The other problem is that the 
memory required for printing almost 
certainly needs to be all in one 
contiguous lump. As you work, 
importing things and moving around 
your document laying things out, the 
Amiga will allocate blocks of memory 
here and there as required, and 
when it comes to printing the page 
perhaps memory has become so 
fragmented that there isn't a large 
enough contiguous chunk left to 
render the page properly. 

The answer might be to save 
your document, reset the Amiga to 
de-fragment memory, and load and 
print your document. This tip 
certainly works with Professional 
Page when the 'bits missing' output 
problem happens. You could also try 
splitting your document, saving it as 
separate pages, then loading and 
printing each page one at a time. 

In my experience - and believe 
me I'm not just saying this because 
you have 5Mb of memory - in my 
experience I've found that almost all 
the DTP problems disappear once 
you get to 7Mb. This really is one 
problem that can be solved by 
throwing money at it. JW 

SOUNDING OFF 

H^HM I recently bought the 
H^H^ Omega Projects 
H^BM Sound Enhancer 
d^H which Is supposed to 
work at its best when the Internal 
audio filter Inside the Amiga Is 
turned off. How do I do this7 
Programs like OctaMED allow you 
to turn It off from within the 
program but Sequencer One Plus 
does not seem to have such a 
facility. Because of this limitation 
have have been forced to run both 
OctaMED and Sequencer One 
concurrently Just so that I can use 
Sequencer One with the Sound 
Enhancer. Is there a better way of 
getting around this problem? 

John Griffiths 

Hodderdon 

HerU 

The Amiga's audio filter is actually 
controlled through one of the 
peripheral control bytes in the Amiga 
CIAs which are located at HEX 
BFEOOl (Decimal 12574721). If you 
have a copy of AmigaBasic then you 
can write a small program which 
could be placed in the startup- 



AM AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUI 1 6 • AUGUST 1 992 



mm 



sequence of your hard drive to 

automatically turn off the audio filter 
during boot up. Here's the code that 
will do the job: 




A - PEKKB(12S74721) XOR 2 
POKES 12574721, A 

If you have access to an assembler, 
then the code is even simpler. All 
you need is a single line: 

EORI.B #2,$BFEa01, 

This register actually toggles the 
audio filter on and off so all you need 
to do to turn the audio filter back on 
again is to run the code above a 
second time. JH 

BJ-1 30 DRIVER 

I have recently bought 
a Canon BJ-130 
printer and I am 
having all sorts of 
problems with printer drivers. 

The BJ-130 driver In 
PageStream 2.1 produces ifarbage, 
however the Epson 9-pln works 
perfectly. Also, the Workbench 
EpsonX[CBM_MI>S-1250] driver 
works fine with Notepad and 
Graphlcdump. But nothing that 
comas wtth Pen Pal or PageStream 
II works, nor any other program I 
have tried. 

I would appreciate It if you could 
tell me where to gat a suitable 
driver, 

Peter Okleford 

Mt Albert 

New Zealand 

You're right, the BJ-i30 driver 
supplied with PageStream does not 
work with the BJ-130. I told Soft- 
Logik about this almost tw/o years 
ago. Plainly the company didn't 
believe me. 

What you need Is the proper 
Workbench CanonBJ130 driver, 
v^hich is on Jamdisk 2 and will cost 
you £5 air mall from: JAM, 75 
Greatfields Drive, LJxbrldge, UBS 
3QN, United Kingdom. To use It with 
PageStream you should select 
PageStream's 'Preferences' driver. 
JW 

PROTEXT LC-200 DRIVER 

I've created a really 
good printer driver for 
the Star LC-200 
printer for use with 
Pn>t0xt, which makes use of all 
possible fonts, colours, sizes and 
pitches. Am I allowed to distribute 
It, or will Amor get annoyed? 

Adam S Pearson 

Gateshead 

Tyna & Wear 

If your Protext Star LC-200 driver is 
bug-free and as good as you say it Is, 
I should think that Arnor would 





probably be interested in including it 
on the Prafext Printer Drivers 
distribution disk. If you play your 
cards right you might even be able to 
wangle a free copy of Prodata in 
return. 

In the meantime, if anyone wants 
Adam's Star LC-200 driver - and 
remember, it's not a Workbench 
printer driver, it's only for use wtth 
Protext 5.0 and later - then send a 
blank fonnatted disk and stamped, 
self-addressed envelope to: Adam S 
Pearson, 19 Camborne Grove, 
Gateshead, Tyne & Wear NE8 4EX. 

(And Adam, speak to Arnor about 
your clock problem while you're at it. 
Ask for a free upgrade to the latest 
version, only don't tell them I told 
you to). JW 

MACHINE CHOICE 

I am writing for some 
advice on buying an 
Amiga. When the 
A500 first came out I 
bought one and was very pleased 
wtth It. 1 had It for quite some time 
before having to reluctantly sell it. 

Having lost touch with the 
Amiga scene I am not entirety 
f^mlHar with the Amiga ISOO, 2000 
or 3000 ranges or their capabilities 
and I would be very grateful If you 
could tell me a little about all the 
machines currently avatlabia 
Including the A500, ASOO Plus and 
the new A600. 1 have a wide range 
of computing Interests (not just 
games] > so I'd be very grateful If 
you could advise me on which modal 
I should buy. 

IVt Milne 

Tankemess 

Orkney 

Which machine you buy depends 
entirely upon how much you wish to 
spend and what you vuant to do with 
your Amiga. Unless you are intending 
to use the Amiga for professional 24- 
bit graphics, then you don't really 
need one of the new high-end A3000 
machines. If you intend to expand 
your machine quite substantially then 
an A1500 is for you. But if your 
needs are fairly minimal then go for 
an ASOO Plus. 

Anyway, here's a quick rundown 
of the Amiga range as It currently 
stands. I've tried to highlight which 
machines are good for which 
applications. 

• A500 Plus - The replacement 
machine for the classic A500, the 
A500 Plus boasts 1 tMb RAIVI as 
standard and comes complete with 
Workbench 2 and the new Enhanced 
Chip Set which gives more screen 
modes, more chip RAIVI and a more 
capable biitter. The A500 Plus is 
ideal for games, small business use 
and amateur video, DTP, music and 
graphics work, A good all-rounder for 
home users. 



UNSUCCESSFUL SID 

have Just upgraded my revision 6.2 B2000 to Workbench 2. 
I have also installed the new Dentse chip. I seem to be 
having a problem. Every now and again my monitor screen 
goes one colour wtth lines In another colour going up from 
Urn bottom of the screen to the top. When this happens my computer 
crashes. This problem happens at random and 95% of the time while I'm 
running SID 1.08. ts this a problem with SID or )s It possible that one of my 
new up^ade chips Is damaged? 

RotJert Hart 
Roehampton 




Not being a great fan of SID (until version 2 anyway), 1 haven't seen this 
problem before. It sounds tike a software crash (the vertical lines are sprites 
gone mad), but this could be caused by a hardware problem - I'd need much 
more Information to diagnose this problem. M 



• A600 - The new A600 machine 
boasts a similar spec to the ASOO 
Plus but is rather limited in its 
expansion capabilities. It can only be 
expanded to 4IWb RAIVI and cannot 
use ASOO hard drives and RAIVI 
expansions that connect to the 
machine through the bus connector. 
It features an all-new ROM Card 
facility which enables software to be 
used which is stored on credit card 
sized ROIvl cards. Currently though, 
virtually no ROM card software 
actually exists. The A600 is good for 
absolutely nothing. Take my advice - 
don't even think about buying an 
A600, at least for the moment! 

• A1500/B2<MM) - Both are virtually 
the same machine apart from an 
extra floppy drive which is fitted to 
the A1500 {which Just happens to be 
the cheaper machine). Comes with 
1Mb RAM (expandable to 9Mb), 
Workbench 2 and the new Enhanced 
Chip Set. Both machines are very 
expandable and feature separate 
keyboards. An excellent choice for 
both home and professional use. 

• A3000 - Available in a number of 
different specifications, the A3000 is 
the flagship of the Amiga range. 
Based around the high sfteed 32-tiit 
68030 processor, the A3000 is 
available in both 16 and 2S MHz 
versions with either 50 or 100Mb 
hard drives as standard. Comes as 
standard with 2Mb Chip RAM 
expandable to 16Mb on board. 
Because of its price however, the 
A3000 is strictly for professional use 
only. JH 

C REQUESTER 

Using intuition from 
C, I want to display a 
requester using four 
string gadgets, all of 
which the user will usually 
complete. I'm OK so far but would 
like to save Hie user swapping 
between mouse and keyboard so 
that when the requester appears 
tha cursor Is already In the first 




gadget.. Whan the user presses 
[Return] I would like the cursor to 
move to the next gadget and so on. 
Pagesetter II does this - how Is It 
achieved? 

J Flymi 
Yate 
Avon 

There is an Intuition library function 
that has been specially designed for 
this type of string gadget situation. 
It's called Activate Gadgeto and the 
usage details are as follows: 

Act 1 vat eGadget ( gadget_p , J 
wlndciw_p, re<iueBt6r_p) 

ffadgat_p Is a pointer J 

to the gadget. 

wiiidow_p is a pointer J 

to the vdndcw containing J 
the gadget. 

re<iuester_p. . . ie a pointer J 
to the requester structure. 

The window and the requester must 
be active before the routine can be 
used with success. PAD 

MORE POWER 

Ha) Since buying my 
Power Computing 
1.5Mb expansion and 
converting to 1Mb 
Chip memory, RAD: has stopped 
working] When I do a warm boot 
everything gets lost - what can I 
do7 

b) My machine has started crashing 
occasionally. Nothing too 
spectacular - the screen Just goes 
grey. Is this due to a lack of power? 
if It Is due to a lack of power, 
should I rig a separate PSU to my 
PC880A external drive? 

c) My floppies have a habit of 
taking an extra five minute to boot 
load - producing a strange grinding 
noise from the drive. I can 
sometimes get round this by 
booting Workbench with the dodgy 
disk in DFl:. Why Is this? 

Jeremy Sharp 

Newbury 

Berkshire 



AMIOA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



65 




SCART AND 
SWEET 

Please could you 
tell me If I connect 
my Amiga to a 
video with a 
SCART socket will It make any 
difference te the picture? 

Andrew Bsrtiam 

Dagenham 

Essex 

Yes, if the SCART accepts analog 
red, green and blue signals, as 
most do. But do you mean video 
{ie VCR}? Or do you mean 
monitor? If you connect to a 
SCART VCR make sure that it is 
correctly connected to a SCART 
TV with a suitable SCART cable, 
not an RF (aerial) cable. The 
picture will probably get worse 
otherwisel GW 



a) RAD in the 1.3 Kickstart was not 
designed to function with 1Mb Chip 
RAM which is why the device gets 
confused and ioses data. You can fix 
this bug by appending -R to the 
SETPATCH command in the startup- 
sequence, like this: 

aetpatch >iill: -r 

b) This could be a virus, but it's more 
likeiy to be "one of those things". 
Computers crash iike this from time 
to time - it's just iife. It is very 
difficult to give a precise diagnosis 
unless this happens with certain 
pieces of software. 

c) That grinding noise is a task 



conflict. Two tasks are trying to 
access the disk at the same time 
and the disk head is constantly 
thrashing between two separate 
points on the disk. This is usually 
caused by poorly written startup- 
sequences but in your case I suspect 
the culprit is something called the 
"disk validator". 

it goes something like this: every 
time you insert a disk the validator 
ensures the structure is secure; this 
process normally takes a second or 
so. if a file has only be partially 
written the validator has to update 
certain structures on the disk - since 
this is being done while AmigaDOS 
attempts to run the startup- 
sequence, the disk head ends up 
flailing all over the disk. That's what 
all the thrashing noise is. Curiously, 
you can make this worse by write- 
protecting the disk! 

The solution is simple. Boot a 
Workbench and place ail the suspect 
disks in your external drive and wait 
for the drive light to go out. Watch 
carefully, it goes out for about a 
second and comes back on again for 
an instant - that's the validator. This 
happens every time you write 
something to the disk and you must 
let it complete before re-booting the 
machine. If you remove a disk before 
it validates you will get a message 
like "You must replace volume XYZ: 
in DFO:" MS 

CONFUa OF CLOCKS 

HA few months ago I 
upgraded from a 
standard A5D0 to an 
A500 PIjs. To ensure 
100% software compattbllity I fitted 
a Phoenix ROM Sharer and 1.3 



JAUGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Binary - A special number format, consisting of only two numerals 
It is used by computers to store all information. 



- and 1. 



Database - An applications program that enables Information to be stored 
and retrieved in a s^uctured manner. Information can be categorised 
according to a user's preference, and searched for according to user- 
specified criteria. 

Directory - An organisational method of storing files on a disk in a helrarchy. 
A directory is a sub-section of a disk which may contain files and/or 
further directories. In this way, similar files can be grouped together. 

nicker fixer - A card that removes the flicker from the Amiga's Interlace 
mode and the visible scan lines in the non-interlace mode, interlace 
mode is the Amiga's way of doubling the vertical screen resolution, but 
normally by effectively halving the screen update rate and creating flicker. 

Font - The group of letters, numbers and special characters that comprise 
on variation of typeface, eg: 12pt Times, 12pt Times Bold, 12pt Times 
Italic. Sometimes (mistakenly) used in desktop publishing to refer to a 
type 1am I ly. 

Task - A program running in memory. Under multi-tasking, each task appears 
to have its own 68000 processor, without having to worry much about 
other tasks Interrupting it. 



Kickstart chl|>. Since then I bought 
a standard O.SMb memory 
expansion, but as the A500 Plus 
already has an Internal clock I Just 
ordered the version without a clock. 
However, when fitted, whether 
switched on or not, the O.SMb 
expansion disables the clock (Ie 
messages of "Battery backed-up 
clock not found" displayed) I cannot 
Intaglne that the ROM sharer Is to 
blame as this problem occurs In 
either 1.3 or 2.x mode. 

Also, according to many sources 
the O.SMb expansions are supposed 
to work perfectly well on the ASOO 
Plus, and I have yet to see any 
advertisement Indicating otherwise. 
What's going on? If the ROM sharer 
Is to blame what Is the remedy? 
This Is not an isolated Incident. Two 
of my friends carried out exactly the 
same procedure with the same 
results. 

I Cameron 

Sacrlston 

Durham 

With an A501 type card fitted, the 
interna! clock is disabled and the 
clock on the card replaces the one 
on the motherboard. Commodore 
only recommends A501-type cards 
(with clocks) for use with the ASOO 
Plus. While it should be possible to 
prevent such a card disabling the 
clock, I'm not sure how this is done. 
JR 

ANIMATION STATION 

'■"j ^ Can you please tell 

r% [ me what software I 

would need (If It Is 
possible] to run my 



'saved' game animations. 1 have 
Deluxe Paint 4 and use a separate 
disk to store my animations. Is It 
possible to run my animations from 
this separata disk without having to 
load DPalnt 4 first? Is It possible to 
make an Icon so that the animation 
can b« run from Workbench or will I 
need a programming language like 
AMOS? 

Markus WItcomb 

Telford 

Shropshire 

All you need is the Animation Player 
program which is on your DPaint 
Animations disk. This will allow you 
to run animations from the 
Workbench without having to load 
DPaint first. JH 

DATABASE DILEMAAA 

I am trying to write a 
database program 
which will use 

random access files 

to record the different counties 
contacted via Amateur Radio. The 
file will have 373 records each of 
138 characters (flag 1 byte,country- 
nante 27 bytes, prefix 10 bytes, 




status 9 times 1 byte, confirmation 
10 times 9 bytes) and a hashing 
algorithm will be used to convert 
country-name to a record number. 
I've written a test module to set up 
blank records, write data to them, 
and then read the data back and 
this works OK. A similar program to 
amend a record however Just 
deletes the existing data and writes 
the new data as the first record. 
I've enclosed listings of the test 
modules - can you please advise me 
on what is wrong. 

GR Gaurrtlett 

Sprottbrough 

Doncaster 

Before 1 try and give you an answer 
can I make a general plea to 
everyone thinking of sending in 
program listings: don't bother. We 
are more than happy to help you with 
programming problems, to offer 
advice and general guidelines. We 
are not interested in trawling through 
pages and pages of listings to find 
your bugs. If you want to write 
programs, then you must also learn 
the necessary patience to debug 
your own programs. 

Anyway, just this once... 

As far as your second module is 
concerned I can see one thing that is 
obviously wrong - the file has not 
been opened for appending data. It 
has been opened for writing new 
data whilst discarding the previous 
contents. 

In short you've written... 
output=f open (filename , "i*" ) 
when you should be using... 
output= f qpen ( f i lenanie , " ol>" ) 
if you are just writing, or... 
outi)fQt=fcs>en.( filename, "a+b") 
if you want to read and write. PAO 

PC MONITORS 

My question Involves 
the use of a PC 
monitor with my 
Amiga 1500, which I 
bought after I became frustrated 
with the lack of f1exit)lllty of my ex- 
work 3270 PC system. I thought, 
however, that I would be able to use 
the PC's monitor with my Amiga, 
but this Is where my problems 
started. 

The monitor, labelled IBM 5272 
colour display, Is connected to the 
outside world with a 9-pln D-type 
connector. I looked up the pin 
assignments In the manual and 
made a lead to connect my Amiga 
to the monitor, linking what I 
thought were the correct pins. But 
although the monitor seems to 
display the correct colours the 
picture Is continually rolling and 
breaking up. 

The monitor pins are as follows: 
1 to 4 Not connected 

5 Green 

6 Blue/Intensity 




66 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1992 



—JhJJjJjiJijL 



7 Red/Vidto 

8 Horizontal Sync 

9 Vertical Sync 

I know the 3270 computer <lo«s not 
use the standard CGA graphics card 
but contains both an APA (All 
Points Addressable) display adaptor 
and a PS (Programmed Symbols) 
card, which I believe are to do with 
its use as a mainframe tennlnal 
emulator. Does this have any 
bearing on the type of monKor It 
uses? Can I use this monitor with 
my Amiga or will I have to purchase 
a new one? My eyes are going funny 
trying to use my TV! 

Brian Parker 

Hemel Hempstead 

Herts 

The 3270 PC is an old type of AT 
computer, and a search through 
documentation archives by IBM's 
Enquiries department (■» 081 747 
0747) came up with nothing of use 
regarding the 5272 monitor, though 
there were mentions of it. I suspect 
this lack of information is to do with 
the fact that the monitor In question 
is mid-1980's vintage. The 
gentleman at IBM enquiries 
suggested i try a couple of its 
dealers which had (possibly) sotd 
these Items in the past, but again I 
drew a puzzled blank. 

Perhaps If there is anyone out 
there who can shed some light on Mr 
Parker's problem they might like to 
contact Amiga Shopper. GW 

LOCK ON 

H Occasionally, the 
Capjs Lock key flashes 
on and off and the 
keyboard locks. Is 
there something wrong with the 
keyboard wiring and what should I 
do? 

Aftab Khan 

Shepherds Bush 

London 

it's difficult to say exactly what is 
wrong with your machine but the 
indications point to a spurious 
hardware fault In the keyboard 
processor. The only recourse for this 
sort of thing is to get the machine 
serviced by a recognised repair outfit 
such as FMG or WTS Electronics. MS 

GOOD CmZEN 

I recently received my 
free copy of Cttlzan 
Print Manager, read 
the instruction leaflet 
and the ReadMe file, together with 
your more innjepth article on 
TurboPrlnt Professional In the April 
edition, which I found far more 
educational and recommend to 
anyone with Citizen Print Manager. 

As you state, the new printer 
drivers are a vast Improvement over 
the Workbench ones, especially for 





DARK SIDE OF THE DJ 

Whenever I try to print IFF Images from PageStream to my 
DeskJet 500 they always come out too dark. Is there a 
simple solution to this? 
Would I get better quality If I converted to halftone and. If 
so, which Is the cheapest way to do this? {PageStream can do this but the 
quality is no better.) 

Alan Hargreaves 
Stoke-on-Trent 

Mot quite sure what you mean by 'convert to halftone". Of course 
PageStream does this, that's how It manages to print coloured pictures on a 
black-and-white printer. 

What I think you mean is would you get better quality if you first 
converted your coloured picture to 16 levels of grey? And the answer ts yes, 
probably, but then you'd need to lighten the darker shades of grey. 

What you really need is The Art Department - not necessarily the 
Professional version, the cheaper, cut-down version will do. This package will 
convert to grey for you and then allow you to play with the brightness, 
contrast and gamma levels of the picture, as well as apply a number of 
dithers which will further enhance the output. 

If you're watting for me to tell you how to do it for next to nothing, then 
you'll be watting a longtime. Good software tends to cost money. JW 



graphics, I use an Installed copy on 
a separate floppy disk, but to really 
appreciate the software I would like 
to Install It on various program 
disks. However I And that Citizen 
Print Manager takes up a lot more 
disk space than Citizen claims. 

Would It therefore be possible to 
pare down a working copy of Cttlien 
Print Manager, to make It a lot 
smaller? If so, what gets deleted? I, 
for Instance, am only interested In 
the Swift 24 driver, 

Terry Birch 
Castle Donlngton 
Derby 
It's easier if I say which files you 
need, rather than which you should 
delete. 

OK, let's start with a blank disk, 
which we'll call the Svi/ift24 disk for 
the purposes of this example. 

You need 'PMPrefs' and 
'PMPrefs.info'. You only need 
'NoPM' and 'NoPM.info' If you have 
the need to remove Print Manager 
from memory. So copy both these 
files to the root directory of the 
Swift24 disk. 

You need the whole CONFIGS 
directory (there's only one small file 
in there), so copy that CONFIGS 
directory from the Print Manager disk 
into the root directory of the Swift24 
disk. 

Next create two directories in the 
root directory of the Swift24 disk, 
called PM and PRINTERS, Into the 
PM directory copy the files called 
■tde', 'ttO' and 'ttl' from the PM 
directory on the Prirjt Manager disk - 
that's Tee Dee Fee, Tee Tee Zero 
and Tee Tee One, just in case of 
confusion. 

The other 'tt' files are for when 
you select another language from the 
Print Manager front panel. 

Into the PRINTERS directory on 



the Swift24 disk copy the 
'Swifl24.m' file from the PRINTERS 
directory on the Print Manager disk. 

And that's it. Comes to about 
120,000 bytes all told. 

Now copy the entire contents of 
the Swift24 disk on to any of the 
program disks you want Citizen Print 
Manager to be on. If you haven't got 
120,000 free bytes on a program 
disk. Citizen Print Manager won't fit 
unless you 'crunch' the PMPrefs 
program with something like 
PowerPaciier Professional, which will 
probably give you another 40,000 
bytes or so of room. JW 

KICK IT IN! 

Whilst using 
Demollshere Utilities 
which I obtained from 
United PD (Disk 
PU040) 1 came across a utility 
which claims to be able to load a 
Klckstart from disk Into RAM. Once 
loaded, the system then treats this 




as ROM and reboots the machine 
under this new Klckstart version. 
Where can I get my hands on copies 
of Klckstart disks 1,3 and 2.04 and 
how much would they cost? 

Morvyn Myles 
Perth 

I presume the PD program that you 
are referring to is either ZKicl< or 
Kiclilt, two utilities which were written 
to enable developers to install pre- 
release Kickstarts (held on disk as 
binary files) to be loaded into RAM 
and then used as if they were real' 
Klckstart chips. Unfortunately, 
although the programs themselves 
are PD, the Klckstart files that they 
feed upon are strictly copyright of 
Commodore UK. Unless you are a 
registered developer, tt is very 
unlikely indeed that you will be able 
to obtain Klckstart 2.04 as a binary 
file (1,3 is not available in this 
format). 

If you do manage to get a copy of 
a Klckstart file, then trash it 
immediately unless you want a letter 
from Commodore's solicitors to drop 
on your door mat. If you really need 
to be able to switch between 
Kickstart versions, then a Klckstart 
ROM sharer board is probably your 
best bet. These boards enable you to 
switch between two different 
Kickstart chips. The one I use (and 
recommend) is the Change Kickstart 
board from Cortex. It costs £30 and 
is available from Cortex w 051 236 
0480. /H 

FOUNTAIN OF TROUBLE 

I have attempted to 
use Fountain as 
supplied with 
Workbench 2.04. 1 



// 



have followed the instmctlons given 
in the manual to add the ASSIGN 
statement to the Ltser-startup file 
but when I double click on Fountain 
t get the message "cannot open 
diskfont.llbrary VS?", Can you help 
me get Fountain running? I did try 




FIXING THE FLICKER 

1 own an Amiga 1500, recently upgraded to WB 2.04, 
Including the Super Denlse. My problem Is that when I try 
and select 'productivity mode' the picture completely 
crashes, (going white and flashing) forcing me to soft boot. 
But If 1 use any of the other screen resolutions it's perfect (and flicker 
free). Is this because i am trying to put the signal through the equivalent 
of two flicker fixers (le Super Denlse and the ICO flicker flxer), or because 
I had to make the connecting cable from the I CD board to the monitor 
myself? 

Nigel Bates 

Nuneaton 

Warwickshire 

It could be your lead causing this problem, as I'm not aware of any 
compatability problem with the ICD Ricker Free Video and the Super Denlse 
chip, I wouldn't get too worned about it: productivity mode is about as useful 
as a chocolate teapot If you've already got a flicker fixer, JR 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 AUGUST • 1992 



67 



Jijjj yjjiju-i 

writing to Commodore - but have 
received no repiy as yet. 

J Davies 
Forest Hili 

London 

One possible answer is to re-assign 
the LiBS: assignment to tlie fonts 
disk viU'Kh contains thie new version 
of disi^font. library. A typical example 
migiit read: 

assign libs: J 

f ontB2 . 04 : libs : defer 

My personal preference is to thirow 
away disl<font. library V36 (on tiie 
Worl^bench disl<) and replace it witli 
V37 from the fonts dish;. You can do 
this as follow/s: 

a) Use Workbench's Shovi/.,.AII files 
on the Workbench and Fonts disks. 
This will reveal the two "Libs" 
drawers. 

b) Op>en the "Libs" drawer on the 
'Fonts" disk and locate the 
diskfont. library. 

c) Now drag tine diskfont, library icon 
from the Fonts disk to the "Libs" 
drawer on the Workbench disk, MS 

BRIDGEBOARD WORRIES 
^V"~^« I have an Amiga 2000 
^^^J (Workbench 1.3), two 
^^ ^H floppy drives, 5Mb 
^f^^H memory (Golden 
Image card), an XT Sridgeboard 
with 5.25" drlv«, and a 20Mb hard 
drive. I have a few questions: 

a) I can't boot the Bridge board with 
my Amiga memory expansion card 
plugged In (Bridgeboard hard disk 
works fine without the card). After 
booting It will ask me to Insert JHD 
or It will Just crash. 

b) My internal and external disk 
drives seems to be incompa(tlble. 
(files saved on one drive can't be 
read by the other; but new software 
can be read by both drives) 

c) If I upgrade to the new ECS chip, 
will my 1Mb In the A2000 be 
converted to Chip RAM? 

Michael Thien Wei Seng 
Singapore 

Dealing with your questions one by 
one: 

a) It sounds like your memory board 
is incompatible with the Bridgeboard. 
Try to replace it with a different board 
(the Commodore, ivlicrobotics and 
ICD cards all work with the 
Bridgeboard). 

b) One (or both} of your drives need 
to be looked at professionaily. It is 
not an easy task to re-align the 
heads on Amiga floppy drives, so let 
the experts at an Amiga repair centre 
look at them, 

c) As long as you have a B2000 (with 
the composite video output at the 
back next to the sound outputs), you 
should have no problem converting 
to 1Mb Chip RAM. Earlier A2000s 




(without the composite video output) 
used the same chips as the Amiga 
1000, and are not upgradeable. JR 

SERIAL MURDER 

i have been trying for 
ages to get a Brother 
"^SiJ HR-15 daisywheel 
printer to print from 
my Amiga 500. The problem Is that 
I don't know the right questions to 
ask, so the only advice I got from 
Brother technical support was that 
It is a serial [irinter. 

Is my printer compatible with 
my Amiga? There is a driver on the 
Extras disk called Brother_HR-15XL, 
Is this close enough to work? 

As I do not have a manual for 
my printer, can you tell me which 
cable I need? Could you give me the 
plnouts so that I can make one 
myself. 

JE Gould 

Waltham Abbey 

Essex 

Yes, the Brother_HR-15XL driver 
should work perfectly. To make a 
cable for the pnnter you'll need 
details of the Amiga's serial port and 
the printer's serial port - look In the 
Amiga manual for the former, and 
speak to Brother about the latter. 
Ask if it can send or sell you a 
manual, or at the very least a wiring 
diagram for the HR-15's serial port, 
plus details of the dip switch 
settings, 

I warn you though, wire the cable 
wrongly and you'll blow up the 
Amiga's serial port. Unless you are 
experienced at this sort of thing I 
suggest you gather all the required 
details and give them to someone 
who knows what they are doing, JW 

MAC AND ME 

in Issue 13 of Amiga 
Shopper (page 154) 
you printed a review 
of MessySID 2 in 
which you stated that the above 
program could be used to transfer 
Amiga files to and from the 
Macintosh. I bought the program 
but have since found that the 
claims that you make in the review 
are simply not true. Am I doing 
something wrong? If so, could you 
please tell me how to transfer files 
between the Amiga and Mac using 
MessySfD. 

Evangelos MIchallldls 

Fallowfleld 

Manchester 

I'm afraid you've got the wrong end 
of the stick, Evangelos. As it 
currently stands, MessySID cannot 
directly read and write Macintosh 

format diskettes - it can only handle 
Amiga and MSDOS-format disks. To 
transfer a file from the Amiga to the 
Mac using MessySID you need a 




Macintosh that has a high density 
disk drive and a copy of the Mac 
program Apple File Exchange (this is 
given away with Mac Finde!). This 
program allows the Macintosh to 
read and write standard 720k 
MSDOS disks (like those produced 
by MessySID]. 

As you can see, the whole 
process of transferring files to ^e 
Mac using MessySID relies entirely 
upon the Mac's ability to access 
MSDOS disks. If your Mac doesn't 
have a high density drive, then 
MessySID cannot be used for this 
purpose. 

If you really need to transfer files 
to and from the Mac, then there are 
two options available to you. The 
cheapest is to treat yourself to a 
Mac to Amiga null modem cable and 
then use communications software 
running on both machines 
(something like NComm on the 
Amiga and Red Ryder on the Mac) to 
transfer the files down the null 
modem cable. This can be a rather 
slow process when you're 
transferring larger files (IFF images, 
for example), but it's very cheap. 

if money is no object then treat 
yourself to a copy of Central Coast's 
Mac2D0S. This hardware and 
software combination will allow you 
to connect a Macintosh 800k disk 
drive to the Amiga and read and write 
files to Macintosh format diskettes 
with ease. 

Expect to pay around £300 for 
the privilege though! Mac2DCiSis 
available from HB Marketing "= 0753 
686000. JH 

NOT MY PAL 

Every now and then 
my computer seems 
to switch Into NSTC 
mode after a guru or 
I perform a soft reset. I have 



when I 



been told by a friend that I may 
have an American processor which 
could result In the machine coming 
up in NTSC instead of PAL. Is there 
anyway of stopping this? 

Also, is there any way to tell If 
another disk drive Is present during 
the startup-sequence? Finally, my 
clock has reset back to 1978. Has 
this been caused by a virus? 

Calum Metcalfe 

Middlesbrough 

Cleveland 

NTSC on reset is a common and well 
known bug in the 1.3 Kickstart ROM 
- even the CDTV suffers from it! You 
can get round It using a little PD 
program (available from all good PD 
libraries) called NoPatReset. 

You just insert NoPalReset in the 
startup-sequence and If the machine 
tries to boot In NTSC, NoPatReset 
then resets the machine (and will 
keep on doing so) until it boots in 
PAL. 

It Is possible to check for the 
presence of another disk drive during 
startup. With your 1.3 Kickstart and 
AmigaDOS, it Is not very practical 
since the command causes a 
requester to appear. 

Your clock could have lost its 
time for two reasons: first, the 
battery may have run down; second it 
might have been affected by a rogue 
program running riot through the 
machine, 

You can charge the battery by 
leaving the machine (not the monitor) 
switched on for 24 hours and reset 
the clock using the following 
command; 

setclock reset 

That should fix any problems that 
may have been caused by a rogue - 
not necessarily a virus. MS 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



ECS - Extended Chip Set Is the name given to the new versions of the 
Amiga's custom chips that handle graphic, sound, memory and so on. 

Library - The Amiga has many special features, and programs are already 
present in the operating system to make use of these features. These 
programs, or library functions, may {and should) be used by applications 
programs, obviating the need for each programmer to write a similar set 
of routines. 

NTSC - National Television Standards Committee. This is the name for the 
TV colour coding system used In the USA and other countries. It has 525 
lines, running at 60 fields aand 30 frames/second, it is often, and 
perhaps unfairly, japed at as Never Twice the Same Colour by PAL 
standard users. 

PAL - One of the main TV colour coding system (with the exception of 
France's SECAM system), which is in use around the world and was 
developed in Britain. PAL refers to Phase Alteration Line. In fact, there 
are several hybrid PAL systems in use, all of which are slightly different. 

Serial port - An interface port at the back of the Amiga, used for connecting 
to a modem. Sometimes used for printers. 



68 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1 992 



AMIGA 600 
RANGE... 

— - 'The new addition '— 



right the Amiga Family has jusl grown! Nol only on you 
Lse tk ASHD Plus Cartoon Qassics Pack, but now, you have 
ce of two imovative Amiga 600 models loo... with or wiih- 
Hard Disk Drive buill-in! 

nodels carry Commodnres' comprehensive new '[n-Homc' 
my Plan, unrivaLed by any other home computer. There's a 
lonc Help Line to assisi you wiih those minor problems, and 
rare occassion of something more serious, you'll be pleased 
w thai an engineer will make a call to your home to affect a 
I' repair or even replace the unit ooraplelely! 

's that for your total 'peace of mind'? 
^^ AMIGA ^^^ AMIGA 

'fJt^jrl&i aires 3J'ni^xDiskDriK& 

fiveSottmm. M.\a. Hard Drire. 

e the 6(X)miige!S so im: ..the details ptm have all yei to be 
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E US A CALL NOW FOR A GREAT 
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ii®0602 



LISTINGS 




We're on the lookout 
for programs In any 
language which Is 
supported on the 
Amiga, and we'll pay £20 for any 
that we publish. 

Programs of any type are 
admissable: serious and useful, 
wild and wacky, or stunningly 
creative. Just remember that we 
can't print listings that rely on binary 
files for sprites, samples and so on. 

All you have to do is pop your 
program on an AmlgaDOS disk 
(along with source code if it is 
compiled or assembled) and send it 
to us at the following address: 



We v/anf your lisHngs! Olspltxy 
your programming proy^ess before 
your felloy^ Amigans and earn 
famcr fortune and everything ifiof 
goes wilfi it (Mfefl, £20 anyv/ay,..) 



Listings 

Amiga Shopper 

Future Publishing 

30 Monmouth Street 

Bath 

BAl 2BW 

Don't forget to include a stamped 



addressed envelope if you want your 
disk returning. Some form of printed 
documentation would be nice, too. 

This month we've got two 
listings from Fu Sang Li of Hackney 
in London, who'll be receiving £20. 
They're both written in C, and 



complied with the PD package 
NorthC. The first, handily named SR, 
Is a text search and replace utility 
run from the Shell, Type sr, followed 
by the text filename, then the text to 
be searched for and the text with 
which it is to be replaced. Two 
switches are permitted: '/c' 
instructs the program to be case 
sensitive; '/p' asks it to prompt you 
before making any changes. The 
second program, TS, is a text 
search program. It will accept the 
'/c' case sensitive switch, and list 
occurrences of the matched string 
in the text file. 

Remember: give us your listtngs! 



LISTING 1 



/* Search- and-Replace utility by Fu Sang U. •/ 

# incliide< stdio . h> 

#def in« OFF 

#define OK lOFF 

fdefine BaCKaP_FII.E "backup" 

void chec]t.c«se ( ) ; 

inaiii(argc, argv) 

lut argc; 

char *argv[]} 

{ 

FIIiE *Brc_fp, 

•deejp; 
char wDr<lj3uff[ 256], line_buff [512] , ca8e_BeiiB=0FF, 

prc(tii)t=OFF, ch, oh2, write_err«FALSE; 
lut i, j, k; lohH line_pD=0, exohange8=0; 

if {argo<4) 

priatf ("\nusage! SR <Filenaiiie> <Search-'r«3Et> <Repl*ce- 
Tajct> [/c] [/pl\3i\n"); 

else 



{ 



•(ftrgv[4]+l)=tolow6r(*(argv[4]+l)); 
* (argv [ 5) +1 > =tolciwor ( • <arav [5] +1) ) f 
if(lstrcns)(argv[4], "/c") II lstrca(p(argv[51 , "/□">) 

caset_senB>OH} 
If (!stronp(argv[4], "/p") II !Btj:cmp{argv[5] , "/p") ) 

proKptnONj 
if (Brc_f p»f open (argv [1] , "r") ) 



{ 



if (deB_f p=f (^pen { BACKDP_FILE, "w" > ) 
{ 



fclose(Bre_fp) J 
f close (des_fp); 
if ( !'write_err) 

{ 

arc_fp=fopen(BftCKtIP_FILE, "r")| 
deB_fp=fCJpen(argv[l], "W">; 
vftiile ( ! f eof ( Brc_fp) ) 

{ 

fgetsdinojiuff, 512, Bro^fp); 

line_jio++; 

iiOt 

j-Oi 

whiletliiie_buff[i]) 

{ 

ch-line_buf f ti] ; 
ch2=*(argv[2]+j)) 
choc5t_caBe(case_eens, ftch, ioh2); 
i£(oh==ch2) 

{ 

(*ile(ch=«ch2) 

{ 

wordjroff [j++]=llne_buff [i++] i 

ch*line_baf f ti] ; 

ch2=*<argvt2]+j)j 

check^case ( caae„BeinB , fich, tch2 ) ; 

} 

If { J==strl«o{argv[21 ) ) 

{ 

if (prcnpt) 



{ 



do 
{ 



ch=fgetc (Bro_Ep) t 
ifdfeof {src_fp)) 

if(fputc(ch, dBB_fp)"BOP} 
writ6_err=TRUE; 

} 

**ileCIfeof(Brc_fp) &t Iwrlte_«rr)j 



1 ine_no , 1 ine_buf f ) ; 
Skip: ")f 



cbar B[2]j 

printf CXnLitte Md:\n%B", 

printf ("<CE>-EjK:toai^e, S*<CE>- 

gets (a) f 

if (iBtronptB, "")) 

( 

fputB{argv[3] , deB_fp) f 
exchangeB++; 
) 



VA AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1 993 



LISTINGS 



) 



elae 

f puts { eirgv [2 ] , dea_f p ) ; 
J 

el Be 
{ 

f puts ( surgv [3 ] , <3eB_f p ) ; 
exchanges++ ; 
} 
> 

ela« 
{ 

wor<I_buff [j] = '\0'; 
fputs(wDrd_buff, doB_fp); 
) 

i-0, 
) 

else 

fputc ( liiiB_buf f £i++] , deB_f p ) i 



} 



printf ("XnDone! Exchange (s): %1A ", 
eKchanges) ; 

prlntf ("(Orginal file backed up In 
' backup '.)\n\n"); 

fcloBe(arc_fp) i 
f close (des_£p) ; 
) 
else 

printf ("\iiNot enough disk Bpec« for backup 
fllonnSn"!; 
J 
else 



t 



) 
) 
else 



print f { "XnError qpenina backup fllel\a\n")f 
fclose(Brc_fp); 



priatf {"XnError opening ^6a<\n\n", argv[l]); 
> 
> 

void check_c:aBe(caBe_sens, chj), ch2_p) 
chat caBe_sene, *ch_p, *ch2_pj 
{ 

•oh_j;>=caBe_sens?*ch_p:toupipor(*chj?> ; 
*oh2_p=caBe_sens?*oh2_p : toijpper ( •ch2__p) j 



tISTING 2 



/* Text Search utility 1^ Pu Sang Li - 13 May 1991 •/ 

# inclii(le< stdio . h> 
#def ine OFF 
Mefine (M lOFF 

void □heck_caBe() ; 

void Eiain(argc, argv) 

int argc; 

char *argv[I; 

t 

FILE "fp/ 

char linej&iiff [S12), 

caBe_aenB-OFF , 

ch, 

cMf 
int 1, 

J, 

freg; 
long line_jio»0, 

coimt=0; 



if (argc<3) 

printf<"\nUaage: TS <Filename> <Search-Text> [/c]\n\rL"}; 
else 
{ 

if {lBtrcnip(argv[3], "/c") II I strcDUp { argv [ 3 ] , "/C") ) 
case_Beiis'=ON; 

If (fp=fci>ea(M^v[l], "r")) 



( 



v*lle<!£eof (fp)) 
{ 

fgetedinejjuff, 512, fp) ; 

line_iio++ ( 

1=0; 

j=0) 

frecisO; 

while (llne_buff ti] ) 



t 



ch=line_buf f [i] ; 
Ch2=*(argv[2}+j); 
check_ca3e(oase_Beiis, fich, tch2); 

if (oh==ch2) 

Tdii le { cli=~eh2 } 



{ 



i++; 

i**t 

ch=HneJjaf f [ij ; 
ch2=*(argvt2]+j); 
cheGk_cafle(caBe_8ena, &ch, sch2); 



if (J==Btrlen{argv[3] )) 

{ 



couat++ ; 



) 

j=0( 
) 
else 

i++r 



J 



if (freg>0) 

printf("%d occurrencets) in liae %ld.\n", 
f req, line_no) ; 
} 

if (count>0) 

printf ( " \n'%fl ' containa %ld occurrence ( b ) . \ii\n" , 
argvll], count); 
else 

printf ("NnHo occurrences of '%b' found in 
'%s'.\n\n", argv[2], argv[l]); 
} 
elae 

printf {"\nError opening '%B'!\n\a", argv[l]); 
} 

> I 

void aheck_caBe(caBe_Bens, cli__p, ch2_p) 
char case_Bens, 

*ch_p, 

•ch2_p» 



{ 



•cb_j>=caBe_senB?*ch_p : toupper [ *ch_p > ; 
*ch2 j)=caBe_aenB? *ch2_p : toiq^iper ( *ch2_p) ; 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



71 



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VIDEO 



Since the first Atnlgas were 
released In 1985 it has 
been acknowledged that 
one of their outstanding 
applications Is for adding graphics 
and titles to video Images. Judging 
by the number of different genlachs 
on the market and the range of 
titling and painting programs 
available, this fact hasn't escaped 
the manufacturers and retailers 
either. No surprise since many 
Amiga owners have access to at 
least one VCR or camcorder, and a 
lot of video owners will have access 
to an Amiga, by rental, purchase or 
through friends and relatives. 

The cost of video production 
equipment has reached the point 
wtiere access is potentially available 
to millions of people, at many levels. 
The quality and specifications are 
increasing, while prices continue to 
fall and equipment which was 
available only to specialised video 
companies 10 years ago has 
become more affordable and 
Increasingly popular, A desire to 
emulate the professionals, or even 
become one, is a logical step 
forward for many Amiga video users. 

Bearing all this in mind, and 
know/ing that many of the Amigas In 
'serious' use are employed in video 
and graphics production, I thought 
that It might be worthwhile giving you 
a few hints and tips to help you to 
Improve your ov/n titling efforts. 

GEHING STARTED 

To use your Amiga for video titfes 
and graphics, there is a minimum 
amount of equipment required. At 
the very least you'll need an Amiga 
(with suitable software, of course!), a 
modulator, a VCR or camcorder and 
a TV set. I'd recommend that the 
Amiga has at least llVlb Chip RAM 
and not less than 1Mb Fast RAM. 
Some programs will require a lot 
more than this to produce their best, 
and the power of programs such as 
DettixePaint can be greatly increased 
by adding another megabyte or two 
of RAIVl. If you are thinking of buying 
an Amiga for video use, please don't 
be fooled into thinking that a brand 
new, straight-out-of-the-box Amiga is 
all you need to get Instant TV-quality 
graphics and special effects. It isn't 



accelerator card, should be 
considered too. 

The same points apply about 
video equipment, and the amounts 
and costs usually increase in 
proportion to the quality you require 
and the format you wish to use. It's 
possible to buy anything from purely 
domestic VHS quality equipment to 
full broadcast specification gear. 
While a simple domestic quality VHS 
rig might cost less than £1000 in 
total, a top end digital setup could 
cost hundreds of thousands of 
pounds, when you take into account 
all the video recorders, monitors, 
high quality genlocks and other 
hardware needed at this level. 

An average setup would probably 
include a genlock, maybe a video 
camera, second VCR and extra 
monitor/s. But the cost and amount 
of equipment is not what concerns 
me here, because whatever level you 
are working at, and whatever your 
titling needs, you may be interested 
to know that there are a number of 
simple things which can be done to 
effectively improve your Image. 



TIPTOP 
TITLING 



Gary Whiteley makes the 

headlines w/ffi some terrific titling 

tips, and sho}/\^s yau hov^ to y^in 

friends and influence people wiffi 

the new Smooth Talker and 

Hama genlock 




Much more prominence can be given to words by outlining or drop- 
shadowing them, as you can see in the above examples 

CARE Wrm COLOUR 

One of the simplest, and most 
important, ways of getting a better 
looking picture involves choosing 
appropriate colours to work with. You 
should always try to avoid using 
heavily saturated colours such as 
deep reds and blues, as these tend 
to 'bleed' on video, and therefore 



signal) which Is usually sharp and 
high quality, and a colour part, which 
Is where the problems start. In 
simple terms, adding colour (the 
chrominance element) reduces the 
picture quality and smearing starts to 
set in. Because this smearing (or 
chroma crawl) is worse with highly 
saturated colours, the degradation 
becomes more noticeable when deep 
reds and blues are used. 

If you have no choice but to use 
such colours, you could try putting a 
dark outline around lettering and 
logos, rather like the outlines on 
cartoon characters. You'll find that 
the text becomes more readable 



F«0«R«E*C*A«H* 



JARGON BUSTING « JARGON BUSTING 



Modulator - An electronic gadget used to convert the RGB output from the 
Amiga into a video signal acceptable by a standard TV set aerial socket; 
other outputs such as composite video and audio may be included. 



- it's only a start. You'll need to add 
more to it, such as memory, extra 
disk drives, maybe a hard drive. If 
you're short of the folding stuff then 
extra memory is definitely more 
important than a second disk drive. 
And if you're really serious about 
graphics a hard disk, and even an 



don't usually look too good at all. 
Light colours and pastel shades tend 
to work best, especially for lettering. 
There are technical reasons for this 
which revolve around the fact that a 
colour television picture is composed 
of two parts - a monochrome video 
image (the luminance part of the 



Increased Sales 



Decreased Cc^^ 



m PROFIT GAINS 



Interesting backgrounds can be added to Improve otherwise dull test. 
In this case it's a treated digitised Image, but It could be live video 
instead. Be careful not to obscure the text though! 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1 992 



73 



VIDEO 



WORLD EBC RATES 






mOWDlNG SMALL TEXT&NTCT 



-NOT HELP THE VIE WERTO 



UNDEM^^I^D WHAT YOU ABE^, 



i^^s^-m 



SOURCE: Dr Gaz's Wortd Of Food 



With enough nremory, a good collection of artworl< (In tills 
case a Scala background and a PD worid map) and 
typefaces you can create some great images on the Amiga 



^0A€MGROtJ. 






Don't make the mlst^a of putting too mucli text on a page! 
Some backgrounds are unsuitable and can distract from the 
headline. (Just as well when there's a typo!) 



because the edges are less smeary. 
Text can be made smaller if need be. 

If you have enough memory 
available use the highest screen 
resoiution your software permits. 
This will help to reduce the jaggies, 
as you'll be using smaller pixels to 
draw with, and your graphics will look 
sharper. Remember that it's not 
always necessary to have 32, or 
even 16, colours on screen, so even 
llVlb Amigas have a chance of 
producing something good. I only use 
HAM' for text if I really have to, as the 
fringing effects this mode produces 
can sometimes make the whole thing 
look messy, and its highest 
resolution is Interlace. 

You should always use an 
Overscan screen size if you can, then 
you won't risk the possibility of 
cutting your graphics off at the edges 
of the screen. Unlike the Amiga's 
'standard' screen sizes (eg 320 x 
256, 640 X 512 etc) which do not 
cover the whole of a normal TV 
screen, overscan screen sizes (eg 
352 X 290, 704 x 580) stretch 
beyond the edges of the average TV 
screen and so really are full screen. 
This is important, especially where 
information moves on and off the 
screen, for Instance with scrolling or 
crawling text, othenMise 
unacceptable cropping could occur. 

LOW STEPPING 

Anti-aliasing can also be a great help 
in improving the look of your 
presentations. Instead of the usual 
jaggy edges which plain non- 
horizontal or vertical lines take on, a 
degree of smoothing can be achieved 
by using intermediate tones to 
visually soften the staircase effect, if 
you have ever used DeiuxePaint IVs 
anti-aliasing functions you will be 
aware just what improvements can 
be made. But even If you don't have 
DPaint IV and have to make the 
adjustments by hand you should still 
find the extra work worthwhile 
because the end result is usually 
immensely improved. 

Smoothing text can be a more 
difficult proposition altogether, as 



DeiuxePaint IV cannot do this directly 
while adding type to a picture, which 
is a pain. Even 24-blt paint programs 
leave something to be desired here, 
so the best option is to use pre- 
processed fonts, either as Colorfonts 
(which are special muiticoloured 
bitmap fonts) or proprietary fonts 
such as those provided with 
programs like Broadcast Titler 2. 
Colorfonts will often be more flexible 
as they can be used with many 
Amiga paint programs, and you can 
use a utility such as Anti-A or 
Caliigrapher to make them from 
normal bitmap fonts. The drawback 
with using such multicoloured 
typefaces is that they use up colours 
from the palette, so you must make 
allowances when designing your 
images. You should be aware that 



some of the more expensive titling 
programs, most notably Scala and 
Broadcast Titler 2, can perTorm anti- 
aliasing on typefaces directly, which 
is often a great aid to producing 
quality results. 

PLANNING 

It might seem an obvious tip to give, 
but planning your titles and graphic 
sequences really is important and 
can save a lot of time later on when 
you find that all your work has to be 
changed because you have to use 
less colours, or a different 
resolution, or some other problem 
has arisen that you did not foresee. 
if you make a serious mistake at the 
planning stage you should be able to 
fix it quickly. If you are half way 
through your graphics sequence you 



TEN TOP TIPS FOR TITLING 



• Colour choice - Avoid saturated colours, especially reds and blues. 
Choose lighter colours wherever possible. 

• Screen size - Use overscan formats whenever possible, then graphics 

won't be cut off before the edges of the screen. 

• Graphic size ~ Avoid small graphics and typefaces - they can be difficult 
to read and transfer badly to video. Avoid lines less than 2 pixels wide. 

• Layouts - Lay out graphics so that they are balanced and well spaced. 
Don't overcrowd them. If they are easy to read the message will get across. 

• Timing - If you have something to communicate at least give the viewer 
time to read it fully. 

• Typefaces - Whole books have been written about typeface usage. 
Basically, use a typeface to reflect the content of your title. Design your own 
if necessary. But don't be afraid to mix It up a bit. 

• Backdrops - Under itie right circumstances a well chosen backdrop can 

greatly Improve a title. 

• Anti-aitasing - Smoothing out the jaggies will often improve the look of 
your graphics enormously. 

• Be appropriate - Stick to the subject. Keep it snappy. Make it stick. And 
don't add extras that aren't necessary! 

• Viewing distance - Remember to step back from the Amiga monitor from 
time to time and check your work from a more realistic viewing distance. 
Nobody watches TV at the distance a computer monitor is viewed from. 

And don't forget the ptannltigl 



might just have to start over. 

There are many aspects of 
graphics and titling which require at 
least some degree of planning. 
Colour choices, for instance. How 
many colours do you really need? 
Will you be using CoiorText? Will 
different pages need different 
palettes? Do some colours need to 
be reserved for a logo? What colours 
will be needed for the text? This Is 
Just the start. 

But don't worry, many of the 
choices you have to make will be 
based upon need. Certain colours 
and typefaces will have to be used. 
Layouts often become obvious 
because of the nature of the work. 

CREDIT SEQUENCES 

As for the content of the images, a 
lot of this can be pre-planned too. If 
you are preparing a credit list for a 
video It makes sense to get a list of 
all the names which have to be 
included, (making sure that you spelt 
them all correctlyl), ensure that you 
know what everyone's role was and 
in which order (and what relative type 
sizes) they appear in. You may be 
provided with a brief for this from the 
director, but more likely than not 
you'll have to sort most of this out 
yourself - especially If you are the 
director. Once you have all the 
Information to hand you can start 
designing the credit sequence. If you 
don't have a brief you will probably 
have to make some choices - will 
the sequence be scrolling up the 
screen, or appear page by page, or 
crawl along the bottom of the page? 
Will there be transition effects which 
need adding, such as wipes? 

If you are animating a flying logo 
with DPaint you may find that drawing 
up a storyboard will help you 
visualise the sequence you want. 
Even quick notes and sketches can 
help and jog your memory when the 
going gets rough. And believe me, it 
does get rough. Planning can save 
your bacon. Because anything that 
can go wrong wiii. It always does. 

You will Inevitably have to make 
some compromises to accommodate 
your software and computer setup, 
but try to follow the plan as closely 
as possible, if you are doing the work 
for someone else check with them 
first and explain the problems. 
Usually changes can be mutually 
agreed and everyone stays happy. 

Even If you're just titling your 
home video there's no need to be 
short of Ideas. Watch TV and learn 
techniques from what you see there. 
Notice which typefaces are used, 
which sizes and which colours. 
Decide what works for you and what 
doesn't. Experiment with your Amiga, 
Play and practise. Accept that you 
will have failures, but make sure that 
you learn from them so that you can 
get It right the next time. 



74 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



VIDEO 



The easy v^ay to 

make friends In 

the TV studio 



GARY TO READER 



Cue 1 

Have you ever wondered why a 
newscaster often seems to be 
shiftily glancing about while he ta/te? 
Or how a studio presenter appears to 
have a wonderful grasp of even the 
most obscure of subjects? 

Cue 2 

Well, I can now reveal that it's alt 
done with mirrors. And computers, 
video monitors and bits of wire. 

Have I lost you? OK, let's go back to 
the second cue and start again. 

Cue 2 

Well, I can now reveal that it's all 
done with mirrors. And computers, 
video monitors and bits of wire. 

Got it yet? 

I'm talking about autocue macliines, 
or teleprompters; feeding scripts to 
talking heads whiie they smile at the 
camera and demonstrate how 
l<nowledgeable they are. I'm tallying 
about Smooth Talker, a newcomer to 
the illustrious (and hitherto 
unspoken) history of teleprompters 
and, as far as I know, the first fully- 
fledged prompter to use the Amiga 
as its host computer. 

You might wonder about the 
mass appeal of a product like 
Smooth Talker. I mean, how many of 
you read the news for a living? 

Nevertheiess, I'm going to tell 
you about Smooth rafter anyway, 
because I like it. It's easy to use, 
and It gets the job done. And it's a 
heck of a sight cheaper than some of 
the systems on the market, if you've 
already got the Amiga to run it on. 

TELEPROMPTING 

What does Smooth Talker do? Well, 
being a teleprompter, it displays text 
for a presenter to read. The text, 
controlled by the presenter or a 
teleprompt controller, rolls up the 
screen at a readable speed, and is 
tiien read out loud. !f the presenter 
is talking directly to camera an 
arrangement similar to Figure X is 
likely to be used, where a monitor 
displaying the rolling text is reflected 
on glass mounted in front of the 
camera. A primitive arrangement, but 
it's all that's needed. If someone is 
speaking to an audience at a 
conference, for instance, those odd 
transparent rectangles which so 
often flank the rostrum will invariably 




be used. They serve the same 
purpose as the monitor - to reflect 
the words so that the speaker can 
see them easily without continuously 
referring to written notes. A 
teleprompter makes the whole affair 
seem that much slicker. 

With Smooth Talker you get a 
software disk and a small black box 
with a knob and a switch on it. The 
disk Is self-explanatory - it contains 
the Smooth Talker program and 
associated files, while the black box 
(which plugs into the parallel port) is 
a hand-held remote control for the 
prompting system, with the switch 
being used to go back and forth 
between preset cue points and the 
rotary knob for setting the forward or 
reverse speed of the text roll. 




By reacting text raflectecf off a glass 
screen In front of a camera, a TV 
presenter can give the Impression of 
great skill and knowledge 

HOW IT WORKS 

There are two parts to the software - 
the main menu screen, where access 
to all of Smooth Talker's functions Is 
made, and the text display itself. 

The program is flexible in that 
scripts can be prepared within 
Smooth Talkers main screen, from 
the prompting screen Itself, or ASCII 
files can be imported and exported 
for simple modification. Prompting 
scripts can be saved for later use. 

Any available Amiga bitmap font 
up to 50 point size can be used, 
though as there are always four or 
five lines displayed on screen a size 
between 24 and 45 is advisable, A 
couple of suitable fonts are provided 
on the disk and there's an unusual 
feature that I should explain to you. 

Look at Rgure 1 again. Then 



think which way round the 

text would have to be on 

the monitor screen for it to 

appear correctly to the 

presenter. That's right - it 

would have to be reversed. 

This can be achieved by 

reversing the scan coils of 

the teleprompting monitor, 

creating a reversed screen 

display but Smooth Talker 

uses a novel method so 

that a normal monitor can 

be used instead. How? By 

providing a backwards 

typefacel All that's then 

required is to link the monochrome 

output to a suitable monitor, rig up a 

glass system and you're in business. 

FLEXIBILITY 

Fonts can be changed at 
any time, and the text 
will reformat automat- 
ically to take account of 
this. Screen colours can 

J be either black text on 

nBMBB white background or vice 
^^^^* versa. There's no need 
for multicolour here. 

Cue points can be 
marked in the text to 
save having to scroli 
back to a certain line if a 
retake is required. A 
marker is ail that is 
required is to click the switch on the 
remote control and the display jumps 
back or forward to the next marker. 

An inverse line facility is included 
to allow text to be highlighted (such 
as instructions to the presenter 
which aren't meant to be read 
aloud). And, if required, all the text 
can be toggled to upper case - 
though this can't be undone. 

Changes to the text on display 
can be made through function key 
selections and the keyboard and, if 
you have a serial printer or don't 
have the remote connected at the 
time, the results can be output to a 
printer for hard copy. 

Scrolling speed can be smoothly 
varied by using the rotary control on 
the remote handset, allowing 
continuous adjustment to keep pace 
with the presenters' requirements. 
Additionally, the handset cable can 
be extended to 30 metres or more. 

Smooth Talker mil run on any 
512K or greater Amiga running 











Figure 1 



Product shot digitised by GW 

AmigaDOS 1.2 or higher. It is self- 
booting and multitasking. If you are 
contemplating buying a teleprompter, 
I'd recommend you contact ZEN 
Computer Services for more info. 
For those who aren't sure, a 
demo tape is available for £2,00 
which shows Smooth Talker in use. 

E-Mail me on CIX as drgaz. 

ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 

Smooth Talker £14! 

from ZEN Computer Smites 
2 Stiver Birch Grove, 
Swinton 

Manchester M27 1 FS 
= 0617931931 




CHECKOUT 

Smooth Talker 



Quality • • • • O 

Fulfils its objectives. 

Features • • • • C 

Wel! thojgm out, everything you need to 
generate teleprompting screens. 

Documentation • • • • O 

Compact but eomprehersive. 

Price Value • • • • C 

No competition in the Amiga world. 

Hardware • • • O O 

Slightly quirky, but easily usable. 

Overall rating • • • • o 

Nice to see ZEN coming up with another 
innovative and well-produced (if limited 
appeal) product. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



75 



VIDEO 




I he 290 genlock, from 
I Hama, Es the latest 
I genlock from one of the 
I well-known names In the 
photographic and domestlc/soml- 
pro video markets. How does this 
new product measure up? 

GOOD LOOKING 

The 290 has plenty of knobs and 
switches, a couple of stubby fader 
levers, Input and output connections 
for S-VHS, composite video, and 
Amiga RGB and a built-in RGB splitter 
for use with digitisers capable of 
automated operation, such as Mew 
Tek's Digi-View Gold. A power supply 
is included for those situations 
where the host Amiga (such as some 
A500s), is unable to supply enough 
juice to power the genlock, or the 
unit Is being used solo to convert S- 
VHS to composite or RGB outputs. 

UP AND RUNNING 

Connection Is easy. There's a 
longish ribbon connector built in to 
the 290 which connects to the Amiga 
RGB port. The RGB output can then 
be taken from the genlock's 23-pin D 
connector to an RGB monitor. Video 
connectors are quickly accessed on 
the upper rear of the unit and consist 
of phono connectors for composite 
video and standard Hosiden (IVllni- 
DIN) connectors for S-VHS. The 
single phono for the digitiser output 
is also on the top. 

Operation is equally straight- 
forward. Through switches and 
faders it is possible to cross fade 
between combinations of Amiga, 
biack, video and l<ey signals. Keying 
Is via the usual Amiga colour zero 
removal, but it's also possible to 
reverse the key to produce a 
'keyhole' effect - where everything 
except colour zero is transparent to 
the video input. The Amiga can be 
switched out entirely by using the 
Bypass switch, letting the video input 
pass through unaffected, and the 
display on the Amiga can be 
switched between Amiga only or 
genlock output signal, which is handy 
for seeing what you are doing when 
placing graphics over video Images. 
The only problem I had with the 
controls was that the fade to black 
lever had an effective range of only a 




In the sleek, dark grey case which is the Hama house style, the 290 
Is around the size of a large hardbaclt of the coffee table variety 



quarter of its travel, resulting in a 
very abrupt fade to black. 

There are also some controls for 
tweaking the video input, allowing 
some degree of colour, contrast and 
brightness adjustment, as well for its 
red, green and blue levels. These will 
be useful where some corrections 
need to be made, but unfortunately I 
thought that the range of RGB 
variation wasn't quite as wide as it 
ought to be for ful! effectiveness. 

Overall the output is reasonable, 
though there is some bleed through 
of live video into the Amiga image 



which could be very annoying. There 
is also an electronic problem In the 
unit causing two narrow vertical lines 
to appear in the processed Image. 
Additionally, the video output shows 
noticeable faults when viewed on 
test equipment, the most noticeable 
being an unstable black level. 

Lastly, in order to work correctly, 
the 290 requires a continuous video 
feed, or no video feed at all. in a 
situation where a tape has run out of 
picture but is still playing back, the 
system will fall over until video Is 
restored or input is disconnected. 



THE BIG 3 PLUSES: 



1. The Inclusion of user controls for video colour, contrast, brightness and 
RGB adjustment. 

2. Ability to convert S-VHS to RGB and composite outputs. 

3. RGB to AtTiiga connector and Amiga/genlock output switching. 



AND THE 7 MINUS POINTS: 



1. Phonos for composite video connection. I'd expect BNCs for this price. 

2. Hosiden (IMini-DIN) sockets for S-VHS were slightly loose. 

3. Video signals were not up to spec, black levels were incorrectly clamped, 
output was noisy (producing 2 vertical lines) and there was slight bleed 
through on to the Amiga image from video input. 

4. Not enough range on colour correction controls to bring some average 
colour problems into line. 

5. Too short a travel on the Video/Black fader, resulting in unsubtle fading. 

6. No manual switching for splitter component output selection. 

7. Direct cutting between genlock and video signals was poor. 



Gary Whiteley 
\^elcomes you 
back to 
Genlock Corner 

WOL NO DIGmSING? 

I tried to use the built-in RGB splitter 
with my Digi-View, but after some 
enquiries to Hama I found that the 
cable required to connect the 
genlock to the Amiga joystick port for 
automatic splitting under software 
control was not yet available. Even 
though I built a cable myself, 1 was 
unable to get the splitter working 
automatically. Because there is no 
way of selecting between the R, G or 
B components I couldn't assess any 
output other than the default (green). 
This lack of manual switching Is 
serious and will preclude owners of 
other monochrome digitisers from 
using the splitter output. 

One final word. I suspected that 
this product was made by a third 
party, boxed and badged by or for 
Hama. iWy suspicions were aroused 
when 1 found the manual for the 290 
genlock was almost identical to the 
manual for the Electronic Design 
genlocks I reviewed in AS 9. 1 
discovered that Hama also sells an 
Electronic Design genlock under the 
name Hama 590! Hama confirmed 
that the units are badged, but 
couldn't say who makes them. CD 

oooocJoooo 

SHOPPING LIST 

Hama 290 Genlwk . — £749 

incPSU 

by Hama PVAC Ltd, Unil 4 

Cherrywood, Chinebom 

Business Park, Basingstoke, 

Hants RG24 OWF 

«02S6708110 




CHECKOUT 
Hama 290 Genlock 



Documentation • • # A 
Good, comprehensive and clear. 



Features 

Well stocked. 



• • • • 



Quality • • • O O 

Output and control problems mar 
performance. 

Price Value • • • • O 

Overpriced, considering its problems. 

Overall rating • • • • Q 

! would have expected much higher quality 
for this price tag. True, there are a number 
of potentially useful features, but an 
overall improvement is needed to make 
this unil a worthwhile buy. 



76 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16«AUGUST 1992 



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Now you can get the best... with PEN PAL! 



A superb package, with immense power, to fulfil all your 
word processing requirements and... it includes a Database! 
It's all so easy to use, you probably won't need to refer to 
the extensive 250 page manual too often. 

Whilst working, you can open up to four documents 
simultaneously (memory penmitting), search and replace; cut, 
copy and paste; check your spelling with a 100,0(X)+ word 
dictionary. You can import your favourite IFF/HAM 
graphics, from programs such as DPaint 11 or Oip Art files 
in various sizes and colours. You can auto- 
matically flow text around graphics in any 
Workbench compatible font (there are over 
200 available styles), in different sizes and 
colours to suit your design... even as you 
type. All this from a word processor 
and... Much, Much, More! 



1^ 



y^ 



PmPSlI 



it- 



*»■ 



^ 



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As you can see, this is not just any ordinary w^ord 
processor! Full Page View? wdth position, edit and creation 
of graphic objects. Mail Merge using the built in database 
and forms designer. Creation of templates for complex 
reports, into wliich the database can be merged. 
Operating with 32 fields per record, and 32,000 records 
^per database with a fast sort of HKK) records in less 
, than 5 seconds this is a real database, 

fen Pal requires an Amiga 5(X)I J 50012000 

or 3000 with a minitman of Imegabyte 

of available memory. 



\* 






% 



Pen Pal 

When,.,you deserve the best! 

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EDUCATION 




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The acceleration of a vehicle with more oomph than a Skoda - line graphs 
Illustrate relationships between speed and time In a clear fbrmait 



This month Wilf Rees looks at 
presenting data, graphs and 
statistics and hoysf Speilboundl 
can develop your memory^ logic 
and spelling skills 



One of tiie surest ways of 
getting your point across 
Is to present your Ideas 
or findings In the 
clearest way possible. The same 
applies In school projects or In the 
business world. Ths more clearly 
you present your worh, the more 
professional and worthy of acclaim 
It Is. This month I'm focusing on 
neat ways of displaying statistical 
Information In various graphs, all 
with a tittle help from the Amiga. 

BE CONVENTIONAL! 

When any data has been collected 
from any source, there are accepted 
norms of graphical presentation. 
These norms follow obvious rules, 
the principal one being, that the 
whole premise of presenting 
statistical information in a graphic 
format, is that It should provide 
visual comparison, and enhanced 
understanding of the data, not 
obvious in pure data form. 

There are basically four 
conventions for presenting data: 
graphs, column and bar charts, 
histograms and pictographs and 
percentage charts. 

Each convention has a specific 
application for which It is most 
suited and whilst these sometimes 
overlap, you should try to get the 
correct application. 

Primarily I want to deal with how 
to actually produce the images. You 
could go out and spend your hard 
earned loot on dedicated software, 
which can do a lot of the donkey- 



worl^ for you, but personally, I always 
use good old DPaint, some of the 
features of which you can adapt to 
enhance your outcomes. 

KISSl 

IMo, I'm not being overtly familiar, but 
the acronym also stands, for Keep it 
Simple, Stupid! and that really is the 
itey to all graphical presentation. 
Above all else the purpose of the 
exercise is to mal<e it obvious what 
we are trying to communicate, the 
more simply the betterl 




FOOD 



LEISURE/ 
SRUIN&S 

SERyiCES/ 
FQELS 



mW. WRTlGflGE/f^ENT 

■aiai> 

S^CLO-fflIiil&/ 

g nisc. 



PERCENTOGE 



UEEKLV PERCENTAGE EKPENDITURE OF ftVERRGE FRtllLV 2 fiDULTS, 
2 CHILDREM <12 VRS. U.K. 1||1 



A pie chart showing expenditures of an average tamlly. Did you know a pie 
chart Is so called as It was named after tts Inventor Professor Helmut Pie? 



iARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Graphs - A graph is used to demonstrate the relationship between two 
parameters, where one is dependent on the other. The presentation can 
be in the form of a series of interconnecting straight Ithes, or as a curre. 
In the example I have shown, top right, the curve showing acceleration is 
a direct function of the inter-relationship of time and speed. 

Columns and bar charts - Used to demonstrate comparisons, where the 
performance of each process or item can be measured against each 
other, A bar chart is drawn horizontally, a column chart vertically. In both 
cases the bars or columns should be of ec|ual thickness and spaced 
eciually apart. Each item should be labelled, with words or an illustration. 
Often column charts are drawn as 3-dimensional columns to give 
enhanced visual appeal. 

Histograms and pictograms - A histogram is used where both axes vary 
numericatiy. The columns are stacked against each other and plot out a 
rough curve along the top. 

Percentage charts - Produced in two formats, as a bar chart, or as a pie 
chart. In both cases, an area is filled with a colour or pattern which 
refects the ratios of each item. In the above example, I have presented 
the data as a pie chart with simple patterns to give the chart more 
visual appeal. 



GROUND RUL£S 

When you start thinking about how 
you might present your information, 
there are a few simple ground rules 
to help you achieve optimum results. 
Try looking at your finished results to 
see if they conform to some simple 
guidelines... 

1 Ensure you ^ve your Image a title 
saying exactly what It shows. 

2 When deciding on the axes of the 
image, determine their ratios within 



FUNNY FORMAT 

I was sent two disks witti the 
following information on: "ADI 
Maths samples Maths screen 
shots, box top etc. Europress 
Software." Sorry, but the discs 
were unreadable. If they are yours, 
please contact us here ait 4m/ga 
Shopper. 



78 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1 992 



EDUCATION 



WH" 



sensible parameters to reflect 
what it is you are showing. 

3 Always label the axes 
oleariy, indicating scaie. 

4 Always provide a 'Key' to 
describe the different 
elements. 

5 Select the most appropriate 
form of presentation for your 
data. 

6 Make the data clear and 
readable 

If the answer Is affinnatlve to 
these criteria, then your data 
should be presented correctly, and in 
a easily interpreted fashion. 

MAKE THE SOFTWARE 
DO THE WORKi 

Let's start looking in detail at how 
we can use the features of DPaint to 
make the preparation and recording 
of your Information quicker. There 
are several of the tools which 
facilitate short-cuts, and none „, 
more useful than the 'Grid' tool. __ 
Clicking on the icon with the right 
mouse button gives us a 
requester, which asks for 
information on the 'X' and 'Y' 
axes. This Is a facility which you 
may not have used before much, 
but now it comes into its own. 
The default settings are both at 
'8', Changing these will cause 
the screen pixel to default to a 
detemnined location at regular 
tntenfals, ideal for spacing your 
axis caitbrationsi 

An additional item on the 
requester is labelled 'Adjust'. Try 
clicking on this, tl^en returning to 
the screen. You will see that by 
holding down the left mouse 
button, you can drag a grid across 
the screen to whatever format you 
require. The 'Line' tool also has an 
important role. Obviously you use it 
to set up the axes, but similar to the 
Grid tool, if you point at the tool and 
press the right hand mouse button a 
requester comes up to ask about 
spacing. Using this facility enables 
you to generate dotted lines of 
infinite variety. These are so useful 
for indicating major calibration points 
on your axes, and leading the lines 
vertically and horizontally to meet at 
strategic points you might want to 
emphasise. 

The rectangle and circle tools are 
going to be useful in the construction 
of boxes to demonstrate 'bars' and 
'pie' charts. It is important though 
that you ensure all columns or bars 
are the same width, and equally 
spaced. The obvious way to do this 
is to use the bmsh. 

GOOD OLD BRUSH 

Probably, the bnjsh tool will come in 
for more use than any other. Get into 
the habit of using it for more than 
just duplicating images and reducing 




The fill requester Is one of the keys to 
making your graphs look professional - 
DPaint 4 gives a range of possibilities 

or enlarging them. It makes a brilliant 
rubber by holding down the right 
mouse button. You can grab any 
nonsense on the screen and use it 
as a rubber , but try grabbing a 
shape similar to the one you want to 
erase. Double clicking on the 'Brush' 



qpjdding 



X-spaoinsr: 
Y-spacirifif: 




ancei 



The G ridding tool« 
enables you to 
highlight the X and 
Y coordinates of 
your graph and 
change them to suit 
the particular 
calibration you 
require for your grid 




Icon gives the ^f^lnfs Une tool Is useful for indicating 
option of calibration points along the length of your 

selecting a graph to hi^ll^t points of Interest 

polygon based brush. This is even 
better, in that you can draw around 
an area with a mistake, superimpose 
the bmsh on the original, right hand 
mouse button, and it's gone! 
Alternatively, move it to the spare 
screen {pressing 'J' on the keyboard) 
carry out repairs, then redraw and 
bring it back to replace the original. 
When making pictographs, the 
bnjsh is ideal. Draw your image, grab 
it, then duplicate it by placing the 
brush image alongside. Another tip 
here, don't try to keep aligning 
further brush images, just redraw the 
two images as a brush and double 
the number of images each time! It 



really does save a lot of frustration 
and repetitive tasks. 

GOING FOR BUST 

Rnally adding the little touches which 
make an ordinary graph into 
something a little more professional. 
Obviously if your graph is going to be 
printed you are limited to your 
printer's facilities. OK, it's nice if you 
can print them out in colour, but it's 
not essential, after all, we don't use 
colour at Amiga Shopper, but it's still 
the first mag everyone looks for each 
mo nth 1 You can generate patterns to 
use as fills, or, use gridded lines as I 
have on the pie chart. Remember 
when all your friends swagger on 
about their colour-kits or ink-jets, the 
best photographs, and those taken 
by the pros, are still black and white. 
If you do have colour printing 
facilities, don't gild the illy by 
overdoing the assortment of colours. 
Stay within a range of tones if the 
subject matter is related. 

I have purposely made my 
examples as simple as possible, 
because their intention was to 
convey the different types. You can 
however spend more time, for 
example on the text, using shadowed 
fonts. 

Alternatively you 
could use the 
perspective 
facility to make 
3D column 
charts. Electronic 
Arts has added 
some interesting 
additions to 
DPaint 4 in the fill 
facilities, and 
several of the 
icons allow fill 
possibilities, 
again by pointing 
and clicking with the right mouse 
button. These can add a variety of 
patterns and textures to what would 
be ordinary blank spaces. (See 
example of fills on the pie chart). 

You could of course Just use your 
graphs as part of a visual 
presentation, intended to be shown 
on a monitor, in which case, the June 
issue of Amiga Shopper contains a 
presentation routine in the Education 
column. Combining your written 
Information and supporting graphical 
statistics in a self-contained 
presentation format will give your 
work professionalism, and score top 
marks! C^ 



GIVE US YOUR BEST SHOT 

Don't be shy about sending in your wori<. We're looking for good examples of 
work on the Amiga to use in this column. If you are developing your studies 
and are pleased with the result, then share It with us. Remember there are 
some nice goodies waiting as rewards, and one of them could have your 
name on itl Mark for Wilf Rees' attention at the Amiga Shopper address. 




Having been presanled wfth 
a word, off we go through 
each tevel shootirig up the 
assorted nasties to collect 
the letters 

A very appropriate titlel I must 
confess I was somewhat spellbound 
by this program. Spellbourtd! is a 
superb piece of software, which is 
frustrating, entertaining, compulsive 
and educational. Morgana's wand 
has been locked in a dungeon by the 
mad Professor Grime, and the task is 
to collect the five keys which open 
the dungeon door. Travelling by 
assorted airisorne and seaborne 
vehicles, you must shoot all manner 
of nasty creatures and obstacles. All 
very familiar, but the difference is, 
that each object once shot, releases 
a letter. The letters must be 
coliected in the con'ect order to spell 
a previously requested word. Now as 
you know most software has hidden 
cheat codes, and for us reviewers it 
saves hours of strife to be able to 
move quickty to different levels to 
see the program. This is one of the 
few where I have ignored cheating! A 
great feature is the ability to change 
ail of the parameters of the game, 
including extending or altering the 
words which could even be foreign 
language spellings, increasing the 
number of lives, having the walls 
safe or fatal etc. In other words, a 
parent, teacher, or yourself, could 
tailor the difficulty to match ability. 

The levels take you through an 
assortment of environments, starting 
with a dungeon, then moving on to 
an undersea scene, a Manhattan 
sky-line, the Alaskan wastes, and 
finally a wild space scene. A high 
score table and zany sound effects 
at! contribute towards the overall 
enjoyment of this product, which is 
supported by a well written and 
informative manual. 

Spellbound! has succeeded in 
combining the excitement of an 
arcade game with an addictive, 
enjoyable education product. It 
deserves a place in every school. 

Spellbound! la available from Lantter 
Software, 74 Victoria Creacant 
Road, Glasgow ai2 9JN s 041 3B7 
1659, and coats £25,99 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUOUST T 992 



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AMOS + EXTRAS DISK £32.00 QUARTERBACK £39,00 

BROADCAST TTTLERU £139.00 PRO- WRITE V3, 2 £69.00 

ULTIMATE DEMO MAKER £99.00 X CAD 3D £159.00 

DIGIVIEW MEDDi STATION £119.00 PHOTON PAIKT 2 ...,£25.00 

LATTICE C V5 10 £149,00 FINAL COPY £45,00 

PACESETTER V2 £42,00 VIDEO EFFECTS 3D £99,00 

PAGESTREAM V2.2 £127,00 DOE 2 DOS .£28.00 

PAGESTREAM FONTS PACK £49 00 Q/BACK TOOLS £42,00 

TV TEXT PRO £79,00 WORDWORTH £72,00 

CROSS-DOS £19,00 SUPEHJAM .£85,00 

SCENERY ANIMATOR £53.00 HEAL 3D BEGINNERS £99,00 

HITACHI VIDEO CAlffiRA, Meal for use with DigiView .£199,00 

PEN PAL, Excellent easy to use woti processor £53,00 

rMAGllJE 3D V2.0 Animations & ray-uacing ...£179,00 

ART DEPARTMENT PROFESSIONAL V2.05 .£119 00 

DIRECTORY OPUS .£29.95 

VIDEO EASE, Video titling package £35,00 

BARS -I- PIPES PROFESSIONAL £189.00 

AMOS COMPILER, Compile your Amos programs £23.00 

THE WORKS PLATINUM. Integrated package £45.00 

PRESENTATION MASTER .,.. £159,00 

VISIONARY Adventure creation language £53.00 

WALT DISNEY ANIMATION STUDIO £62.00 

REAL 3D TURBO/PROFESSIONAL £269.00 

PROFESSIONAL PAGE V2.1 writh tutorial video £115.00 

PROFESSIONAL PAGE V3.0 New Version £139.00 



: 386/20 AT Bridgebaard Foil 500/2000 £425.00 

I ROM V2.04 AND ECS CENISE NOW IN STOCK each £34.00 

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I AMIGA COMPATIBLE DISK DRIVE on/oft Stoou^ port £57.50 

I QTEC MOUSE high tjualitr teDtacement mouse £22.50 

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Speed Merchant Doubles Amiga Speed £149.00 

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Jeff Walker takes a look at 
HotLinks, the new^ cfafa exchange 
system for PageStream and 
revlev/s Shades, the latest 
gradient fill package 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 




Two of the criticisms I've 
made of Soft-Loglk's 
PageStream desl<top 
publishing program are that 
K is difficult to use the Picture 
Window feature to crop bitmap 
graphics accurately, and that It is 
Impossible to prepare text 
beforehand In a word processor 
using typesetting or style 
commands so that you don't have 
to do it the slow way within 
PageStream itself. 

I was criticised myself for making 
these remarks, by PageStream 
owners mainly who told me that they 
didn't require these features and 
that I was giving these shortcomings 
too much importance, i mention this 
piece of history because Soft-Logik's 
latest releases happen to be BME, a 
bitmap editor for cropping and 
retouching graphics, and PageLiner, 
a text editor that supports 
PageStream style tags. 

These two applications, pi us the 
version 2.2 reiease of PageStream, 
are the first three programs to 
employ Soft-Logik's new HotLinks 
inter-program communication 
system, and before we get on to 
looking at BME and PageLiner 
themselves we need to learn all 
about HotLinks. 

SIMPLE CONCEPT 

The HotLinks concept is simple to 
understand. In desktop publishing 
there are several distinct jobs, like 
writing the copy, creating the artwork, 
and laying out or 'making up' the 
pages, to give just three examples. A 
single program that was an expert at 
every job would be massive, and 
probably very difficult to learn how to 
use, so the answer is to use a word 
processor for writing the copy, art 
programs for messing about with the 
artwork, and a desktop publisher for 



making up the pages. 

Now the beauty of the Amiga is 
that with enough memory you are 
able to have more than one 
application running at the same time, 
so you don't have to keep quitting 
from one program in order to load 
and use another. But wouldn't it be 
great if instead of having to save 
data to disk and then import it into 
one of the other applications you 
could send the text from the word 
processor and the artwork from the 
art program directly to the desktop 
publishing program and vice versa? 
That is what HotLinks is a!! about. 

THE INVISIBLE PROGRAM 

Experienced Amiga users will be 
screaming "What about ARexx?" at 
this point, but bear with me and I 
think you'll see why Soft-Logik has 

decided to re-invent a wheel. 
HotLinks is one of those 
'invisible' Amiga programs; when you 
double click its icon nothing appears 
to happen. But it has. After running 



HotLinks any program that supports 
the system will make its HotLinks 
features available. 

There are four features - 
Subscribe, Publish, Update and 
information. The first job will be to 
'publish' something. From PageLiner 
you would publish text, from e/WE it 
would be a graphic, from PageStream 
it could be either. Once some data 
has been published, another 
program that supports HotLinks can 
'subscribe' to it, PageLinercan 
subscribe only to text, BME only to 
graphics, PageStream to either. 

In effect, publishing and 
subscribing is almost exactly the 
same as saving and loading data. 
The difference is that you don't 
supply a filename. "Vou have to give it 
a name, of course, othenwise you'd 
never remember what on earth it was 
you'd published, and this name can 
be anything you like, but it isn't an 
actual file name, it's more like the 
filenotes you can create with the 
AmigaDOS Rlenote command. 



JARGON BUSTING • MRGON BUSTING 



Bitmap graptitcs - See IFF ILBM. 

Copy - A term used by writers and publishers for the words that form a 
complete piece of writing. 

GIF - A bitmap graphics file fomiat that can contain up to 256 colours or 
greyscales, 

iPF- Stands for interchange File Format. Many people call Amiga graphics 
IFFs when they really mean IFF ILBM - the ILBM stands for 
InterLeaved BitMap. IFF is the general file fomiat, ILBM is the 'type' of 
IFFthat is a graphic. 

Retouching - The act of repairing or cleaning up a damaged or dirty part of a 
graphic. 

TIFF - A bitmap graphics file fomiat tiiat can contain up to 256 colours or 
greyscales. 



Typically you'd call some data a 
name like 'Figure 2 graphic for 
Chapter 1' or 'Body text for Chapter 
2'. 

Along with this name you can jot 
down some information about the 
data in a small notes area, and this 
is what the HotLinks Information 
facility presents you with when it is 
selected - it's an 'About' requester 
about a data file, written by yourself. 

The data itself is saved to disk 
using a WotL/nks-specific file format 
and file naming system that you 
don't need to worry about. 

Once something is published it is 
known as an 'edition'. I hope you're 
remembering these HotLinks terms 
because you may become confused 
while reading the rest of this article 
otherwise. To recap: 'publishing' is 
like saving the data, 'subscribing' is 
like loading it, and the things (files, if 
you like) you publish and subscribe 
to are called 'editions'. 

REVISING EDITIONS 

So far there's not much advantage to 
using HotLinks over the normal 'save 
and load' way of working. Which is 
where the Update feature comes in. 
If you subscribe to an edition and 
then change It in some way - alter 
the wording of some text for example 
- then you need to record those 
changes. Now, you couid publish it 
again and then subscribe to the new 
version, but that's no better than 
'save and load', instead you 'update' 
the edition. 

Updating an edition means that 
any application which supports 
HotLinks and uses that edition will 
automatically change to reflect the 
alterations the next time it is used. 

So to give a simple practical 
example, 'i^ou've laid out the same 
leaflet three times in three different 
languages. Suddenly somebody 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 19912 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 




text edit] 
desktop £>i 
also U3* I 

Mw ttitft p. 
If j^ou Ita\ 



iiaCml 



I 



the past> user^ hac^ to load 



- -.Jy 
text edil^or 



fiie* t^i*e. the. cjiansfes, saue_LJ bafik'toil 

. artiole 

i^ti you oora>letg 



ansfes, . . _ 

rtiole tpon PifleStFean a 
the phangat iti Pjijgt.ii]ijp 



desktop publisher. ^ .._._,, 

publish the text artiole fpan PifleStFean 
HheTi you ootvle' " ' - . _ 



After applying PageStream style tags 
to a section of text and 'p jblishing' it 
in PageUner, the copy automatically 
formats Itself when subscribed to by 
PageStreani 

points out that there Is a glitch in I 

one of the bitmap graphics on the I 

page. So you load the graphic into 
Deluxe Paint (or whatever), clean It 
up, save it, load PageStream, load a 
leaflet, delete the old version of the 
graphic, import and position the new 
one and save the leaflet; then you 
load tiie second leaflet and do the 
same; then you load the third leaflet 
and do It again. 

That took a little while. Probably 
an hour or more. 

GRAPHICS CLEAN-UP 

Now the same thing using HotLinks. 
You load the BME program, 
subscribe to the offending graphic 
edition, use BMPs art editing tools 
to clean up the graphic, then Update 
the edition. 

That's it. Tool< maybe 10 
minutes. Next time you load any of 
the three leaflets that use this 
graphic (or subscribe to this edition, 
to use the HotLinhs parlance) the 
altered version is what gets used. 

I've used a graphic as an 
example, but it's the same for text. 
Can you see the advantage of the 
HotLinks system now? 

The absolute beauty is that it is 
so simple - publish, subscribe, 
update, that's all you have to 
remember, and it's all done for you. 
The standard Amiga inter-program 
communication system is ARexx, and 
to achieve the same thing using 
programs that supported ARexx 
would require you (or someone else) 
to write ARexx programs for each of 
the separate applications involved. 

There is one more string to the 
HotLinks bow, real-time data 
transfer. If you have two HotLinks 
compatible programs running, the 
Update command will not only 
update the edition file on disk, but 
also any copies of that edition in any 
application that has a copy of that 
edition loaded. 

EASY STYLES 

Having discussed the theory of 
HotLinks, it's time to see how it 




works using BME and PageUner. 

PageUner \s not a 'word 
processor' because it cannot print 
out text styles, only unstyled drafts. 
And it's not a 'text editor' because 
style and formatting commands can 
be incorporated within the text. So 
Soft-Logik has split the difference 



it understands PageSf ream's style 
tagging system, and will let you apply 
style tags to blocks of text so that 
they automatically format themselves 
when imported into PageStream 
{V2,2 and greater). 

Style tags are deeply wonderful 
things. You've all used word 
processing style 
features like bold and 
italics, now imagine 
extending that facility 
to include the font, 
point size, line spacing, 
tracking, paragraph 
indent... and a whole 
host of other things. 
For instance you couid 
set up a style tag 
called 'Body Copy' and 
give it all the style 
attributes that you 
want your body copy to 
have, and set up 
another style tag called 
'Subhead' and give it all the style 
attributes you want your sub- 
headings to have, and set up another 
style tag called 'Captions' and give it 
all the style attributes you want your 
picture captions to have... And you 
can keep on going until every piece 
of text in your document that has a 
different style has its 
own style tag. 

When preparing 
the text you would 
highlight sections of 
the text tinat you want 
in particular styles, 
and apply the 
relevant style tag. On 
screen the text 
doesn't change, 
except that bold. 



Although BME 
displays pictures 
in only 16 levels 
of grey, It retains 
all the original 
colour Information 
and allows you to 
'edit' the picture 
using the full 
palette In up to 
32:1 
magnfflcation 



and called PageUner a 'text 
processor'. 

It contains all the expected 
facilities of a simple text editor, like 
block cut/ paste/copy, wordwrap, find 
and replace, plus it comes with a 
spelling checker and small dictionary 
to which you can add new words. For 
bashing out or editing words, 
PageUner is an entirely adequate 
tool. 

The program's real power is that 



underline and italics are displayed, 
but along the bottom of the display is 
an information line that tells you 
which style tag has been applied to 
the piece of text at the current cursor 
position. 

After a bit of practice with style 
tags you should be able to do all the 
hard work in the quicker PageUner 
program, rather than having to 
highlight blocks in the much slower 
PageStream program and select 




styles or apply tags. This way of 
doing things is a great aid to 
productivity - you'll be able to get 
more done in less time. 

The style tags themselves must 
be set up within PageStream, using 
its Text/Tag requester. You'd set up 
and 'Add' each style you require, 
then store the entire list of tags to 
disk using the 'Save' button. This is 
the file that PageUner can import, 
and it can import any number of 
'tags' files, appending any new style 
tags to the list, ignoring any 
duplicate style tag names. 

(Ah yes, now might be an 
appropriate time to mention that if 
you attempt to save a tags file from 
PageStream without giving it a 
filename, PageStream 2.2 hangs.) 

SPECTACULAR CRASHES 

Alas, this first version of PageL/ner Is 
not entirely stable. Or perhaps ft is 
HotLinks, I don't know, but following 
through the tutorial on a WB1.3 
Amiga 2000, and then on a WB2.04 
Amiga 3000, both machines crashed 
at the same stage over and over 
again. I have managed to get the 
publish, subscribe and update 
system to work, but at different 
stages either PageStream or 
Pa^eL/ner eventually always crashes 
spectacularly. And while I'm 
confident that Soft-Logik will fix this 
problem, I'm disappointed that 
HotLinks has been released while it 
contains such a serious bug; I can't 
imagine how it wasn't spotted by the 
beta-testers. 

When the developers have got it 
working properly, however, I can see 
that PageUner vi'\\i be an enormous 
help to PageStream users. But if you 
buy it now, for heaven's sake send 
back the registration card to Soft- 
Logik so that you can follow the 
upgrade path. 

BEHER BME 

The HotLinks bitmap editor, BME, 
appears to be a lot more stable than 
PageUner. What I mean to say is 
that it has not yet crashed on me, 
and neither has PageStream when 
subscribing to, publishing and 
updating graphics. 

Now unless I'm missing 
something very obvious, there are 
only two uses for BME. The most 
obvious, to me at least, is for 
cropping. You see, the problem is 
that while PageStream can import 
bitmaps that contain up to 16.7 
million colours, it will only display 
them in black and white. Sometimes 
you can see enough of the picture to 
be able to crop it fairly accurately, 
although most of the time there's not 
enough detail. 

OK. so if it's an IFF ILBM you 
couid load the bitmap into Deluxe 
Paint, crop it and save it again. But 
what about the 16.7 million colour 



83 



AMIGA SHOPPIR • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1 992 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 




244Dit ILBMs? And what about the 
256-colour bitmap formats 
PageStream supports, like TIFF and 
GIF? Without a 24-bit graphics card 
and art software (or Art Department 
Professional and the relevant fiie 
format modules) you're stuck with 
trying to crop the black and white 
representation that PageStream 
provides. 

Unless you've got BME. 

The process goes like this: 
import the bitmap into PageStream, 
publish it, subscribe to it in BME, 
crop it, and then update it. 

BME creates an on-screen 16 
levels of grey representation of the 
bitmap, which is plenty good enough 
to see most of the details in even 
16.7 million colour pictures, making 
them easy to crop. 

BME itself supports only two 
bitmap file formats, IFF ILBM (but 
not HAM) and GIF. These can be 
loaded straight into BME (rather 
than subscribed to) and 
subsequently published if you like, 
but if you want to work on HAM, TIFF, 
or 24-bit ILBM bitmaps you have to 
import them into PageStream first, 
publish them, and then subscribe to 
them in BME. 

UNDOmG DAMAGE 

It's important to realise that BME 
doesn't convert the bitmap to 16 
levels of grey, it retains all the 
original colour information, the 16 
greyscales are just for display 
purposes. 

Another use for BME is for 
cleaning up or 'retouching' a graphic. 
For instance you might have scanned 
an original photograph that was 
damaged in some way, and with 
PageStream and BME you could 
publish and subscribe to it and then 
zoom in on the damaged part and 
paint over the damaged pixels with 
one of BMEs 10 types of brush. 
Because BME retains all the original 
colour information, you are able to 
choose which colours to paint with 
from the full 16.7 million colour 
palette. In the palette requester the 



mation, plus the actual RGB and 
CMYK values, although what gets 
displayed on screen is one of the 16 
shades of grey. 

It can be a bit of a hit and miss 
operation, but it's an awful lot 
cheaper (and faster) than 24-bit 
hardware and software. 

As well as cropping and painting 
with brushes, BMEmn enable you to 
cut or copy rectangular sections from 
a picture and paste them down 
elsewhere on the same picture, or 



BME makes pict jre cropping for PageStream a more 
accurate affair. First you Import the picture into 
PageStream (left), titen Publlsii it and Subscribe to it In 
BME witere you can drag out an area to be cropped 
(mldctie), the Update in BIVIE and quit, and ftnaily 
mirrriT-T-nn -fl Update in PageStream (right) 

You can probably see the 
advantages of the HotLinks 

publishing, subscribing and updating 



an art package, more as a simple 
cropping and retouching extension to 
PageStream. As such, it does the job 
admirably. 



NETWORK SUPPORT 

In the near future (says Soft-Logik) 
there will be a version of HotLinks 
that supports networks. 

Put simply, a network would 
consist of a number of people, all at 
different Amiga workstations - in 
different offices in an office block for 



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BME ailows as many pictures to be ioaded as memory permits, after vtlilch 
you can copy bits from one picture Into another If you like, or create a 'new' 
window into which parts of lots of pictures can be pasted, for Instance, to 
create a collage. 



into another one. You can even 
create an empty window and then 
copy bits from various other bitmaps 
into the empty one so you can make 
collages. 

In the same way that PageUner 
is no replacement for a proper, fully- 
featured word processor, BME is no 
replacement for a dedicated art 
package. It mustn't be thought of as 



instance - all connected to one 
massive storage device, probably a 
hard drive with capacity measured in 
gigabytes {1,000 megabytes or 
more}. 

While each workstation would run 
its own personal copy of HotLintiS 
and applications software, they 
would all save and load their data 
from the communal hard drive. 



system here - one person updates a 
text or graphic edition, and everyone 
else on the system automatically 
gets updated next time they access 
that edition. 

Obviously such a set-up would 
need a security system because the 
person in charge would want to 
restrict access of certain editions 
only to those people who need 
access to them, otherwise any Andy, 
Cliff or Diana could muck about with 
the data and deface or destroy 
Important work. And although 
HotLinks doesn't yet support 
networking, the security system has 
been written and is included with the 
VI .0 release. 

SYSTEM MANAGEMENT 

It all revolves around the 'system 
manager'. This person has his or her 
own personal 'handle' (name) and 
password that gets his or her into 
HUMP, the HotLinks User 
Management Program. From here he 
or she can add new users to the 
network, and combine them into 
groups if need be; each user can 
have a password, initially provided by 
the system manager but which can 
be changed later by individuals, or 
there can be Just one password for 
the entire group. 

With the network set up, and 
when the networking version of 
HotUnl<s is released, editions can be 
published with 're ad /write' flags set 
so that only certain individuals, or 
groups of individuals, have access to 
them. You could ensure that nobody 
made any further changes to your 
edition by setting the Read Access to 
All, but the Write Access to Just 
Owner, provided you are the owner of 
the edition, of course. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1992 



DESKTOP PUBLISHING 



This security system isn't useful 
just in a networking situation, it 
might come in handy if you inave oniy 
one worl^station used by many 
peopie. if you don't want others 
messing with your editions you could 
use the security password system 
and restrict access to only yourself 
or those who need access. 

But wliiie this networl<ing system 
is a good idea, one that is used 
widely out there in the professional 



HotLinks improves 

PageStream's 

chances of 

being used 

professionally/^ 



world, I'm not convinced that 
PageStream is a professional enough 
product to warrant the development 
of HotLinks in this direction. I can't 
see many home users setting up 
Amiga publishing networks, and in 
the seriously real world publishers 
use Macintosh computers and Quark 
Xpress software, period. 

! hate complaining about 
PageStream In public because 
people always accuse me of being 
biased against it, but if you'll allow 
me one quick demonstration of why 
PageStream could not be used to 
publish, for example, this 
magazine... I have 7lvlb of memory in 
my Amiga 2000. 1 asked PageStream 
to Import a 24-blt IFF picture whose 
file size was 2.5Mb. It imported OK 
as an Object, but when I tried to put 
that object on to the page I was told 
1 was Out Of Memory. When I tried it 
again with a slightly smaller 24-bit 
picture, PageStream crashed 
unceremoniously. 

Now that's one, single, lonely, 
individual, sole, solitary 24-bit IFF 
picture. "You obviously need more 
memory!" I hear you scream. Well, if 
that's the case how come that with 
the same computer I recently used a 
rival DTP package to produce a full 
colour A4 leaflet that contained no 
less than six 24-bit colour pictures 
whose accumulative file size was 
about 16Mb, plus a 1.5Mb 8-bit 
greyscale picture, all viewable on- 
screen (albeit in four greyscales), 
plus a load of text? 

CONCLUDING THOUGHTS 

The point I'm trying to make Is that 
perhaps Soft-Logik would be better 
advised to concentrate on improving 
PageStream's performance so that it 
can be used truly professionally 
before developing a product that is of 
use only to professional publishers? 



Having said that, I must say that 
HotLmks certainly improves 
PageStream's chances of being used 
professionally, at least when they've 
got P^eL/ner working properly it will. 

But at the end of the day I'm left 
wondering what use the home 
desktop publisher will have for 
HotLinks. Home users will on the 
whole be using ordinary IFF or 
structured graphics, and there are 
better packages for working with both 
these formats. And if you really 
need to view and crop 24-blt or 
alien format bitmaps I 
suggest that, even though it 
costs a lot more and you 
need a lot of memory to use 
it. Art Department 
Professional is a much better 
investment. 

PageUner, if the publishing 
and subscribing system worked 
properly, would be a good reason to 
buy HotLinks because of the time It 
would save applying styles to 
different blocks of text throughout a 
long document. In fact I'd go so far 
as to say that this feature alone may 
be worth the cost of the whole 
package. But at the moment it 
doesn't work. (|0 

ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 

HotLinks £69.95 

by Soft Logik Publishing Corporation 
n 1 31 F South Towne Square, St Louis, 
MO, 631 23 USA 
« 0101800 829 8608 

Distributed in UK by: 

HB Marketing, Unit 3, 
Poyle 14, Newlnnds Drive 
Colnbrook SL3 ODX 
» 0753 686000 




CHECKOUT 

HOTLINKS 



Ease of Use • • • • O 

There's very little to remember, and the 
BMEand PageUner programs do rot have 
many features, so the system is not 
difficult to master. 

Features • • O O O 

When you write a list of what PageUner 
and B/H£car actually do, it's suiprlsirg 
hew short it is. 

Documentation • • • • O 

The three manuals are excellent, and each 
provides easy-to-follow tutorials. 

Price Vaiue • • O O O 

BME Is underpowered, PageLmer doesn't 
work properly, HotLinliS itself oniy works 
with these two programs and PageStream 
2.2. 

Overall ratitig • • o o o 

in theory It's a good idea, in practice it 
sucks. Another curate's egg from Soft 

Logik. 





NOT SO COOL 
IN THE SHADE 



Check out Shades - a new^ product 
wrfifch supplies gradient fills 
for PageStream users 

One feature tliat PageStream and ProPage ignore Is gradient 
fills, or fade textures. Fade textures blend an area from solid 
black to white In as smootti a gradient as possible. DPalnt lias 
this feature, but the standard Amiga can display only 16 stiades 
of gray, so the difference between each is easily seen. 
Proper fade textures go from black to white in 
256 steps, but this takes at least 8-bit colour to get 256 
shades of grey. Expensive, memory munching and time 
consuming. Without many-iit colour the only other way 
to get smoother gradients is to use a structured drawing 
package that allows you to specify fill colours as 
percentages of red, green and blue, so achieving a fade 
from black to white in 100 steps or 200 steps by using half 
per cent jumps. This also involves the drawing of 100 or 200 
shapes into which to put the fill colours, and accurate positioning. 
Not expensive, not as memory munching, but even more time consuming. 
Enter Shades, a dtskful of ready-to-use 100-step gradient fills. 

NOT FOR PROPAGE 

The first thing to note is that Sfiades' gradient fills are for PageStream 2.1 and 
greater, so ProPage users can stop reading here. 

There are 27 shapes and styles, including cirdes, squares, rounded 
squares, triangles, polygons, stars, shooting stars, spheres and diagonals. 
Using them couldn't be simpler as they are saved as PageStream documents; all 
you do is Append the Shades file of your choice to the document you are working 
on and then cut-and-paste the ciip to where you want it. 

iVIsny hours have been spent creating Shades, and Source Graphics 
deserves credit for a job weti done. However I wouldn't be doing my job if I didn't 
point out a few things that the promotional blurb and manual fail to make clear. 

Dot-matrix printers - even high resolution ones like 300 dpi inkjets, laser 
printers and 360 dpi bubble jets - are unable to produce 100 grey shades. 
Because of the way dithering works, they can only produce patterns representing 
16 levels of grey. So when you output a Stiades gradient fill to a dot-matrix 
printer, what you get on the page looks very much like a greyscale gradient fill 
produced in DPaint - you can see each band of grey quite clearly, so the illusion 
of a smooth gradient goes straight out the window. 

To get printouts which contain smooth gradients you need to output to a 
PostScript device, or to non-PostScript printer via a PostScript interpreter. 

This is because PostScript uses 'halftoning', which is nothing like and 
nothing to do with, the Halftone dither option in Workbench Printer preferences. I 
explained about halftoning in the SaxonScript Professional review last month, so 
If you need more details I recommend you dig that out. This dithering problem 
doesn't mean that Stiades is only useful 
to rich kids, the non-PostScript output is 



basically the same as a DPaint bitmap 
gradient but without j aggies, so there is 
one advantage for us poor kids too. 

Shades Is by Source Gra/^lce, costs 
£59.95 and Is available In the UK from 
Meridian Software, 150 Lubblesthorpe 
Road, Narborough Road South, 
Leicester LE3 2XF, «- 0533 
896743/827102. 

The difference between bubble Jet - 
360 dpi (top right), laserjet - 300 dpi 
{above left), and PostScript laser 
printer output - 360 dpi {bottom left) 



CHECKOUT 

Shades 



Ease of Use • • • • • 

Easy; simpiy Append, Cut and Paste. 

Documentation • • O O O 

Manuel is skimpy, out of date, with 
grammatical errors and spelling nni stakes. 

Price Vaiue • • O O O 

tot of money for 27 clips; £2 plus each. 

Overall rating • • o o o 

Good idea, but a PostScript device is 

needed to get the best from them. 



84 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16* AUGUST 1992 



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iC4c:|C3|C]|C3|C3|C:|C«3|c4C9K]|C 



C O M M S 




modem 

0^ 




Setting up a BBS Is not a 
simple task. It takes quite 
a while and there are a lot 
of decisions to be taken. 
Amiga Shopper Is here to help, so 
we've come up with a guide to 
setting up your own BBS. 

We start off with what equipment 
you will need, how much it will cost 
and iiow to plan your board. Next 
month we'll take a look at the 
software that Is available and 
examine how easy it is to use and 



This month our 
comms expert 
Phil Harris 
begins a look at 
fiov\f to build 
your oy^n BBS 

which features are provided. Rnally 
we'll finish off with a look at some of 
the BBS utilities available and a look 
round an example board where the 
theory has been put into practice, 

SETTING UP 

As we examine the set-up process 
we'll be looking at the general 
features boards contain, which will 
be of interest to you even if you are 
not planning on setting up your own 
board. 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



BB& ~ A bulletin board system. A BBS is simply an electronic noticeboard. 
Callers to the system leave messages for other users to see, or can 
download and upload files for other peopie. 

Download - To transfer a file from a BBS to your own computer. Boards will 
usually limit the amount of time you have to spend downloading files, 
although many boards reward uploads with longer download times. 

Upload - To transfer a file from your computer to a BBS. 

Modem - A MODulator DEModutator. A modem is used to transiate signals 
from your computer to and from audible signals that can be transmitted 
down a telephone line. 

Tennlnal - A software package which enables you to communicate with a 
modem. 



Having spent a few months 
wandering round the bulletin boards, 
many users get the urge to set up 
their own BBS. One of the reasons 
for this Is money. 

Although setting up a board can 
cost a not inconsiderable amount of 
money, it does mean that flies, 
messages and users come to you, 
saving you an awful lot of phone 
calls. 



SAVING MONEY 

One of the main reasons for wanting 
to set up a BBS is to save money, so 
the chances are that you will use 
your modem less. But if you want 
your board to become successful you 
will need to put effort into keeping it 
up to date, in particular by obtaining 
the latest and greatest files, so you 
will still need to use your modem. 



This Is the *-MEW-* Big Bang Burger Bar BBS, 
Well Its the riEU SoFtware*.. RRPPORT ... 



Uhats Fl8u I hear you ask ne? 



So uhy the Chari^e? Ueli -lU-BB^t Was good in its day BUT lacked a lot of 
required featur^es , and 5 lot of the fttw [releases h?d rathpp annoMiFsq BUGS. 
TMis iifu sof ti-iar^e ,Hri t ten by Qapgravari* and HMself. prokfides the Pind of 
srrwice that we both uould like to see. ftfiPIJNR? will pnouide 
a lot none features than -ID-BBS, like vastly inproyed File Tf^ansfeT^s via 
the use of XPRLihparies, 

This soFtuane ii Still undpr development so please pass on any bug reports, 
noans and groans to ne on GangnaDann. 

Thanks Fof your Go-flperation and Hope to Chat Soon,.- ftLL IE BEST Fop ' 9R 



\ / _^ \ /\ 



/ // _^ // 



\/ \/ \ / \/ 



/ v____/ N____/y/ 



Hit any Key to coi>tihU(? 



Weird names abound at the Big Bang Burger Bar, an excel lant BBS with the 
custom software Rapport 



THE EQUIPMENT 

The first thing you need to decide 
before setting up a bulletin board 
system is what equipment you need, 
and more importantly, what you can 
afford. 

Obviously you will need a 
computer, a modem and a telephone 
line. If you're reading this the 
chances are you'll already have a 
computer, and it will be an Amiga so 
we'll assume that from now on. 

BAUD FOR THE BOARD 

You may already have a modem as 
well If not, the minimum speed you 
need is really 2400 baud, with 
support for 300 and 1200 as well. 
You could go for a faster 9600 baud 
modem complete with data 
compression and the works, but it is 
better to stick with a slower and 
cheaper modem to begin with. 

You may well decide that you 
don't like running your own BBS after 
all and decide to pack it in, so the 
cheaper the modem the better when 
you're just starting out. You can 
usually reckon on the modem costing 
£50-£100. Whatever modem you 
have It must have an "auto-answer" 
facility to enable it to function with 
the BBS software. Most new 
modems have this; get a Hayes 
compatible model and you'll be OK, 

If you do already have a modem 
you will need to decide whether you 
still wish to use it for your own 
comms work, and if so how often you 
will use it. If you only have one 
modem the BBS will have to be 
taken off-line while you dial your 
favourite board and this will lead to 
frustration as your callers find your 
board corrtinualty down. 



If you do want to keep using the 
modem and not disturb the board too 
often you will need a second modem, 
and a computer to use it with, which, 
unless you are lucky enough to 
already have one spare, will be 
expensive. 

We'll assume you will be cutting 
down on your comms use and using 
it in the quiet moments for now 
though. 

THE TELEPHONE UNE 

The third requirement for a BBS is a 
telephone line. There are two 
options: use an existing line or get a 
new one installed. 

Using an existing line Is 
obviously the cheapest and most 
preferable option. There are major 
disadvantages though. Obviously 
having a modem stuck-on the end of 
the line all the time means that 
"normal" voice calls cannot be 
received without the caller being 
greeted with a high pitched whistle 
every time they call. 

TTiere are ways around this. 
Limiting access to the board is the 
most obvious or you could try only 
allowing calls between certain times, 
when other callers won't be 
phoning. Late night is usually the 
best time for this, say between 9pm 
and 9am. 

The disadvantage with this is 
that you could lose callers who don't 
ordinarily have access to their 
modem at ttie time you are open. A 
night time board, for instance, would 
miss out on callers who use their 
modems from the office during the 
day. 

Inevitably people will forget that 
the board is not on-line during the 



86 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1 992 



C O M M S 



day and try to phone anyway. They'll 
be shocked when you answer the 
phone and you'll get an earful of 
modem. 

RINGBACK RIGMAROLE 

There is another way of combining 
voice and modem calls on one line, 
using "ring back' software. Ring 
back software waits for the 
telephone to ring and counts the 
number of times it does so. If the 
phone continues ringing beyond a set 
number of rings {usually three or 
four) the software ignores the call, 
allowing you to answer it. 

If the phone stops ringing before 
the limit is reached the software puts 
the modem into auto-answer mode 
and if another call comes in within 
the next minute or so it will be 
answered by the modem. 

That way voice callers can still 
get through, but modem users who 
follow the correct procedure (ie dial, 
wait for one or two rings, hang up, 
then dial again) get through to the 
BBS. 

As with the limited access 
method, people will forget and you 
will answer the phone to a modem 
occasionally but the board will be 
available for longer periods giving you 
more callers. 

GETTING A NEW UNE 

Obtaining a new line is the most 
satisfactory option, but also the 
most expensive. A new line from BT 
will cost you approximately £150, not 
the sort of thing to be taken lightly, 
and if there is any chance of you not 
wanting to run the BBS, you are 
better off using an existing line until 
you are certain you like the idea. 
A new line is by far the best 
option though; it gives full access to 
the board with the least hassle and 
you can still use the other line for 
your own calls. Even if you are sure 
that you will want a new line, it is 
best to leave it as late as possible, 
Just In case. 

DRIVE DECISIONS 

The one thing that BBSs are always 
short of is space. No matter how 
much storage space you have, you'll 
always need more, particularly If you 
want to make lots of files available. 
You've got three options on the 
Amiga. 

FLOPPY DRAWBACKS 

It is possible to run a BBS from a 
single floppy drive but 1 wouldn't 
recommend it. By the time you've put 
the BBS software on the disk, plus 
the message base and any support 
files required, there will be no room 
for any files. 

Adding a couple of external disk 
drives (£50-£100 each) would give 
you an extra couple of megabytes of 
space for files. In an Ideal world, 



though, that's stil! not really enough. 

Of course, you don't have to 
have files. It is possible to run a 
message-only BBS, particularly if you 
have some form of expertise which 
you can offer callers. However, 
floppies are pretty slow and callers 
will soon get frustrated with the long 
delays which are costing them 
money. 

But, it's files which attract 



would make using floppies much 
easier and quicker, although it's still 
far from ideal. 

HARD DRIVE 

This is by far the best method of 
storing the files required for running 
a BBS. Indeed, it Is the only way for 
a serious BBS of any size. 
The Amiga does have a 
disadvantage compared to other 



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nnll SENT UPIDHDS DUmLVBDS CRI.LS lODnv 




Sl-Jiin-t4iie 86:^7:471 



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An example of how to make your board btteiestlnc - the Information screen 
from the Big Bang BBS 

callers, so although It is possible to 
run a BBS from floppies on a 
temporary basis it Isn't really viable 
in the long term. 



RAM DRIVE 

If you have plenty of RAM you could 
conceivably run the BBS from RAM, 
You would, however, need to copy 
any data files to disk regularly to 
ensure that they weren't lost if the 
power went down. 

RAM does give you very fast 
access, but that's about all. The risk 
of losing the board at a moment's 
notice due to a power cut or 
something similar Is really too great 
to allow its use. 

A RAM drive could be used in 
conjunction with a traditional floppy 
drive to give extra storage space, for 
the BBS software perhaps. This 



machines when it comes to hard 
drives in that they are quite 
expensive compared to drives for 
other machines, although, with a 
little shopping around, it is possible 
to get pretty large drives for a 
reasonable price nowadays. 

The minimum size for a hard 
drive^Dased system is really 30 
megabytes although a 20 megabyte 
system would suffice for a while. 
Remember that if your board begins 
to get more successful in the future, 
you will probably want to upgrade to 
give yourself more room for files. 

WHICH SOFTWARE? 

Finally, you'll want some software. 
There are plenty of packages 
around to choose from, from freebie 
systems written in Basic to full-scale 
commercial packages which can 



IT'S ALL IN THE NAME 



The name you choose for your BBS Is Important, A good name will attract 
callers. What constitutes a good name depentis on your point of view, but 
K's still worth putting a little thou^t Irrto this area... 

If you wish only to attract Amiga callers then putting Amiga in the title 
gets the message across immediately. 01 FDR AMIGA for instance is clearly 
an Amiga only board. 

Alternatively you could choose a name relating to the theme of your 
board, some^iing which will make it stand out to other people interested in 
the subject matter. For instance. The Big Bang Burger Bar will Immediately 
attract the attention of anyone interested in The Hitch H/tefs Guide To Ttie 
Gaiaxy, where the name comes from. 

Or you can choose an unusual name. People will always be attracted to 
the board because of the name. Pernicious Anttemia BBS falls into this 
category. 

Once you've chosen your name, it's a good idea to check to make sure 
that one does not already exist with the same name. It would be confusing 
and counter productive to have two boards with the same name and some 
sysops defend their names with vigour. 



cost several hundred pounds. 

It is best to plan the layout and 
feel of your board before you get the 
software. That way you can ensure 
that the software you get can do 
what you want it to. This enables you 
to create the boani you want rather 
than what the software wants. 

We'll be taking a close look at 
the various packages available next 
month but before then we'll discuss 
how to design your bulletin board, 
and make it a success. 

ANATOMY OF A BBS 

A lot of thought must go into what 
your board is going to contain, and 
what is going to make it stand out 
from the rest of the BBSs, 

A BBS is divided into several 
sections, we'll take a look at each 
one in turn giving a quick description 
of what you'll find there. 

1 MAIN MENU 

The main menu is the first area 
callers see. From here it should be 
possible to get to most other areas 
on the board. It Is also a good idea 
to include some general purpose 
options Irom here such as a help 
command for users to find out more 
about the layout of the board, and a 
"page sysop" option to allow users 
to chat to you. 

2 BULmiNS 

The bulletins area is a selection of 
text files accessible from a menu. 

Exactly what is contained in the 
text files is up to you but common 
items include board news containing 
any important announcements you 
wish to make, information about the 
board such as its history, items you 
have for sale second-hand and the 
rules and regulations that apply to 
the board. 

Sysop specials 

Some sysops are also able to run 
special offers with the help of local 
shops and sell disks, software, 
hardware and sometimes public 
domain software. The bulletin area is 
the Ideal place to advertise that sort 
of thing. 

Otfier boards 

Many bulletin boards supply lists of 
other recommended BBSs. Again, 
this is a good place to put a text file 
giving details of your own favourite 
board. 

Some bulletin board software 
has special support for a bulletin 
area which will ask users if they want 
to read any bulletins every time they 
call and infonn them if any have 
changed since they last phoned the 
board. If you are planning on placing 
a great deal of emphasis on 
bulletins, it would be worth 

contliHKd m pigf M 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



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lil 



C O M M S 



considering software which has this 
facility. 

Either way, it is a good idea to 
make it easy for callers to download 
the bulletins as files, preferably by 
having LIST FILES and DOWNLOAD 
options on the bulletin menu. This is 
a feature missing from all the boards 
I call; something I'd like to see 
corrected. 

3 MESSAGE AREA 

All bulletin boards have message 
areas of one sort or another. 

You should provide areas for 
private e-mail, general discussion 
and probably an area for Amiga 
specific discussion. 

Which other areas you provide is 
entirely up to you. Coverage of other 
computers, such as PCs, will attract 
other callers but you will really need 
room for storing PC software. 

A better bet, particularly if you 
only have a limited amount of space, 
is to have general discussion areas, 
covering sci-fi perhaps or television 
programs. If your board has a 
specific theme then message areas 
for related subjects are a must. 

For example Pernicious Anaemia 
BBS has horror as its theme. In 
particular vampires. It has a 
message area for vampire-specific 
discussion and an area for general 
horror chat. See below for more 
information on bulletin boards with a 
theme. 

4 FILES AREA 

The files areas are the most 
important part of a BBS, particularly 
an Amiga one. You should aim to 
provide as many files as you possibly 
can, all archived, and make them as 
easy to find as possible. 

The easiest way to do this is to 
split the files area into several 
sections, eg: 

• Communications 

• Virus utilities 

• Music 

• Graphics 

• Games 

• Text files 

• Programming utilities 

• Word processors and text editors 

Obviously, If you only have a fewf 
(less than 50) files It is easier to 
combine them all into one list, 
perhaps dividing the file list into the 
appropriate sections. If you have 
more than fifty or so files it is worth 
dividing the file area into categories. 

Searching quesrions 

A "search for filename or 
description" option Is also an 
important part of the files area. This 
allows people to find the software 
they want, quickly and easily. 

It Is also important to have a full 
file list available as a text file, ready 



for downloading. Make this file nice 
and visible so that it is easy to find. 
You could even go as far as having a 
specific menu item which allows you 
to download the list from wherever 
you are. 

VIRUS FREE! 

You should check all files for 
viruses, taking particular care to 
inspect uploads. Make it clear to 



has, the type of editor they wish to 
use etc. 

6 STATISTICS MENU 

Most BBS software enables you to 
compile statistics about the users 
who call your board. The amount of 
information depends on the software 
but can include the number of calls, 
both total and per user, the speeds 
used, the number of downloads and 



I'M soi*ry^ I thin{< we'd be better ofF with a slide rule. 



VouF* Choice h■.^'1\■. 



The main menu from the Big Bang Burger Bar BBS. Clever names like this are 
a good way of attracting callers, but the work doesn't stop there... 



users that you do so. 

It is also a good idea to decide 
on a standard archive program which 
is used to archive all the files on 
your BBS. This makes it easier for 
beginners as they don't have to have 
lots of different archive programs 
and can get used to one In 
particular. Which archive program you 
use is up to you. I'd recommend 
LHA. 

If your files areas are well 
organised, easy to use and contain 
useful, up-to-date software, your 
board will be a success. Once you 
have the callers the messages will 



which protocols were used how 
often. 

Very often to compile these 
statistics you will need external 
programs and we'll be taking a look 
at the sort of programs available In a 
future issue. 

7 DOORS 

A door is an external program that 
can be run by the users. Most 
commonly this is some form of on- 
line game, and as such it can be very 
enjoyable. Other doors include a 
*time bank" where users can store 
the time they have left on the board 




The main menu from Mission Possible 
layout. Easy to use; that way you won 

I begin to mount up and ttie board will 
become more Interesting, attracting 
even more regular callers. 

5 CONFIGURATION 
MENU 

This area is designed for users to 
configure the system for their own 
use. From here they can tell the 
system whether they want to have 
ANSI (colour) menus, how many lines 
per screen their comms package 



8BS, clearly showing the menu style 
't lose any callers 

for a later date, and interactive BBS 
lists. 

8 LOGOFF MENU 

You should have a log off menu 
giving users the chance to change 
their mind about whether they wish 
to leave the BBS, A handy option to 
include Is the ability to leave you a 
message before leaving the BBS. 
Once the user has chosen to 
leave the board the final log off 





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message Is a good place to make 
some friends. If you place brief 
details of other boards you 
recommend users will see them as 
they log off and give them a call. 

The sysops of those boards will 
be more than grateful for any 
publicity they get and will probably 
return the favour. 

STANDING OUT FROM 
THE CROWD 

There are literally hundreds of 
bulletin boards in the UK, all offering 
very similar facilities and files. In 
order to make your board stand out It 
is important to offer something 
different, something to attract people 
to your board. 

LAYING OUT 

Once you have attracted your callers 
you need to keep them. 

The best way to do this is to 
make your board interesting to use 
by adding pictures to each menu, or 
laying each one out in a specific 
style. Pernicious Anaemia, for 
instance has a horror-related quote 
at each menu; Mission impossible 
BBS has menus laid out to resemble 
drop down menus on a computer. 

it is important though that the 
BBS Is still easy to use, even with 
your fancy layout. And if you use a lot 
of ANSI graphics then be careful not 
to make things too complicated, 
otherwise the board will be too slow 
for slow callers to use, 

USER FRIENDLY 

It doesn't matter how pretty the 
board Is; if it Is difficult to use, or too 
slow, people won't use It, 

Stay user-friendly at all times. 
Help files makes the board easier to 
use. Having a help file on each menu 
is tedious to set up but is a great 
boon, particularly for new users. 

THEME TUNES 

Another way to attract, and keep, 
callers is to have a board theme. 

If you have a hobby or interest 
(apart from the Amiga) you can use 
that as a theme for the board and 
attract other like minded people. 

For Instance, The Big Bang 
Burger Bar has a Hitch Hikers Guide 
to ttie Gaiaxy theme and attracts 
users who have read and enjoyed the 
books. Pernicious Anaemia 
specialises in horror films and 
books, in particular vampires. A lot of 
its callers have an interest in that 
area. 

It is also possible to have a 
computer-related theme; 
I programming or AMOS, for Instance. 
' It does help to have some knowledge 
In the area though, otherwise you'll 
be Inundated with questions you 
can't answer. 

matlnutd an poge 91 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST T992 



T^ 




AMERICAS LARGEST 

SUPPLIER OF 

AMIGA CUSTOM 

CHIPS + UPGRADES '^fww^ 

657U-036 keyboatd thip 

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AIIWO origmai PIS. 220 volls 

A50t original new 512K moduJe ,.„..,..,. 

A5(K> lialemji] fltuppy drive 

Pdnawnic 32k printer buffer chip 

Citizen 32k printer bul^er chip „ 

GVP-SIMM 32JlMb/«) 



S372A(PAL) 1 Meg Agnus £31,1(1 

S375 (PAL) 2 Meg Agnus £39.50 

1.3 Kickstan ROM il9.70 

AJOO UK Keylmard-fsclofy new (#312JO2-.Ol)£35.60 

5719Gaiy £10.44 

8362 Denise i hrtghl jE13.90 

1 x 4/JSO Static Column Zip £15.60 

SS20A CIA (2MHi) Great price jE6.35 

A500 PC Motherboard -PAL, populated & tested -(new low price) Rev. 3 , 

A2tK)0PC MolhertKianl-PAL, populated & tested - Includes the 1.3 Rom, S372A 1 Meg 

Agnus & Super Denise S373 installed (factory new) , 



£8.75 

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£46,00 

£'>.(XI 

-i;i:.j.i) 

...IIJU.OD 
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...£301.60 



UPGRADE VOUR ASOK TO THE A5t» PLUS - 8373 SUPER DENISE - £21,25 



Advanced .\miga Analyser: Sophisllcated but ea.sy to u-se. Ciletks status uf all data tnuismissions/signals, disk . 
drive, pons. bufJ'tr cbipei, alij^nmenc, joystick + mouse. Checks status of read/write errors and [ells 
what chips arc bad, (hardware and software) A must for every Amiga ser^'ite centre , £42,50 

McCoy Pl.CC; (Bumdy clone) Agnus chip puller (sold by CBM for £32) £9.50 

Amiga Di^nostictan: Diagnase up to 2K ct>mmon pn>bkms. Comes wilh diagnostic software 

and tHHiklec. -Save time & money by locating faulty chips yourself ..„., ,.... ...£9.R6 

The Final Test: Diagnostic diskette tests lieyboard, display, graphics. Workbench, 

sound, liming' realtime clock, RAM,eK, (12 diagnostic programs in all) „ .£6.95 

MegaChip 3000 by DKB: Upgrade your ASOO/AISOWAIOOO to 2Mb 
of chip RAM, Includes 2 meg Agnus, chip puller & "Final Test" 

diagnostic diskette (no soldering). Sanieft372B cbipused in A3000,-,,.,,,. £173,40 

Buy the MegaChip from us and we'll give you tbe new Super Denise foe .,,. £17.00 

Switcfaitt by Global Upgrades Irtc. Hlecnonic ROM selector switch for 1.3 or 2.0. Makes all yout software 
compatible. Keyboard or mou.se controlled. Does not overlap (he 6S0OO - allows for acceieialor 
(2.0 oompalible) very popular in the U.S. (iirclutles dual-ttme speaker for confirmation) £19.50 



•2.0 Ilpgratie Kit (PAL td,): Contains ROM, ) ,000 paie manual and diskettes £50,75 

*2.0 Upgrade ROM only (PAL): No manual or diskettes, ideal for multi -computer 

owners, schools, businesses, etc „,. „,„„ £22.()0 



AdRAM 540 fur ASOO hj [CD: Add up to 4 megs of RAM with taHery backup 

intemaily in your A500. 1 Meg/2 Megs (install up to 4 megs)- 



AdSpeed by ICD: Best accelerator in its price r^ge,,, £94,50 

Flicker Free Video by ICD: Eliminates interlace flicker ..„.„ .......£ 1 32.50 

Klicker Fixer by Microway (PAL) £130,50 



-^ DO NOT FEAR! 



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KCS PC Board for ASOO witboui MS DOS p&p £2 £ i "^ 00 

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1 Mb Fat Agnus B372 tree pap £35 00 

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nAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnAnA 



C O MM 5 



continued fmnt page 89 

FIDONET UNK5 

Another way to attract callers is to 
provide a Rdonet iinti. Fidonet 
provides you with a host of 
messages and the facility to send 
electronic mail to any Fidonet board 
in the world. 

Obviously this costs money, and 
you're the one who has to pay for it. 
It's not usually too expensive though: 
one phone call per night to transfer 
messages. 

It Is also possible to get a 
central board to call you for a regular 
fee, usually around £35. For that you 
get all the messages you can handle 
and can also request files from other 
boards. 

To run a Fidonet board you need 
to meet certain criteria, such as no 
pornographic or illegal material, real 
names only etc. If you're interested 
in finding out more about Fidonet, 
contact a local Fidonet sysop and he 
or she should be able to tell you who 
to get In touch with. 

RULES OF THE GAME 

Just as Fidonet has rules so should 
you. Of course, it's up to you exactly 
which rules you have - but when 
writing them you should bare in mind 
the sort of user you want to attract, 
the range of users who use bulletin 
boards and also how strict you wish 
to be. 

Too strict a board will result in 
less callers, and those who do call 
are more liitely to break a rule 
they've forgotten about. If you don't 
have any rules, users don't know 
where they stand and some callers 
may be offended by the actions of 
others. 

It is a very good idea to specify 
no uploads of commercial software. 
BBSs are often subject to checks 
and If any are guilty of piracy they 
can be closed down very quickly. 

Foul language is also a good 
thing to ban; the range of modem 
users is very wide and many will be 
offended by bad language. 

UMITATIONS AND 
RATIOS 

Most boards enforce limits on their 
callers' daily usage. Limiting the time 
on-line Is the most common, along 
with the number of files they can 
download. 

As users call more often and 
upload files, a nice touch is to 
reward those particular users, the 
regulars, if you like, with a higher 
security rating and allow them more 
time on-line. 

To encourage uploads as well as 
downloads many boards enforce a 
"file ratio" which limits the number of 
files which can be downloaded 
depending on how many you have 
uploaded. You might for example 



only be able to download four files 
for every one you upload or 
alternatively you might be able to 
download 250K of files for every 25K 
uploaded. 

A size restriction as in the 
second example is generally better 
for you because the uploads will be 
bigger and generally better. It's 
worse for the callers though, 
because they have to spend more 
time uploading. 

Whether you enforce a file ratio 
is up to you. Speaking from 
experience, 1 don't think it makes 
much difference either way. The 
uploads you do get will generally not 
be of sufficient quality to warrant the 
restriction and there wilt always be 
users who will download as many 
files as possible before moving on to 
another board. 

Most BBS software enables you 
to give people who upload software a 
"prize" of more time on the board 
and this is a better way to encourage 
uploads, twice the amount of time 
spent uploading added to the users' 
time on-line is common. 

MEMBERSHIP FEES 

Some boards offer a membership 
scheme for callers. For a small fee 
(usually around £10) users are given 
much greater access to the board 
than non-members, given longer time 
on-line and are allowed to download 
more files. 

Many boards which offer 
membership have special members- 
only lines and areas which contain 
the best software downloadable for 
free. 

Other advantages are usually 
given, perhaps a help-line, or the 
ability to send a disk to the sysop to 
obtain the software on the board 
without having to download it. 

The only boards that can really 
offer a membership scheme are 
those which offer a large number of 
files and other services. 

There are so many boards 
around that it must be something 
really special to be able to charge for 
access. Most users would rather go 
to another BBS and get the same 
software for free. 

THAT'S ALL FOLKS 

That's it for this time. I^ext month I'll 
be taking a close look at the BBS 
software available and comparing the 
various facilities so that you can 
decide which option is best for you. 

Phlltp Harris can be contacted on 

CIX (081 390 12SS) as plharris. 



The excellent Big Bang Burger 

Bar is on 081 420 6356 while 

IVfission Impossible BBS is on 

0602 654329. 



ORGANISATIONAL OPTIONS 



There are three main options when d«4^ing on the tayout of your board, 
sub|ect-basect, area-based or mixed. 

SUBJECT-BASED 

On a subject-based board all actions associated with a particular subject area 
are grouped together under one menu. For example, all access to the Amiga 
files and messages would be via a single Amiga menu. There would be 
corresponding menus for other areas, PC, films etc. This option can result in 
the menus being cluttered so menus need to be carefully designed. 

AREA-BASED 

On an area-based board actions are grouped together with entries for each 
subject available. For example, there would be a flies menu, the flies menu 
would allow you to download a file from various groups, Amiga, PC etc. There 
would be similar areas for messages etc. 

MIXED BASE 

As the title suggests this is a mixture of the two. Options at the main menu 
allow you to branch into areas such as Amiga or PC. From there each subject 
menu allows you to branch to messages or files. This type of layout makes the 
system menus less cluttered, trying to fit all the message reading options and 
all the file download and search options on one screen is not always an easy 
task. 

Which type you use Is entirely up to you; it makes very little difference to 
the user. Your BBS software may have been written with a bias to a particular 
sort of layout, so try and have a chat with someone who already uses that 
particular software, to make sure your Ideas are usable. 



WHAT YOU NEED 




The fundamental building blocl< 
of the BBS board. An ASOO will 
do Just the job. This Is where 
all 'Uie action starts - software 
downloads for free and you can 
chat 'til the early hours with 
other nightbirds... 



Next up's the modem - the faster the 
better. Remember the quiclter users 

can carry out uploads and downloads, 

the less time they spend on-iine and 

the more often thsy will visit 




Don't overtook the need for a 
phone line. Check out the 
teiecommun (cations rivals, BT 
and Mercury, to assess the 
potential size of the hole to be 
burned In your pocket 



A hard drive is not essential, 

but It will speed up your board, 

enatriing your BBS to store 

more flies - an essential 

element In ensurlrtg your i>oard 

Is a success 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16* AUGUST 1992 



91 



AM IG A DOS 



Cr 



Ojcking 



Shell 



Mark Smiddy 
demonstrates 
The Pest 
appointment 
scheduler for 
AmigaDOS 1,3 





oes anyone out there 
sttll use AmigaDOS 1.3? 
It's slow, bugged and 
written In a language, 
BCPL, few people have even heard 
of - let alone programmed In. I can 
understand folks still using the 1.3 
ROM to retain downward 
compatibility, but still being stuck 
with AmigaDOS 1.3 must be a 
comparative nightmare. Uke all 
classics, AmigaDOS 1.3 Is still the 
weapon of choice for many of you - 
as has been pointed out by the 
battery of Indignation from 1,3 
users wanting to use Tfte Peat 
[Amiga Shopper 13). 

For those who missed it, the 
original Pest is shown in Listing 1 
and only works with AmigaDOS 2 or 
higher. The main bone of contention 
lies with the use of the revised 
environment handler in lines 4 and 
5. (Additionally, commands such as 
IF, ELSE and ECHO are automatically 
resident in AmigaDOS 2 and make 
this startup extension execute at a 
reasonable speed.) 

The compatibility probiem is this: 
in AmigaDOS 2 an environmental 
variable can be read directly by a 
command by preceding the variable's 
name mVh a dollar symbol. For 
instance, say you gave the arbitrary 
variable NAME a value of "Mark", 
and then typed the following: 

1>ECK0 "Hello $NfiME" 

The response from the computer 
would be: 

Hello Mark 

In The Pest the current date is sent 
to a file and processed into a global 
environmental variable (called NOW) 
using EDIT. 

Typically, a date such as: 

Kfcmday 2-Mar-92 12:30:04 

becomes: 

2-Mar-92 

At Line 4, The Pest creates a print 
file using the environmental variable 
NOW, vifhich will contain a string 



such as this one here: 

== Reminders for: 2 -Mar- 92 == 

The same thing can be achieved in 
AmigaDOS 1.3 by joining files 
together: 

echo >T!pfl "== Reminders J 

for: " noline 

echo >T:pf2 " ==*n" 

join Tspfl EMV:iiow T:p£2 J 

AS T:pf 

An alternative method which 
achieves the same effect looks like 
this; 

echo >T:pfl "== Rardnders J 



the search string is read directly by 
AmigaDOS from the NOW variable. 
The solution is to trick AmigaDOS 
1.3 into reading the variable from a 
file, and this can be accomplished 
using interactive mode, by following 
the command vifith a question mark: 

search <:ENV:iiow s:Reminders 7 

Here, I've reduced the command to 
its most basic format. 

The file "S: Reminders" is being 
searched for the string contained in 
"EI\(V;now". 

Interactive mode has been 
covered previously in this series, but 
it's worth going over again because it 
is an important, misunderstood and 



LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 • LISTING 1 



The Pest AmigaDOS 2 version 

1. echo >T:Autol "ETA/ /*nDFA/ /" 

2. dace to T: today 

3. edit T: today to ENVinow vd.tb TiAutol 

4. echo >T:pf "== Reminders for; ^now ==*n" 

5. search >->T:pf b: Reminders "$now" nonum 

6. if warn 

7. echo "Nothing in reminder diary today. . . 

8. else 

9. run more T:pf 

10. endif 



for: " noline 

join T:pfl ENVinow AS Tipf 

echo 5->T:pf " --*n" 

Of course, both those methods 
assume you want to exactly mirror 
the original function provided by the 
AmigaDOS 2 version. 

In practice, it would be better to 



very under-used concept. 

You are probably already aware 
that If you supply a question mark as 
part of a command line, AmigaDOS 
spits out a command's template and 
waits for you to enter something. 
This technique was quite widely used 
in older versions (1.2 and earlier) to 
pre-load commands such as DIR, The 



LISTING 2 • LISTING 2 • LISTING 2 



The Pest AmigaDOS 1.3 Versk>n 

X. echo >T:Autol "DTA/ /*nDFA/ /" 

2. echo >T:Auto2 "2n;d" 

3. echo >T!pf "== Reminders for today ==*n" 

4. date >T; today 

5. edit T: today to EKV:now with TiAutol 

0. search »T!pf <ERV:now s : Reminders nonum 

7. if warn 

8. echo "Nothing in reminder diazy today. . ." 

9. else 

10. edit T:pf to T:pfl with T!»Wto2 

11. run more Tipfl 

12. endif 



just use a simpler string as is shown 
here: 

echo >T:pf "== Reminders J 
for today ==*n" 

A more subtle problem arises at Line 
5 where the reminders file is being 
searched for sjsecific dates, because 



an-ival of RESIDENT in 1.3 and ROM- 
based AmigaDOS at 2.x means this 
technique has been almost 
forgotten. 

The key thing to remember is 
this: when a command enters 
interactive mode, it can read input 

(ostinued ss page K 



93 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



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A M I G A D O S 



imtbiiHit film pcqa 92 

from anywhere - including files. This 
effect can be achieved by supplying a 
command's argument in a file and 
preceding the filename with "<" 
(redirect input from file). Here for 
example, the search string is read 
from the contents of the file 
"ENVmow": 

search <ENV:iioh siKeminders 7 

Interestingly enough, it is also 
possible to supply further 
parameters on the command line 
too. Therefore, since The Pest uses 
the NO MUM switch, we can add that 
too: 

searcih <ENV:iiow s : Reminders J 
HGNOH ? 

The following piece of code should 
help illustrate the usefulness of 
using the question mark to put 
Amiga DOS into interactive mode. Try 
typing it in and executing it, but take 



to the NIL: device and the condition 
codes (WARN, ERROR and so on) 
tested, but The Pest creates a file 
based on SEARCH'S output. 

The solution therefore is to 
create another EDIT macro which will 
hack out the extraneous Information 
and make the output look better. As 
it turns out, this is quite simple to 
do. The file consists of a header, one 
blank line, then the unwanted 
template. Therefore the EDIT macro 
is constructed to skip two lines and 
delete the next one like this: 

2n;d 

A script based on this idea is shown 
in Listing 2 and should be inserted 
Just before the LOADWB command in 
the startup-sequence. Alternatively, 
you can execute the script in its own 
right - but this should be done late 
on in the startup-sequence. 

PEST CONTROL 

lyost of this article has so far 
concentrated on tine use of the 




LISTING 3 • LISTING 3 • LISTING 3 



The Pest 2 - Newshell/EDIT Versfon 

1. echo >T:AutOl "UFA/ /•nIffl'A/ /" 

2. dote >T: today 

D 3. edit Tt today to EHVjilcw with Ttftutol 

4. search >HlIi: <eEv:iiow S: reminders 7 

5. if warn 

6. echo "*o[0)OH*etJHothiiiB In rendndar diaey today..." 

7. else 

8. echo "•e[0|OH*e[J== Ttia Pest (1.3> »=*nOoe moment J 
please. .." 

\ 9. echo >T:A«to2 "2CL" 
10. echo >T:a "0{f/" 
tLecho >T:b "/f?m)" 

12, Join T:a EHVsnow Tsb AS ttc 

13, edit T:c TO T:A-uto3 with T:Aiito2 

14. edit S: Reminders with TjAuto3 VBR=* rOaNIL: 

15. ask "Press <Ret«m> to exit" 
IS. endlf 

17. endcli 



note of what happens when you do 
so. 

LIST >T;Temp SYS: 
ECHO >T: Search ".info" 
SE&RCS <T: Search TiTenp J 
HOMtlH ? 

The first two lines create a dummy 
file to search and something to 
search for respectively. This just 
ensures the SEARCH command will 
do something. Execute the search a 
couple of times and watch what 
happens. 

Notice how the command's 
template appears? If this output 
were being sent to a file, that 
template would also appear and 
would look messy. This technique is 
usually used with output redirected 



SEARCH command to locate and 
print text strings within a file - that 
is, after all, what it's there for. 
However, the AmigaDOS line editor 
also has a search feature and with a 
little cajoling it can be pressed Into 
useful sen/ice. 

The basic idea is this: get EDIT 
to search for any lines containing the 
required string - a date in this case - 
and display them. In fact, this is 
more complex than It appears. 
Because EDIT Is a line editor. It 
stops when a matching string is 
found on a line; initiate another 
search from the same position and 
EDIT finds the same occurrence. In 
other words it get locked in a loop - 
always assuming you can get it to 

tM^mi M poga 17 



D0S-2-DUALITY 

For a iiumbef of reasons 1 am not a big fan of ROM swKches, however I 
have to admit, there are beneflts of having two operating systems In one 
machine. One of the disadvantages, of course, Is the Incompatibility 
between AmigaDOS 1.3 and AmigaDOS 2. Several readers have written In 
asking If It's possible to automatically sense which KIcicstart Is In use and 
load the appropriate version of Workbench/ AmigaDOS from a hard dislt. 

The obvious approach is to use the AmigaDOS 2 boot menu (hold both 
mouse buttons after a reset) and have two bootable partitions on the hard 
disk. The first partition contains a 1.3 Wori^bench, the second contains 
version 2. This can be problematical - especially if you have a mouse based 
ROM switch. 

One option is to ask which Kickstart Is in use, then execute the correct 
sequence. It could look something like this: 

ASK "Press Y <Retum> for 1,3 or <Return>- for 2.04" 
IF vasN 

EXECOTB S;BOOtl.3 

EKDIF 

; HbB 2,04 boot segueoce ocmtlmies here... 

Besides being a little awkward, this doesn't actually work very well! If you 
display something early in the AmigaDOS 2 Startup-sequence, the default 
screen preferences are loaded from ROM. This causes IPREFS to complain 
when It starts later In the script. 

The only other alternative is to build a startup wrfiich will automatically 
sense which Kickstart version is in use at the time and load the appropriate 
Workbench. This method is shown in Listing 4 as a script fragment which 
should be entered at the beginning of the main Workbench 2 Startup- 
sequence, 

HOW rr WORKS 

ECL£CnC STARTUP 

1. Creates a file in the RAM disk containing the location of ECHO. This 
command is resident in AmigaDOS 2, and a transient command in older 
versions. Therefore the file will contain either; 

BESinEHT ECHO 

-or- 

C:VCSO 

2. Tests the file created in the previous step for the presence of the 
substring: RESIDENT. If this is found {as It will be for Kickstart 2) the WARN 
flag will be cleared; otherwise it will be set. 

In effect, the WARN condition, warns (vrell, what else would you expect 
something cailed 'warn' to do?) of the lower Kickstart version. 
(Conventionally, this test could be done with VERSION, but the command can 
be problematical when used In this way.) 

3. Checks w^ich version of Kickstart Is in use and branches accordingly, 
Kickstart 1.3 causes execution to continue; Kickstart 2 causes execution to 
branch to 10. 

4. Calls the 1.3 ASSIGN command to re-assign the command directory. (See 
notes be tow). 

5,8. Re-assign the main system di rectories to their correct positions on the 
hard drive. 

9. Runs the original 1.3 Startuphsequenoe. 

10. Close the IF construct opened at 3. Execution only gets here if the 2.04 
Kickstart was sensed. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



95 



33 Ormskif 
Road^ 
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order. Although our prices are not 
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to olfer consistently good service and 
backijp. This isn't just our opinion we 
*8fe voted 'Best Dealer 1989' by the 
readers of ST World iragazine. not tor 
'ttie number ol t>oxes sbifted'. btit for 
quality service. 

Alt prhes are correct at copy dale 
W/06/92 (wtile stixks last), and are 
atjiiect to change without prior notice 
Please phone tor i^ to date prices AH 
prices include VW. On orders under 
£150 aoW £3 tor postal deivery or £6 
!0! next working day delivery On orders 
over £tSO add £3 for next working day 
deivsry (prices tor defvary UK 
mainlarK] onl^ AH prices avaHatile an 
Mail Order Shop prices may dilfer Shop 
& Mak order premises: 33 Ormskirk 
Road. Preston. Lancasttre. Pfll 2QP 
Open Monday to Seiurday 9 30am to 
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Ladbroke Corr^xiting Mernabonat e a 
trading name of Ladbroke Computing 
Ud. Ai trade marks reco7>i5sd 



Du6 to limitations of space 
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A M I G A D O S 



conliaued from page 95 

USING ECifcnc 

STARTUP 

If only it were that stmplel In many 
respects it Is, but a certain 
amount of work remains, to 
ensure you do get a complete 1.3 
Workbench. Before you run this 
script for the first time you should 
copy the appropriate directories 
from an original copy of 
Workbench 1.3,x. Assuming you 
have booted from the hard disk 
(into AmigaDOS 2) this is what 
you have to do: 

MftKEDIR SyS!EfEVS_1.3 

MAKEDIR SYS!LIBS_1.3 

MMEDIR SyS:S_1.3 

J&KEDIR SYS:L_1.3 

MAKEDIR SYS:C_1.3 

MftKEDIR SYS!System_l,3 

MAKEDIR SYS: PrefB_1.3 

COPY dfOjDBVS SYS: J 

DEVB_1.3 ALL 

COPY dfO:LIBS SYB;J 

LIBS_1.3 ALL 

COPY dfO:L SYS:L_1,3 ALL 

COPY dfO:S SYS:S_1.3 AI,L 

COPY d£0:C SYS:C_1.3 ALL 

COPY dfO: System J 

Syatein_1.3 ALL 

COPY dfOjPrefs J PreEa_1.3 

AliL 

COFY dfOsfontS FOMTS: ALL 

COPY dfO: System. info J 

SYS : Systeni_l . 3 . info 

COPY dfO:Prefs.iELfo J 

SYS : Pref s_l . 3 . info 

You also need to modify the 
following in the 1,3 Startup- 
sequence. (Don't forget, the 1.3 
startup script is in S_l,31) These 
lines: 

SYS : System/FaBtManiFirst 
SYS: System/ SetMap GB 
Pati. ram: c: sya: system J 
e: sysjprefs add 

should be re-written thus: 

SYS ! SYatem_l . 3 / FastMemFl ret 
SYS!SYStem_l,3/SetMap GB 
Path ram: c: eystenul.S J 
s: syB:prefB_1.3 add 



GOTTA PROBLEM? 

If you get stuck with AmIgaOOS or 
there is anything specific you would 
like to see covered here, drop a line 
detailing your conundrum to: Mark 

Smiddy, Amiga Shopper, 30 

Monmouth St, BATH, BAl 2BW. 

Sorry, no personal correspondence 

can be entered into. You can EMall 

me on CIX @ "SMIDOID". 



(ontinotd from ftqe 95 

loop in the first case that is. 

The solution is a macro like the 
following: 

0(f /"string"/; ?;n) 

Briefly, here's what it all does... 



The semi-colon character is used as 
a command separator. 

• 0() 

The commands contained in brackets 
are executed in a loop until the input 
is exhausted. 

• f/"Btriiig"/ 

Locate the string "String" anywhere 
in the current line, or search the text 
until any occurrence is found. (The 
string in the final script is assembled 
as part of the macro.) This function 
is case-sensitive so UPPER and lower 
case are different. 



Display the current line. Strictly 
speaking this is the verily function 
which sends output to EDIT's own 
verify display port. This is usually the 
cun-ent console and the relevance of 
this will become clear later on. 



Go to the next line, or stop if there is 
no input left to search. 

Unfortunately, that is not the 
complete answer. EDIT normally 
outputs every line it scans to the 
console or the TO file. It also 
generates a separate "verify" output 
and this is the one we will use here. 
The main scan output will be sent to 
oblivion down the NIL: device, and 
only the lines displayed with the '?' 
command will be shown. 

HOW rr WORKS 

Listing 3 

The complete EDIT-based Pest Is 
longer, but the exercise gives rise to 
some interesting examples in its own 
right. You should note that a lot of 
commands are grouped together, 
and thanks to the disk caching 
system, this reduces the amount of 
disk access. 

The Pest was only intended for 
AmigaDOS 2 because it takes 
advantage of the ROM-based 
(internal) commands, but this script 
was provided as an alternative that 
will only work in AmigaDOS 1.3. 
Here's how it all works: 

1. Creates an EDIT macro that will be 
used to extract the date component 
from the day/date/time format 
provided by DATE at Step 2. See 
Amiga Shopper 13 for a more 
complete description. 



2. Reads the current system time 
and date and sends it to a file called 
Today. 

Of course, your system must 
have a real time clock for this to be 
of any benefit. 

3. Edits the date in the Today file as 
described at Step 1. The edited 
version is sent to the file, "now". 

4. Looks in your reminder file to see 
if any dates match the current date 
read from the system clock. If no 
match is found, the WARN flag is set; 
it is cleared otherwise. 

5. Tests the WARN condition from 
Step 4. If no matches were found (in 
which case WARN=TRUE) execution 
continues at Step 6. If WARN is not 
equal to TRUE, control branches 
forward to Step 7. 

6. Clears the screen and displays a 
short message. 

The screen is cleared using the 
short escape sequence: 
*e[0;OH*e[J, (This is available from 



"/" delimiter. 

12. The three files are now married 
together to form something which 
(assuming the date was 12-Jun-92) 
would look like this: 

0(f/ 

12-Jim-92 

f;?!n) 

Of course, that doesn't make a 

macro, but it is necessary to include 
a variable in a complex string such 
as this one. Next the string has to be 
assembled... 

13. ...which is what this does. Look 
back at that macro, Auto2. It joins 
the three lines together as one and 
presto - a macro is created and 

ready to run. 

14. In effect this just runs the 
macro, Auto3, The reminders file is 
scanned for the current date and any 
matches are displayed on the current 
console. The TO file is directed to 
NIL: so spurious rubbish produced by 



LISTING 4 • LISTING 4 • LISTING 4 



Eclectic Startup-sequence 

1. v&ich >RAM: tenqp ECHO 

2. search. >NIL; RAMstanp "RESIEEHT" 

3. if vram 

4. C_l . 3/ASSIGN C : SYS : C_l , 3 
5.C!ASSrGNS: SYS:S_1.3 

6. C: ASSIGN DEVS: DEVS_1.3 

7. CiASSIGN LIBS: LIBS_1,3 

8. CiASSICSN L: L„1.3 

9. execute Ss Startup- sequence 

10. endif 

11. iOlie Workbench 2.04 startugp continues here 



Shell using the alias CLEAR.) 

7. If execution gets here from Step 6 
it branches directly to Step 16r 
otheraflse it continues at 8, 

8. Clears the screen and displays a 
two line message. (See Step 6.) 

9. Creates the EDIT macro, Auto2. 
This command tells EDIT to 
concatenate (join together) three 
consecutive lines. Literally, two lines, 
twice. 

10. This is the first part of an EDIT 
macro which will form the search. 
The text in quotes is written to the 
file 'a', held in the RAI^ directory *T'. 
The line ends at the first delimiting 
'/"; a line-feed will automatically be 
appended. 

11. This is the third (not second) part 
of the EDIT macro mentioned above. 
Mote how ft begins with the closing 



this command is not displayed. 

15. Forces a short delay so you can 
examine the list of jobs to do. 

IS. Closes the IF... ELSE... ENDIF 
construct opened at Step 5. 

17. Close the cun'ent Shell. 

It's important to note here that 
this command can be the last one in 

the normal startup-sequence if you 
include either version as part of your 
usual startup. It must be included if 
you start Pest using the NEWSHELL 
command: 



NEWSHEIJ. FROM S:Peat 



(B 



COMING NEXT MONTH 

Next month's Cracking tlie Shell 

will demonstrate how to program 

a perpetual calendar in 

AmigaDOS. See you then. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16* AUGUST 1992 



97 



AMOS 



i4aiON 



Jason Holborn 
spills the beans 
on 'what^s hot 
and v^hafls not 
in the ysforld of 
AMOS, 
continues his 
tutorial on 
AMOS for 
beginners and 
explains the art 
of creating high 
score tables,,. 



AMOS Action may only be 
three pages long this 
month, but don't worry, 
we haven't sacrificed on 
content. We've all the usual 
features including games 
programming focusing on high scor« 
tables this month and AMOS for 
beginners which highlights the joys 
of hardware scrolling. Oh and don't 
fo^et to check out page 104 for 
Europress' AMOS challenge. 

Changes are afoot in the world of 
AMOS. Just when I was starting to 
think that the AMOS scene had 
nothing new to offer since last 
month's exciting installment of 
AMOS Action, 1 get a ietter from Anne 
Tucker of Totally AMOS fame 
informing me of some quite major 
changes that are taking place in the 
organisation of the off ciai AMOS PD 
library (it's deemed official because 
it was launched with the assistance 
of Europress Software). 

Untii now, the AMOS library had 
been handled very capably by my 
good friend Sandra Sharkey. As 
anyone who has either bought disks 



from Sandra or just simply monitored 
the library's development will know, 
Sandra has done a sterling job of 
launching and then fine tuning the 
library into the ultra-efficient miracle 
of PD distribution which we now 
know. Sadly though, it seems that 
Sandra has stepped down from her 
mantle in order to pursue her own 
interests. I'm sure we would all 
agree that Sandra will be sorely 
missed from the AMOS scene. 

Bad news indeed, but it seems 
that this story at least does have a 
happy ending. Rnding a replacement 
for Sandra is a formidable task 
indeed, but AMOS owners can rest 
easy with the news that the official 
AMOS PD library has been placed in 
the capable hands of Len and Anne 
Tucker, two very talented and active 
members of the AMOS community. 

PRICE FREEZE 

Even Len admits that filling Sandra's 
shoes is not going to be easy, but he 
feels confident that he and Anne will 
be able to mairtain the standards of 
service which have made the AMOS 
PD library the choice for AMOS 
programmers and developers alike. 
Indeed, the changeover should be 
transparent to most customers 
thanks to Len's decision to freeze 
prices on all the library's range of PD 
and iicenseware disks. 

You can find out more about the 
AMOS PD library and its extensive 
range of AMOS only disks by writing 
(stamps are jolly expensive these 
days, so don't forget to include e 
stamped addressed envelope!) to 
Len at 1 Penmynydd Road, Swansea 
SAB 7EH. Alternatively, you can call 
Len or Anne on 0792 588156. 

TOTALLY AWESOME 

On the subject of Len Tucker, I'm 
sure both Len and Anne would be 
very grateful if I mentioned the fact 
that issue 4 of Totaify AMOS is now 
available and issue 5 is only a 
matter of days away. Each issue is 
packed full of reviews, tutorials and 
hints and tips all of which are 
designed to make your AMOS 
programming sessions more 
productive. For more, contact Len on 
the address (not forgetting to 
enclose a SAE of course!). Or you 
can talk to them on 0706 376572. 




3,MtlSIC, 
4.(5WHICS 



7. OTHER INFO. 
3 .QUICKIE IHDEX. 



iiaiaiiiPiPW 





If you're an AMOS user, then don't miss the excellent Totally AMOS disk 
magazine. As the name suggests, Totally Amos Is dedicated entirely to AMOS 



AMOS ANSWERS 



If AMOS is giving you grief, then 
let Jason Holborn bring relief 

MAZE CRAZY 

I am trying to write a game for my children which Involves them guiding a 
frog around a computer-generated maze. I have already managed to get 
mazes stored as IFF pictures woridng, but they take up a lot of disit space. 
What I need Is a routine in AMOS which will automatically generate 
working mazes with either 8 or 16 pixel wide paths. 

Derek Godson 
Southend-On-Sea, Essex 

Hmm, sounds like quite an interesting project to set all you AMOS 
programmers out there. In fact, it's so interesting that I think I'll turn it into a 
mini-competition. If you think that you can write a routine which will do the 
job, then send it into the usual address. Entries will be Judged on efficiency 
of code and the quality of the end results. Apart from the enviable accolade 
of seeing your name in print, the winner will also receive a piece of mystery 
software. Go for iti 

DIRECT QUESTION 

When oiw of my prc^rams starts to get quite large, Direct Mode stops 
working and I keep getting a message saying Too Many Direct Motto 
VariaUes' even thmigh I'm not usii^ any. Is tliere a way around this problem? 
Is It true that Sierra Online is writing a game using AMOS called Hotel 
Manager which Is very similar to Monopoly. Would it need to get 
permission from Waddingtons? 

Paul Mtehalak 
Chasetown, Staffe 

AMOS' error messages are sometimes a little misleading. The error 
message that you're getting hasn't got anything to do with Direct Mode 
variables; it is being caused by a lack of memory. If possible, try to split your 
program up into several smaller programs and then chain them together. 
This will save a lot of memory. Failing that, get some more RAM. 

Unless a program is a blatant copy of an established game, then you 
won't need to get permission from a third party to market it. If Sierra is 
producing a game based around Monopoly, then it will have to be somewhat 
different in its gameplay and graphics to avoid legal action from 
Waddingtons. If you do produce a direct clone of an established title, then 
you'reaskingfortrouble. tM'minim poje 1 03 



98 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



AMOS 




Ifter last month's took at 
I opening and positioning 

I screens, we continue the 

ttimne with a look at hardware 
scrolling, probably one of the most 
powerful aspects of AMOS. For 
games that require the background 
Image to be scrolled smoothly 
either up or down, left or right, 
AMOS' hardware scrolling facility 
gives you the tools to do the job 
with a minimal amount of fuss. 

Considering the oompiexities of 
hardware scrolling, you'il be pleased 
to learn that incorporating hardware 
scroiiing Into your own AMOS 
programs is surprisingly easy. 
Indeed, all that is required to get 
things moving (pardon the pun) is the 
command - SCREEN OFFSET. The 
Screen Offset command is similar to 
the Screen Display command that we 
discussed last month except for one 
major difference. 

THROUGH THE WINDOW 

The Amiga's dispiay is split into 
basically two sections - the main 
dfsplay (the area that sprites, 
windows and bobs can be drawn 
into) and the borders around this 
display area. Imagine if you will that 
the display area (or 'viewport' as the 
techies call It) is simply a window in 
your house which you iook through to 
view bobs and sprites outside in your 
garden. With the Screen Dispiay 
command, you can physically move 
the window around the wall, but with 
Screen Offset the window remains in 
the same position but the landscape 
outside it is moved instead. 

All well and good, but there's one 
big problem. If the window is 320 by 
256 pixels wide then the scroll area 
outside must be larger. After ali, if 
the scroll area Is scrolled one pixel 
to the left, a blank 1 pixel line will 
appear on the right. If the display is 
scrolled another pixel to the left, 
another blank line will be displayed. 
To get around this problem, you need 
what Is known as a 'SuperBltMap'. A 
SuperBitMap is simply an image held 
in memory which is larger than the 
rectangular display area that you can 
see on your monitor. 

Tate for example a superbitmap 
that is 640 by 256 pixels, if your 
viewport is only 320 pixels wide, 
then only half of the superbitmap can 
be displayed at any one time. Using 



HARDWARE SCROLLING 



uleuiport ortQln 
M- 



1 



UISIBLE 



Ul^lllPUHT 



SUPEHDITMHP 



Hardware scrolling works by changing the position of the viewport 
so that a different section of a superbitmap is exposed 

hardware scrolling however, it is 
possible to change the position of 
the viewport so that all of the 
superbitmap can be viewed. With a 
game that needs the background to 



be scrolled continuously In one 
direction, programmers cheat by 
simply looping round the 
superbitmap so that when the scroll 
reaches the bitmap's boundaries, it 
wraps back round to view the first 
part of the bitmap. If you understood 
that lot, then you've already got 
hardware scroiiing sussed. 

THEORY INTO PRACTICE 

Now we've covered the theory, the 
time has come to put all that you've 
learned into practice. First though, 
let's take a look at the Screen Offset 
command. The format of the Screen 
Offset command is SCREEN OFFSET 
<Screen Number>, <ViewPort X 
Position>, <ViewPort Y Positlon>, 
The screen number parameter is 
pretty straightforward, but it's worth 
expialning the X and Y parameters. 
These two values denote the X 
and Y position of the top left hand 
comer of the viewport in relation to 
the top left hand corner of the 
superbitmap. If, for example, you had 
a 640 by 256 pixel superbitmap and 
you wanted the viewport to display 
the middle 320 pixels of the 
superbitmap (we'll ignore the Y 
parameter for now), the top left hand 
comer of the viewport would have to 
be placed at 160 pixels left of the 
start of the superbitmap. The middle 



320 by 256 pixels would be 
displayed with 160 by 256 pixels 
hidden on both sides of the viewport. 
To get this kind of display, you would 
therefore enter the line SCREEN 
OFFSET 1,160,0. 

To actually scroll the screen, all 
you need is a continuous loop that 
counts up from to 320 and then 
resets itself and starts counting 
again. When the counter equals 0, 
the first 320 pixels of the bitmap will 
be displayed and when the counter 
reaches 320, the second half of the 
bitmap will be displayed. Clever, eh? 
Let's take a look at the source code 
that will bring this to life. 

Screen Open J 

1,540, 256, 32, Lowres 

Screen Display 1, 128, , 320,256 

Flash Off 

Load Iff "LOWRESPIC.IFF" 

Screen Copy 1,0,0,320,255 J 

To 1,320,0 

Double Buffer 

Do 

For CaUNTER=0 

Screen Offset 

Wait Vbl 

Hext COUNTER 

Loop 

As you can see, the hardware scroll 
example above is fairly simple, but it 
does introduce a couple of new 
commands which you may not have 
encountered. 

The program starts by opening a 
640 by 256 pixel screen in low 



To 319 Step 

1, COUNTER, 



resolution. This creates a 
superbitmapped screen because the 
size of the bitmap that the program 
allocates Is too large to fit on a 
standard low resolution dispiay. in 
the next line we tell AMOS how large 
the bitmap must be - In this case, 
320 by 256 pixels. 

Next we turn off colour cycling 
(Flash Off) and load up a standard 
low resolution IFF image into our 
superbitmap. AMOS will 
automatically load the image Into the 
left hand side of the bitmap so we 
must therefore copy the left hand 
side of the bitmap to the right hand 
side of the superbitmap. This 
effectively gives us two copies of the 
same image side by side within the 
same bitmap. 

Finally we have Double Buffer, 
Double Buffering is quite complex. All 
you need to know for the moment is 
that the Double Buffer command is 
necessary to keep hardware scrolling 
nice and smooth. We'll be covering 
double buffering in great depth in a 
future issue, 

GET SCROLLING 

Once this Is done, we can start to 
scroll the screen. The scroll routine 
contains two loops - one continuous 
loop and a conditional loop which is 
used to count from to 319. We 
count to 316 simply because the 
scroll position will increment in steps 
of 4. Note that the loop doesn't 
count up to 320. This is simply 
because the loop starts at zero and 
therefore counting to 320 would 
actually give 321 steps (divided by 
four, of course!). 

Another new command that you 
may not have encountered is Wait 
VBL. Wait VBL is a very Important 
command that you'll find yourself 
using increasing more as you start to 
play around with graphics that are 
animated (moving). Wait VBL ensures 
that the Amiga only updates its 
screen dispiay when the raster beam 
which draws the screen on to your 
monitor screen reaches the bottom 
of the screen. This way, we can 
ensure that no screen updates are 
made half way through a screen 
refresh. Don't worry if this confuses 
you - we'll be covering screen 
synchronisation In a future issue. 

WHArS IN STORE? 

So there we have it - hardware 
scroiiing in a nutshell. Next month 
we'll be taking a look at software 
scrolling; AMOS' own scroll routines 
are somewhat more flexible than 
hardware scrolling. In the meantime 
though, practise what you've learnt 
by writing a couple of hardware scroll 
demos yourself. Anyone who doesn't 
do their homework will be put into 
detention! 

GflniQi ptogrommlng (hi page 1 D3 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 •AUGUST 1992 



09 



WANT MORE 

GAMES 

OR OTHER 



JUST JSK & M GIMAKIH TO 8EA1 M COttranWN 
wm MSESFWCK AIM BEST TOf! 



HOW" 

SUND 



L B ft H Si 

n P E Hi 



71 



AMIGA 5001^ 

M UK MftL, inc. rtiDuso, [nwer supply, oil leads & monualS; sk. 

ALONt WITH MONITOR 

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AMIGA 3000 

2SMHZ, 100UB HD, 4M8 kit RAM, 2U8 chip lUM 

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WITH PHILIPS 7CM 3279 3539.00 



AMIGA 600 

1MB, we 2.05, 3,5 FD + Smart Caid Inlerface, with 

• 12 month oii-Mtewatronty 

A600 + DELUXE PAIKT III + GAME £364.95 
A600 20MB HD (LAiiGiR AVAiLABir) £459.95 



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STARTER PACK II 

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• CFABosit SO.00 

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'Wliite ito<ki last, ntlitles 2 ptoflt to ilay up ts 1 6 
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Did you know that you could do this ? 

Load " AMOS_Data : Samples /Samples , abk" 
Sam Loop On s Samplay 3,14,10000 
While Mouse key=0 

S=Xscreen(Xmouse)+40 
Doke $DFF0A6,X : Doke $DFF0B6,X 
Wend 
If not, join the Official AMOS Club, and find out how 

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commands like SAM SPEED, CASE, SHUFFLE etc. 

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Membership costs £12 (£15 Overseas) for the current 
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The AMOS Cluh, 1 Lower Moor, Whiddon Valley, 
Barnstaple, N.Devon. EX32 8NW. 



Overseas Customers Please Note: We can only accept cheques or 
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UoFTWARt • SECTOR SOITWARE«_SECTORSOPT^^^ 

TOUCH TYPIST *14 

Touch Typist is a very fasc fully featured typing tutor for any Amiga, this program 
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Amiga Shopper July 1992. 

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CV Amiga Octoberl991 

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AMIGA TO Z88 LINK *25 

Use the Cambridge 288 portable computer as a portable Amiga terminal, Write 
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Similar to the Amiga-Z88 Link but will converse with the Tandy 'WP2 portable 
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AMOS 




Iver the past few months 
■ we've covered some 
I pretty heavy subjects, so 
I thought K would be 
nice to take a break from our game 
and look at another routine that Is 
equally Important for games - the 
high score table. How you 
Incorporate this routine Is up to you, 
but the theory behind the high score 
table Is pretty much the same. 

HIGH SCORE TABLES 

If you started working for a software 
house as a trainee programmer, you 
would probably start your 
apprenticeship writing routines of 
this kind SQ it's worth knowing how a 
good high score routine works. 

At its simplest level, the high 
score table Is held internally as two 
dimensional arrays - one for the 
score and another for the players' 
names. At the end of each game, the 
high score routine checks to see If 
the player has scored enough to be 
entered Into the score table. If so, 
the player's position is Inserted with 
all scores below the player's score 
shifted down by one position. This 
will mean that one score drops off 
the bottom of the table, but then 
that's how a high score table works. 
Anyway, enough of the waffle - let's 
take a look at the high score routine. 

'*** High Score Routine vO.l 
»*** By Jason Holborn 

SETUPTABLE: 

Dim J 

SCQRETABLES [ 5 } , SCORETABLE ( 5 ) 

For C=0 To 4 

SCORETABLES ( C ) = " J 



SCORETABLE (C) =5000- (C*1000) 
Next C 

MAIN: 

Do 

For C=0 Tio 4 

Print J 

SCORETABLES ( C ) ; SCORETABLE ( C ) 

Next C 

Input "Enter Score: "; SCORE 

If SC0RE>SCORETABLE{4) J 

Then Gosub HISCORE 

Loop 
t 

HISCORE: 

Input "Congratulations ! J 

Enter Name; °;NAIM$ 

For C=4 To Step -1 

If SC0RE>SCORETABLE(C) J 



Here's our very basic high score table routine In action. Obviously It needs to be 
tidied up In a big way If you Intend to use It within your own games, but the 
bones of the routine are all there 



"Ehen POSITI0N=C 

Next C 

For C=3 To POSITION Step -1 

SCORETABLES (C+l)= J 

SCORETABLES (C) 

SCORETABLE (C+1) =SCORETABLE (C) 

Next C 

SCORETABLES (POSITION) =NAIMS 

SCORETABLE (POSITION) =SCORE 

Return 

As you can see from the code, the 
procedure which handles the high 
score array is simple. Before entering 
the routine, the main program 
checks to see if the player's score is 
higher than the lowest score in the 
score table. 

Technically the score should be 
registered If it Is equal to the lowest 
score, but there's just no room In the 
table to hold the new score. 
Presidence should be given to the 
first player to achieve that score. If 
you run the program above (I've 
added a few ertra lines to make it 
run as a stand-aione program), you'll 
notice that when identical scores are 
entered, new scores are added 
beneath previous ones. This way you 
know who achieved the score first. 

Once the score has been 
checked, the program Jumps to the 
HISCORE routine which does all the 
hard work. First of all the program 
asks for the player's name. In the 
routine above this is very basic 
indeed. If you feel adventurous, a 



much better bet Is to write a routine 
which enables the player to enter his 
or her name using the joystick. This 
way, the player will never have to 
touch the Amiga keyboard. 

ALL FALLING INTO PLACE 

The next part of the HIScore routine 
attempts to find the position within 
the high score table where the 
player's score should be placed. This 
is achieved simply by comparing the 
player's score with the scores 
already held in the high score table, 
starting from the lowest upwards. 
Once the position is found, it Is held 
in the variable POSITION. 

Now that we know where the 
score should be inserted, all scores 
below thfe player's score are shifted 
down by one position discarding the 
last score in the table. Once this is 
done, the player's name and score 
are inserted in the table and the new 
table is displayed. 

SCORES ON THE BOARD 

This high score table is by no means 
perfect, but It does the job. At the 
moment it will only hold five scores, 
but it's very easy to change this to 
make the table handle more scores 
simply by changing the size of the 
dimension and by altering the loop 
ranges within the HiScore routine. 
Play around with it and why not have 
a go at writing a better routine 
yourself. fT\ 



nnlimied from page 98 

3D PROBLEMS 

Why Is K that I never seem to 
read a single word of criticism 
concerning AMOS In the AMOS 
section of Amiga Stioppei? 
Although I would agree that 
BASIC Itself Is very good, I have 
been having serious grief with 
AMOS 3D since I upgraded to 
AmIgaDOS 2.04. Although It runs 
fine under 1.3 (I've got a ROM 
sharer), the AMOS 3D Object 
Editor OM doesn't run at all under 
2.04. What's more, It refuses to 
run from a Workbench Icon under 
both 2.04 and 1.3. I've written to 
Commodore and Europress 
i Software but neither of these 
seem to understand what Is going 
wrong. 

Alan M Gratiame 
Ampthlll, Beds 

I must admit that I'm just as 
confused as Commodore and 
Europress. I've got a 2.04-based 
B2000 and OM certainly runs fine 
on that, I've had many letters from 
AMOS 3D users who own 2.04- 
based machines and they don't 
seem to have encountered this 
problem either. 

Presuming that you're booting 
from your Am Drive, it might be 
worth checking that your Startup- 
sequence isn't launching 
something weird which OM 
doesn't like - try breaking out of 
the startup-sequence as soon as 
the hard drive starts to boot and 
run DM from AmigaDOS, If it still 
doesn't work under 2.04, then I 
don't know what to surest. Can 
anyone who has encountered this 
problem help? 

NCOMMAND 
PERFORMANCE 

Could you please tell me where I 
can buy the NCommanit 
procedures disk for AMOS? 

Ben M«rrlfleld 

Batty 

South QIa morgan 

The address and telephone 
number for Oasis software was 
actually printed in the last issue 
but for those of you that missed it, 
NCommand and the new 
NCommand Extras disk are both 
available from Oasis Software at 
392 Birch Road, Wardle, Rochdale 
in Lancashire. Failing that, you can 
talk to them directly on 0706 
376572. 

It you 've got a problem with 
AMOS, send It to AMOS 
ANSWERS, Amiga Shopper, 
Future Publishing Ltd, 30 
Monmouth St, BATH BAl 2BW. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 •AUGUST 1992 



AMOS 



AaiOH 



JC* 




A fractal plotting procedure Is Just one of the utilities Europress Is after 




Get your AMOS 
procedures ^ 
published! 
Europress, m - 
conjunction 
wff/i Amiga 
Shopper, y^ants 
your coding 
gems for 
Inclusion v^lth 
the forthcoming 
Amos 
Professional 



E 



uropress, the maker of 

Amos, Is currently 

developing Amos 

Professional. One of this 
package's strengths will bs the 
Inclusion of folders crammed full of 
useful procedures that can be used 
to construct programs. 

Europress plans to provide as 
many procedures as possible, but is 
sure the AMOS users that read the 
AMOS Action column in Amiga 
Shopper w\\\ have written plenty of 
great procedures that would benefit 
their fellow users. 

Consequently, if you have any 
procedure routines then this is your 
chance to share them worid-wide. 
Europress wants to inciude your 
routines on the actual Amos 
Professional masters. You'il get your 
name in the package credits, and wiii 
receive a free copy of the completed 
package with a personal message 



101 PROCEDURES COMPETITION 



from AMOS author Frangois Lionet 
thanking you for your contribution. 
In an effort to standardise the 
procedures to aid their 
understanding by users, please 
follow the guidelines listed below: 

NAMING PROCEDURES 

When naming procedures start them 
with an underscore character ("_"). 
This will ensure that the name does 
not collide with any new instructions 
that are added to Amos Professional 
or extensions. It also allows the use 
of reserved keywords within the 
name: 

ProcBdure _MYIiBOC 
Procedure _PRINTBIG 

If you write more than one 
procedure to perform a task then 
start the whole set of them with the 
same name. A set of scroll 
procedures might be called: 

_SCROLL_IHIT 
_SCROIi._MOKK 
_SCROIiL_EtID 

VARIABLES 

Use as few global variables as 
possible. Keep necessary variables 
hidden within the procedures. Other 
than arrays, don't make the user 
have to declare variables at the start 
of a program. 

The vanables within a procedure 
should start with an abbreviation of 
the procedure's name. The scrolling 
demo might have the following 
variables: 

_9CRS {scroll X position) 
_gCH5f (scroll Y position) 

Use the SHARED instruction to 
pass parameters between 
procedures: 

Procedure _SCROIiL_INIT [X, Y] 

Shared _SCRX, SCRY 

_SCRX=Xj SCRY=Y 
End Proc 
Procedure _SCROLL_W0KK 

Shared _SCRX, _SCRY 

Print _SCRX, SCHY 
End Proc 



ORGANISING 

If you need to set up conditions 
before the procedures are used then 
have an initialisation procedure. 



There should be only one IN IT 


Procedure NftMB[X,Y,Z] 


procedure, which initialises all of its 






parameters: 




Imnits : X. . . 
Y, . * 


Procedure _IiKME_lMn! tltist J 




Z... 


of Inlt paroms] 






When all is complete and you're 




Outirat : Param 


ready to quit the use of your 




Param# 


procedures, or even the program. 




Parnin.? 


then it may sometimes be necessary 




************** 


to provide an EMD of procedure 






routine: 




Qlobal variables used 
<try avoid using these) 


procedure _ifflHE_END 




GLl, GL2, GL3. .. 


This procedure should also work if 






the initialisation routine failed. The 




'Shared variables used 


IN IT procedure should set a flag ttiat 




says "OK, I'm initialised". 


End 


Proc 



SYSTEM DEFAULTS 

Don't assume a set screen type has 
been set up ready for your 
procedures' outputs. Set the screen 
format outside of the procedure so 
that other users can see what the 
routine needs: 

Screen Open 0,640, 200, J 

16, Hires 

Proc GET_FONT ["Times", "24"! 

If your routine requires the use of 
Bobs/Music/Sample Banks, then 
state what size they are and how 
many there are. 

READABILITY 

Ensure you comment your listings as 
clearly as possible. It's important to 
explain every aspect of a routine so 
that users can adapt them to their 
specialist needs. Also - keep the 
spelling clean! 

DESTRUCTIBILITY 

Bug test it with as many inputs as 
possible. If your routine is not stable 
it is of no use to anyone. 

Trap all errors and return error 
codes if applicable. 



Don't let your procedure interfere 
with the user's programs. 

PROCEDURE STRUaURE 



WHAT WE'RE AFTER 

We already have the following 
procedures: Disk track read/write, 
Format disk, Expression parser, 
Scrolling routine. Date, Time. 

We'd particularly like to see 
procedures to do the following: 
Chess algorithm. Screen saver, 
Rapid fire. Fancy screen wipes. 
Plasma FX, Radar, MagnilV, Fractals. 

FINAL NOTES 

Send your procedures on disk, along 

with explanatory text both printed out 

and in ASCII on the disk. Include an 

SAE if you want your disk returning. 

Include an example program which 

uses your routine. You may include 

as many procedures as you wish on 

each disk so long as they are all 

properly documented. They will be 

judged by the AMOS team. Send your 

entries by the end of July to: 

101 Procedures Compo 

Europress Software 

Europa House 

Addlington Park 

Macclesfield 

Cheshire 

SKIO 4NP 

Get those procedures rolling! CD 



1 AA AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



FREE CATALOGUE 

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A patisr basic i«HB[pfater 

TOTAL VALUE: £359.73 





AMIGA 500 

WITH BUILT-IN 

NUMERIC KEYPAD 



»ftmo,NSiSSf 



• 512K AMIGA 500 COMPUTER 

• BUILT-IN 1Mb DRIVE 

• A520 TV MODULATOR ^5^ 

• MOUSE CONTROLLER 

PLUS! 

FREE FROM SILICA: 

• PHOTON PAINT 2.0 

• ARCADE ACTION GAMES PACK 

• GFA BASIC INTERPRETER V3.5 

• 16 NIGHTS HOLIDAY 
HOTEL ACCOMMODATION 




/ 



£299 

INC VAT & DELIVERY REF: AMC 0550 



CARTOON CLASSICS 



AMIGA SOOt 

WITH BUILT-IN I 

.NWrnC KEYPMJ 




1Mb AMiOA 500 PLUS . 
BUILT-IN 1Mb DRIVE 



• A520 TELEVISION MODULATOR 

• THE SIMPSONS - BART v SPACE MUTMITS , 

• CAPTAIN PLANET AND THE PLANETEERS 

• LEMMINGS 

• DELUXE PAINT III 

H.USI - FREi FROM SILICA 

• PHOTON PAINT V2.0 

• ARCAOE ACTION GAMES PACK 

• GFA BASIC INTERPRETER V3.5 „...„ „. 



£399.99 
FREE 
FREE 
£24.99 
£25.99 
£25.99 
£79.99 

£69.95 

£219.78 

£50.00 



TOTAL PACK VALUE: 

LESS PACK SAVING: 
SILICA PRICE: 



PLUS! 

16 NIGHTS FREE HOLIDAY 
HOTEL ACCOMMODATION 





AMIGA 600 




NEW 

COMPACT 
V, DESIGN J 



ThB AfiDO lias a builC in; 1Mb drive, T^/ M«iulB(br. inlembi IDE hgni drive inlertace, 
Smart dKi siol \w ROM. I^AM or gam§ cards, easy 10 atxsss moysa^oystick ports (on 
side) ma ri»dllied expajiglon sin undamealh for extra HAM and bartery backed clodL 

0Mb HD JOMbHn 



• 1MI> AMIGA 600 £399.99 

• 20UD HARD DISK NfA 

• DELUXE PAINT III £79.99 

• 'MYSTtRY' GAME VJBUIBLE 

• 1 YEAR HOME SERVICE WARRANTY 
flUSl - FREE FROM SILICA 

• PHOTON PAINT V2.0 , £89,95 

• ARCADE ACTION GAMES PACK Ea9.7B 

• GFA BASIC INTERPRETER V3.S £50,00 



£399,99 

£299,00 

N/A 

NTA 



£09,95 
£229.78 
£50.00 



TDTAL PACK VALUE: E84B.71 E10SB.72 

i£SS PACK SAVING: Ea50,71 £559,72 
SILICA PRICE: E399,00 E496.00 



NO HARD DISK 



imSrw^'iSs^ mfVwwi 



20Mb HARD DISK 




CDTV DRIVE 



AMIGA ADD-ON 

.R)R «00 i W 



\ 



« 




Commodore have anrwunced (heir new CDTV drwes f&r the Amiga SCO and 6(X) 
campufers- Swripfy plug ttie drive tHitD your Amiga and you Jiave ifie power W. 

• USE THE SUCCESSFUL RANGE OF CDTV SOFTWARE A vast amay d 
titlas are available now and more are being released all the Eime. With the 
GO'S ability Lo retrieve 540Mb of data (over 610 Amiga flcfpy disks!), it is 
the id^at media tar entertainment, miusic, education and more! 

• PLAY NORMAL AUDIO CDs. TVie CD Player (S x over samptirvg) outpuls 
top sound quality. The CDTV drr^^e alhyws you to sel&ct rancbm play, pre- 
set play order an^l mucJi more, all wilh cn-screen options. 

f PLAY AND SEE CP+Q (Compact Disk f Oraptiics] CDs show graptifcs on 
screen [on ]he tfack theme, or lyrics) as the track piaya. 

To USB tlw A670 CD-flOt,^ drive, your Amiga nuHl hgue 1MU ef chip HAM. All ASOOe 

Bnd AS<)0 Pius itipdQle are 1iEt«l wilh 1Mb i3F Chip RAM as standard. II you have a 

non-plus version of Ihe Amiga 500, ypuf cumpuSBr will racjuire .an internal modfllcallQn 

which Sdlca can psdcmn lor you, Rease call 

quoting ret flEA 1000. 

There are two vgrgioRs dI! ^hs CCKROM drrrt: 

Ainlsa 50a (all modals) - He4: CCD 0670 

Ani^ «O0' (avail S6p1|< - ^S^L CCD 0€77 
PLEASE GALL FOR STOCK A VA1LABI LUTY . 



£399 



ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT ■ DELIVERY IS FREE OF CHARGE IN THE UK MAINLAND 



[ SILICA SYSTEMS OFFER YOU 



• FREE OVEFtNlGHT DEUVERY: On al\ hardware oreters stiipped in the UK main land, 

• TECHNICAL SUPPORT HBLPLINE: T^rn of tachnlcal experts bA your service. 

• PRICE MATCH: We normally match competHors. on a "Sam© product - Same price" basis. 

• ESTABLiSHBD 12 YEARS: Proven track record in professional compuler sales. 

« BUSiNESS + EDUCATION -h GOVERNMENT: Vdume discounSs available 081-308 0888. 

• SHOWROOMS: Demons! ratiori and training lacilities at our Londcin & SIdoup branclies- 

• THB fULL STOCK RANGE: All of your requirements Tnam one supplier. 

• FREE CATALOGUES: Will be mailed to you wilh offers and soriwara/peripherai detailS- 

• PAYMENT: By cash, cheque and all rnajor credit cards. 

Before you dedde when to buy your new Amiga computer, we suggest you ihink very carefully ^out 
WHERE you buy iL Consider what it wilt bs tike a tew months after buying your Amiga, when you may 
require actditlor^aF peripherals or soRware, or help and advice with your new purchase. And, will the 
cjmpany you buy from contact you with details oi new proditcts? At Silica Systems we ensure that you 
will have nothing to worry about.. We have t>een established for over 12 years and, wtth our unrivalled 
ejtperience and expertise, we can now ctaim to meet our customers' requirements with an 
understanding which is second to none. Bui don't Jusi lake our word for it. Complete ar»d relum the 
coupon now tor ouf latesl FREE litsTature ar>d begm to ejqserience the "Silica Systems Service". 



m Mews, Hatherley Rd, Sidcup, Kent, DAI 4 4DK Tsl: 081-309 1111 

Order Lies Opan: Mon-Sai &.iX>at»-e.OQpiTi m Ule Night Opantng Fa« Ho: Cei-3&S 06QB 



MAIL ORDER: 



1:-4 ■ 



LONDON SHOP: 

Opening Houra: 



52 Tottenliam Court Real London, WIP DBA TbI: 071-560 4000' 

Mtein-Sal 9.3Qani-6.0Qpm WO Ula Nig^t Opomng Fait Np: Ci?1-3g3 ^757 



LONDON SHOP: 

Opaningi Hourg; 



Selfridges iist fiod^j, Oxtord Street, London, W1A 1A@ Tsl: 071-BZ9 1234 

h*on-Sa1 9,30am-B.iOOpfn Lata WigTil: Thuraday untu Bpm Extons^n: 39t4 



SIDCUP SHOP: 

Openw^ Hours; 



1-4 The Mews, Hatherley Rd, Sidcup, Kant, DA14 4DX TbI: OBI-302 8811 

hMn-Sal 9,CKi«rn-5.30pm t.a1e N^Hl: Friday untri 7pfn FOX No: 081-309 0017 



I 



To: Silica Systems, AMSHP-0892-eo, 1-4 The Mews, Hatherley Rd, SWcup, Kent, DA14 4DX 



PLEASE SEND A 64 PAGE AMIGA COLOUR CATALOGUE 



^ 



I Mr/Mrs'Miss/Ms: Initials; Surname: 

I AcWfass: 



r7~;~-\ MAIL ORDER HOTLINE 

^iJ 081-309 1111 



SlUCA 
SYSTEMS 



B 



Tel (Home): 



Postcode ,.,. 
Tel (Work):. 



I Company Name Of applicable): , 

I Which computerfs). if any, do you own? ,..,.,. 8BB I 

E£OE - Advflhi&Bd prlc«s am Ep«iricalian& rnay chsnge^PlBa^Qr^urnlhe coupon For trralaHEtinror.nall(}n 



/Oi A 



WE ALSO STOCK THE 

TOP 30 AMIGA 

GAMESAT LOW PRICES 




ROCGEN PLUS 
GENLOCK £129.99 

ZYDEC AMIGA 
HAND SCANNER £94.99 

VIDl TheCon^lstrSglullor liM.n 

VIDt £«».99 

RGB SPLITTER Rnm*» Elertioiic type £SM9 

ROCGEN GENLOCK SAVEiOJi £W.W 

FRAMEGRABBER £519.99 

SUPERFIC- Colour DIgltiMr&GcnJock £499.99 

SUPERTEC ANIMATE PRICE DOWN £629.99 

COLOURPIC colcwrdtgidKr £>99.99 

COLOUPIC ANIMATE PRlCfuOWN £529.99 
CABARFT FORCOIjOURPIOSUPERP1C£M.99 

CABARET PLUS £»7.99 

DIGIVIEW MEDIASTATION 
DIGIVIE W + DIGIPAINT 3 

+ ELAN PERFORMER 
BARGAIN OFFER - £129.99 

I DIG] VI EW GOLD thebcstwithicimen £99.99 
RENDALEM02 GENLOCK jtH9.99 1 

RENDALE SUPER MOI SVHS GENLOCKi4S9.99 I 

1 HITACHI MONO CAM ERA LOW PRICE £179.991 



SEAL n TYPE KEYBOARD 

SKIN. 

Moulded to cover each key^ but flexible enough 
to tvpe thfotih &wjtecpnx)Cl 
ANlICA 5 DO & PLUS ( ittte which when 
Drdering|!leiH) £12.49 

1500/2000 £12.99 

ANTISTATIC DUST COVERS 
AMIGA SOO & 500 Plus £4.99 

AMIGA 1»(I/20CO 2P1ECE £12.99 
8833/1084 MONITOR £7.99 

SWIFT 9, LC2M PRINTER £7.99 
OTHERS TYPES AVAILABLE 

w'.'.'.w.'.mw.T, 
IkTORS & SPARES 

AMIGA ROM SWITCH 
FOR 2 ROMS. ONLY £19.99 

KEYBOA RD OPERATED VERSION £ 27.99 

HAS NO EXTERNAL SWITCHES. 

KICKSTA RT 1 J ROM £29.99 

KICKSTARTIROM NUVV £39.99 

ASABOVEPLUSMANUALS £79.99 

FATTER AGNUS 8372A £3fl,99 

SUPER DENISE £»K99 

GARY £31.99 

iS2IIA t/Odilp £15.99 

AS20 MODULATOR £19.99 

AMIGA INTERNAL DRIVE NOW £59.99 

MAINS SUPPRESSOR BLOCK 4WAY £12.99 

UPRATED ASOO POWER PACK NOW £J9.»9 

STANDA RD POWER PACK £».99 

KCS PC CARD v3 + DOS4 

■lite wbetber ttr A3M> ar AJ<M+ 

NOW £204.99 

KCS WITHOUT MSDOS 

KCS 1000 PC BOARD ADAPTOR 

AT ONCE + ISMHi PC EMULATOR 



NAKSHA MOUSE + 

OPERATION STEALTH 

ONLY £24.99 

I SPEED MOUSE £15.99 

{budget REPLACEMENT MOUSE- £12.99 

I CDTV KEYBOARD -BLACK £49.99 

J CD TV TRACKBALL CONTROLLER £77.99 
IgRAVTSMOUSE STICK CONTROLLER £65.99 

I del™ 3A ANALOGUE JOYSTICK £14.49 

IZIFSTICK AUTORRE £12.99 

I QUICKJOY SUPERSTAR £13.99 

I QUICKSHOT TOPSTA R £ 19.99 

] QUICKS HOT 1 NTRU DER JOYSTICK £29.99 

I MEGA STAR HEAVY DUTY JOYSTICK £24.99 

I NAVIGATOR AUTOHRE JOYSTICK £13.99 

ISPEEDKINGAUTOHRE £11.99 

I CHEETAH BUGJOYSTICK £16.99 

IqUICKJOY python £10.99 

IZYDECAMIGATRACKBALL £34,99 

I CRYSTAL TRACKBALL £34.99 

] OPTICAL MOUSE £37.99 

MOUSE /JO YSTICK PORT 
SWITCH NOW JUST£1Z99 

' Has sockets foe mouse ^ joystick. 
^ Push button setecia [iHMjBe cir joystick. 

* Uses no power unlike other types. 

* Cutnpatlbie with ourty donees. 
^ Save* wear & tearon EnouBe purt. 



S AMIGA BOOKS 




A M I GA FOR B EGI NN< ERS £15.99 

AMIGA BASIC INSlDEiOUT £18.45 

AMIGA SYSTEM PRO GUIDE £32.45 

ADVANCEDSYB PRCXiRS GUIDE £32.45 

AMIGA DISK DRIVKS 1 &0 £27.95 

AMIGA DOS INSIDE OUT £19.99* 

A M !GA PRINTERS I & O £31.95 

AMIGA DESKTOP VIDEO £23.95 

AMIGA3DGRAPH!CS £17.95 

MAKINGMUSICONAMIGA £27.99' 

AMIGA GRAHICS 1 & O £31 .95 

AMIGA MACHINE LA NGUA £14.15 

AMIGA C FOR BEGINNERS £16.99 

AMIGA C FOR ADVANCED PROCMIS £27.99 
AMIGA DOS MANUAL £19.95 

KIDS fc THE AMIGA £15.95 

B EST AMIGA TRICKS & TIPS £27 JS' 

MAPPING THE AMI GA £24.95 

MACFflNE LANGUAGE FOR BGINRS £19.95 
ELEM ENT A RY AM IGA BASIC £14.95 

ADVANCED AMIGA BASIC £14.95 

PROGRAM DESIGN TECHNIQUES £16.95 

USING AREXX ON AMIGA £27.99 

Fl RST BOO K OF THE AMIGA £14.95 

USING DE LUXE PAl NT £19.95 

DELUXE PAINT VI DEO £19.99 

AMIGA VISON HANDBOOK £23.45 

THE IMAGINE COMPANION £24,95" 

HA RD W A RE R EF MA NU A L £21.95 

6M0C ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE PROGR £24.95 
AMIGA ROM KERNEL REFERENCE BOOKS - 3 
AVAlLABLE-IATESTEDlTIONSeich £28.95 
DELUXEFAINTVIDEO £19.99 

SUFERBASE • THE BOOK £11.49 

VIDiAFAGESTREAM GUIDE £4.95 

MKSSTCXTKED 



&DIS8 



150 SIZE FOSSO BOX £19.99 

4050 SIZE LOCKAB LE BOX £6.99 
M SIZE UXXABLE BOX £7.99 
100 SIZE LOC KA B LE BOX £8.99 
TDK BRANDED INBOX £7.99/10 
BULK DISKS 100 » GUARANTEED 
.99/1 H £22.99/S0,- £39.99/1 00; £U9 .99/500 




Cillcn wdcome - wc'n easy to find, just 15inlles bvm the 
M62. UirectionE. 

Leave M62 it junction 26, lake A438 to Bnfonl, uphill, after 
about 15 miles, turn left just over a railway bridge. After V 
inA]if \oak fix* us opposite a Royal Mail letterbox . 



UNIT 1, DEPTAS8, 

253 NEW WORKS RD, 
BRADFORD, BD12 OQP 



SALES: 
0274-691115. 



HOW TO ORDER. ALL PRICES INOUDE VAT FAX 0274- W0150 

FAST MAILORDER SERVICE. 

OttlH by phone uslnp your ACCESS, VISA, SWTTCH, CONNECTOR AMERICAN EXPRESS CARD. 
Onlerby Mall . sending dieque , bankers draft or postal orders nude pyable to TRILOGIC. 
Add part poata Be of £1 .00 to orde nunder£100or£2.00toonlem over £1 00. 
OpUona I 48hr Pancel f one - add £350, OvemlghtcarTier-idd£5J0.(Maytake longer foroutlylng, 
remoter areas. (Uk Mainland only). Situtilay delivery & Datapoet service availat)le POA. 
EXPORT ORDERS WELCOME no vat - deduct 17t/J» , but add canlage at eatL 
OpenMon-Fri8HII4, Sat8.4pm. Coiii«iodOre *•!•« •hlM «M 



X COPY PRO 

Latest version - £33.99 iXHnpIete 
with Cydone ext eciul drive adaptor. 

X COPY CYCLONE 

AD.VPTOR £12.99 



AMI SUPERCARD 

3E34. "" (Re^Blman wlenwl drive) 



f.l niER DISK UTlMTltlS 
ACnON REPLAY FOR ASOO £57.99 
ACTION REPLAYFOR2000 £67.99 
NB. Making backups without the petmislion 
of the cQpyri ^ holderisillegal. 



|fi[Kp 30 AMIGA GAMES ] 


1 ANOTHGRWORLD 


£17.99 


B AGONY 


£17,99 


^ AIR LAND &SEA 


£24,99 


m BLACK CRYPT 
g CASTLES 


£17.99 


£19.99 


M CHUCKYEAGERSAOVFLT 


£7.99 


P CHART ATTACK 


£19.99 


11 FORMULAIGRANDPRIX 


£14.99 


H Fisir 


£2499 


^ GOLF 


£2499 


a GODS 


£17.99 


9 HARLEQUIN 


£17.99 


a JIMMYWTHITE SNOOKER 


£19.99 


a JOHN BARNES 


£17.99 


n KNIGHTS OF THE SKY 


£24.99 


m LOTUS TURBO CHALLENGE £17.99 i 


M LEMMINGS 1.1 DATA DISK 


£1199 


M OH NOT MORE LEMMINGS 


£17.99 


m MEGALOV 1ST SAMURAI 


£20^99 


m MITANKPIATOONB 


£2499 


M PAPERBOY 2 


£17.99 


m RACEDRIVIN 


£17.99 


m SHADOWLANDS 


£19.99 


m STEEL EMPIRE 


£19.99 


m SUFERSKl 


£17.99 


m THUNDERJAWS 


£17.99 


m THUNDERHAWK 


£20.99 


m ULTIMA 6 


£20.99 


m VROOM 


£17.99 


MLWOLFCHILD 


£17.99 


^^gggSKoBS;, ;■;%-, ^:v;;;'-s r<^'C$»»9K4wK€q^5$w4Hccwn<S5!ig^^ 







A FEW OF THE MANY TITLES IN STOCK 

BETTER MATHS (! J-14YRS) £19.99 

BETTER S FE LIJ NG (8+ ) £19.99 

COMPENDIUM 6 £3499 

FIRST SHAPES (3.8 YRS) £12.99 
FIRST LETERS & WORDS (3.8)£12.99 

EUNSCHOOL4 RANGE £19.99 

JUNIOR TYPIST (5-12) £19.99 

LETS SPELL SERIES £16.99 

MICRO RANGE £19.99 

MATHS TALK{S-13YRS) £2199 

MAVIS BEACCWJ TYPING £29.99 

MONEY MATTERS (4-7YRS) £16,99 

PAINTMEASTORY(3-10) £21.99 

PUZZLE BpOKS 1 & 2 £16.99 

TARGETMATHS(4+) £16.99 

THE FRENtZH MISTRESS £16.99 

THE GERMAN TUTOR £16.99 

THE SPANISH MASTER £16.99 

L THE ITAUAN TUTOR £16.99 



MIDI INTERFACE 2 

, Our unique 5 port Midi Interface 2 has Irv Oiit 
j&Thru9dcki?tsplL£two^dlt[orul swftchiibleout/ ' 
1 thru socket^ tor inziaiicHLLs versdtiEity. 

' NOW ONLY £26.99 

|Eitn Midi lead ].2ni£1.49 
fjEjIn Midi lead 3m £1.99 

STEREO SAMPLER 2 

: Our Superb scxirviing STEREO SAMPLER 2 uses a 
l state of the drt A/D mip which samples so fast, it 
: caplurea every detail of (he sound. Easily adjusled 
u evet coo( rol. conrwct ing i cad & Inee stereo sampling 
^ software. Fuiiy com patitsle with ail popular 
I Mmpling software. f^^yf q^^Y £37.99 



i SUPER-Fl 1 STEREO SYSTEM 

\' siVt 12 WAITS PER Ci IAN N EL 



£3499 



; SUPER J1 2 STEREO SYTEW £54.99 1 

• a WA rre PER Cl I ANNEL, + TONE 

in; I HOLS- FROI^ESSIONAL QUALITY 

iZYFl STEREO SYSTEM £36.99 



ADVANTAGE NOW 

AMI ALIGNMENT 

AMAS2 

AMIGA VISION 

AMOS 

AMOS- EASY NEW 

AMOS 3D 

AMOS COMPILER 

ART DEPARTMENT 

ART DEPARTMENT FRO 

ASSSEMPRO 

A TALK III 

AUDITION 4 superb value 

AUD10MASTER4 

AUDIO ENGINEER 

BARS t FIFES 

BBC EM ULA TOR ' ■ X ! i 

BROADCAST TITLER 2 

CAN DO 1.6 

CASH BOOK CONTROLLER 

CROSS DOS 

DAY BY DAY 

DELUXE PAINT 4 

DELUXE MUSIC 

CffiLUXEVIDE03 

DEVFAC 3 - new version 

DCCALC 

DIRECTORY OPUS 

DISK MASTER 

DISK MASTER 2 

DOCTOR AMI 

DRTs TIGER CUB li : 

ELAN PERFORMER 2 

E TYPE 

EXPERT DRAW NEW 

EXPERT 4DJNR NEW 

EASY AMOS NEW 

EXCEU.ENCE 

FINAL COPY ''I«CTrX7\VN' 

FLOW ¥3.0 

FRENCH MISTRESS N: W 

FUN SCHOOL 4 RANGE 

GERMAN MASTER i' 

GB ROUTE PLUS 

GOLD DISK OFFICE ' 

HIGHSPEED PASCAL 

HISOFT BASIC 

HI SO FT BASIC PROFESS 

HOME ACCOUNTS 2 

HOMEBASE 

HCm.lNKS 

HYFERBOOK 

IMAGINE 1 

ITAUAN TUTC» 

INTROCAD PLUS 

KINDWORDS 

LATTICE CvSSASC 

MACRO 68000 ASSEMBLER 

MAI LSHOT PLUS 

MEDIA SHOW 

MEGAMIX MASTER "-> ■■ 

MICRO RANGE (LCL) 

MUSIC Xvl.l BARGAIN 

MUSIC X JUNIOR 

PAGESTEAMZl 

PAGE SETTER 2 

PENPAL .TILL ONLY 

PERSONAL TAX FUNNER 

PERSONAL FINANCE MANG £23.99 

PKMATE 

PROFESSIONAL CALC 

PRODATA :.v 

PROFESSIONAL DRAW 2 

PROFESSIONAL PAGE 3 

PRafIEYrv55 

FRO VIDEO PLUS 

PROWRITEv3.2 

QUARTERBACK 

QUARTERBACK TOOLS 

QUARTET 

REAL 3D BEGINNERS 

SCALA500 :KICEDOWN 

SCULPT 3DXL 

SCU L P A NIMATE 4D JNR 

SONIX 

SOUNDMASTEK 

STEREO MASTER 

SUPERJAM mV 

SUFERBASE PROF 4 

SUPERPLAN 

SYSTEMS 

SYSTEM 3e newvenion 

TAKE 2 

TECHNOSOUND NEW 

TOPFORM NFW 

TRANS WRITE 

TURBOPRINTPRO ONLY 

TV SHOW 

VIDEO EFFECTS 3D 

VIDEOSCAFE3D 

VIDEO TITLER 3D 

VIDFO DIRECTOR 

WORD PERFECT 41 

WORD WORTH 1.1 

3D CONSTRUCTION KIT 

3D PROFESSIONAL £149.9 



NEW 



NEW 
NEW 



£69,99 

£29,99 

£89,99 

£89,99 

£3499 

£26,99 

£25,99 

£2199 

£49.99 

£149,99 

£59.99 

£39.99 

£37.49 

£49.99 

£169,99 

£99.99 

£30.99 

£167.99 

£69.99 

£52.49 

£21.99 

£22.49 

£57.99 

£49.99 

£7499 

£51.99 

£29.99 

£29.99 

£19.99 

£49.99 

£19.99 

£49.99 

£4499 

£29,99 

£49.99 

£37.99 

tXM 

tS»M 

£47,99 

£5499 

£16.99 

£19,99 

£16,99 

£59.99 

£59.99 

£7499 

£47.99 

£59.99 

£39.99 

£2499 

£53.99 

£44.99 

£199,99 

£16.99 

£7499 

£37.49 

£169.99 

£39.99 

£37.49 

£51,99 

£29.99 

£19.99 

£5499 

£39.99 

£139.99 

£4499 

£5499 

£29.99 



£3499 

£139.99 

£69,99 

£9449 

£167.99 

£104.99 

£17499 „„„.„, 





BOriOM^i3So»MSS&i5WW^ 



ACCESS VISA 

SWITCH CONNECT \ 
AMERICAN EXPRESS 



C\MIGA 500 PLUS T AMIGA 600 £369.9^ 




NOW £329.99 

2 MEG VERSION £369.99 



» BUILT-IN DISK DRIVE 



» 1 MEG RAM 
» MOUSE 

» TV MODULATOR 
» WORKBENCH 2. 
» BUILT-IN CLOCK 
+ LEMMINGS 
+ THE SIMPSONS 
+ CAPTAIN PLANET 
+ DiELUXEPAINT3 



LOWCOST3 &5YEAR 

EXTENDED 

WARRANTIES 

AVAILABLE. PLEASE 

SEEBELOWFOR 

DETAILS 

For 1.3 CDinpaUbility^ we can 

diipply Si nt our KS Rnm 
Switch CT^mplete with 1.J rem 
for )u<it £S4.M with out 
■. 'i :.■■". .laiirwjiiTjoly. 



AMI GA 600hd £469.9 9 

» 1 MEG RAM 

»3.S" DISK DRIVE ACCESSORIES PACK £29.99 

.WORKBENCH 2 

»BUILT IN TV MODULATOR 

.BUILT IN 20 MEG HARD DRIVE (ON AMIGA 
600HD MODEL) 

» CAPTAIN PLANET ( not witK HD model) 

» DELUXE PAINT 3 (not with HD model) 

nCotnpatible with most Amiga SOO peripherals - 

eg Bctenul drives. Samplers etc 
All Amiga 600s hive 12 months on site warranty, 
with optional (at extra cost) extended warranty. 



[I PHIUPSCM 8833MK2 T COMMODORE 1084S 



TVIJUH^R 



vrithPI^&On site warranty 
OFFICIAL UK MODEL 

N(JWONLYai4.M 

» If SCREEN 

. STEREO SOUND 
I . RGB U COMPOSITE INPUTS 
1 » FREE CONNECTING LEADS 



LATEST MODEL 
NOW ONLY £229.99 

1 . 1*" ANTIGLARE SCREEN 
. GREEN SCREEN SWITCH 
I • STEREO SOUND 
I. RGB t COMFOSETE INPUTS 



NOW ONLY i.n?.9? 

• H"ANT] GLARE SCREEN 

• ANALOGUE RGB INPUT 
. FLICKER FIXER COMPATIBLE 

. » WORKS IN PRODUCTIVITY 
MODE 



luBeyf]urS83>lor1 
1 1084 monttoraft [ 
|a tv. 

ONLY£3».M 



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PROGRAMMING 




Cliff Ramshaw 
continues his 
programming 
tutorial for 
beginners* This 
month - how^ 
fihe computer 
chooses a move 
in a game of 
noughts andWB 
crosses 




It's all very well getting the 
computer to display a noughts 
and crosses board and accept 
moves from a player, but the 
really clever bit Is In getting It to 
make Its own moves. 

There are at least a couple of 
ways this could be done. You might, 
for Instance, write a program that 
tried to play as much like a human 
as possible. Its starting move would 
be to take a corner position or the 
centre. Then It would start looMng 
along each of the possible lines 
with which It could win - eight In 
all. If It saw two noughts together 
and a gap. It would place a nought 
there. Otherwise, If It saw two 
crosses together It would place a 
nou^t in the gap to prevent the 
player from winning, tf there were 
no pairs, perhaps It would try 
placing a nought In one of the 
remaining comers. 

As you can see, there are many 
possibilities. Piaying noughts and 



crosses isn't as simple as it at first 
seems. The problem with writing a 
program to piay in the above way is 
that it wiii consist of littie more than 
a huge list of If statements, it would 
be nice if there vifere a strategy which 
wouid work out the best possible 
move from any board position. And 
indeed there is such a strategy. 

It's similar to the one used by 
chess programs, although a little 
simpler. !t does not work in the same 
way that a human plays the game. 
Instead, it looks at every possible 
move, and decides which is the best 
by looking to the end of the game to 
see which is the winning move. 

ON THE MOVE 

There are two main parts needed to 
do this (see the box^iut on 
procedures in this and last montti's 
issue). The simple part, which later 
forms the base case for the 
recursion used to choose the 
computer's move, looks at a given 
board position and decides whether 
or not the game is over. There are a 
number of ways in which this may 
happen, and for simplicity's sake 
they are each separated into 
d iffere nt proced u res . 

The controlling one, GAMEOVER, 
returns a result of True (this is an 
AMOS reserved variable with a value 
of -1). This result can be read by the 
program that called GAMEOVER by 
looking at the value of Param. 
GAMEOVER itself looks like this: 

Procedure GRMEOVER 

Shared BOARD ( ) , NOtJGHT, CROSS 

RESULTS False 



FTJIiL 

If Parami»True ^en J 

RESULT=True 

WONINODGHT] 

If Param=True llieii J 

RESUliT=True 

WOK [CROSS] 

If Paraiii=True Then J 

RES<ILT=True 

End Proc [BEStlUT] 

Notice that the procedure must have 
access to the game board, and the 
values for noughts and crosses, so 
the corresponding variables must be 
shared. REStJLT is a variable used to 
hold the result of the GAMEOVER 
procedure before it is returned. 

Two further procedures are called 
by GAMEOVER. The first is FULL, 
which returns a value of True in 
Param if the game board is full. If 
this Is the case, then the game must 
be over and RESULT can be set to 
True. The second procedure is WON. 
This takes a single parameter: the 
type of piece in which we are 
interested. If it is passed NOUGHT 
and the game has been won by the 
noughts, then it will return True, 
False otherwise. Similarly, If It is 
passed CROSS as a parameter and 
the game has been won by the 
crosses, then it will return True, 
False otherwise. 

Here is the FULL procedure: 

Procedure FULL 
Shared BOftRD C ) , EMPIY 
REStJLT=True 
For X=l To 3 
For Y=l To 3 

If BOfiBD(X,Y)=EMPTY 



AND MORE ON PROCEDURES 



• •• 



Procedures have more up their sleeves than I let 
on last month. 

You may remember the mention of local 
variables, shared variables and parameters. Let's 
recap: a local variable is one that is only used 
Inside a procedure. After the procedure has 
finished, the value held In the local variable will be 
forgotten. No modifications made to it within the 
procedure can have any effect on the parts of the 
program external to the procedure, A local variable 
may have the same name as a variable external to 
the procedure, but they will be unconnected. 
Altering one will not alter the other. All variables 
used in a procedure are local unless declared by 
the programmer to be otherwise. 

Shared variables are the exception. If a variable 
within a procedure is declared as shared, then it is 
exactly the same as the variable external to the 
procedure with the same name. Any modifications 
to one will alter the value of the other. In the 
noughts and crosses example, the board array Is 
declared as shared for all of the procedures, since 
clearly each procedure needs to be working with the 
same game board. 



Parameters are variables 'passed' to a 
procedure by the external program. In AMOS they 
are enclosed in square brackets after the 
procedure name, both in its definition and 
whenever it is called. The variables in the call - 
those passed to the procedure - need not have the 
same names as those inside the procedure 
definition. The parameters within the procedure act 
like local variables. Modilying them will not alter the 
external variables which were passed to the 
procedure at the call. The difference is that their 
values are initially set to those of the external 
variables used in the call whenever the procedure 
is called. 

The best way to learn about the different types 
of variables available to procedures is to 
experiment. Write a few procedures - try a few 
experiments with variable values and Include a few 
print statements so you can see what is going on. 
You'll soon get the hang of it. 

There's a further kind of variable usable by 
procedures - a result or return value. Supposing 
you wanted to write a procedure which multiplied 
three numbers. These could be passed as ttiree 



parameters to the procedure. But if the variable 
holding the result of the calculation Is local to the 
procedure, how can the external pro&^am ever know 
what the result Is? One answer is to share the 
result variable between the procedure and the rest 
of the program. Another, more elegant solution, is 
to return the result to the main program, A 
procedure can only return one value: It is done In 
AMOS by placing the variable to be returned in 
square brackets following the End Proc statement. 

Tfie value can then be accessed by the main 
program via a special variable called Psram - this 
always holds the result returned from the last 
procedure called. Type In this short example to get 
a feel for it; 



0=3 

MU1T[A,B,C] 

Print "Answer =■ 

A=7 

B=5 

C=12 

UOLT[A,S>C] 

Print "Answers 

Stop 

Procedure [X, Y, Z] 

RESULT=X*Y*Z 

End Proo [RESCLT: 



Param 



Parao! 



108 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUf 16 • AUGUST 1992 



PROGRAMMING 



Itien RESUI/TsFalae 

Next Y 
Next X 
Bad Froc [KESXILT] 

FULL assumes that the board is 
already full, and so sets RESULT to 
True. It then searches through each 
of the positions in turn. As soon as it 
f nds a blanl< one (a position whose 
value is equal to EMPTY) it sets 
RESULT to False, since the board is 
clearly not false. Once each position 
has been checked, FULL ends, 
returning the value held In RESULT. 

The procedure WON looks as 
follows: 

Procedure WOMtmRN] 

Shared BOARDO 

REStJLT=False 

HORIZLIHE [TORN] 

If Param=True Then J 

RESULT=True 

VERTLINB [TURN] 

If ParaiteTnie Vbrni J 

RESULT=Tru« 

DIAGLINE [TtJRKT] 

If ParantsTrue Then J 

REStJLT=True 

End Proc[RESimT] 

As you can see, WON does little 
more than rely on another set of 
procedures: HORIZLINE, VERTLINE 
and DIAGLINE. Lil<e WON, these are 
passed a type of piece as a 
parameter, and then go on to decide 
w/hether this particular piece has won 
the game. 

HORiZLINE decides whether or 
not the piece whose value is heid In 
TURN has won by making a 
horizontal line of three. It does this 
as follows: 

Procedure HORIZLJUE [TDRHl 
Shared BOftRDO 
SESUI.T= False 

If ((B0ARD(1,1)=T0RN and J 
BaARD(2,l)=r[JRK and J 
BaftRIl{3,l)=TDRN) J 
or(BQARD(l,2)=TURN and J 
BQARD{2,2)=rOTtN and J 
BCARD(3,2)=TURH) J 
or(BORRD(l,3)=TDRN and J 
BaftRD(2,3)=r[JRN and J 
BaftRD{3,3)=TURN)) Then J 
RESUl/TisTnie 
Snd ProcCREStJI/rl 

That's fairly straightforward, as is the 
procedure to see whether the piece 
in TURN has won on a vertical line: 

Procedure VERTLIMEtTDRN] 
Shared BQARDO 
KESIII/r= False 

If ((B0ARD(1,1)=T0HN and J 
BaRRD(l,2)-TtJRK and J 
B0ARD(l,3)=TtJRM) J 
or(BOftHD(2,l)='njHN and J 
BOARD(2,2)=TORN and J 
BOaHD(2,3)=TDRN) J 
or(B0ARD(3,l)=TUEN and J 



BoasD(3,2)='raHH and J 

BOftHIK3,3)='njRN)) Then J 

REStJLT-Tum 

End Proc [RE3UI/I] 

Similarly, the procedure to check for 
wins along a diagonal looks like this: 

Procedure DIAGLIHB [TtTRN] 

Shared BOARDO 

RE^StILT=False 

If ([BQftRD(l,l)=rURN and J 

BOABD(2,2)=TURN and J 

BQaRD(3,3)=TURN) J 

or(B0ftRD!3,l)=T0RN and J 

BQAHD(2,2)=rORN and J 

BQftRD(l,3)=TURN)) Then J 

RESULT=True 

End ProcEREStmr] 

The three procedures above could all 
have been incorporated into the WON 
procedure, but that would have made 
things messy. As it is, it's much 
easier to see wtiat's going on by 
splitting different parts of the 
program up into different sections. 

The procedure which makes use 
of all of the above is known as a 
'static evaluator'. It looks at the 
board from a particular player's point 
of view and returns a value of +1 if 
that player has won, -1 If the player 
has lost, or If neither player has 
won. The code for it Is as follows: 

Procedure STATIC [TORH] 

Shared BOARD () 

WONCTURN] 

If ParanicTrue 

RESUKT-l 
Else 

WON [-TURN] 

If ParamsTrue 
BSStJI/r=-l 

Else 

EEStJLT=0 

End If 
End If 
End Proc [RESDLT] 

STATIC returns a result depending on 
the type of piece passed to it in the 
parameter TURN. It first calls WON to 
see if TURN has won, and if so it 
sets RESULT to 1. If not, it calls 
WON with the negative of TURN - 
that is the opponent of the player in 
question - and if this player has won 
then RESULT is set to -1. Otherwise 
RESULT is set to 0. 

Ail of the above forms the ioase 
case of the recursion necessary to 
generate the computer's move. The 
recursion steps through every 
possible move that the computer and 
the player can make. It only stops 
when the game is over, which it can 
discover by calling GAMEOVER. 

Next month I'll go into the 
recursive part of the move generator. 
It's a little complicated, so have a 
look at the box to the right to 
acquaint yourself with the basic 
ideas. CD 



RECURSION 



Recursion Is one of the most powerful of programming techniques. 
Initially It can be a little dlfflcitlt to follow, but once mastered It proves 
Its worth. 

Something that is recursive Includes itself as part of its definition. In 
computer programs. It is usually procedures which are recursive. The 
procedure definition will include a procedure call to itself. Look at the 
following: 

Procedure FACTORIAL [NJ 
FACTORIAL [N-1 3 

H=N*Paraiii 
End Proc[N] 

It computes the factorial of a number. The factorial of a number N is 
obtained by multiplying all the numbers between 1 and N, In the example, 
tfiis is done by multiplying N by the factorial of N-1, which achieves tine 
same result. One slight problem with the above - it never stops. The 
procedure is infinitely recursive. 

Because factorials only work for numbers of one or greater, there is 
no need to continue the recursion once the value of N is 1 or less. The 
procedure can be modified to: 

Procedure FACTORIAL [N] 
Z£ II>1 

FACTORIAL [N-1] 

N=N*Param 
End If 
End ProcfN] 

This Checking for the value of N is looking for 'the base case'. If the base 
case holds (in this example, that N is 1), then no further recursion occurs, 
and an answer can be given immediately. If the base case is not satisfied, 
further recursion is called for. 

Imagine the procedure Factorial called with a parameter of 3. The If 
statement will be true, since 3 is greater than 1, so Factorial will be called 
cgain with a parameter of 2. Again, the If statement will be true, so 
Factorial will be called with a value of 1. 

Now the tf statement is false, so the procedure ends. The value it 
returns is N, which at the moment is equal to 1. After the end of the 
procedure, control returns to the statement after the previous call to 
Factorial. The special variable Param has a value of 1, given by the result 
of the last call. This is multiplied by N, and the result assigned to N. In 
this case, N has a value of 2 (remember that N, being a local variable, has 
a different value in this invocation of the procedure from those Ns used in 
other calls of the same procedure), and the result is 2. 

This result is then returned at the end of the procedure. Control again 
passes to the statement following the call to Factorial. Now Param has a 
value of 2. It is multiplied by N, which equals 3 In this particular call to the 
procedure (this is the value with which the procedure was originally 
called). The result, 6, is then returned by the procedure. 

Control then passes to the main program, since the recursion has 
ceased. 

The main program would look something like: 

FACTORIAL [31 
Print Param 
Stop 

You can see that a recursive procedure consists of two parts: a base 
case, which yields a definite result; and a recursive, general case, which 
can only yield a result dependent on further calls to the procedure. Bear in 
mind that any local variables in the procedure (including the procedure's 
parameters) will have different values in each recursive call to the 
procedure, even though they share the same names. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1993 



10 



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Photon Paint V2.0 £19.99 

Deluxe Paint IV X54.99 

Walt Disney Animator ...£64.99 
Professional Draw V.2. ...£89.99 



• VIDEO STUDIO* 

Vidi Amiga + Vidi Chrome ..X69. 99 

Rombo RGB Splitter £39.99 

Take 2 Animation Package .£34.99 
Complete Colour Solution ...£99.99 
Colour Solution + Take 2 ..£129.99 

Rocgen Genlock ^^.99 

Rocgen Plus Genlock £129.95 

ScalaSOO - -^9,95 

Scala (requires 1Mb) £149.95 

Roctec Genlock £99.95 



Midi-Master Interface 

+ 2 Midi Cables 

+ Music X Junior. £29.99 



MuiicXl 1 "." 


....£49.99 


Rombo Mega-Mix...... 


£29.99 


GVP Sound Studio.... 


£49.95 




£89.95 


Bars and Pipes Pro.., 


,..£179.95 



• STAR/CITIZEN* 
PRINTERS 

* £109.95 

CITIZEN 120D+ * 

STARLC20 

CITIZEN SWIFT 9. 

STARLC200 • 

STAR UC24-20 (NEW) 

STAR LCZ4-2(K> (MONO) 

CITIZEN 224 

STAR S]48 BUBBLEJET 

STAR 1X24-200 (COLOUR) 
* CITIZEN SWIFT 24e 



XI 19.95 

£169.95 

£169.95 

£179.95 

£199.95 

,£209.9S 

£214.95 

£249.95 

£264.95 



* POWER HAND SCANNER* 

FEATURING: 

• LATEST VERSION 2 SOFTWARE 

• 64 GRAYSCALES 

• 100 - 400 DPI 
I PLUS raiE PHOTON PAINT 2.0 (RRP ^89,95) 

A DYNAMITE EXCLUSIVE AT £99.95 



HOW TO ORDER 

Call us NOW on 
0234 214212 

Send Cheque or postal order to 

, DYNAMITE COMPUTERS 
Dynamite House 
44a Stanley Street 
Bedford MK41 7RW 

NB Pfease write cheque guarantee card number 

on the reverse of chequeto ensure same day 

clearance (cheques without card number subject 

to today clearance) 

Call Into our showroom for a fast and 

friendly service 

Retail/Queries 0234 364428 




,.£15.95 



* Complete with free colour kit 
whilst stocks last 

ACCESSORIES 

PARALLEL PRINTER CABLE *^-»« 

UNIVERSAL PRINTER STAND ^^'S^ 

200 SHEETS OF CONTINUOUS ^^ ^^ 

p.(VPER 

COLOUR KIT OPTION FOR ^34.95 



* MEMORV 

5UKRAM EXPANSION IWV— ^^^^^ 

SUKlt^MEXPANStON tU CLOOC ^^^^^ 

IMBRAMEXPANS1ONIA50 PLUS) ^^^^^ 
1Mb bv 8 SIMM boards (GVP) 

A500 RAM BOARDS 
^f.Uvautoconfig/iv.ll*"^'^'*''' ...£119.95 

2Mb ■ £179.95 

4Mb '22 £279.95 

8Mb 




^ 



DELIVERY CHARGES* 

E2.95 for orders less ttian £100 
£4.95 for orders over £1 00 
Next day express service £7,50 
Saturday delivery only £15.00 
"Charges applicable to UK mainland only 

PLATINUM SERVICE CARD 

Only £19,99! 

Features: • Next day courier delivery 

• 30 day exctiange for new 

• 1 year guarantee giving free collection 

and delivery should a fault occur. 

All prices subject to availability and may 

change without notice, E & OE 



10 BLANK DISKS (3.5 DS/DD) 
50 BLANK DISKS (3.5 DS/DD} 

QUALITY MOUSEPAD 

40 CARiVClTYLOCKABLE BOX 

80 CAPACITY LOCKABLE BOX 

ROLL OF 1000 3,5" DISK LABELS 

MOUSE/JOYSTICK Switcher box unit 



ACCESSORIES/EXTRAS 

.£3.99 ZIPSTICKSUPERPRO JOYSTICK 



£9.99 

£17.99 QUICKJOY TOP -STAR JOYSTICK ^l*'^^ 

£1,99 AMIGA SOFT DUSTCOVER Tk^ 

£2 99 AMIGA PERSPEXDUSTCOV'ER £»-99 

' nw^**'*' ran QQ 

£4.49 REPLACEMENT MOUSE - -"J"^; 

£6.99 REPLACEMENT TV MODULATOR "JJ'™ 

£9.95 REPLACEMENT POWER SUPPLY *^»-^» 



P, 



^* 



TO PLACE YOUR ORDER PHONE THE DYNAMITE HOTLiwi. 

0234 214212 



Tk'wwr A m'TO' 



nnilSF. A4a STANLEY STREET, BEDFORD 



PUBLISHERS tHwvKj^ ^ 

* COMPRISES; Xl^ '^nnVpAGESETTER + ^„. 

(WORDPROCEbSOR) PAGKb ^^^^ ^^^^ 

HEADLINE FONTS . ARTISTS Cti ^^^^ 

Th. pack u.d . --t«XtK>e to offer 
but we've managed to source ^ £19.95 



USER GROUPS 



Find your local group 



1E20 Ptottsr Group (ICPUQ) v John Bentleir 
06286 65932. 

I&a2 Mlero Programming AMOS, bimonthly 
fanzine, PD, (nsh->590t Membership lOOFF/ 
£10 Contact F Moreau, 132 rue Jean Foiiain, 
50000 Salntio, France ir 31 52 20 02 

Arnlga AMIcts Newsletter and open nights For 
more Info SAE to A Minnock, Clonkelly, BInn, Co 
Off sly, (leland 

Aml£a Artlita Chib 34 Roundha/ Mount, Leeds 

LSS 4DW, For Amiga artists, musicians and 
coders. Pirates not welcome, Fr^e. b KAM on 
0532 493942, frSpm. 

Amlea Beglnnen' Club 110 Whitehlll Perk, 
Limavldy, Co. LorKlonderry, 8T4B OQG. Club to 
help newv:omers. Bi-monthly club disk, ar>d a 
small PD library. Membership £2 for a single 
disk, or £20 for every Issue. 

Aml^ Computer CFub PD Library, graphics, 
video, DTP, monthly mag SAE for details to R 

McDonald, 3 Islay Court, Irvine, KAll 4JQ 

Amiea Helpllns Service DTP, PD, IHelp/problem 

service. Free membership. Beginners welcome. 
Send stamp for more info to: G Keenan, 21 
Sklrsa PI. Glasgow 023 SEE. 



t' Club Membership gets you a 
disk with 50 IFF samples a month for 12 months. 
Also sample service. Meimbershlp £30, Contact 
Gavin Wylie, Guthfle Street, Carnoustie, Angus. 

Amifa Network Inteniatioiul 2 monthly clyb 
dlsl<, reviews, advice For info contact Phil or 
Steve: 434 Denby Dele Rd East, Waiiefleld, W 
Vorks WF4 3AE 

Amiga Usem' Klub, Windsor House, 19 Castle 

St, Bodmin, Cornwall PL31 20X, Meets every 
Friday from 6.30-9pm, to expand members' 
knowledge of Anilga and to heip solve people's 
problems. Contact Jack Tailing. 

Aml^ Ua«r* Oroup- FVLDE Advice on Amiga, 
technical support, discussions, workshops, 

tuition , £10 year, £6 6 months. Contact A 
Wilkinson, 25 Glen Eldon Rd, Lytham St Annas. 
Lanes « 02 S3 724607. 



If your group isn't mentioned, fill 
in the form at the bottom of the 
page to let us fcnow about you 



Amiga Video Producen' Qroup Me6t$ quarterly in 

Swindon. For info pgck send SAE to J StAJtton, 8 
Rochford CI, Grange Park, Swindon, Wilts SM5 
6Aa»0793S70667. 

Afnlga WItlum U»n' Group S5 MighflaldS Rd. 

With.am, Essex CMS ILW. Tfps and Basic 
programs. K Anderson «- 0376 51S271. 

Amlgalwllci Club Free membership. Own disk 

magazine r For further information contact Kevin 
Biyan v 071-5SD 2000 Ext 240 or 29 Wolfe 
Ores, Chariton. London SE7 8TS. 



1 Quarterly newsletter (tIpSr advice 
etc), quality PD, discount harcfware, software and 
acccessortes, free advice. Annual membership 
fee £7. Contact S Green, 9 St Lukes Walk, 

Hawkinge, KentCTia7EF 

J^u Programme Club Fr&a membership, swap 
AMOS programs and PD, disk magazine and help 
for new users. Contact GareUi Downes-Powell, 6 

Bfassey A^nue, Broadstairs, KentCT10 2DS 

AMOS Programmers' Exchpn^ Free 

memb'srship. Swapping software and ideas. Help 
available. J Lanng, 7 Majestic Rd, Hatch Warren. 
Basingstoke. Hants RG22 4XD 

AMOS User Group Swap fdeas, help on any 
AMOS subject, swap PD and own creations. 
Contact Andy v 0323 2S790 or write: 22 Ceylon 
PI. Eastbourne, E Sussex BM21 3JF 

Avon Micro Computer Club Graphics and 

animation, business and the chance to speak to 
professional users. £3 per annum. Contact 
Roger; 95 Downend Rd, Horfleld,. Bristol * 0272 
5^3234. 



' Group €8 Queers Elizabeth 
Dr, Itomnanton, West Yorka WF6 liF. Encourages 



GET YOURSELF LISTED 

If you fun a user group which Isn't listed on this page, fill tn the 
form below for your free entry. Send it to Amiga Shopper User 
Groups List, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BAl 2BW. We reserve the 
right to refuse entries. 



g«s- 



AS16 



Group name.. 

Contact name 

Contact telephone number. 
Contact address 



Place of meetings . 



Time of meetings . 
Type of activities . 



Membership fee . 



the use of Basic, exchanges ideas and a$S9Sts 
beginners to the larigusge. Free newsletter Mark 
Blaohall « 0924 89210S. 

Csmlwrtey Usar Qtoup Ucturas. compstWons, 

advice, meetings, free membersiilp. For more info 
contact F WeiibalDve u 0262 S71 646 

Champion PD Club PD at 30p, newsletters, 
advice, heip and more. Membership £10, 
Contact: Steve Pichett, 31 Someiset Ciose. 
Cattericif, N Yoritshire, DL9 3HE. 

CheitaMe^lnal 16-BH CmniMtM Club Ground 
floor function suite. The Civic Centre. Newcastie 
Rd, Chester-ie-Stjieet. Club rttsets Mondays from 
7,30'9-30pfTi, Excharige advice and swap tips. 
Contact Peter Hears » 091-385 2939, 

COTV Uaers Club Swap views on softvi'arB and 
hardware. Contact Julian Lavanini, 113 Fouracres 
Rd. Newaii Green, Manchester M23 8ES, 

Cfilc CoRiputsr Club Puii detaiis with an SAE to 
STAMP, Chic Computer Ciub, TO Bon 121. 
Gerrards Cross. Bucks, Contact Steve Winter s 
0753 834473, 

Club Amiga MemherahipilOayeerforPD 
software and a 24-hr heipiine service (091-385 
2627), For more info send SAE to Chris Longiey, 
5 Bowes Lea, Shiney Row, Houghton Le Spring. 
Tyne and V^ear. 

Club Futura Advice to programmers and 

beginners. Send SAE for info to G Holland, 16 
Hermlston. Moniiseaton, Whtiiey Bay, Tyne ^ 

WearNE25 9AN 

Camp-U-Pal Austrsiian grcup for users in the 
outback. Newsietter, heipiine, PD iibrery. 
Membership A$24, Comp-U-Pai, c/o MDA, PO Box 
29, Knoifield 3180, Victoria, Australia. 

Computer Club 16 Laton Rd. Hastings, East 
Sussex T 0424 421480, A 16-blt club dedicated 
to being computer enthusiasts Membership costs 
£15 per year. 

IHiabtfld Qniup < ICPUQ) Contact David Sate, 71 

Bedford Rd, Bootie, Merseyside L20 7DN. 

Edinburgh Amiga Group Membership £5, 
Includes free advice and PD, Contact Neil McRea, 
37 Kingsknowe Road Nor^, 
Edinburgh EH 14 2DE with SAE. 

Ouni Mastera PD. demos etc. contact the Sheriff, 
111 Sherbouma Rd. Banbury, Wolverhampton. 
WVIO 9EIJ » 0902 782277 

Hereford Amiga Group Membership free, heip, 
erehange of PD and shareware, Lotus Turbo 2 
Quad Player Championship. ContaclJohn 
Macdonald, Alma Cottage. Ailensmore. Hereford 
HR2 9AT « 0981 21414 

In Touch Amiga Penpals, contacts. PD, swaps 
£2.50/year. Contact P Alien, 0342 835530, PO 
Box 21, Lingfieid, Surrey RH7 6YJ 

Independent Corranodore Products Users' droup 

Biggin Hill Library, Church Rd, Biggin Hill, Kent, 
Meets most Thursdays from 7, 45-9.45 pm. 
Lectures and open nights, » John Bicnerstatt 
after 8,30pm 081-S51 5436, Also national 
rtetwork of user ^ups. Contact Individual groups 
for details on activities, cost, meeetings etc: 
Andovar « R Geere 0264 790003 
AncleM^ n N Massey 0407 765221 
Ayr 1 J Smith 0292 261408 
Coveptry » W Light 0203 413511 
Dublin <r G Reeves 010 3S3 12 883S63 
Durham "■ S Harvey 68 Wood Vue, Spenn^oor, 
Co Durham DL16 eRF 

\ ■» 031 557 4242 
rRE)Te 0532 487691 
MacclesfleM « P Richardson 0298 23644 
MaraeyeHe o G Titherlngton 051 521 2553 
Mid Tliame* " M Hatt 0753 645728 
S Walu ICPUQ « I Kelly 0222 513B15 
Sotant " A Dimmer 0705 254969 
SouthWsit IT p Miles 0297 60339 
Stevenage ■» 6 Grainger 0438 727925 
WMford -IT M Pfyor 0442 864 234 
W Riding v K Morton 0532 537318 
WIgan -^ B Caswell 0942 213402 



imagliie Uaers' Qnrap Encourages the use of 
Imagine and other ray tracing packages. Affiliated 
to US group. Object library. Membership tree. 
Contact Brian Walker. 16 Cambridge Road, 
Newton Cambridge CB2 5PL. 

Jam eit Tech 24-hr hotline, PD library For info 
contact J Maron, Greycourt, Greycourt CI, Idle, 
Bradford, BDIO 80H W Vorlfs » 0274 611111 
Ex 248 

Kent Youth Coinputer Qroup Computer fair visits, 
programming, video and DTP work, monthly 
newsletter, 30p entry/evening. Meetings Sundays 
6,30 - 9pm at the D Bowen Youth centre, 
Kingsnoith Road, Ashford, Kent TN23 2LY, 
■» 0233 629804 

Maritime Amiga Club Maritime computing, 
Interact with seafarers ashore on Amigas, 
Contact CDR K Osei. GN Ships Refit Office, 51 
Rue de la Bretonniere. 50105 Cherbourg. France, 
" 33 33225447 

Nprtham Irviaml Aml^ Uaef Newsletter, free PD 
library. Send SAE for further info. £5 annual 
membership. Contact; S Hamer, 98 Crebiliy Rd, 
Saiiymena, Co Aritrim BT42 4DS 

Norwich Masked Heroa SAE for Info. Free 
membership. Contact jorro, 278 Aylsham Rd, 
Nont/ieh, Norfolk NR32RG v 0603 409899 

Pennine Amiga Cluh 26 Spencer Street, 
Keighiey. West Yorkshire BD21 2BU. Free 
membership, tree advice and a newsletter. 
Contact Neville Annstrong ■» 0535 609263. 

PuWic Domain Exchange Demos, music, utilities. 

aimatlon Annual fee £3 Contact D McLelsh, 26 
Taunton Ave, Leigh, Lanes WN7 5PT 

Pubttc Domain User Qroup Swaps PD, provides 
advice. SAE to 12 Oxford Rd. Guildford, Surrey 
GUI 3RP. 

Red Led Amiga Club Swap games and utilities 
Contact N Hansen. 62 Wolsey Dr, Walton on 
Thames, Surrey KT12 3BA 

Rye Computer Club Swap/meet at the Rye 

Community Centre. For info contact Oliver 
Campion. 71 The Mint. Rye. E Sussex TW31 7DP 
10797 222876 

Sarfikia Amiga Uaer* Membership £5, £1 
admission. Contact J Kucak for more: « 0706 
290387. Fortnightly meetings 7.30-11 at tiie 
High Crompton Conservative Ciub. 

Sharfock PD Quarterly disk mag, help and advice 

for beginners, 50p/disk. A Doyle. 44 Miiton 
Street, Warrenpoint, Co Down N Ireland 

Shropahire Amiga Link Advice, monthly disk mag, 
PD £16/year fee. Contact N CochsiynB, 2 
Dodmoor Grao^e, Randiay, Telford, Shropshire 
TF3 2AW " 0952 S91376 

Slim Agnus 115 Brocks Drive, Morth Oheam, 
Sutton, Surrey SMS 9UW, Meat last Thursday of 
month. PD library. BBS. advice from Amiga 
experts. Contact Philip Wofrei, 

Software Exchange Service 13 Soumviiie Larw. 

Stirchley. Birmingham. West Midlands 830 2JY. 

Michael Pun ■» 021-459 7576. 

South 16 Bimonthly mag and disk, also PD 
library. Send SAE. £10/year. Contact Bnjce. PO 
Box 16, Southampton SOS 7AU 

South Wales Club Newslener, PD. advice. 
Contact Alien 53 West Ave, Trecenydd, 
Caerphilly, CFB 2SF 

Warpdrlvfl (friendi of Amiga} Amiga hejp-llne, PD 
iilirary, bi-monthly disk mag, free drinks, 
competitions and Infosheet, £15 a year. Contact 
B Scales 110 Burton Ave, Baiby, Doncaster D'N4 
8BB ■" 0302 859715 

WCSPSAI Help available. PD disk of your choice 
and newsietter every month. PD at £1, 
Membership fse £25. For information contact A 
Jamleson " 0749 677609 

Wr«xham District Computet Club PD. library, 
equipment loan. lOp to join, 50p to get in. 
Memorial Hail, Wrexham every Thursday, 7-lOpm, 
Contact Paul Evans, 3 Ffordd Eifed, RhosnesI, 
Wrexham, Ciwyd LL12 7LU, 

Your Amiga Club Helplines, PD, social evenings, 
classes, ciub mag. Fee; £12, family £15. Contact 
P HIggins e- 0424 892269. The Old Chapel, 
Church Rd, Catsfield Battle, Sussex TN33 9 DP 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE T6 • AU0U5T 1993 



3GVP 




AMIGA PERIPHERALS 



GREAT 

VALLEY 

PRODUCTS 



QUAUTY AMIGA PERIPHERALS 
Wrm A 2 YEAR WARRANTY 

Silica Systems are pleased to present the 
GVP range of peripherals. GVP are the world's 
largest third party manufacturer of peripherals 
for the Amiga range and have a reputation for 
high specification, quality products, The 
company was founded only four years ago by 
a man who knows about the Amiga, 
Commodore's ex-Vice President of Technology. 
He, along with a team of Amiga experts 
including other ex-CommoctorB staff, understand 
the add-on requirements of Amiga owners 
tjetter than anyone. F^ot only do GVP provide 
peripherals that Amiga owners want, fiey also 
offer peace of mind, with a 2 year warranty on 
the products they manufacture. So, if you are 
looking for the very best in peripherals for your 
Amiga computer, look no further than GVP, 



QVP's HDS+ hard drive and A53I3 hard drive with 40MHz accelerator, 
reprasant the tiighssl quality Amija 500 peripherals, ai vary affordable 
prices. Each Ir^corporate^ a Quanium disk drive, RAM expariBion 
capability, custom VLSI chip and FAAASTROM SCSI driver, tor , . 

unbealabie performarvca. 
The HD8+ hard drive offars up to awb o- 
standard inlarnai Fast HAM axpansion 
and llie A530 Comljo, up to 8Mb of 32- 
bit wida last RAM expansiort. Both 
feature a SCSI controller, virtiich 
supports up to 6 additional devices, 
and an Autoboot/Game cut-oft 
switch. Both are available in 52, 120 
and 240Mb tiard drive versions. 
In addtlion, the A530 Combo zooms 
the Amiga forward wilh an 030 
accelerator, running at a blistering 
«l^l-tz. This envies your Amiga 600 to 
run at an Incredible 12.1 I^IPS, faster than 
an Amiga 30001 No other product in the 
world combine all the features found in the 
AS30 Combo! A plug-in PC emulator option, 
shown below, is available for both the HD8+ and 
A530 Combo. ___ 



PC EMULATOR 



PLUG-lf^ OPTION FOR HDB+ & A530 


Tlitlri 



• 16MHz802e6processor 

• 287 K/laths Co-Processor socket 

• 512K of PC RAM plus file use of Amiga FWM 

• Supports Hercules, CGA. EGAWGA 
(monochrome) and T3i00 video modes 

• Runs fvfS-DOS (3.2 and upvuards) plus 
thousands of other PC programs 

This poiverful 286 emulator module simptv plugs into 
the 'mini-slot" of the GVP HD3+ or A530 (without 
invalidating the warranty). It has full access to the 
Amiga's resources and allows 
you to run PC and Amiga pro- 
grams at the same time, giving 
you two oompijters in one. 



£249 





HDS-f 


A530I 


HARD DRIVE 


OUiUniM ICHI HMtn DRPl^ 


• 


« 


JlTTUMfTnrBIJUXQt 


• 


« 


rTHERATEOFTK-ZiJUdHEi 


* 


• 


ms^smsm^^ 


JlDHHi AIDSHEC C?]3 




« 


CFTIDIUL am MATHS CD-PHOCESSOR; 




■ 


flUNS AT ^t^ Mll^ If A^HP UVi Ki i}Wil' I 




« 


IHitnPVI'MIE aUPPDflT TD MilP KICHStitRt IHTD 
32-tllVIID( Ndl FtIM FDRftUTER DERATION 

1 M ttfHhC THE apgnTHj SYsny . 




• 



RAJfl BOARD 1 


Itf TO HI OF t OR B-H FAST PUM 

\i Ofl 9-UI m\ S4MS - lSCm OH mcfSR; 


• 




UPTUBMOFSZ'tlitVntlEFASTIIAM 
iJi-BiJW^tJESIMVs-HlssI 




• 


>MhFahlLJliT{D 




• 


OTHER FEATURES 


!IOD.'AGC£LEnATH1 'ClfT'QFF' SWITCH Hf\ 
IWiQiUtfCDMPATIBILm 






fCSIl^TnQLLEItlFIHIUPTOe 
ADDITIONitL DEVICES 






VLSI CtJSTOM CHIP 






FIUUI&T{I(IM£C:SI[»R1VER 






IDPITlOiU. CQlQUfl ii; STVLIHQ TD THE ASH 






BlIILTm vrHTMTION F.AM TO PfUVE^T 
THE UHlTnt{lllWEniKfiTIIIQ 






DEDIUTEDPQWBl SUPPLY 






■ifilll-SLOr,Fflfl FUTURE HPANSIDHB 

,[■3 pcewjlat:.^ 






HEHDVABLI MEDIA SUPPOfIT 






DIHECTMEHDflT«CM»(l)IU|aTHE 
F^I^ULTIIUTEPERfQRHUICI 






EAST-TO-USESDfTWAflE 






!li'EAIiWMllUHTT 




• 




WHAT THE PRESS SAY: 

'Superb build, axceHant oeatheHa and 
blinding speed make this tha best 
A500 hard driye' .. amiga SHoePEH 

'GVP claims this Is the hstest hard drive 
In the world and none of our tests emild 
prove that vming^ Amu snopPin 

'Overall: Untouchr^ble. THE choke' 

AMIOA SHDPCfH 

'Sai ti\e best hard drive' .. 92% 

AmEA mfiMAr 



r:rHARD drives 

!/& ACCELERATORS 

PRICES FROtifl: 

£379 


MODEL 


52F«ib HD 


MOm HD 


240Mb HD 


HARD DRUfE 
HD8+ 


£379 

Fkjf HAP .3653 


£499 

Hel- HA^ 0:VX\ 


£779 

flr'; HAR G^4£ 


A53D COMBO 

HSBODBfJE 


£749 

Rd'- HAR 0952 


£869 


£1149 

Pdl; HA.q 096a 



FORALLAMIGAS 



lUIIGA 1500 4- 2000 + 3000 PRODUCT 




SOUND SAMPLER 



■ Plugs into pai'BM port 
• MIOS $iippcrt f<M- song input 



• Exiensive editing f0Btof$$ 

QuaHy e-bri staw hxtkI saniji^ ths cvnaitt itiiD 
tl»|BnMpQ(taia:rvAirig&SiaD, m, ^SX^, £000 
or 3CICH) cominiE^r. CornBin^Cl with ^^a d\ \hs 
hBM, moGl janaM ind se^j^bxist scurf mi 
mii/c ad)^ iKOpms $i^aas. incUMs 'Utredt 



MUS 
2500 



% 



ACCELERATORS 

• SS030EC/6S030EG'68030 pwC6$i0f 
« 25/4iS/$0MHzdocksf>as(is 

* 6S8B2 Maf/tS co-prcc$$$or 

• ^Kpamts to 7 m m 6Mt SZ-bit flAiW 

* ^-t/^SCSIcontfoHsronboani 

Fb31 6a(l3Ds'&9D30£C aixfllerttOJS walh msmpri' 
upgnnj^ «nd SCSI interlaoa l»airdi. Eacl^ comas 
KirpWfl tt* a eaBK m#is M-p(CceS9& and RM1 
L^r^je i$ siEuvjBfd. M Bvaitt^sia, "a nam i" Hand 
Dnva wiary G-FuTa CQCi Bwrtf. GVA flESI, CS.^S 
25MHx/lMb R^UPQPrn £S99 
40MHx/4Mb n.uPaa4H £000 

50MHE/4Mb Rt.!UFfit»:^ £1399 




HARD CARDS 

• Factory Inslslhd hlsfxi Dnves 

• SS. fSO. 24Q &■ 420Mb options 

• On-toani 8Mb fTWfTJory sockets 

• Add uptoS SCSI devicBS 

• Eesy to in5t&IS SIMMS 

The Impaja II HCB Kurd carda are Iht Kjuwalenl 
Ol the HDQ^ rianldm^. bullor iJw iSKtand iSHXi 
moOals, ttol oniy are ftie^ some d ilw laat^sl 
h^ ilnv& SivsitaHg, DltI tHev ^^ wtisxpat&tB an 
unpopiMed SMb HAM es^ngicrn ttoiti. 

e£Mb RtfHARI35E £299 

120Mb FtoiHAHi4» £449 

240Mb ^irfiHAPiuo £699 

420Mb wH*Ri&« E1299 



BSMb4* 



>95 

ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT - DELIVERY IS FREE OF CHARGE IN THE UK MAINLAND 




VIDEO ENHANCER 

• 7eS X 5S0 PAL ftesolistfOn 

• Si^p(>OftS comp vittap. S- VHS & FiGB 

• BmadcastiHi&Hty genlock 

• f<iow with RGB spmgT 

ftnpoct Viaon 24 is IhQ Isteet i'^tA f nsfessianal 
VttM Adapbr. It feaiurea ie \ni\m colours on 
iotedn Si VXS. bdH-tn parbcic, [lk:iflr fiver, Frsme 
tHitBT, 1am DiabtHf and <ft{jtei teyar. ^jf^lM 
wlh Cai)(|eD^1v;24 HD irffidellkig ardi fflndefing 
sDftwan, ScOa \V2A wddo tilling Botiviara, iJlua 
MacfO PaM ^-bii psini: package. AtSO&'^OOD 
reqjina adiftlcnaj Klttftor. GVAli224, £49.Bg 
m* ■ VIU SPLITTEH -^1 viD tih^ £ 1 69 9 
mi ■ flU'fflWISCODEItR.1 ^iD7i2* £2099 




RAM BOARDS 

• Upte eMb of FA$T RAM 

• UpgfBde in 2Mb increments 

• Stippo{tsin<Su^fy$tendsrdPAM chips 

• Diagnosilc software irKlodeii 

• FulSy Bulo-configu/ing 

J\fm RAkl^ Q\f&i^ an »aay way ^ upgrgdQ y<^r 
1S63 OS 2M! in 3Ut) inasinenl& up ta SMiS' The 
RAM B la. 1ully auto-oinfiguraiQ and Is sufipllad 
hvlih peaoB-ol-nniiid difigeiosirc sctfiwaf>e. £Mb 
cgiifi^iatiori suppoited hsrbriclgebc^rd e<wners 

0Mb pqputated RAU^aac £99 

2Mb populated H*^^ j-hu;- £ 169 




REMOVABLE MEDIA 

t SyquBsi 4d Or BSMtf removflbi'e media 
m 2Grr\s access fjrrre 

• O'l^P 1^8 ContraHor option ^xtra 

• BttefTia^cfls&^faj'faWfl tor ^5003000 
GvP ofler Sfyqwsl drives witti or wilhciirf ilwlr 
tics contrQller. Thsy a/a Avallabis in 4^Mb and 
8EiWn. capacities a^d twe a soma iKese llmt. 
Each drive Hi^e« ^lih a ran]ovai>le canritlge. 

44Mb (Si™ Driv*) Hil t-JB1»< t4'49 

£549 
£599 



(♦HOG WhJiH 

88Mbi|P(r*Prt«^ IVKtPi 



£699 



( SILICA SYSTEMS OFFER YOU ) 

• FREE OVERNIGHT DELIVERY: On all hardware orders shipped In the UK mainland. 

• TECHNICAL SUPPORT HELPLINE: Team ot technical experts at your service. 

• PRICE MATCH: We normally match competitors on a "Seme product - Same price" basis. 

• ESTABLISHED 12 YEARS: Proven track record in piofassionai computer sales. 

• BUSINESS + EDUCATION + GOVERNUBNT: Volume rlisoounts avalisPis 081^08 (KM. 

• SHOWROOMS: Demonstration and training facilities at our London & Sidcup branches. 

• THE FULL STOCK RANGE: All of your requiremerts from one supplier. 

• FREE CATALOGUES: Will he mailed to you with offers and software/peripheral details. 

• PAYMENT: By casti. cheque and all mfijor credit cards. 

Before you decide when to buy your new Amiga products, we suggest you think very caretuily at»ul 
WHERE you liuy them. Consider what it will be iike a few months alter you tiave made your purchase, 
when you may require addiliorial peripherals and software, or help and advice. And, will the company 
you buy from contacl you with delails ot new products? At Silica Syslems, we ensure that you will have 
nothing to worry about. We have been astabllshed for over 12 years and. with our unnivalled experience 
and eiparllse, we can now claim to meet our customers' requirements with an understanding which is 
second to none. But don't just lake our word for it. Complete and return the coupon now lor our latest 
FREE literature and iMgin to experience the "Silica Systems Ssrvice". 



MAIL ORDER; 1-4 The Mews, 

Ord^r L'"iQt} Operi: Mon-Sal S.DOant'fi.COpnii 



Katheney Rd, Sittcup, 

No LatB Nighl Opanirt 



Kent, 



DAH 4DX Tel: [1B1-309 1111^ 
fbk rjD: O01-3OB csoa 



LONDON SHOP: " B2 Tottenham Court Roai. London, W1P DBA Tel: 071-580 400D 

Oponin^^ Houre: Mpn-Sal 9.3Qani.6.Q0pn^ rto Laie NlQhl Openirg Pst No: il71- 3g3 473,. 



LONDON SHOP: 



SIDCUP SHOP: 

Opening Hdura: 



Moo&at ^.OOam-S.aOpm 



Sartridoes m Floor). Oxford Straet. London, W1A 1AB TbI: 071-6?9 1Z34 

va.DOpffl LalQ NigN'. ThUfSdev until flpm Enlgrtgion: 39 1j 

ey ., - 

Ualt N^TTt: Friday unM 7pin Fax N(f: 081-3CJ9 0Cn7 



Mnn-Sfli fl.SQatTfg. DI3p<ri __^^^ 

1-4 The Mews, Haltierley Rd, Sidcup, Kent, 0*14 ^DX Tsl: 081-302 0011 



Ito: 



Silica Systems, AMSHP'0892-68, 1-4 The Mews. Hatherley Rd, Sldeup, Kent, DA14 4DX 



PLEASE SEND A BROCHURE ON THE GVP RANGE 



r\ 



M'/MrsWIlss/fils: 



Address: 



Postcode: . 



r'~~r\ MAIL ORDER HOTLINE 

m 081-309 1111 



SIUCA 
SYSTEMS 



B 



Tel (Home); Tel (Work): 

Company Name (i1 applicable): 



I Which computer(s), if any, do you own? 68D I 

^^ E&OE . Adv«r1JHd prknend BpedflcAilona may cfang* ■ Ptoflaa rerun uw coupon for the lataat inharmallon. 



i/lissing the complete set? - well get your back issues NOW while you can! 



SOLD OUT 

Buying a paint package pius reviews of Pagestream, 

Colourpic, Sequencer 1 , KCS Powertoard, and Scala. 

Accelerating the Amiga plus reviews of Bars & Pipes, 

Daatascan, ATOnce, DynaCADD and BASIC languages. 



1 

2 
3 





Buying a printer plus reviews of Pro-24, Real 3D, Wordworth, 

TEX, Imagine and Superbase 4 

Amiga Answers special pius reviews of Spectracoior, Superbase 

4, Touch-Up, Action Repiay, VideoCenter Plus and more 

The most comprehensive review ever of Amiga word processors, 

pius the Video Toaster and a free fractais guide 



ORDER YOUR BACK ISSUES AND 
CAKH UP ON WHAT 
YOU MISSED 



SOLD OUT 

A hardware and add-on buyer's guide special, tons 

of tips for Professional Page and an in-depth iooi< 

at tine HAf^-E colour system 

The definitive guide to the A500 Plus, down-ioading satellite 

images, choosing sequencers, using video and ProPage 2. 



7 
8 





FREE Tracey plus special animation tutorial, test drive of Roc 

Tec's new hard distt, Amiga CO, Pixel 3D, Superbase. A 

definitive memory guide and the biggest Amiga Answers ever 

Round up of best hand scanners, 5-page special on RAM 

boards, first in the series on Artificial Intelligence plus reviews 

of 3D animation packages, Ray Dance, Expert Draw and a 

preview of the new Easy AI^OS 

PD special - a guide to the most indespensable PD programs 

and an in-depth review of PD postscript, part two of the series 

on Artificial Intelligence plus reviews of ImageMaster, 

SaxonScript, SuperJam and 23 pages of Amiga Answers 



10 

11 

12 

13 
14 

15 



Special graphics Issue featuring the Amiga's top art pacttages. 

Audition 4, Sound Enhancer and desktop video directing 

with Showmaker 

Insight Into CDTV, a comprehensive guide to printer 

preferences, 24-bit graphics, reviews of Genesis, Turbo Print 

and Stereo (faster 

Drive guide special - ail the facts and advice on hard drives, 

quality video output with Impact Vision-24 card, DCTV graphics 

and more 




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If you think taking tiie 
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having fun... 



If your Interest in the Amiga covers everything 
- including gamesi - you ought to take a look 
at the latest issue of the world's best-selling 
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ON SALE 
NOlAfS 




fe^v. 










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*»»^*& 



*^«IW^ 




^^^^ 



Read the full review of The Secret of Monkey Island 
2 " LeChuck's Revenge. The best Amiga game ever? 

Find out what we think are the top 1 classic Amiga games 
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Discover some amazing facts about football and see which 
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Explore the complete CanDO! Jr program, worth £ 1 00, and 
see how it can help you become a multimedia master. 






And while you're there, you can get the low-down on the 
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Amiga 600, find out what happened when we tested the 
A570 CD-ROM drive and discover how a cheap sampler or 
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of graphics and music. 



AMIOA FORMAT ISSUE 36 - IT'S WAITING FOR YOU AT THE NEWSAGENT NOW[ 



ALWAYS A GOOD IDEA 

FREE DELIVERY 

NEKtDay-Arr^twreirttHtJK mainynd 



Silica presents some great 
offers on the award winning 
range of high quality matrix 
printers (ram Citizen. Each 
Citizen printer is built in the 
UK to exacting standards, 
ensuring superb reliability and 
output. Our confidence in 
Citizen's quality is such ttiat 
we are pleased to include a 2 
year guarantee with every 
printer. Plus, if you buy a 
Citizen printer (not Inkjet) from 
(is, we will give you the Silica 
Printer Starter Kit (worth 
£29.38), FREE OF CHARGEI 



FREE STARTER KIT 

Warih E29.3B - Wtlti every OliEen pnntar 

2 YEAR WARRANTY 

Silica (sitiu 2 </iai warrantjr [inciudinii' the dirt 
m^rlx piinEBT haa) viHh smr/ Gntzan printer, 

WINDOWS 3.0 

Free Wlr^rtrnvs 3.0 driver. 
IrtcludEd vritti tlK SIlKa Slaitfir Kit. 

FREE COLOUR KIT 

Witti evary frodot 9, Swm 9 fi 244 and 22A 

FREE HELPLINE 

Teclirttcal supDon lulpFiiu open during o^tcs ItDjrs. 

MADE IN THE UK 

Citizen ti'rinters are manufaclurwll to high standanls. 



LOW PRICE Spin PRINTER 




144 CPS 80 COLUMN 

Citizen 120D+ - 9 pin ■ 80 column 
144cps Draft, 30cps NLQ 
4K Printer Buffer + S Fonts 
Parallel or Serial Interface 
Graphics Resolution: 240 x240dpi 
Epson and IBM Emulation 
Pull tractor & bottom feed 
FREE Silica Printer Starter Kit 

nflp Eim 

SILICA STARTER KITi29 



£115 



+VAT= El 35.13 ret: PRI 2120 



lOTM VALUt: 

s*me- 



E2I4 

£109 



SmCAfmCt: £111 



Tha Cttizan 1200 printer c<]mes supplied with & parallel 
Interface as standard. II you require a serial interface Instead, 
pj&ass slatB rdf: PRt 2125 when piacirig your prefer wlui Silica. 



9 PIN PRINTERS 




300 CPS 80 COLUMN 

• CitizBr\ Prodot 9 - 9 pin - 80 column 

• aOQcps Orsft, SOcps NLQ 

• eK Printer Buffer + 3 Fonts 

• Par^fiel interface 

• Graptiics Rasoiution: 240)1 240dpi 

• Epson and IBM Emulation 

• FREE Colour Kit 

• FREE Silica Printer Starter Kit 



mF -„.,.. £189 

CDlDLin RIT... £11 

nUU tTMIEfl iaTu_,^E3» 

m/u. vxjitiWi 

SAVm: EM 


£189] 


«KflMM«£El'» 


I. tWT.ajs.osirfPBian 




192 CPS 80 COLUMN 

• Citizen Swift 9-9 pin -80 cotumn 
m 1&2cps Draft, 48cps f^LQ 

9 BK Pn'rjter Buffer + 3 Fonts 

• Pareilsi Intefface 

• Graphics i^ssofutiorr: 240x240<fpi 
9 ^psan anti BM Emulation 

« FHEt Coiour Kit 

• FREE SsUca Printer Stertsr Xrt 

£2» 



Gauvn HT 

SlUU STMTEH KI TJM 

TOTM VALiX; ElU 

SAVHiQ. Ill J 



£189 



SIttfaffltfg,' flgg V ^'V*T.= KaOfl ral: PRl2gC9j 



192 CPS 136 COLUMN 

• Otfzen Swift 9x - 9 pfn - 136 cokmn 

• 192cps Draft, 48cps NLQ 

• BK Pfinter Buffer + 3 Foffts 

• PamtSsS intsrtacs 

• Grapfiics Hesotution: 240 x240dpi 

• Ef)Son flrttf tBM Emuf0tiOff 

• Caftjwr Option Avaifatte 

• FRE^ Silica Printer Starter Kit 

.E3» 



»LIGA aTAATEn B Tja 




24 PIN PRINTER 




PRINTER + SOFTWARE + COLOUR 



• Citizen Swift 24e- 24 pin - 30 columr} 

• 2l6cps Draft, ?2cps LQ 

• 8K Printer Buffer + 6 Font$ 

• Paraffei Merface 

• Graphics R&sofution: 360x3SOdpi 

• Epson, IBfvt & NBC P6 Fmafstion 

• FREE Colour Kit 

• FREE SitiCB Printer Sta/ler Kit 

• FHEE Lotus A!\^l t.2 Ward 
Processor antj DTP pacfcsge 

• FREE Adobe Type Wanaaw VU5 



-IS 

.Etc 

JUQBE rrPE hUNABEn V1.15[ftmiifm 

TOT/U. VAliif: 'EIHlfl 

SAVlfiS- £33T 

jftiHaHUeE E^H 



VtWCr^ESEM mipflizmy tofus+./lA)i»M*wasisAirPCflft^(vi3y.- cK* \ 



*yi,U E3ia.0B wri;Pttl2544_ 



24 PIN PRINTERS 



INKJET PRINTER NOTEBOOK PRINTER 




1 92 CPS 80 coLuii/iN 

• Citizert 224 ■ 24 pin - SO i^umn 

• 19Scps Draft. 64ips LO 

• eK Printer Buffer + 4 Fonts 

• Pargilel interface 

• Grapt\ics Resoiution: 360 x360dpi 

• Bpsorj antj fBM Bmuiation 

• FREE CGiome Kit 

» FREE. Siiica Printer Starter Kit 

fllBP ^,^ Oil 

WtOUFlHT -m 

ULIM BTAmiRKITIIB 

TOTAL VAliiE: £33! 

S4LW5- El 33 



BUB 



StiiCi fflJl^E tlU V4WT-IS33.B3 refiPflia^ftT, 




192 CPS 136 COLUMM 

• Citizen Swift 24x -24 pin- 13$ coiurnn 

• I32cps Draft, 64cps NLO 

• 8K Pdnter Buffer + 4 Fonts 

• Parailei interface 

• Graphics Rssolutiorr: 360 x 360dpi 

• Epson, iBH4 and JVEC Pe EmtritaJwn 

• Coiour Option Avallabie 

• ffleF SiOca Printer Starter Kit 



..E4n 



IIRP . . 

SlUtli StiUtTEn iitjza 

Tom VAttJ£: au 

SAVHtG. E165 
SRtCAPRKE: EUfi 



SIB 




360 CPS 80 COLUMN 

• Citizen Ptojst - inffjot - 30 column 

* 360cps Oraft. 120cps NLQ 

* SO Noz2fs Haad - m^OiMet47dB(A) 

* BK Printer Buffer + 3 Fonts 

• Optionat HP CoTnpatit}ie Font cards 

* Paraftei interface 

• Graphics Hesotutfon: StXx^OOdpi 

• HP DesS<iet pius emulation 
nnp — fi!H 

mUt H(Uii£UtW 
SAmti: t13? 



£M£ri nrfiE osy 



£359 



\^tVJtTi-&liai.B3 rir:PHia»Q^ 




64 CPS 80 COLUMN 



• Citizen PN43 jVofftboofc Printer 

• Wcfl^jTivMisf Printing on Plain Papsr 

• 53cps La ' 4K Buffer * 2 Fonts 

• Psar ancf Bottom Pspsr LoaoVflgr 
■ ParallB! inlsdace 

• 0repf]iG3 ResoiiJtion: 360x360clpi 

• Epsofj, ffiW. wee PB & atizBf} Emjle&x\ 

• FREE Silica Prin tsr Stsrter Kit 

sftp _i3H 

SILIU UMTBtBr-BS 

SAvm: noi 



£249 



•VAr-E2EE.5B rellPRl'ZlEX]' 



IFREEI 

STARTER KIT 

This junar k? will help s'^g iq. gai 

SuvpM njnnir»p viilfl ydur ntn 
itzen dc^ milRi c^ nolttKCt 
3ilH ^fiitm. FfuJs 
[MliHl only, M iw 
, a ClBen Mnt Hintje/ 
for 1hB AmtjB Fn» of Chai^i i^ 
pari <^ lhfl Sl>ta Sliitr Kir. 
bringing (hg 1pUl vjlut DJ Ihe Tm 
kilupiDE'M.33. 
*' 3lf Ciak'^ipJStOiTrtis 
•3:^ 6sl(-DiwBhirWndoM3 

* 2 Msiit PaialM PrirrlH Cable 

' m Shtm of CodHniKHQ Pipir 

* IN ConliniHhja Addrui Libds 
' 5 Conijrjjow Eiwrtps 

* fniji FYlni Mirdgei 

The- Anih^ Pnm hiaujtr dAirarm^ 
e>^hiiK«j primed oitiiin Pn:v«lB 
diTvtiB hir all Citinn pmUn irtd 
uptos Amifl^ mrmjl phnltr 
p[«1i[«r»u sySMm ' ptintr:^ ii <\\itAti, 

iXWl ITIQI! -iMm. (fiphH k« 

hizn'. iiSj %:> \m '.v4h iislnianrfi. 
Features Include: 

* In^unvtd tflUfit SmuttiJIHl 

* GBmmaiypur ■ilpnTKC'cn 

■ inugfi ScjliriQ 

■ Cntour Stparallcri 

* fleiliKS.'lFJnilniliB iinir^i 
STARTER KIT WH 
AMIQA PfllNT MilWililM E14.9S 

.ISJS^E £44.33 




ACCESSORIES 



SHEET FEEDEfta 

liDOlMO JEHM 

P1UrilSlI<lQffl4;!«M»2< «.7tl 
PfVi>St IZtfL'iU'Mnt^, £^00 
9ERML WTERFMaS 
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mitm MKisvs>fS\u ..niia 

PfmfTEH STAND 

m/imtMV/B*^miw .turn 
iviwi^mma. .... {%« 

owfiMUL nmooNS 

mssa ^sxiSwttts^i q.si 

:Btta E?1D 

tliasafi IMfflSiftM HM H.TU 

mva ZHSMIHCtiOif. £1S£I 

niBiHB PHUfiiiiiiistrM a«[ 

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pnAi!4as«it?a^4< ms 

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PfUmB PWSaiBn ESl.ra 

PMll&S PrMOMiEKtn tTSC 

PRAUHPNUt^JUvnET... . fTBC 
ilicUiiiTt{l#Hwy 



( SILICA SYSTEMS OFFER YOU ) 

• FREE OVERNiGHT OEUVERY: On all nardware ordere shippeij in the UK mainland. 

• TECHNICAL SUPPORT HELPLiNEi Team ol technical exparts at your $«ivlce 

• PRICE MATCH: We normally match competftors on a "Same producll - Same price" basis. 

• ESTABLISHED 12 YEARS: Proven wack lecord in profea^ionai ijomputer sates. 

• BUSINESS + BDUCATfON + GOVERNMENT: Volume discounts available 081-308 0888. 

• SHOWROOMS: Demonstraiiion and training facilities at oor London & Stdcup branches. 

• THE FULL STOCK RANGE: Ail ol your raqutrerrtents from one supplier 

• FREE CATALOGUES; Will bs malted to you with otfars and softwaTeypenpheral deitalEs. 

• PAYMENT: By cash, cheque and ail mafor credit cards. 

G«lore you decide when to buy your new prrnSer, we suggest you think very carefully about WHEflE you 
buy it. Consider what it will be Eike a few months after you have made your purchase, '^han you may 
require additional pahpherais or software, or help and advice vi.itth your nev^r purchase. And, will the 
company you buy from contact you with details of nev^ products? At SINca Systems we ensure that you 
v^ll have nothing to worry about. We have been established i'or over 12 years and, with our unrivalled 
experience and expertise, we can now cia^m to meet cur customers' requiramants with an 
underslandrng wTilch fs secoiKd to none. But don't just take our word tor It. Complete and return the 
coupon now for our latest FREE literature and begin to experience [ha "Silica Systems Service". 



r'~~~~\ MAIL ORDER HOTLINE 

V.|ilV 081-309 1111 



SILICA 
SYSTEMS 



MAIL ORDER: 1-4 The Mews, Hatherley Rd, Sidcup, Kent, DA14 4DX Tat: 081-309 IIIO 

Ordef LTies Open: Mon-Ba1_a.0Oarr>j,O0piTi hfo L3.\b Nighl QpanlnH Fan No- C&t-aPS DBOS 



LONDON SHOP: 52 TottenHam Court R&ad, London, m? OBA TftI: 071-560 401 

QpBning Hours: Mon-SM 9.3Qa[n-6,O0pni No Ule Hlgfil OpyMig Fax Ho: P7t-3g3 4737 



LONDON SHOP: 

Opsning hkiura: 



Selfriijges (1st Figoii. Oxford Stre«t, LondDn, W1A 1A8 Tal: UTi^lt 1234 

tAin.Sat 9.30flm.6.0Qpfn Laie NIQt^l- Ttiuftdey ^rilJ flpm Extenaiofi: 3&14 



SIDCUP SHOP: 

Opaning Houra: 



r^Dn-SAl 8,0DarTi' 



fTc 



1-4 The Mews. HaWierley U Sidcup, Kent. DA14 4DX Tsl: Oei^DZ 8111 

am-5.3l3fyn Lala ^flflM: Friday vm 7pm Fax No: 081-309 QQt7 ^ 



m 



To: Silica Systems, AMSHP-0892-80, 1-4 The Mews, Hatlierley Rd, Sidcup, Kent, DA14 4DX 



PLEASE SEND A BROCHURE ON THE CITIZEN RANGE 



Mr/Mrs/Mlss/Ms: 



Initials: Surname: 



Tel (Hotne): 

Company Name (if applicable): 



RoBtcoda .... 
Tel (Work):. 



I Which computerts), if any. do you own?......... 



BOB 1 



E&OE ■ Athtttbtd ptIOH wd KHCiteation* rmtf ctiingt - PImk rvtum ^coupQnldrlliBralBMinlctrnalkM. 



OMEGA 



PROJECTS"" 



OMEGA HOUSE 
83 RAILWAY ROAD 



sTEroXv 0942 682203 



SALES ONLY 



(EUROPE) LTD 



LANCS, WN7 4AD 



s^a°l7s^oTv 0942 682205 
^rp^A'x'" 0942 682206 



ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT 



ALL CHEQUES, P.O., 

I ETC SHOULD BE MADE 
PAYABLE TO OMEGA 
PROJECTS LTD. WE 

I ALSO TAKE ACCESS, 
VISA, MASTERCARD 
& EUfiOCARD 



SOUND ENHANCER 



a^.'^s 



IF NOT SATISFIED WITH THIS PfiODUCT SfM- 
FlY HETURN FOR A NO QUSBLf REFUND. 
THIS IS HOW SURE WE ARE THAT YOU Will • 
B£ MCHE THAN IMPRESSED. VOUVE SOT 
rOHEARItrOBEUEVEn, 

100% COMPATIBLE 
WITH ALL SOFTWARE 

IF YOU THOUGHT THAT THE AMIGA SOUND WAS GOOD THEN YOU ARE IN FOR A REAL SHOCK, 
AS YOU CAN ENHANCE THE SOUND TO NEW HEIGHTS WITH THE BRAND NEW RELEASE 
FROM OMEGA PROJECTS: LOOK OUT FOR THE REVIEWS 



NOW WITH BASS 
ENHANCEMENT 



CSA 
ROCKET LAUNCHER 

A BRAND NEW PRODUCT 
to enable people that own 

the Commodore A2630 
Accelerator to increase its 
speed to a fuil SOMHz while 
retaining full origind compatibil- 
ity. So don't even thlni< about 
swapping your original card for 
a faster one untii you have seen 
the ROCKET LAUNCHER, 

£595.00 

TURBO CHARGE YOUR CBM 
A2630 ACCELERATOR 



KICKSWITCH ROM SWITCHER 

DOES NOT REQUIRE riHACHINE TO BE SWITCHED OFF TO SWAP ROMS 

1 . RIBBON CABLE MOUNTED 24.95 (Bare) 

2. WORKS WITH ACCELERATORS 44.95 (Inc 1.3 Rom) 

3. AUDIBLE SWITCH OVER 49.95 [inc 2 x Rom) 

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TEN TOP TIPS 



Computer programming Is 
somsthiflg that just about 
overy Amiga owner decides 
to try at some point, it's the 
twst metliod there is for getting to 
itnow your machine, learning Itow 
things tick, and gaining a Iwtter 
understanding of commercially 
written programs, which can oniy 
[Kiy off when you come to use tliem. 
Aside from all that, programming 
is also a lot of fun. And who knows, 
perhaps you'il find you have enougli 
of a talent to make some money out 
of it? 

Deciding where to begin with 
programming on the Amiga can be a 
confusing business, simpiy because 
there are so many languages and 
packages available for it. Here are 
ten points to mull over before making 
the plunge... 

O High and ioW'Jevel - Languages 
are often piaced into one of these 
two categories. If programming is 
iikened to joining functional blocks 
together, then a high-ievel language 
consists of iarge, complex blocks - 
oniy a few need be joined to create a 
sophisticated program - whereas a 
iow-level language has lots of smaii, 
simple blocks, several of which must 
be joined to make the equivalent of a 
block in a high-level language. 

While high-level languages are 
easy to use and better for expressing 
complex ideas, low-level languages 
are usually faster and give the 
programmer more flexibility - they 
allow more direct control over the 
machine's hardware. 

@ Compiiers and interpreters - 

These are the two different methods 
by which programming languages are 
translated into a form 
understandable by the computer - 
known as machine code. A compiler 
will translate a program wholesale, 
taking it in as a text tile and 
producing something called an object 
file. This then has to go through a 
process known as linking before the 
final program is created. This will run 
completely independently of the 
compiler or the original text file, and 
it will generally run pretty fast. If a 
change Is to be made to the 
program, it must be made to the 



TOI^UPS - Choosing 
a programming 
language g 



Cliff Ramshavs^ tells you the ten 
essentials to look out for "when 
mafgjng a start in programming 






l.SYS:> cc 

, info 

f Actoi^'ia. 

- - -^s3.: 



Screen. q 
. It/an: ijon 



net_add. . 
1 « Ivan: SOI 



i : |F^ 1 1 a 1 1: J t? f £ ti'.& e n 



^|CJiiii:0:i« Fast;i533 4;54;12 FM t_!Lm 



..icit^a to %f> linlkeU to:\n" *no^eC i 1 ^cKoi t* 
^Kt ncnie;j++3 
if Cltni<EjUjl>a5 

Pi*intf(" Jis, a* Jie\rs" ^nod^C J] , exci ttC j3tfl3 > ; 



^*t prDtiessifig dai^«, now to pi^oduc^ soh^ output i*/ 

printf<"\n\n"} ; 
^rew_jtford-- 1 ; 

=eiJf<pespo^s^^;l('^+> < /» ain for a reply of RESPOWSE iKtrd 
jt'^-xntf C"y^fj .nflrtflt^Kcitfl wriA]>; 
fur (i=fl; i<l6; i+*> /* nitiJilLse Ifli jjossibi L i ti«s «/ 

npKt_exci telil=:fl,e; /* strsnsth of linlis m/ 
J,inK5„fownd-8; /« nuMrber of possibilities found »/ 
tar- t (-e:i<nejft^nf>cle; H*> \ 

it innltrpxqrte^i(rainJ>a> < /^ if there's a Unk to i » 
Caf < j-'Sj J>-fl: J — y l /* is it a sti>drtsr as othci" ten 
if <exciteET3Cfl]>iitxt ejtcit^rjl) i 
for a:-«: Kj; 1 + *J ^ 

next exfji teCl]i:ne*tt &xtii te t I+IJ : /*t dt>t>y tp^tl 
ne>:tIlJ-neKttUlJ: 



mHWH 



SAS/Lattlce C is a great favourite amongst professional developers, it's a 
powerful language which comes with many usefui programming toois 



original text file, which then has to 
be re<ompiled and re-linked. 
Modilying programs like this can be a 
laborious process. 

An interpreter translates 
programs line by line, as they are 
actually running. This translation 
occurs every time the program is run, 
and if one part of the program is 
used several times, then it must be 
translated each time. The result Is 
that interpreted programs are 
relatively slow, but making 
alterations to them Is easy because 
nothing further need be done beyond 
altering the program's text file. 

® Absolute tieglnners - If you have 

no programming experience 
whatsoever, you would be well 
advised to go for an interpreted 
language. You are bound to make 
mistakes - everyone does - and the 
development cycle of a compiler is 
almost certainly guaranteed to 
infuriate. It's best to steer clear of 
low-level languages - you really need 
to know what you are doing to use 
one of these. The best beginner's 
language is Basic. It was designed to 
teach people to program, and while it 
doesn't have all of the features of a 
high level language {nor some of the 
complicated concepts behind them) 
it is sufficiently more powerful than a 
low-level language to enable you to 



produce good results in an easy to 
understand and read form. 

O Graphics and sound - Access to 
the Amiga's graphics and sound 
facilities can be obtained through a 
set of 'libraries'. These are pre- 
written programs which handle all the 
messy business of dealing with the 
Amiga's hardware. The disadvantage 
is that they can be quite complex to 
get to grips with. An alternative Is to 
buy AMOS, a variant of Basic that 
provides extremely powerful and easy 
to use facilities for graphics and 
sound. 

@ Speed - If you feel the need for 
speed, then you really ought to 
consider a compiled language, or 
even an assembler. Interpreters 
simply can't cut the mustard when It 
comes to speed-Intensive 
applications. 

® Games - It's possible to write 

games In just about any language, 
but If you want to produce a game of 
commercial quality with fast moving 
graphics, there Is only one choice - 
assembler. 

Assembler Is a low-level 
language, the most basic possible. It 
is also the fastest and most memory 
efficient. It is translated in much the 
same way as a compiled language. 



although there Is a direct 
correspondence between each 
assembler instruction and each 
machine code instruction that the 
computer understands. The only 
difference is that the instructions are 
expressed in words instead of 
numbers. The disadvantage of 
assembly language Is that It is 
difficult to learn. 

O Serious devetopment ~ 

Commercial applications are usually 
written in C ~ a compiled language 
which combines the best of both high 
and low-level languages. C is so 
popular on the Amiga because it was 
used to write the operating system. 
Interfacing to It is therefore easiest 
with C. Alternatives are Pascal and 
IVlodula-2. 

© Academia - If you are about to 
embark on an Open University or 
college programming course, you'll 
almost certainly come into contact 
with Pascal. It was designed 
specifically for this purpose, and is 
still popular amongst lecturers. It has 
grown more powerful over the years, 
and Is now a serious competitor to C 
In the commercial stakes, too. 

® Includes - If you get a compiler 
from the public domain, you will be 
missing the official Commodore 
include files. These contain 
segments of code needed for easy 
access to the Amiga's library 
functions. They can be obtained for 
£25 from Commodore Business 
Machines, Commodore-Amiga 
Technical Support, Bradboum Drive, 
Tilbrook, Milton Keynes IVIK4 SAT. 

® Weird and wonderful - There are 

many more languages other than the 
ones mentioned so far. They are 
available from the public domain, 
and present great opportunities for 
experimentation. Languages such as 
Lisp and Prolog can be used for 
artificial intelligence; Smalltalk for 
learning about object-oriented 
programming, "/ou'll need extra 
books to use these, since their 
documentation assumes knowledge 
of the language in question, but 
they're a good way of realising just 
how diverse languages can be. ( ^ 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AlfOUST 1992 



lEvesnamnicroni 



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MIDI 



Have a break, 



have a 



More 

sequencing 
help as Paul 
Overaa looks at 
some current 
offerings from 
Gaiits Music 




Last month I talked about 
how SuporJAM can simplify 
the creation of song 
arrang«nents. I thought 
this month that 1 would continue 
with this theme and look at another 
approach which simplifies the 
construction of a song, namely the 
use of pi«-wrltten blocks of music. 
Gqllts Music Software's Hit Hit 
offering Is based on this method and 
since it Is aimed at Sequencer One 
and Sequencer One Plus users I 
thought that It would be useful to 
start with some details of the 
sequencers themselves... 
Gajit's MIDI sequencer, 
Sequencer One, has established a 
large user base which includes not 
just Amiga but a great many Atari ST 
users (in itself no mean achievement 
when you consider the scale of the 
ST music software competition). 

Why has Sequencer One done so 
wel!? It's because Gajits, instead of 
trying to offer an all-singing all- 
dancing package, set out to produce 
a sequencer which offered the user 
just the basic facilities needed by a 
musician. 

What Gajits left behind of course 
was the complex, and often rarely 
used, things which intimidate many 



users (and the 400 page 
manuals that take forever 
and a day to understand). 

In short Gajits produced a 
sequencer which was ideal for 
beginners and ideal for any 
applications where the 
sophistication of the heavyweight 
sequencers was not needed. It also 
left behind the heavyweight prices 
and in fact last year an Amiga Fbmiaf 
coverdisk offer placed Sequencer 
One in the hands of almost anyone 
who wanted it. Since this time 
Sequencer One has of course moved 
on and an upgraded version, 
Sequencer One Plus, has been 
introduced. 



SEQUENCER ONE 



AN OVERVIEW 

Sequencer One provides the usual 
types of loop mode recording, 
overdub and block transfer 
operations. 

All the normal fornis of sequence 
editing facilities are provided but as 
well as the common or garden 
quantization and transposition type 
options there are seme additional 
goodies thrown in, including 
controller re-mapping and range 
controlled MIDI event stripping and 
thinning functions. 

The program works with both 
MIDI gear and internal sound 
samples and as the sequencer loads 
the user gets the chance to assign 
memory usage. If, for example, it 
was known that 120K of chip 
memory would be needed for holding 
sound samples then you'd need to 
ensure that Sequencer One left a 
sufficient amount of chip memory 
freel 

SCREEN DISPLAYS 

Three main screen displays are 
available with the original program - 
the track screen, the step editor 
screen and the bar editor screen. 




Like most sequencers, the main 
controls are based on a set of 
record, play, fast forward, rewind, 
stop type tape-deck gadgets. These, 
together with the usual array of 
position counters, channel activity 
indicators and so forth are present 
on all three of the Sequencer One 
program screens. 

The track screen consists of two 
scrollable list areas: on the left there 
is a display containing information 
about the sequencer's 32 tracks and 
these hold track number, track 
name, mute on/off status, and 
channel info. 

On the right is a list of 

user definable 'song positions'. 

The user can set these to any 

position in the song and assign a 
name to that position. Recording 
and re-channelling output (to either 
MIDI or the internal sound chips) 
quite simply could not have been 
made any easier. 

The step editor provides a piano 



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Sequencer One 

»»»»»»»»»»))> FIDS 



SonsKsne: Fachbol.PLS 
Euents Used: 883384 
Eoents Free: 835582 



Juke Box fBGllltles - anoth«r pli» for th« new releasel 



\n 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUI 16 • AUGUST 1 992 



MIDI 



roll type display of a track, showing 
which notes are played and where 
they start and end. This editor is 
used for editing (and deleting) 
individual notes or entering music in 
step time. 

Three modes are associated with 
the step editor - delete mode, info 
mode and a step entry mode. In 
delete mode, notes disappear as you 
touch them, in info mode you can 
view and edit events, and in step 
entry mode you can enter notes 
manually in step time. 

Event editing {providing of course 
you know what the various MlDi 
event values mean) is reasonably 
straightforward... click on the event 
and then when the information panel 
appears type in whatever new values 
are required. 

The bar editor shows the 
arrangement of the song graphically. 
indicating for each track, which bars 
contain data. It's mainly used for 
viewing and creating arrangements 
and it is well suited for carrying out 
block operations. 

The file menu lets you load/save 
files in both Sequencer One format 
and Standard MlDi File formats 
and 1 which are the most commonly 
used MIDI file arrangements. 

Format incidentally is a single 
stream arrangement which is 
probably the most portable of all 
MIDI f les types, format 1 Is a 
multiple track storage scheme. One 
useful facility is that when SeQuencer 
One loads a type MIDI file it splits 
the file data up so that the data from 
each MIDI channel ends up in a 
separate track. Even when you are 
not porting your compositions to or 
from other sequencers this split 
effect allows the MIDI save/load 
operations to be used for separating 
multi-channel track data. 

There's also a block menu which 
provides cut/copy/paste/delete type 
functions, and a track menu which Is 
concemed with global operations 
carried out on a single track. It's 
from this latter menu that quantizing. 




Secaiencer One 

)>/)»)))»»»)»))»? FLOS 



Sons \{m'. Fachiiel.PLS 
Events Used: mm 
Events Free: 839497 



Tempo mamHng comes to the new Sequencer One Plus 



stripping, thinning and 
note/timing/controller alteration Is 
carried out. There's also a rather 
sneaky track info facility which, in 
addition to giving you some basic 
track statistics, lets you attach 
volume, patch {program change) and 
pan information to a track. 

On the MIDI menu side the 
options of Sequencer One are. 



''The Juke Box 
screen allows 
albums fo be 
created or played. 



H 



relative to many other sequencers, 
fairly basic. There is the nowadays 
indispensable Soft Thru option 
available plus internal/external clock 
choice and SSP (song position 
pointer) support. 

A number of data filters are also 
provided so that note on/off, 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



MIDI - Musical Instmnnent Digital Interface; the universal standard by 
which digital instalments such as synths and computers can 
communicate. 

Loop - The section of sound that is designed to repeat as a key is held 
down - usually to create the illusion of a continuous sound. 

Quantisation - In sampling this is the method of smoothing the overali 
level of sound as it progresses from one sound slice to the next. 

Seqiiencer - A piece of software on a computer (or sometimes built on to a 
keyboard) which stores musical scores and transmtts this infonnation 
in real time via MIDI to synthesisers which will then play it. 



Me^onome - Timed electronic pulse, 
underground. 



or a dwarf on ^e Parisian 



polyphonic and channel aftertouch, 
program change, pitchbend and 
controller information can be 
selectively passed or filtered, 

in addition Sequencer One offers 
audible or user selectable MID!- 
note/MIDI-channel metronome 
control, mouse click tempo setting, 
song notes (ie text notes to be 
associated with the song) and things 
like keyboard help. The big plus for 
many users however was being able 
to use the Amiga's internal sound 
chips either as an alternative to MIDI 
or in conjunction with it. 

Using IFF sound samples and 
MIDI output together is a piece of 
cake and there are a lot of musicians 
who find many uses for the 
thousands of IFF sound samples 
which are nowadays available. 
Sequencer One then, clearly won 
many friends in the 'ease of use' 
department. 



SB!: 



^''"^'•''U^'l 



^ 



This latest version of the software 
called Sequencer One Plus, adds a 
number of facilities which are not to 
be found in the original program. For 
a start two new screens, namely a 
Tempo Map screen and a Juke Box 
screen, have been added. 

Tempo maps are graphs of 
tempo versus song position which 
allow you to define either gradual or 
sudden changes in the tempo 
(speed) of a piece of music as it is 
played. 

The Juke Bex screen allows 
'albums' (song sets of up to 32 
songs) to be created and played. CD 
style controls are provided and you 
can skip back and forth between 
songs, play in random order, pause, 
mute selections etc. Vou can also 
alter the delay between songs and, 
given sufficient memory, have the 
sequencer load the next song as the 
current one is playing. 



A new track 'solo' button has 
been Included so that Individual 
tracks can be heard in isolation and 
'punch in' facilities have also been 
added (this allows you to limit 
recording to a specific area of the 
sequence). 

Many other operations including 
the quantizing, metronome, and 
event filtering options have been 
enhanced and there is even a special 
filter which solves the 'MIDI echo' 
problem found on some Yamaha 
synths. Changes to the Alter Notes 
options make it possible to scale or 
shift note lengths and to change all 
occurrences of a particular note to 
any other note (this now means that 
drum note remapping becomes quite 
easy). In addition to these Sysex 
recording facilities, a count-in box, 
and numerous other facilities have 
been added. 

By far the most interesting 
changes however concern the Step 
Editor screen tiecause here a new 
'Diamond Drag' graphic editing 
scheme has been introduced. This 
offers a fast, audible, interactive 
note placement and editing scheme 
which allows you to listen to, add, 
move, stretch, snap (push a note on 
to the current step interval) or delete 
notes very easily. 

EASE OF USE 

When you select a note for editing a 
set of four 'drag diamonds' appear 
around it with note value, velocity, 
length and position data being 
displayed at the top of the screen. If, 
for example, you wish to move the 
note you just select the top diamond 
and then use the mouse to drag the 
note to where you want it! The Drag 
Diamond system works in 
conjunction with a mini-menu that 
drops down beneath the note to 
provide other facilities (including the 
conversion of notes to MIDI 
controller data) and the net result is 
an editing system that is both simple 
to use and effective. 

cofltinued overlMf 

ooooooooo" 

SHOPPING LIST 

Sequence One £1 9.95 

[Latest ve5ion with new User Guide) 

Sequencer One Plus „,. £49.95 

{ovallalile for a limited time ns an 
upgrade to registered Sequencer One 
owners for £39.95) 



Available from: 

Gafrtj Music SoHwore 
l-Mex House 
40 Princes Street 
Manchester Ml 6DE 
» 061-236-2515 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1 992 



MIDI 




l(i« Hit Kit is Gajet's musfc 
Icomtiosltlon system that I 
I mentioned earlier, it can 
h#tp to create professional sounding 
drum traclw, Imss lines, arpeggio 
patterns, and even complete pieces 
of music and the good news is that, 
since this Is all achieved from within 
the environment of Sequencer One 
or Sequencer One Plus, there is no 
nesd to leant how to use another 
prcH^aml I'll be showing you how 
you can used the Htt Kit to its iwst 
potential to show you how to 
achieve some great musical effects. 

How does it work? Very simply, 
the Hit Kit consists of a disk which 
provides a large selection of 'musical 
building blocks' which can form the 
basis of a piece of music. All you 
have to do, is choose the blocks you 
want, and arrange them as required 
using the sequencers block 



'There are seven 

style directories 

confaining ba/fact 

blues, discOf house, 

krfin and others,,*" 



movement facii [ties. 

As far as the Hit Kit is concerned 
each block has two characteristics 
associated with it: a 'style', and a 
'type'. The style is just the style of 
music for which the block was written 
(eg disco). The type, is the 
suggested use of the block (eg a 
bass line pattern). These categories 
are intended to help you cheese 
blocks for a particular situation but 
they're not rigid, so you are always 
free to experiment! 

ON THE BEAT 

The Drum Bank blocks contain drum 
patterns configured for a particular 
instrument. Each dmm pattern is one 
bar in length and you will find three 
different Drum Bank directories on 
the Hit Kit disk. 

Separate Roland and Yamaha 
format drum patterns are provided 
but if you are using a drum machine 




Use the Hit Kit to compose anything ftom isolated sounds to complete pieces 
of music, all from within Sequencer One or Sequencer One Plus 



Sequencer One PLUS 



SQijits 1S92 



"EST 




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Song Nane: ilNIITLED.FLS 
Events Used; 888118 
Eii9iit£ Fpes; 842S96 



Loading bloclu of data from the Hit Kit via Sequencer One 



which uses some other druovnote 
<-> voice convention you can do one 
of two things: reconfigure the drum 
machine itself to match either the 
Roland or the Yamaha drum kit or, if 
you have Sequencer One Plus, remap 
the drum parts. 

Drum parts are also provided in a 
more specialised multi-track form 
needed for some applications, 
including internal sound based drum 
parts. When you load these blocks. 



you will find tinat each drum sound is 
located on a separate track of the 
sequencer. This means that you can 
easily set up the channel and patch 
number for the track to trigger the 
appropriate sound. 

The multi-track format may also 
be useful if you have a MIDI 
instrument which does not have a 
separate drum channel or if ycu want 
to play around with the relative 
positions of certain drum parts (for 



Create pro 
sounding 
compositions 
wffh the Hit Kit - 
Paul Overaa 
sho^^s you flow 



instance, slightly shifting the snare 
drum part will alter the 'feel' of many 
drum patterns). 

Most of the patterns are in four- 
four time (except for JAZWALTZ.BLK, 
which is in three-four time) and a 
fairly wide range of styles are 
available. 

Despite the fact that there are a 
lot of files on the Hit Kit disk a block 
naming convention has been 
adopted which makes it quite easy to 
pick out the right types of patterns; 
for each style, the blocks are 
numbered from 1 upwards (eg 
JAZZl.BLK, JAZZ2.BLK, and so on, 
for jazz style) and in general the 
pattern becomes more complicated 
as the number increases. 

For a particular block number, 
there may even be several 
associated variations available - for 
example: the blocks JAZZ4A.BLK to 
JAZZ4F.BLK indicate a set of similar 
patterns, designed to be used 
together in the sequence in which 
they are lettered {that is: one bar of 
JAZZ4A.BLK, then one bar of 
JAZZ4B.BLK, and so on). This is only 
a su^ested order and you may, of 
course, use them in a completely 
different order, just use one of the 
blocks repeatedly, or even mix them 
with the other stales! 

FILL THE RHYTHM 

Some of the patterns have 'fill in' 
blocks which they can be used in 
conjunction with. These can be 
inserted at suitable points In the 
rhythm, perhaps to separate a verse 
from a chorus, or simply to 'lift' the 
rhythm. Again a useful name 
convention helps to make things 
easier for the user- fill In blocks are 
suffixed with the letter "F" and so 
BALLAD2F.BLK, for example, is 
designed to be used as a fill in with 
BALLAD2.BLK. 

PHRASE FINDER AND 
STYLE LOOPS 

Phrase Rnder blocks cover bass and 
drum parts, chords, arpeggios etc., 
and with the exception of the drum 
patterns all are eight bars in 
duration. 

The phrases are contained In 
seven style directories covering 
ballad, blues, disco, house, latin 
(samba, bossa nova and so on). 



I tkM AMIGA SHOPKR • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1 992 



MIDI 



JARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



Arpeg^o ~ A chord made up of notes which are played in a rapid and 
normaiiy upward succession. 

CKord ~ Severai notes played at once, usuaiiy to create a harmonically 
pleasing combination. 

Bar - A unit of musical time with a fixed numlser of beats. 

E>ub - To add sound effects or music. 

Sequencer - Software which stores musical scores and transmits this 
infonnation in real time via MIDI to synthesisers which will then play it. 



reggae and techno styles. Within 
each of these style directories, is a 
set of type directories, one for each 
type of block. Hence you can 'home 
in' on a particular block simply by 
using your sequencer's file selector 
box to step through the directories. 
The blocks provided in the drum type 
sub-directories, incidentally, have 
just been duplicated from the main 



'Ihe m Kit gives 

you instant library 

data, saving you 

Hme and hassle," 



drum bank data. These contain a 
selection of drum blocks which are 
suggested for use with that particular 
style although it is of course just as 
easy to pick your own from the main 
drum banks. 

The Style Loops are a set of 
looping Sequencer One songs made 
up of ail the phrase blocks (except 
the drums) for a particular style. They 
are not intended to be complete 
pieces of music and are there simply 
as a means of listening to the 
blocks which are available without 
having to load and play each in 
turn. 

BLOCK OPERATIONS 

To load a Hit Kit block into 
Sequencer One or Sequencer One 
Plus, you select the Load Block 
option from the Block menu bar 
heading and then use the file 
selector box to choose the block to 
load. The block will then be loaded 
into the clipboard. To check this, you 
can use the Block Info facility (again, 
this is under the Block menu 
heading). The Block Info box shows 
the number of events contained in 
the block just loaded, and also the 
track and position from which it was 
originally taken. 

To use the block in the clipboard, 
you will need to Paste it into your 
music. For single-track blocks (all Hit 



Kit blocks except multWrack drum 
patterns). Paste will write the 
clipboard contents at the current 
song position on the current track. 
The current track and song position 
should therefore be set before using 
Paste. A multi-track block will be 
pasted at the current song position 
on all tracks (even though the block 
may not actually use ail tracks). If, 
incidentally, the sequencer's overdub 
mode is on the clipboard It is merged 
with the existing data rather than 
replacing jt. Since you can choose 
the number of repetitions for a Paste 
operation it's often possible, if you 
are taking the easy way out and just 
using a basic pattern, to paste in 
complete song sections with one 
paste operation. 

AN EXAMPLE 

The following example illustrates just 
how simple it is to create a rhythm 
track for an instrument 



using Sequencer One or Sequencer 
One Plus in conjunction with the Hit 

m... 

Rrstly, we'd choose a track to be 
the daim track, say track 1, and set 
it to the current record track (setting 
the MIDI channel as appropriate for 
the instrument). Then, with the Hit. 
Kit disk in s drive, we would select 
the appropriate drum bank directory 
using the file selector box, identify a 
suitable drum pattern and click on 
OK - this will copy that block to the 
clipboard. 

Having ensured that the song 
position is at 1:01, we select Paste 
from the Block menu, set the number 
of copies to say 4, and click on OK. 
Four copies of the block will be 
pasted onto track 1 at the start of 
the song (if in doubt you can always 
check this using the step editor 
screen which, in the case of the 
example, should then show a 4 bar 
pattern). 

After a paste, the song position 
advances automatically to the end of 
the blocks, ready to paste again so 
after the above steps it would be 
reading 5:01. 

We might then decide to load a 
variation of the first block and repeat 
the steps described above - if four 
bar pastes had been used in each 
case an eight bar rhythm pattern 
would have been created. This could 
then be copied and repeated as 
many times as required using the 
normal sequencer block copy 
operations. 

Since you can do these types of 
operations with the 



drum parts, bass lines, chord 
progressions and other 
accompaniments, this building block 
approach makes life substantially 
easier for both the musician and the 
would-be musician. Don't forget also 
that once the blocks have been 
loaded into the sequencer there is 
nothing to stop you modi'^ing the 
blocks in any way you that choose. 

THE BOnOM LINE 

To be fair it would be perfectly 
possible to create your own libraries 
of sequence fragments for general 
use and, in the early days that is 
exactly what an awful lot of MIDI 
users, including myself, did. The 
disadvantage of the 'self made' 
approach, even if you have the 
musical expertise. Is that it takes a 
lot of time to create such libranes. 
The Hit Kit gives you that library data 
instantaneously so it saves you both 
time and hassle! CS 

ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 



TbeHitiat 

The Sample Series 
Per vdirnie 



For the S vohinie set . 

By: 

Gafrts Music Software 
l-Mex House 
40 Princes Street 
ManchBster Ml 6I)E 
n 061236 2515 



E24.9S 








THE SAMPLE SERIES 



Stnce Sequencer One, Sequencer One Plus, and tite 
Hit Kit all provide sampled sounds support, we 
ou0tt In passing also to mention GaJH'a Sample Series 
disks. 

These are a collection of IFF format digital sound 
samples which have been created from professional 



quality sources and they therefore sound an awful lot 
better than anything you could create yourself. Rve 
volumes are available covering Percussion & Effects, 
Guitars & Strings, Brass & Woodwind, Synth and Vocals 
and Piano & keyboards and each disk does incidentally 
include its own demo tune. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1 9« 141 



NEWSFLASH 

8833 Mk II Monitors 

Genuine UK Model ^tK 

F19 Promotion ONLY £189.95 



D 




CLEARANCE SALE 

EXDEMO A590'5£199 
EXDEMOA500's£199 



ON 




COMPUTER SYSTEMS LTD 



■^ 



1Mb W 1Mb 

RAM Pack <tAM 

THE FANTASTIC NEW 
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AS SEEN IN THE COMPUTER PRESS 
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ON A600 

Free Deluxe Paint III * game 

while stocks Last 

WE CANNOT BE BEATEN 

ON PRICE .^KSKSl 





1Mb W 1Mb 

RAM Pack ^^^^^ 

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AMIGA 600 PLUS 

With the NEW 

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AND 9Pin Seikosha Printer 

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PACK 



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wilh 60Mb tiard disk and 2Mb RAM 
ONLY £899.00 INC VAT 

■ Full Range of PC^s Available - 

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• Less £150 when yog PX 

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4 

Mousemat, Taibrmode Dust Cover, Joystick, 

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ONLY £799.00 INC VAT 
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The NEW Adventures Of CAPTAIN DIAMOND 



p=^ 



wexoMt fcucs 

1DTHE fiH\C,^!JP^D 




C*>li feBOi+O IS 
TMt PeoPLES CWiHPlCN 
C*iP»iir>J 0thNC*lI5O<!lVlN<; 
THE ftotjfiiS& ISBBPM 

ftctEieoMoa oveo-His. 

BfSlt END^WE 1SMJ^SC0 
MSO in *iW *S00iS HIS 

fAMOZ Q)vA(„"thE sue 

fiteH", uiiTH Ti-ie dvP 
ACcej-EEmce a<QD. 

AMD THE^f'Gt ©tfTH UP 

«c;ftir4sr tvie h<st 
PAuootarrC . TH£ i500 

scco.... HiNDTMrcee. 
afP.".: 




>i*^.^ 



WANT A 1 500 
With Workbench 2.04? 
GOT A 500 
SWAP IT FOR ONLY £399.95 
ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT 




Checkout the price on 

PROGRESSIVE PERIPHERALS ProductsI 

Nobody in the UNIVERSE 

Can touch Captain Diamond 

On Pricel 



CAPTAIN DIAMOND'S 1500 & 3000 CENTRE 



A1S00 

All Diamond's 1 500's come with 
Workbench 2.04 and are also supplied 
with:- Deluxe Paint III, Home Accounts, The 
Works (word processor, spreadsheet and 
database), 3 Games (Puzznic, Toki & E(f), 
ond a book (Get The Best Out Of Your 
Amiga) 

A1500 on its own £549 

wiriiGVP eWfc bore board+52Mb Quantum.. £839 
wirh 8Mb Ok RAM board+ 105Mb Quonhjm .£998 
Al 500+8833 .£745 

Out Of Memory? 

Try our 8Mb RAM Board for your AT 500 
or 2000 

Aries Board 0Mb .....£89 

For each 2Mb RAM add £69 



AMIGA 3000 

The NEW Commodore AMIGA 3000 

25MHz processor, ] 00 Mb hard disk, 4Mb 

Fast RAM, 2Mb Chip RAM. 

+ SCALA + Deluxe Paint IV, 

CM 1 960 M/SYNC MONITOR 

£3295.00 INC VAT 

Phone for PX pricing 

GENLOCKS 

Rocgen £89.95 

Rocger + £124.95 

Rendale 8802 £1 19.95 

G2 £575.00 

G2+ £999.00 

Video Pilot £999.00 

Nevtf Philips Editing System 

Only £399.00 



IMPACT II HC8 

/ Faclofy intalled hard dfii/ei 
/ 52. UO.. 240 & 420Mb cptions 
/ Orthaofd 8Mb memcwy 5ccfce^' 
/ Add up to 6 more SCSI devices 
/ Easy Jo Sn&iaii SIMMS 
Thase am he ^uivi:ilQfit of |^ 
HD8+ hard drive, buf fortfie 
1 500 & 2000 models. Not o*i ly 
are Ihey iorrie of the Fostest hard 
drives available buf hliey abo 
incorporate an urtpoptiloied 8Mb 
RAMexporubn board. 

52Mb £295 

120Mb £445 

240Mb £695 

420Mb £1295 



SYQUESr44/88iVlb 

rf^ 44 or &BMb Jsrnoweobfe medio 

^ 20ffiL access time 

/ Ccwi be supplied with of wisha/f 

GVPHC8caniid}Bf 
/ ExiSfnoS case iTi^ihhle hr A5(X} 

ofASOOO users 
Each dfjvfl coir\^i complete with 
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camplefe storogv Rs'Xibill^, 
offering a quick and easy way la 
add exlra jlorcige to your system. 

44Mb bare £445 

44Mh+HCe.... £545 

eSMbbore £595 

eSMb + HCS £695 



/ 6B03OeC/6303OEC/6S03O . 

processor 
/ 25/4O/50MH2 dock speeds 
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bilSAM 
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■ftese fast 68O3OEC/68O30 
occflieratorj withnnemofy upgrade 
ond SCSI interface board offer 
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50MHi/4Mb ET395 



IMPAa VISION 24 

/ 7d8x5S0fAlrexAilion 

/ S^ppofis cornposite vKjbo, 5-VHS 

OTjd ^G9 signois 
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features 16.7rniflion colours on 
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comes witfi Coligori IV2J 3D, 
Scolo IV24 plus Macro Paint. 
Al 500/2000 requires additional 
odoplo<eE49,9S 

i:>ily£1695 



COMPONENT SHOP 

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t^mcn.«abia canridg* drrv« 

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CONTROUER (m above add £A9.9S 

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412 56K OiMMS 

ForAJWStK J^99 

IXIMB l»AM5 Fw 81^/Supro (tc je3.99 

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Far NEXUS/GVP/Roehaid »tc X34,99 

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1.3 ROM .{19.99 

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25MHi Motojoia 68O40. ByiiMn Molhs cc- 
pro;*u«r. 5oftwaf« compatiblg ^rii 6SQ0Q cliip). 
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oilowsd fo pr.nl OUF pricBS off we'll g«l iued, fof 
fWiculoutly low priCBi conlocl your iocoi jhc^. 



AVIDEO 24 

24'bir sraphlct fw iha A500. 76Bx5BQ q^Miltly 
rojoluNsn. 1 6J(nillior> colour frams buffer. Small 
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24.bitcaiovr. 164Tii[i[QncoiourB- Pitt bolh 
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AMKSAInteaiai £39.95 

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A500 ACCESSORIES 



ROCHARD 40Mb £299.00 

GVP SERIES 2 HARD DISKS 

52Mb ONLY £345.00 

105Mb ONLY £449.00 

Perfectly tnatched in colour + style to the AMIGA 
500p. 1 1 ms access drive, 1 " high drive by Quantum 
Room for up to 8Mb of RAM expaniior. Cut Off 
switch fiar games Exsponsion 'Mini Slot'. Externol SCSI 
port Dedicoted PSU and fan. 2 years free warranty. 
Add £65.00 per extrea 2Mb RAM 

ROCHARD DRIVES ALWAYS IN STOCK 52Mb 

105Mb 
Ok £369.00 Ok £529.00 

2Mb £434.00 2Mb £594.00 

4Mb £499.00 4Mb £659,00 

6Mb £564.00 6Mb £724.00 

BMb £629.00 SMb £789.00 



286 Emulator . 
120Mb £495 



.£245 



240Mb £795 

A530 Accelerator 

/ 40MHz 68030EC processor 

/ Hi-ipeed SCSI interface with 52, i 20 or 240Mb ... 

hard drive 
• I Mb populated Accomodotes up to maximum SMb 

of 32-bit wide RAM 
/ Optional 68882 Maths co-processor 
/ Opd'o/idf PC-Aremu/oWor 

ACCELHATOIt + HD + RAM Uporade 
Plugging a GVP A530 Accelerator onto your A500 or 
A500 Plus will boost its speed from 7. 1 4MHz to o 
blistering dOMHz. The A530 will be available wilh 
either 52, 1 20 or 240Mb hard drive ond can be 
upgraded to include an odditionol mathe co- 
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more through GVP's unique "mini-slot". 

40MHz 1Mb RAM/52Mb HD £749 

40MHz 1Mb RAM/120Mb HD £899 

40MH2 1Mb RAM/240Mb HD £1099 

Monitors & TVs 

ee33Mkll +F19 promotion £189.95 

Panasonic 1381 multisync £275 

Philips TV/Monitor £249 

Philips 3350 51" remote control .£349.99 

Philips 86cm malchline 

1 OOHz widescteen £2499.99 

New Philips Designer cube TV/Monitor.. £279 

Goldstor TV/Monitor £159 

Philips 14''SVGA monitor^ suitoble for use with 

A3000or 15O0 with flicker fixer £229.95 

Plwisa odd £9.95 for csnnecting lead 



AWD •ft THPt tie*C POC THE LtWE, tT^ 

Twe tsoo •rtJD 3000- 1 ottjjjr ^ueue "rtie 




Unfortunately due to its provocative nature we were not ailowed by Future 
Publishing to print the names of our competitors. However can you work out who 
they are? If you can there's a FREE dislt drive to the first ten correct answers. 

YOU CAN'T BUY CHEAPER THAN DIAMOND 







Diarrwnd 


UK 8633 
Monitor 


£229.99 


£229.95 


£234.99 


£219 


£209.99 


£199 


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£219 


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£240 


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HP Deskjet 
Colour 


£575.00 


N/A 


£599.99 


£539 


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N/A 


£559 


N/A 


£699 


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Star LC200 
Colour 


N/A 


£209.95 


£199.99 


£189 


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£189 


£169.95 


£199.99 


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Roc lite Drive 
External 


£54.95 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


£55.99 


£56 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


£59 


£49.95 


10 Blonk Disks 


N/A 


£9.99 


£4.99 


N/A 


£7.99 


£7.50 


£3.99 


N/A 


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£3.50 


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£399.99 


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£369 


£364.95 


£349.99 


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£399 


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Citizen 224 

Colour 


£240 


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£239 


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S239 


£244.90 


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Pen Pal 
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£79.99 


£53.99 


£53 


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SVP Series II 
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£345 


Progressive 
Petipherd 

68M0 Accetetator 
cord for A500 


Captain Diamond scoured the pages of every magazine he could lay his hands on and 
unfortunately he could not find any other supplier who felt technically competent enough to 
retail the amazing 68040 product, so if you want to speak to the experts speak to Diamond the 
largest Amiga dealer In Northern Europe. 


£725 


If YPU bpMght QDTV qnd qr^ now living to regret it read on 



"..Commodore mode multimedia available to the 
masses witli the Dynamic Total Vision (CDTV), but it 
iooks set for dinosaur status in the light of Phiiips' 
impressive Compact Disc-interactive (CD-i). Chris 
Cain's (Senior Staff Writer PCW) comparison of the 
two systems gave him the best hardv^are experi- 
ence he's had for five years..,." 



Personal Computer Worid July 1992 

Did you bet on black and it came up red? 
Did you buy Betamax when everybody bouglit VHS? 
Hove you booked your summer lioliday in Yugoslavia? 
I bet you've got CDTV. 

Well don't worry we won't take the micky anymore because your not the only 
person who fell for oil the hype, but don't panick, Captain Diamond as always is 
here to save the day. You can bring your old CDTV into any branch of Diamond 
until the end of August and we will give you a brand new all singing all dancing 
CD-I system for only £449 






P/X Your old 500 

for a ne^ Amiga 1 500 

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WITH WORKBENCH 2.04 

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PART EXCHANGE EX DEMO 
AMIGA 500 +3 MONTH'S 
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WITH 2Mb RAM £249.95 



CAPTAIN DIAMOND'S PERIPHERALS PAGE 



ALL PRICES INCLUDE VAT 



APPLICATION SOFTWARE 




£27,49 


Graphki & General 




DislanI Suns 4.0 




Advantage 


£64.99 


fun School Series 


£IS 99 


Anim Font lor 2 or 5 


£19,59 


French Mistress 


£15.49 


An DepI 


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GB Route Plus 


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Art DepI. Pro 2 

Big Allernotiva Scroller 


£139.99 
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Movis Beacon Typing, 
Micro Series 


Broodcost Tiller 2 


£1 S4.99 




Colourbursl 


£449.99 


DTP K Wordprocauing 




Deluxe Paiil IV 


£54.99 


Excellence 2 


£59 99 


DigiviBw Medio Station 


£109.00 


Gold Disk Video 


£3O.S0 
£29.99 


Disney AnimaKon S(ud 


£64,99 


Kindwords 


ImoginB 2 


£194.99 


Pogesetter 2 


£39.99 


Mediaslotion 


£119,95 


Fogeslreom 2.2 


£139.99 


Personol Finance Mgr 


CI 9.99 


Pen Pol 


£39.95 
£T9.99 


Personal Font Maker 


£34.99 


Personal Write 


Pixel 3D 


£64.95 


Pro Page 3.0 


£149.00 


Presentohon Moster 


£149.99 


Quickwrita 


£29.99 


Prodraw 2 


£89.99 


Scribble 


£34.95 


Professiopiol Cole 


£129.99 


Tronswrite 


£29.99 


Pro Video Post 


£117.60 


Woidswonh 1 . 1 


£79.99 


Real 3D Beginners 


£99.99 


Works Piotinum 


£49.99 


Scenery An i motion 


£49.99 






Speclro Colour 


£39.99 


Oevelopment & Ulilrti*> 




TV Text 


£34.» 


AMOS or Eosy AMOS 


£29.99 


Video Director 


£99,99 


AMOS 3D 


£22.99 


Vidi Amigo 


£S4,99 


AMOS Compiler 


£19.99 


Vidi Colour Solution 


£139,99 


Bliti Basic 


£69.99 


VishQ Pro 


£49.99 


Con Do VI .6 


£64.99 






Cross Dos 


£22.99 


Muik & Sound 




Dev Pac 3.0 


£49.99 


AMAS2 


e6».9S 


DiractB7 Opus 


£25.99 


Audio Engineer +2 


£149.99 




£32.99 


Audiomoster A 


£44.38 


Hi Speed Poscol 


£64.99 


Audition 4 


£34.99 


Home Accounts 2 


£36.99 


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BUSINESS 



When Gold Disk flist 
Introduced Michael 
Todorovlc't, The 
Advantage K was 
hailed as the best spreadsheet for 
the Amiga ever devised. In many 
respects, there were better 
offerings: MMS's Analyse II had 
more powerful graphing facilities; 
Kuma's HSpmad 4 had more 
functions. Nevertheless, Advantage 
Is fast, superbly easy to use and 
generally quite reliable. Time has 
marched relentlessly on (as It has a 
habit of doing) and the Amiga has a 
new Workbench with a more 
professional look. To mark this 
occasion, Mike put his programming 
hat on again, Improved the 
Advantage Interface still further, 
added loads more features and the 
result Is Pfofes^onal Calc. 

Dedicated Advantage users will 
be Immediately at home with the 
new system; the enhanced features 
and 140<idd functions will soon 
become second-nature. However, 
Professional Calc Is so much 
better than its predecessor that we 
felt it necessary to devote a full 
review to it. 

The program Is supplied on three 
disks with a friendly and well written, 
if limited user manual. Just like its 
predecessor, It requires at least 1Mb 
RAM and a second drive is highly 
recommended. 

Installation to hard disk Is 
painless and can be driven directly 
from the Workbench. Unlike some 
installs, this one doesn't copy 
everything carte bianche, but gives 
you some control over what happens. 

Customisation options are not 
set during installation, but can be 
altered through the Icon information 
later on. Support has been provided 
for all the main screens under 1.3 
Kickstart in 4, 8 or 16 colours; plus 
the SuperiHlRes, Productivity and 
A2024 modes added to Kickstart 2 
and the ECS. 

FUNCTION FACEUFT 

in perfect tune with the new 
Workbench design. Professional Calc 
features a drab grey, 3D bas-reilef 
screen. Even the row and column 
headings are displayed as miniature 
buttons. The overall effect is very 
business-like and easy on the eye; 
better still It's easier for neophyte 
users to pick out clickable areas. 

However, perhaps the best new 
addition, at least as far as instant 
functionality goes, is the toolbox. 
This runs along the top of each sheet 
and provides instant point-ancklick 
access to functions such as: cut, 
copy, paste, style tags, colours and 
the ARexx Interface. Beginners and 
the terminally lazy will find this 
feature a real boon. Even so, in the 
best traditions of well-written 
software, the toolbox can be 



switched off to reclaim a little extra 
real-estate on the sheet. 

STYU TAGS 

One failure of The Advantage was the 
range of text options. Text within the 
sheet could be set in the normal 
console styles of bold, italic and the 
various colours. But each operation 
was separate, and although a style 
could be applied to a block of cells, 
getting the desired affect could 
take some time. Lack of proper 
macros (except ARexx) effectively 
meant most sheets ended up 



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Professional Calc comes with a professional looking user Interface. One of the 
best additions Is the tool box which gives easy access to the functions 

Something else I took exception 
to was the similarity to the Mac 
interface. There's nothing wrong with 



lacking that certain pazazz. 

With Professional Calc this cavil 
has been completely eliminated and 
enhanced by the use of style tags. 
Basically, you can apply a set of 
parameters to a cell and give that 
"style" a name. Once defined the 
style can be applied to any cell or 
block of cells. One fault with this 
process is that it's not possible to 
apply "no style" to a cell. This is, I 
suspect, a bug and something which 
may be corrected in a later release. 



that (Apple would argue otherwise 
I'm sure) but it only goes half way. 
For instance, clicking the Style 
selector on the toolbox brings up a 
requester; clicking the fonts button 
pulls up another. This means you 
have to move the mouse somewhere 
else. A roll-down selection below the 



>I3J 



iARGON BUSTING • JARGON BUSTING 



ARexx -The Amiga's version of the scripting language from IBM 

mainframes, Rexx. ARexx was written by William Hawes and has become 
so standard it replaces Amiga BASIC in Workbench 2. 

CSV - Comma Separated Values. An Import/export protocol used to transfer 
data between spreadsheets and databases (usually). Every value Is 
delimited by a comma - it's that simplel 

EPSF - Encapsulated Postscript File. A postscript program which may be 
read by other software. 

Macro - A set of common operations recorded by the application. Macros 
can be played back at will to perform a series of commonly used 
functions automatically and thus allow for faster operation. 

Poftttcrlpt - A page description (printer) language devised by Adobe and 
used by many high-end laser and LED page printers. 

Tag - Text Attribute Grouping, A short form for Styie Tag. Style tags are used 
to attach a common name to a set of text attributes: font and size, 
italics, colour, and so on. Tags can be viewed as named mescros which 
apply a specific style to a cell or group of cells. In DTP systems, tags are 
also known as paraigraph styles. 



Mark Smiddy 

casts a critical 

eye over 

Professional 

Calc, Gold Disk's 

Mloy^-up to the 

acclaimed 

Advantage 

spreadsheet 




AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



131 



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BUSINESS 




Graphics are one of the selling points of Professlonai Calc ~ theie te a 
len^hy list of chart options ran^ng from Pie to Scatter charts 



(Ofillrwed fruii i 



!l31 



selection point (like a menu) would 
be much easier - and faster - to 
use. Also, the style tags have to be 
defined using a menu function - 
surely the names could be entered 
directly into a toolbox gadget? Oddly 
enough, tags are not supported by 
the graptiics functions -which 
seems a little odd. 

Standard Amiga bitmap 
typefaces are fuliy supported - with 
sizes in excess of 120 points would 
you believe? (I would hawe preferred 
a fonts requester that could retrieve 
typestyles from other drawers and 
devices - but that's a little picky). 
Postscript support is complemented 
by several specially built screen 
fonts - and there is nothing to say 
these couldn't be used on a dot- 
matrix printer. 

CURIOUS OUTUNES 

One particularly Interesting new 
feature is the use of multipte views. 
This sort of thing is common in other 
systems but seems rare on tiie 
Amiga. The idea is to open several 
"child" windows based on the current 
spreadsheet. 

Each view shows a separate part 
of the sheet and can be used 
independently (ranges can be copied 
and charted) of the main sheet. Any 
changes made In any view are, of 
course, reflected in the main display. 
When a view is being used the menu 
bar changes colour to indicate this - 
nice touch that. 

A curious addition Is outline 
support. Outlines are difficult to 
describe, but the idea is to gather a 
group of common data under a 
heading and collapse the display 
under that heading. Groups of 
headings can themselves be 
compressed down and so on. This 
feature may be useful to hide ranges 
of rows and columns and just show 
results - but its inclusion in a 
spreadsheet seems a little eccentrJc. 
More time could have been spent in 
other areas. 

Other new functions Include a 



proper (if limited) Fill Range and 
macro features - in Advantage these 
were implemented in ARexx - and 
that made them tediously slow. 

GRAPHICS GALORE 

Graphics have always been one of 
the strongest selling points in 
Advantage. Not just because it offers 
a wide range of options, but mainly 
because they are so accessible. 
Professional Calc makes things even 
simpler. Clicking an Icon on the 
toolbox pulls up the chart requester - 
where each chart is represented by a 
picture depicting what it will looks 
like. This Is much more beginner 
(and expert) friendly than fishing 
through the menus for that elusive 
"SD/split/proportional/pie chart" or 
some such thing. 

Basically, Professional Gate 
offers the classic charts; pie, line, 
scatter, bar, hl-lo etc, plus 3D lines, 
3D area and dual pie. But why, oh 
why isn't it possible to overlay two 
different charts on the same display? 
This was a major flaw with Advantage 
and one which I would have expected 
to see corrected. 

Admittedly, one of the pre-define 
charts comprises a pie chart 
alongside a vertically stacked bar 
chart - but this is hardly sufficient. I 
want the ability to chart two different 
ranges on the same display with 
different Y axes if necessary. Also, 
the ability to chart some row data 
along with an independent piece of 
column data elsewhere on the sheet 
would be handy too. 

WISHFUL THINKING 

On the subject of extra features, a 
facility to calculate linear regression 
on a scatter chart and the area under 
a line would be nice. Just to be really 
pernickety, the ability to define the 
viewing angle and perspective of a 
3D chart would be nice. 

This considerations rnight seem 
a little "OTT" to the casual user, but 
it should be considered essential for 
those presenting reports or making 
presentations. In this respect, an 
overall impression of professionalism 



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Multiple views are one handy feature of Professional Calc, several windows 
to one spreadsheet can be viewed at once 




BEGINNERS 



Whatlsa 
spreadsheet? 
At its simplest 

level, a spi«adsheet is a tool for 
processing lots of numbers In 
rows and columns; matrices if you 
like. (That said, pure 
mathematical matrices are a 
different thing altt^ether and aie 
not supported by Professhiat 
Calc). Today's spieadsheets are 
used for a variety of different 
tilings but most And a home in the 
business environment where they 
are used for complex costing and 
cashflow analysis. Many even 
liave simple database-like and 
word processing functions too. 

What Is a celt? 

Every spreadsheet Is constructed 
from a ^d of mmiy columns and 
rows^ the intersections of which 
are called cells. Rows are mari<ed 
with numbers, the columns letters 
- so every cell has a unique 
address (cell reference) ma<fe up 
of a letter and a numlier. Cells 
can contain fomiulas, numbers 
and text; they may even be 
empty. At the simplest level, you 
can get the sheet to add up an 
entire row or column with one 
simple command. In this r^pect, 
spreadsheets can be viewed as 
exbemely powerful calculators. 

How are calculations carried out? 
The biggest pntbi^n wWi a 
spreadsheet Is it's an open 
application: a blank piece of 
|K9er; like the first screen on a 
word processor or an empty 
database. The application Is 
defined by tiie user and that 
means you have to enter all the 
fonnuiss youiseif. Sfmfrie 
arithmetic such as 24-2 or 5*4 
csn be contained itf a single eel), 




but more 
comptex 
pmbiems may 
Involve the use of many hundreds 
of cells vrith forward or even 
circular references. 

Wfat are forward and circular 
references? 

In simpler systems these are 
errors, the simplest of which Is a 
forward reference. To explain how 
this comes about require a 
knowlet^e of how spreadsheets 
calculate results. As has already 
been expjalned, the spreadsheet 
Is constrocted tmm a large grid of 
cells: row-by-row, column-by- 
column. When you ask the sheet 
to recalculate (work out the 
results of any changes you liave 
made) it works through the entire 
sheet In a specific order. 

For cdumnar recalculation: It 
will move down each column (a 
row at a time) until It gets to the 
bottom, tlwn move to the rtext 
column until It reaches tiie end of 
the sheet. For row-wise recaic, It 
goes the opposite way, traverslr^ 
the ciriumns (left to riglit) and 
moving down one, when each row 
Is completed. 

Forward references occur 
when a fonnuia requires a value 
from a celt which is ahead of the 
current recaic position. In other 
words, the cell Is always one 
calculation out of step. CIroular 
references are more or less the 
same, ttut In this case, the two or 
more cells may reference each 
other. These features may be 
required for some applications 
and the correct answer Is 
determined by the number of 
iterations - the numtier of times 
a spreadsheet Is recalculated. 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



BUSINESS 



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Mac like requesters are part and parcel of the Professional Calc program; 
guaranteed to give your mouse a workout! 



is often as important as the 
information presented. This is not 
what power users demand; it is what 
they expect. 

In spite of my cavils, there are a 
lot of chart options - far too many to 
even list, let alone describe here. 
However, a great deal of thought has 



such as Stipettase and graphics can 
tie saved as IFF (of course) CAD and 
Pro Draw. 

The printer options are more 
interesting because someone at 
Gold Disl< has realised that 
Postscript exists outside the realms 
of Professional Page. Postscript, 



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Areas of Professional Calc can be selected easily with a drag of the mouse. 
Her«, an area covering the cells A32:D47 is shown 



been put into how the various 
requesters appear. Essentially, you 
are never struck by a barrage of 
questions - unless you want to add 
fancy bits such as: headers, footers, 
weird grids - you name it. 
Professional Calc even has a 
dithering feature allowing access to 
136 screen colours - so they claim. 

FILE AND PRINTER 
SUPPORT 

Professional Calc will import files 
from: Advantage 1.1; Office Cala 
(aka ^cA'anfage 1.0); Maxipian and 
Lotus 1-2-3. Gold Disk admits the 
Lotos support is not perfect, but it 
should be quite adequate for most 
Amiga users. (If you really must use 
Lotus, get a KCS Power PC Board or 
something similar and run it on that). 
For Lotus export. Professional Calc 
provides the option of not writing the 
extraneous file header. This startup 
default is accessed through the icon 
info and will not usually be altered 
anyway. CSV export Is provided for 
compatibility with database systems 



Adobe's page description language is 
as good at printing graphics as It Is 
at printing text. With the price of 
high-quality Postscript laser printers 
dropping all the time, support in 
Professional Calc Is a bonus. 

Version 1.04 reviewed here Is 
capable of printing even on the larger 



A3 machines - which has to be good 
news for all concerned. Notably, even 
if you don't own a Postscript printer, 
the program will write a Postscript 
program to disk for despatch to a 
specialist. If your work includes DTP, 
Professional Calc will save an EPSF 
for Inclusion in pages prepared on 
the Amiga, PC or Macintosh. 

DOT ON THE LANDSCAPE 

If the high-flying world of laser 
printers isn't your thing, the 
traditional impact dot-matrix 
machines have not been Ignored. 

The program will even print 
sideways (landscape) on most 
graphic pnnters - that is, not daisy 
wheels. Taking that Into account, I 
think the HP Laserjet/ Deskjet 500 
printers should have been catered 
for. Although they should pnnt using 
the Preferences driver, It is doubtful 
the effect would be as good as a 
customised support for these 
popular machines. 

CONCLUSIONS 

There is little doubt that Amiga-based 
spreadsheets have a very limited 
appeal - since the machine is not 
generally viewed as a business 
micro. 

A lot of snobbery still surrounds 
the PC simply, 'because IBM makes 
them". The Amiga, on the other hand 
has (or rather had) two major 
problems. Rrst, thanks to a thriving 
games market it was viewed as a 
games machine. This has been 
eased by the proliferation of console 
systems and explosion of PC games. 
Second: the user interface. Intuition 
was looked at as a bit of a joke. 
Given that the Amiga was the first 
affordable micro to offer reliable 
multi-tasking, the GUI was a bit of a 
let-down, Kickstart 2 has changed 
that and with rumours of new, faster 
machines coming, the Amiga might 
finally become the machine others 
can only promise. 

However, this can only be the 
case if the software can match the 
hardware; and all things considered. 



t^ 



in: :Bdv3nt38e/SiipertiaseSraphi[5 



jMa 



>| Hone I iljli E| Pj AJ ^MM 

B i I i J_ 



ij. 



J ^ ml Tj Fof Ml llSd 



1 E 1 F I 



J. 



Big Text! 




standard Amiga bitmap typefaces are supported by Professional Calc. It's 
even possible to view text which is even bigger than 120 point in size 



the massive range of clever software 
Is why the PC still sun/lves. Even 486 
systems can be likened to little more 
than a leather trimmed Mini with a 
Ford-Cosworth engine. The machine 
might be fast, but the chassis 
technology Is outdated. 

POWER SPREADSHEET 

Professional Calc Is an early example 
of a new breed of software which has 
the potential to propel the Amiga Into 
the world's offices. Michael 
Todorovlc has put a lot of effort into 
making this powerful application so 
far in front of the competition it Is 
unlikely they will ever catch up. 
However, It must not stop there. 
Being best on one system does not 
mean you're best all round. 

It Is comparatively weak when 
compared to, say: Informix's Wingz 
or Microsoft's Excel- and it Is those 
systems by which It will and must be 
judged. I hope Gold Disk will listen to 
the criticism waged here and 
encourage Mike to improve the 
product until it reaches beyond all 
the competition and can truly be 
called the professional's choice. As 
far as the Amiga is concerned 
though, if you need an all-singing, all- 
dancing sheet this one is definitely 
worth closer examination. 8't-l 

ooooooooo 

SHOPPING LIST 



Professional Cak. 
Supptied by: 

HB Marketing Ltd 
UnilS.PoyieM 
Newlands Drive 
ColnbrDok 
Slough SL30DX 
w 0753686000 



,£159.9S 



CHECKOUT 

Professional Calc 



Speed • • • • • 

still probably tbe fastest Amiga 'sheet 

around. 

Ease of Use • • • • • 

Supreme - if only everything on tfie Amiga 
were this simple. 

Functions • • • • C 

Sufficient for a vast range of applications. 

Documentation • • • • O 

Beautifully laid out, but a little too sparse 
for beginners. 

Graphics • • • O O 

Easy to access, but limited for a power 
spreadsheet. 

Value • • • • O 

High price, but high performance too. 

Overall rating • • • • o 

A worthy successor to TVie Advantage. 



134 



AJMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



9^^l 




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This handy little modem will get 
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This excellent 

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The Hyundai modem Is an 

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Plug it into your pnnter port, 
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TECHNOSOUND TURBO 





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Miocsoft-MS-DOS. 
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Why stick wriYfi an Amiga ^^hen 
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■^* ^ ' COmpanOlllTy plug-ln card for the A1500/A2000/A300 series. It comes with 1Mb of extra memory, too 

METAMORPHOSE YOUR MACHINE 



The KCS Power PC Board was the 
first of the PC emulators available for 
the Amiga 500. More recently a 
version has been released on a plug- 
in card for use with the A1500 and 
upwards range of Amigas. 

The board uses an NEC V30 
processor, equivalent to an Intel 
8088 as used in the IBM XT and its 
clones. The board comes with 1Mb of 
RAM. Of this, 0.5Mb is given over to a 
private PC RAM disk, while the other 
0.5Mb can be accessed by either the 
Amiga or PC. In PC mode on a base 
Amiga, there is 704K of free memory 
with a further 192 K configured as 



extended memory (EMS). 

Installing the Powerboard in an 
A500 is a snap. Just unplug your 
machine, remove the trapdoor 
expansion cover, plug the card in and 
you're ready to go. Preferences can 
be set up with the supplied 
installation software. 

The board will emulate several PC 
screen modes: MDA, CGA, Tandy, 
Hercules, and 16 colour EGA and VGA 
at a resolution of up to 640x480 
pixels. 

Most popular Amiga hard disks are 
supported by the board, including 
Commodore's A590, the GVP Impact 



and the Supra. 3.5" 720K and 5.25" 
360K floppies are also supported. 

Serial mouse emulation is 
supplied via the Amiga's standard 
mouse. The Amiga's senal port can 
be accessed by DOS for use by 
modems and so forth. 

The system is ideai for users who 
need to run PC applications and who 
don't want to go to the expense of 
buying a PC. UK-based Bitcon's 
technical support line makes the 
Power PC Board an even more 
attractive proposition. And, because it 
is a complete PC in its own right, ail 
upgrades are software-based. 



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AMOS COMPILER 

AMOS 

AMOS is one of the 

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serious programs, either. 

AMOS COIVIPILER 

AMOS programs are pretty test, but 
if you feei tlie ne«d for even more 
speed, tlieti tlie AMOS Compiler is 
for you. Your programs will become 
stand-alone applications, independent 
of the AMOS interpreter. 



OEVPAC 3 



HiSoft's Devpae 3 Is 
probably the most 
advanced assembly 

language 
programming 
system you can buy j 
for your Amiga. Mot 

only does it come 
with a fully- 
featured 
assembler with 
macro support, 
but it also 
Includes HiSoft's 
editor and debugging 
program MonAm. Commodore's 
header files are supplied, so you can 
create Amiga applications immediately. 




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INTUITION: A PRACTICAL AIVIIGA PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE 

BY MIKE NELSW - KUMA PUBLICATIONS 

Use of Intuition, the Amiga's graphical interface, is 

essential for 0vlng your programs that professional look 

and maintaining compatibility across different versions of 

tlie operating system. This book shows you how, with 

sections on screens and windows, communications, menus, 

gadgets and requesters. 

PROGRAM DESIGN TECHNIQUES FOR THE AMIGA BY PAUL 

OVERAA - KUMA PUBLICATIONS 

if you've ever written reams of code only to find that It 

doesn't work and you can't And th« bugs, then this l>ook Is 

for you. It shows you how to design your programs before 

typing them In, ensuring more reliable and efficient code. 

MARK SMIDDY'S LITTLE BLUE WORKBENCH 2.0 BOOK - 

KUMA PUBUCATIONS 

Mark Smiddy, probably one of the most knowtedgeable 

Workbench gurus, brings you this guide to the Amiga's 

operating system. Handy tips include how to maKe a iaoot 

disk, how to set up a printer with the right driver, and how to 

customise your startuphsequence, with extensive examples. 



HISOR PASCAL 



At last there's a version of this 

popular programming language 

for the Amigal Pascal is 

popular throughout the 

academic worid for its clarity 

and precision, so much so 

that it has been taken up by 

large portions of the 

commercial sector. Rnd 

out why it has done so 

well with HiSoft's 

blihdingly fast version, 

Highspeed Pascal. A 

full set of files are included for 

accessing the Amiga's operating system 

as well as an integrated editor and a debugger, 

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HISOFT P 



C PT V 



Multimedia '92, held at 
Wembley 2 in mid- 
June was one of the 
best exhibitions I've 
ever visited and over the past five 
years I must have been to them all. 
I have to admit some of them have 
Involved nothing more than grabbing 
a quick train to London, snatching 
every press release I could find and 
reading them up on the way home 
but this show had me gawking at 
stuff for a good eight hours. Over 70 
exhibitors were showing off their 
wares and while most of these were 
PC-based, there were a few Amiga 
GDTV set-ups away from the main 
Commodore stand. 

Now multimedia, whatever you 
might thinly of the term, is pretty 
fascinating stuff, so much so that 
most purveyors of its hardware seem 
to spend most of their time figuring 
how to get it to work faster rather 
than concluding what they actually 
want to use it for. Loads of 
applications come tumbling out of 
the ether of course - desktop TV, 
video e-mait, interactive training, 
point of sale, even virtual reality. And 
there's loads of whizzo add-on cards, 
touch screens, hi-res monitors, laser 
disk systems and video cameras all 
waiting to be hooked up together. 

BE A DEVELOPER 

But as I said, the applications arena 
is wide open because the technology 
is still in its infancy. It's almost as 
though multimedia is at the same 
stage as computers were, say, ten 
years or so ago - before someone 
had the bright idea that you could 
actually use them to write a letter to 



CDTV INTERPLAY 

Leading CDTV systems engineers, 
Optonrca has announced an August 
launch for its interplay authoring 
system. Billed as 'a multimedia 
authoring environment for non- 
technical producers... who require 
the production of professional 





The Amiga CDTV as an Enhanced 
QWERTY keyboard, disk drive and 

applications without the normal 
excessive learning curve and 
development costs', Interplay uses a 
desktop publishing style front-end to 
make it relatively easy for would-be 
CDTV authors to build applications by 
laying out multimedia productions as 
series of pages containing media 
clips. The system comes with a low 
overhead runtime player and a 
motion video playback simulator. It 



Multimedia Computer with a 
Inft'a-red mouse 



STILL NO A570 



Although there's still no sign of it, Commodore is confidently predicting sales 
of 100,000 A570 CD-ROM drives before the end of the year. A £399 price 
point now seems likely since the drive has been upgraded to include RAM: 
expansion and built-in hard disk. But at least Commodore is keeping the ball 
rolling. It's just announced a new bundle for GDTV - the Enhanced 
Multimedia Computer, or as it's known in the trade - The Multimedia Pack. 
This consists of a CDTV, keyboard, mouse and disk drive for £599. CDTV 
product manager, Gary Lewis, claims the bundle sold 6-7000 units in its first 
two months on sale in Germany. So CDTV has now come full circle - whereas 
once it was pitched as a machine with no connection whatsoever with 
computers, it then became the Amiga CDTV and now the EMC, A year sure is 
a long time in Commodore computing. 



someone. So the fact that there were 
a number of off-the-shelf authoring 
systems available for the Amiga 
CDTV is not only encouraging but just 
goes to show that if you want to 
reach 1.2 million users in the UK, 
many of whom will be buying a A570 
CD-ROM drive when it arrives, you 
could do worse than to buy such a 
system now and do the business 
with a market just dying for a new 
product. 



will handle sampled audio files, ANIM 
animations, ILBM pictures in ail 
modes, VideoStream motion clips, 
SMUS music files and multi-font text 
support. But no price is fixed as yet 
though. More information from Lee 
Gibson, Optonica, 0455 558282 

SCALA MULTIMEDIA 2.00 

What many consider to be the 
premier multimedia presentation 
package for the Amiga, Sca/a, has 



now been upgraded with advanced 
sound/graphics synchronization, 
improved animation loading and 
more than 25 new visual effects. 
Commodore claims Scala is the top- 
selling multimedia authoring package 
on any platform in Europe and has 
set the standards by which all others 
follow. With Scala Multimedia 2.00 
available for £395 ex VAT, sound, 
music, video and graphics can now 
be timed In seconds and frames 
while animations can be loaded 
directly from a disk as they are 
played thus enabling a 16Mb 
animation to play back on a 3Mb 
machine with instant access. 
Soundtracks can be added to 
animations without any reduction in 
the time of playback. Video 
manipulation techniques have also 
been enhanced with effects such as 
flips, flows, rolls and stretches now 
possible. Up to 112 slides can be 
viewed simultaneously on-screen 
using Scala's Shuffler with the user 
able to edit and shuffle the sequence 
of slides for presentation with the 
click of a mouse. The package's 
built-in infociiannel module allows 
Sca/a-based presentations to be 
distributed to an unlimited number of 
remote sites via telephone or data 
broadcast links. 

VIDEOSTREAMING 

A stereo audio sampler, real time 
image digitlser and professional 
video deck controller along with 
production and editing software for 
the Amiga and CDTV has also been 
announced by Optonica. Although it's 



WHIRL 



Andy Storer visits 
Multimedia '92 
and comes ay^ay 
yvith news of the 
latest CDTV 
authoring systems 



a touch pricey at, ahem, £2500, 
VideoStream is targeted at 
multimedia title developers and 
requires an Amiga 1500, 2000 or 
3000 with 2Mb RAM, hard disk and 
video deck. All video recorders 
conforming to Sony's 9-pin serial 
protocol - covering a range of high- 
band U-Matic, Mil and S-VHS decks - 
and offering perfect freeze frame and 
frame advance are supported. With a 
fully automated front-end, WYSIWYG 
previewing, ARexx compatibility and 
on-board runtime player, 
VideoStream offers point and click 
video and audio sampling. Used In 
conjunction with Optonica' s 
/rj(e/p/sy authoring system, motion 
video files can be incorporated into 
CDTV titles via a 'video from hard 
disk' simulator. Video and audio 
portions can be fine out via 
VideoStreaWs built-in SMPTE 
timecode generator, f^ 

THE TOP TEN 

CD TITLES 

ON THEIR WAY 



PD SHAREWARE 

HOME OFFICE 

CINEMABILIA 

DISTANT SUNS 

NORTH POLAR EXPEDITION 

NEW YORK CITY 

MEDIALEXICON 

PROWRITE/FLOW/DESiGN 

WORKS 

MUSICOLOR 

FIDO FAX 

...more Info next month 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



READER ADS 



Shopper Reader Ads 

•«• Or hoysf you can reach 50,000 fellow Amiga oy^ners for only £5 



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] D|»k Issue 2. TwcKlish 
magazine, packed with even more 
reviews, news, games, cheats, music, 
PO, programs and utilities, send 
£2.50 to R Wild, 8 Cranleigh Place. 
Whittey Bay. IME25 9UD. 
personal 



PERSONAL 



EKchiii^ AmtCB 50O public domain. 
Demos, music, etc; tor /our used 
Mercury phonecards. Regular contacts 
wanted, David Jamas, PO Sox 1154, 
London W3SPZ. 

QFA Basic; if you use GFA, why not 
contact Ttie Fomm. Both beginners 
and advanced users v^lcome. Also 
advanced tutorial disk avalEabie. Ring 
John any time on 0768 S91197, 



FOR SALE 



A500 Pliu>. 2 meg RAM, 52 meg 
Quantum with rnonitor gnd printer . 
Also selection of software £S50 
OVNO. * 0606 594717. 

Amiga AGOO, 4 Mb, A590 20Mb H/D, 
twin floppy, modulator, mouse and 
mat, cover, loads of disks, original 
boxes, manuals etc, £500 or will 



split. Call Ken after 6pm 0929 
462634 (Dorset) 



r version 2,0 only two 
weeks old. Fully guarartteed, free 
Mastersound included. Will deliver In 
London area. £S5. Contact Bany 071 
2673031. 

Epson LQ 2500 Printer, manual and 
spare ribbons included, £150 or best 
offer may exchange for A590, * 051 
428 5429 after 6pm. 

Amiga 1500, i034S monitor, loads 
cf software, kernel plus abacus 
manuals, magazines. Excellent 
condition. Cost over £1300 new, sell 
for £660 ono. Contact Richaiil Vina, 
Tadpole Cottage, Eardisland, 
Herefordshire, HR6 9AR, 

A3(KK), lOQMb, em RAM. 1950 
Monitor, 25 mhz, speakers inci 8 
months oJd, plus software. Quick 
sale. £2300 ono. Ask for Pam. « 081 
886 8666 evenings. 

AmlEa A500 plus (Apni '92), GVP 
S2Mb hard drive inci, 4Mb RAM 
(bought with above). Cortex 4Mb 
eirtemai RAM expansion (upgradeable 
to 8Mb) for A500/A500+/ AlOOO 
witti own PSU (Brand new), Philips 
CM8832II colour monitor. Star 9 pin 
colour printer and ribbons, Cumana 
second drive, GFA Basic 3,5, Amos 
1.3, Amos compiler, Amos 3I>, Protexl 
5, SAS *c' compiler 5.1, Deluxe Paint, 
Pboton Paint 2, over 11 games 
(unused). Worth over £2000, Will 
split. Ring for more details. Sensible 
offers, 11 081 427 6511 evenings. 

> studio: Imagine, 



Deluxe video III, Video Titter 3D, 
Videoscape 3D, Di^Painit 3, Deluxe 
Paint III, Fantavision, Photon Paint II,. 
original disks, manuals. All boxed, 
£135, •■'0298 22862, 

A500 1Mb 1,3 Extra drive, hand 
scanner ar>d software. DPaInt 4. Real 
D>Engs, Safari Studio, 30 Anr^iga mags 
and software. All manuals, joystick, 
mouse, dust cover, PD software 
various games £650. » 0359 40620 
evenings. 

Anttga SOO 1. 3, mouse, Joysticks, 

expansion, modulator, external drive, 
action replay, rombo colour digitizer, 
Panasonic camera. Worth £650 sell 
£400. GVP 52 Mb with 2Mb. 3300 
KXP 1124 printer £130 - " 0752 
670880, 

A500 1.S Mb, UpgradeVortex 40Mb 
hard drive Midi Interface Music-X, 10 
games Sonlx-2.0 Xerox 4020 Ink-Jet 
Printer (4024 colours), Panasonic KXP 
, lOSQ Dot Matrix Printer. All manuals 
included £800 ono, Chns 446521, 

GVP S(^l controller for 

A1500/A2000. V3,07 Autobooting 
Fast roms. Manual and software 
bargain at £115, Vidi Amiga, Vidi 
Chrome, Vidi RGB, The Complete 
video digitiser, bargain; £93. " 081 
395 2S25. 

CSAesoao Acceleratoi with MMU, 

68882, 4 Mb Dram, 512K SRAM, 
Software/ hardware suitable to 
68000 mode. Fits A5000, A1500, 
A2000, Boxed with manual. Absolute 
bargain at £880. t 081 3952525, 

avp SCSI controller for A1500/ 



A2000. V3.07 autobooting 
Faastroms. Manual and software/ 
Bargain at £115 vidi amiga, vidi 
chrome, vidi RGB, TTie 'Complete 
video" digitiser, bargain: £95 ■» 081 
395 2525, 



1 SOO 1Mb chip, manuals 
software extras original packaging. 
Also 52Mb Quantum hard-drive with 
SCSI, 8 meg unpopulated RAM-board 
software installed. Both under year 
old £7000,00 ono, will separate. 
"0332 571177, 

Amvtrad OMP 2160 Dot-matrix printer 
£75 orto, TV modulator. New action 
replay M,H, II £45 ono, WTS 512K 
expansion £15, new cumana drive, 
£45, All In full working or^er. Try 
before you buy 0516 258994 4pm-f. 

A590 hani drtve witti 2Mb disks and 
manual £200. Dave 0252 519092 
evenings, 

Afniga aoftwsn Drakken £6, Silent 

samice II £10 F19 £8 Devpac 3 £30, 
F151I £10 Kings Quest 5+ Hint Book, 
£15 Thundertiawk £6 Heropuest + 
Data £11, " 0622 554102, 

A590 hanI drive with two meg fitted 
£250, Philips 8833 £180, Star LCIO 
colour printer, £130 all ono, 
Numerous mags plus disks offers, 
■^ 0455 610879 

Amiga AEOO A5go 20Mb Hard drive 
with 1Mb RAM £200, 0483 772739 
evenings and 0252 24461 ext 2851 

daytime, 

DeluxePaInt 2 (No Box) £5, 
DeluxePaint 3 £10, both Include 



It's only £5 to sell your used hardware and software in Amiga Shopper 



Sell your excess hardware and software with Amiga Shopper Reader 
Adverts, Just fill in the form and send it to us along w\Vr\ a cheque 
(made payable to Future Publishing) or postal order for £5, But BE 
WARNED. This magazine is not a forum for selling pirate software or 
other illegal goods. Software must include all issue disks, manuals and 



a signed statement that all other copies have been destroyed. Please 
advise us if you are offered pirate or copied software by advertisers. All 
ads are at;cepted in good faith. The editor reserves the right to refuse 
or amend ads. We accept no responsibility for typographical errors or 
tosses arising from the use of this service. 



Trade ads will not be accepted, Including anyone advertising the sale of PD software. 



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manuals (no covers] all disks. ^ 0954 
780856 after 7pm, 

Amiga 500, Commodore model 1081 
monitor, 1 meg, 20 games, joystick, 
mouse, manuals all necessary leads 
in mint condition cost £900 sell for 
£450, " Elliot 0745 334035 
weekdays after 6pm, 

Amiga 2000 with XT tiridgeboard (IBM 
compatible) 20Mb hard drive loads of 
software £695 ono. Also patel Action 
Replay £30, For more information 
B 081 959 7002. 

Amiga AaOOO Quantum 40Mb HD 
2091 controller at BB 20Mh HO 2068 
RAM Card 3Mb RAM 108450 Monitor 
Mouse KYBRD various software 
manuals £1700 ■» 0733 371304. 

S8020 (SMIlI) + 66881 (20tvlhz) CSA 
midget racer for A500, A1500, 
A2000, Hts in CPU socket. £90 ono. 
For mors infomiatlon « Richard 0206 
854946 after 7pm, 

ColOiJr bunt 24.bit grapfticsboxfor 

all Amigas 16,8 million coioursi No 
special monitor needed. Pure RGB 
output Including CB Paint software 
only £300! •» Tony 02264 350125, 

Haidwan: Citizen KQP40 24.pin 
printer. Audio engineer + (SOMhz 
stereo + software) and Triiogic mono 
ssampiens, sound-blaster. Software: 
Pretext V 5,0, DPaint III, Sonix, 
distant. Suns, Amos V1.3. Loads of 
programming manuals, * Nick 0274- 
621118, 

GVP Quantum hard disk + RAiM card 
52Mb ft A20O0. 25MhJ 68030 
accelerator with 4 Mb Dram GVP 
A3001 Kit, ysn Board 51/4 drive all 
complete boxed £600, Many extras. 
After 6pm, » 027664298. 

Original Amiga software in great 
condition Populous II £15, Jimmy 
White's snooker £15, UTOPIA £14. 
Allen breed £13. Wonderland 14. 
Supenna^ £14. t» Steve on 
Blimlngham 021 743 9468. 

Stow uan TV for the Amiga for sale . 
8 sees. Ml , etc £145. Also eolourpic 
real time digitiser comp and S- 
VHSinputs plus PSU. £275. v after 
6pm. Frank 0279 420755. 

Yamalia elettronlc keyboard PSR 38 
61 keys Midi out/In 5050 voices, 
split, auto chord and keyboard 
percussion, 24 accompaniment styles 
manual, power adaptor, music book, 
£190 ono. " 081 8708084, 081 
87033034 after 9pm. 

Amiga SOO hard drive. XETEC 6SMb 
fast SCSI drive with power supply. 
SMb Fast RAM, SIMM expansion 
board populated with 2Mb. Boxed with 
all manuals £300. For this essential 
equipment " Dave 0793 7832553. 

Amiga 500 1Mb RAM 1,3 extra 
floppy drive dust cover games, utilities 
software every thing boxe<J as new 
mirirt condition would sv^p fpr A1500 
or £250 cash, •» 0246 417807, 

HAM-E Hhre* 24 Bit graphics card. 
Officially modified for use with 
Genlock hardware. Cost £400 will sell 
for £300 ono. n Robert on 0733 
535888 ext 2251 off ce twurs only. 

GVP Impact vision £1200.00 with TV 
Paint Rendale 8802 fieniock £350 
Rendale 8S02 Sen lock £300 Sculpt 
4D £100 imagine £100. " Joe 0279 
730020. 

SDftwai«: Spectracolor, lights, 
camera action, Animagic, video titler, 
provideo companion, digiPaint 3, 
Kindwor^s. Still boxed, £25 each. For 
info 1 St Albans 0727 868415 



10 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1992 




Ian Wrlgley puts ffie neiv version 
of SID under scrutiny^ discovers a 
new^ collection of first-rate fonts 
as v^e// as picking out the best of 
the latest PD and sharev^are 

don't tell 



nrTFiTi 



by Timm Martin 



Thts month, I'm looking at 
the new version of SID, 
pluB (of GO jfse) the best of 
the PD and shareware 
avaliable at the moment. Strangely 
enough, there seems to be a little 
mora software out there - strangely, 
because normally sumnter Is the 
'dead' time. Pertiaps It's tiecause of 
the interest generated by the new 
A600 - or perhaps It's because 
programmers are afraid of the suni 

Anyway, eyes down for a full 
house of serious PD software... 

Well, it's finally arrived. After a 
one-and-a-half year wait, Timm Martin 



mm 



KELP 



aiilT 



What [troif tn 4a y«u uh t« I ist tb* coitttnti «P 
LHAfX srchlvfd fl(»? 

CB« >ur« ta *ii ttit neCBHirv arfwianti to list 
*n irchiwt, iHch » *c:llMrt t*.> 

|c;lh«pc li 

OK I NONE 




SID 2.0'i QuIckPreft program configures the main program and copies flies 
into the correct area of your system. Prompts suggest reasonable responses 
to many of the questions 



— puBqtJMymN 

much RAM; Trial, which Is the one 
you'll find distributed on bulletin 
boards and from PD houses, and 
which is fully featured except that it 
doesn't save any user preferences; 
and Professional, which Is the 
version you'll get when you pay your 
$25 shareware fee. It's registered in 
your name, and allows you to save 
preferences so that on launching it's 
configured to your personal tastes. 

SORTING OUT SID 

To configure SID, you need to run a 
program called QuickPrefs, which 
asks a string of about 20 questions, 
such as which text editor, graphics 
viewer and so on you use. Then, 
theoretically, all the correct files are 
copied to the correct places on your 
hard disk, so that the program will 
launch automatically. Unfortunately, 
the version I received {from the C IX 
bulletin board) didn't seem to be too 
interested in doing that, so I bed to 
specify the paths for things like the 
help files myself. And I couldn't get 
the program to run from its icon - 
which uses the IconX program to 
launch StD proper - because it was 
desperately looking for a utility called 
'brun', which I don't appear to have 
in my system. 

Still, back to the Shell I went (a 
little peeved now, but willing to be 
impressed), and launched S(D from 




has managed to solve a)! the 
problems with SID 2.0, and has 
released the trial version to an eager 
Amiga world. For those of you who 
haven't come across version 1.06 of 



BEGINNERS 



WhatisPD? 

PDIsagenenri 
tsnn which many peopie 
incorrectiy use to refer to all 
fre«ly-iHstr1biitalile software. In 
tact, PD (which stands for Public 
Domdn) software Is only one 
brarwh of this af»a; the other 
main one Is shareware. 

Essentially, PD software may 
be coptod and i»ed by anyone, 
aKhot^ some authors place 
restrtcthms such as not allowing 
a PD library to charge more than 
a cartahi amount (or the disk. 

Sharew»e, on the ottwr hand, 
ahoutd be treated more like 
CMnmerdti software. Although 
you are allowed to copy and pass 
arotmd shareware pn^iams, If 
you like one tiwn you should pay 
the requested fee to the autiwr - 
It's normally onty £15 or Ims, and 
often entitles you to an upgraded 
verskm or a printed manual. 
Pa^ng your shareware fees 
encourages software authors to 



programs -and 
If they don't, the 

Amiga scene will be a poorer 

place. 

Can I paas othor peoplB cof^BS of 
PD? 

Yes - tiiat's the way that It gets 
to a wide audience. Just make 
sure that you have fcriknived the 
author's tequlrements for 
dtstrlbutfon - nonndKy that you 
don't charge more than a certain 
amount for the iHsk, or that you 
make sure that all the 
documentation is included on the 
disk. 

You can also pass on 
shareware - but not aiv 
registered copies of programs. 

If, when you pay your 
shareware fee, the author sends 
yoti an Improved version of the 
program, then be careful not to 
^ve that out. Only pass on 
unregtetered ^weware. 



SISI 




■^tWt ILlSTIffiC 
BY HRtlEl MMRC 



SID'S display Is... er... crowded, to say the least. And behind one set of 
buttons, accessed by right cllckine, Is another set. All fully customlsable. 
It's enough to scare the most tedila of users 



the program (why not?l), SID is the 
de facto standard Amiga utility for 
getting around your hard bisk. 
Although other programs have 
appeared since SID first hit the 
scene, many of which are superior in 
one way or another, SID still has 
thousands of devotees around the 
world. Version 2.0 was written to 
update the program and, according 
to the author, to make it the ultimate 
utility. So, the question is, does it 
live up to that aim? 

The program comes in three 
different versions: Personal, a 
compact version that contains the 
basic features of the program but 
that is designed for those with not 



there. And then ran screaming from 
the room. When you launch SID, you 
realise just how many features have 
been packed in. There are buttons 
everywhere, and right-clicking on one 
set of buttons reveals another set - 
there apparently wasn't enough room 
on a standard screen to fit them all 
in. 

Being one of those people who 
don't read manuals unless 
absolutely forced to do so, I 
immediately launched in to the 
program, clicking and seeing what 
random commands from the menu 
do. At least, I did for a few minutes, 

nmlimwd n p«gt 143 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 





PD 



ONLY 99P 



ONLY TEL; 0222 705044 (9am - 4pm) PER DISK[ 



— ^^gj^jygjg^^^r-^^jjgjj^jTs^^ 



D264 - Shark Animation (IMeg) 
D278 - Madonna Hanky Panky (P) 
D240 - At The Movies (2 Meg) 
D279 - More Aerotoons (IMeg) (P) 
D280 - Amy VS. Walker Anim 

(1 Meg) 
D294 - Life Of Brian (?) (2 disks) 
D297 - Anti Lemtnin Demo ( 2 Meg) 

(2 disks) 
D298 - Robocop Animation (1 Meg) 

(P) 
D300 - Silents: Ice Demg 
D254- Virtual World (IMeg) 
D150 - Windsurfer Animation (P) 
D315 - Mr Potato Head ( 1 Meg) (P) 
D316 - Creature Comforts Demo 
D318 - 3D PinbaJl Animation (1 Meg) 

(P) 
DOOl- Walker 1(1 Meg) 
D002- Walker 2(1 Meg) 
D003 - Walker 3 (1 Meg) 
D004 - Cool Cougar (1 Meg) 
D012 - Rebels Megademo 
D014 - Space Ace Demo 
D023 - Stealthy 2 Anim (1 Meg) 
D028 - Budbrain Mega Demo 

(2 disks) 
D047 - RAF Megademo ( 2 disks) 
D045 - Arse Wipe Advert 
DOS 9 - Red Sector Megademo 

(2 disks) 
D062 - Red Sector Cebit 90 
D077 - Good Morning Vietnam 
D088 - Silents Megademo 
D095 - Outsiders Acid Demo 
Dl 15 - Vision Mega Demo 4 
D127- Chubby Brown 
D134- Garfield Demo 
D147 - Neighbours Slideshow 
D148-VizSlideshow 
D151 - Robocop 2 Slideshow 
D153 - Epic Game Demo (1 Meg) 
D158- Operation Vark 
D160 - Exodus Real 3D (1 Meg) 
D163 - Probe Sequence 
D164 - Slycath Amazing Demo Comp 
D168 - Horizon Mega Demo 
D169 - Budbrain Mega Demo 2 
D176 - Jasper Carrot Demo 
D184 - Dragons Lair 2 Demo 
D185 Wrath Of The Demon Demo 
Dl 87 - Batman The Movie Demo 
D251 - Decaying Paradise (1 Meg) 
D264 - Hardwired (1 Meg) 
D225 - Phenomena Enigma 

(1 Meg) 
D231 - KGB Mega Demo (2 disks - 

IMeg) 
D237 - Silents - Global Trash 
D240 - Vic Reeves Demo ( 2 disks) 
D241 - Ray Of Hope ( 2 disks) 
D247 - DMob It's A Lame Demo 
D284 - Odyssey - Alcatraz (5 disks) 
D312 - Anarchy - Seeing Is Believing 
D325 - Hynautic Hammer 
D327 - Greatest Demos Vol 1 
D330 - Greatest Demos Vol 2 
D333 - Greatest Demos Vol 3 
D345 - It Came From The Desert 

Demo 
D346 - Harry Meets A ST Owner 
D347 - Shuttle Cock Animation 
D354 - NASA Slideshow 
D357 - KGB Mega Demo 2 
D359 - Kefrens GuEudian Dragon 
D370 - Tenninator 2 Slide Show 
D379 - Navy Seals SlideShow 
D388 - Ttack Ro Vectra 



MOOl - Seriously Good Music I 

M002 - Seriously Good Music 2 

M003 - Seriously Good Music 3 

MO 11 -DMOB Music 2 

M012 - DMOB Music 4 (2 disks) 

M014 - Rebel Megablast 

MO 16 - Micromix 2 

M022 ■ Amiga Charts Mix 3 

M029 - D-Mob Music 3 

M023 - Titan Trax 1 

M026 - Amiga Charts Mix 5 

M029 - D-MOB Music 3 

M034 - Arnie Swarzenaggar Total 

Remix (2 disks) 
M035 - Digital Concert 2 
M036 - Digital Concert 3 
M037 - Digital Concert 4 
M038 - Digital Concert 5 
M039 - Digital Concert 6 
M040 - RAF Megamix 1 
M042- Bat Dance Remix 
M049 - Ben Elton (xxx) 
M057 - DMOB Music 1 
M081- Flash 2 (disks) 
Ml 02 - Debbie Gibson's Electric 

Youth (2 disks) 
Ml 14 - Betty Boo - Doing The Do 
M121- Band Aid 11 (2 disks) 
M122- RAF Beat Thiz 1 
M123-RAFBeatThiz2 
M124-RAFBeatThiz3 
M125 - RAF Megamix 2 (2 disks) 
Ml 26 - Amiga Charts Mix 2 
M 1 27 - Amiga Charts Mix 6 
M134 - Miami Vice Theme (4 disks) 
Ml 36 - Laurel And Hardy (2 disks) 
M141 - JM Jarte - Definitive 
M143 - CD Plaver Demo (1 Meg) 
M144- Flash! Queen (2) 
Ml 59 - Techotronic Remix 
M161 - Crusaders Bacteria 
Ml 83 - ScooPex Beast Sonix 
Ml 57 - Digital Concert 5 (VI) 
M151 - Crusaders; Genesis 
Ml 32 - Depeche Mode Mix Disk 
M156 - Seal Crazy Remix (1 Meg) 
Ml 85 - 1 Think We're Alone 
Ml 86 - Everybodv Dance Now 
Ml 87 - Doing The Do (Remix) 
Ml 89 - Amazing Tunes (1 Meg) (3 disks) 
Ml 90 - Move Any Mountain 
M192-Charly Remix 
Ml 93 - What Can You Do For Me? 
Ml 94 - Bruno Music Box (2 disks) 
M195 - Manic Raves (2 disks) 
M199 - Star Trek Theme 
M201 - Journey Into Sound 
M203 - Looney Tbnes 
M205 - Vogue CD Player 
M206 - Flashing Bytes 
M208 - Remember The Itme (Remix) 
M209 - Enjoy Live 
M211 - Rave Around The Clock 
M212- Raver's Dehght 
M2 1 6 - Genesis 
M217 - Dirty Digit Songs 
M22S - Phil Collins 
M226 - The WaU By Pink Floyd (6 disks) 
M229 - Desire Lego Land ' 
M230 - Manic Raves Remix 
M234 - 808 State Remix 
M241 - The Equiliser 
M246 - Music Dream 2 
M247 - Four Seasons 
M24a - Flash Team Music 
M249 - Move Any Mountain 
M251 - Roger Ramjet 
M253 - Crazy Looney Hines 
M260 - Old Soul Remix 
M265 - Stand By Me 
M269 - Mv Giri 
M271 - Simply Red-Stars (2 disks) 



- ]^» UTILITIES •J - 

UOOl - Sound Ti'acker Collection 

(3 disks) 
U012 - Mega Utilities (175 utilities) 
U024 - Sid Cli Utility 
U039-AmibaseV3,76 
U042 - Front Disk 
U043 - Kim Database 
U059 ~ Clip Art 
U062 - Ultimate PD Copiers + 

Virus Killers Disk 
U069 - Demolisher Utilities 
U071-D-Copy 
U073 - Hard Disk Utilities 
U074 - Easy Back Up And View 80 
U075 - Pascal C Compiler 
U078 - A500 + Utihties (For The 

A500 +only) 
U080 - Tlirbotitle 
U081 -S-Movie 
LI082 - Graphs 
U083- Drawmap V3.1 
U085 - RBase H V5 
U086 - Text Engine V3 
U025 - Sid VI 6 
U091 - Opti Utilities 2 
U093 - PCQ Pascal 
U094-M.U.KV2.1 
U095 - Zerovirtis + Bootx V4.30 
U096 - ST Emulator 
U098 - Amibase V3 6.7 
U099- M-CAD 
UlOl-C Manual V2.00 
U103 - Iconmania 
Ut04-Messvsid 11 
U105- Insanity Tools 
U106 -ImploderV4.0 
U107.N-CommVl.921 
U108- Amiga MCAD 
U109 - D Paint Cartoon Brushes 
Ul 1 1 - D Paint Font Disks (4 disks) 
UH2 - Ham Radio UUlities (5 disks) 
Un3 - Programming Disk (2 disks) 
Ul 17 - Sound Applications (2 disks) 
Uil9 - Video Applications (2 disks) 
U128- The Comms Disk 
U129 - D- Paint Clip Art ( 2 disks) 
Li 130 - Video Graphics (4 disks) 
U132- Genealogy (3 Meg) 
U066-C-Light(TMeg) 
U135. New Super Killers 
UBS ■ Electrocad VI .4 Demo 
U139- Spectra Paint V3.0 
U140 - Language Tutor 
U145 ■ Database Master 2.0 
U146 - Dynamite Brush Fonts 
U147 - Textplus Word Processor 
U149-Med^V3.10 
U151-DiceV2.06A 
U152 - Pagesetter Clip Art ( 8 disks) 
U154 ■ Night Flyers Utilities IV 
U156 - Vector ball Editor (1 Meg) 
U157- Antivirus V3. 14 
U158 - Kids Paint 
U159 - Text Engine 
U160 - Windows Bench 
U161 ■ PDS Utilities Nol Printing Udlities 
U163-NCommeVl,921 
U164 - Work Bench 2+ Work Station 
UI65 - Video Screens 
Ut67 - Cursor Basic Compiler 
UI68 -JRCommV1.02 
UI7I - Super C. Commands 
U172-P.SuiteV1.4 
UI73 - The Ripper Guide 
U174 - Jam Ripper V1.7 Jam Cracker VI 
U175 - Beatrix Potter Clip Art 
U 1 77 - Thief Sound Ripper V3 .0 
UI78 - Faulty Towers Samples 
U179- News Flash 21 
VIS3- Swag No 4: Fractals 
U184-Littie Bench 
U18S - PlotUng + Graphics: Plot-X-Y 



U186- Draw Map V3.1 

GOOl . Star Trek 3 (2 disks) 

G006 - Breakout Construction Kit 

G008 - Board Games (Monopoly etc) 

G014 - Buck Rogers 

G015 - Star Ti-ek ( 3 disks, 1 Meg) 

G016- Tennis (1 Meg) 

G020 - Itain Set 

G024 - Pipeline 

G026 - IVeasure Hunt 

G031-Drip! 

G033- Jeopard (IMeg) 

G034 - Dragon Cave 

G037 - Seven Tiles 

G038 - Pom Pom Gunner 

G043 - Mental Image Games Disk 

G056 - Strategy Games 

G057 - Simpsons Game 

G059 - Bionix II (1 Meg) 

G062-AticAtac(l Meg) 

G065 - Battle Pong (1 Meg) 

G066 - Frantic Freddie 

G068 - Air Ace II 

G069 - Down Hill Challenge 

G070 - Llamatron 

G071- Sky Flyer 

G074 - Revenge Of Mutant Camels 

G075 - Jet man 

G077 - Asteroids 

G078 - T^vinn-is 

G079 - Card Games 

G080 - Battle Cards 

G081 -Mind Games 21 

G083 - Sword Of The Warlock 

G084 - Sohtaire 

G086 - Scramble 

G087 - Dungeon On Nadroj 

G088 - Royal Boulder Dash 

G090 - Sub Attack 

G092 - Mega Ball 

G093 - Air Warrior 

G095 - Super Skoda Challenge 



^ SPECIAL * 
OFFERS 

UNBRANDED 

BLANK DISKS 

38p EACH 

DISK BOXES 

3.5" Cap 10 99p 

3.5" Cap 40 £4.00 

3.5" Cap 80 £6.50 

Mouse Mat £2.99 

1000 Disk Labels. ..£9.99 
5 I2K Memory Upgrades 

With Clock £32.50 

Without Clock £28.50 

We also stock Fred 

Fish disks 1-596 & 

T-Bag 1-59 



I^ease make cheques and postal orders payable to: 
Ultimate PD. 

The Ulthnate PD Mag - Catalogue disk is available 
for 75p or free with orders of 2 disks or 



BFL 
t TI 



PLEASE SEND ORDERS TO: 
ULTIMATE PD 
PLAS PAMIR, PORTWAY MARINA 

PENARTH CF6 IBT 
TEL: 0222 705044 (9AM - 4PM) 



Alt disks arB99p each, some tilks are on more 
than 1 disk. 

Pkase add 50p p&p to she total order. 
European orders please add 50p per disk and ^^^^_ 
the rest of the warU add 7Sp per disk VISA 



J?!!ySJJffl!!*™ 




Alt clicking on a button In SID brings up a Requester where you can 
things like the colour, name and function that the button perfomis 



edit 



directory window. This is mentioned 
in the on-line help, but since you're 
unlikely to ever access help for the 
Parent button - It's pretty self- 
evident what it does - you may never 
find the feature. 

I have to admit that I was never a 
great fan of the original SID; it 
alv^ays seemed to me that ttiere 
were far more features than I 
needed, while the ones that I did 
want weren't intuitive or easy to use. 
Version 2.0 of the program 
introduces even more features, and 
even more customisability. If you 
liked the original, you'll love it. 
Personally, I'll stick to FileMinder 
(revieviied last month). The 'Program 



frompoH 141 



until I realised that the only way to 
have any chance of getting the most 
out of the program was to sit down 
and plough through the 
documentation. Hmmm... what 
documentation? 

In terms of actual help files, 
there doesn't seem to be much 
documentation about. However, the 
program has an excellent on-line help 
facility which just about makes up for 
this. Hitting the Help key provides 
general help (as does selecting the 
Help menu option), while holding 
Control down while clicking on any 
button brings up context-sensitive 
help on what that button does. 

BUTTON BANKS 

All buttons are totally configurable: 
just hold down the Alt key while 
clicking and a requester appears, 
asking you to specify just what the 
button does. There are two 'banks', 
each with fifty buttons, so even 
power users shouldn't run out of 
room. 

Configuring is easy; for example, 
if you don't have a hard drive named 
dh3:, but you have a floppy df2:, Alt- 
click on the DH3 button, select 
'Dirioad' as the command to be 
performed - explanatory text that 
this means "load specified directory' 
appears to help you - and select 
directory df2:. Finally rename the 
button and click OK. Simple, You 
can even define keyboard shortcuts 
for each of the buttons, If you're 
happier with the keyboard than the 
mouse. 

The menus are frightening in 
their complexity; seven of them, each 
with a multitude of entries. However, 
again, by holding down the Control 
key as you select a menu item you 
access the context-sensitive help 
which describes exactly what the 
consequences of making this choice 
will be. 

There's no denying that SID 2.0 
is powerful. Unfortunately, it's also 
very complex, and on-line help is no 
substitute for a detailed 




SID On-Ltne Mf 

is fUi sptciftes whether you want to 
verify tfie deletion of each selected 
directory: 

Ho Verify 
(deletes selected directories without 
verification. 

Verify 
I^tsptays a requester before deleting each 
directory to verify that you uant to 
delete that directory. 



m 



Holding down the Control key while you 
Requester with details about what the 

documentation fie. There are stacks 
of hidden features in the program, 
and If you don't know how to access 
them, context-sensitive help isn't 
much use. For instance, although 
there is a 'Parent' button to take you 
one step up in the directory tree, you 
can perform the same action by 
clicking just to the left of the 



select a menu Item brings up a 
menu Item actually does 

rating' for this program reflects my 
personal tastes, so you may well not 
agree with my views. But StD 2,0 is 
just too complex for someone who 
only uses a file navigation program 
as a means to an end, and not as an 
end in itself. The lack of proper 
documentation doesn't help, either. 
Program ratlnfi 6/10 



WHERE to GET IT 



Thar« mn two main ways to get hold of Amiga PD and shar«wai«: from a 
bulletin board or from a PD Itbrwy. 

The advantage of using a bulletin board is that often the latest software 
is uploaded as soon as it's available. On the down side, you need a modem 
to connect, and you'll have to pay phone charges (and sometimes a 
connection fee to the bulletin board as well). 

There are a growing number of bulletin boards wfth a wide range of Amiga 
software available for download. Check out Ol-for Amiga (071 377 1358) 
and the Cheam Amiga Bulletin Board (081 644 8714). Another good option 
is joining CIX (the Compulink information exchange), which not only has 
Amiga software but also contains conference and file areas on a wide range 
of subjects, from politics to scuba diving, biking to Science Fiction. Many of 
the Amiga S/iopper writers have accounts on CIX, so you can get first-hand 
advice on your problems, too. For more details, call CIX on 081 390 8446 
(voice) or 081 390 1255 (modem). 

If you don't want to use a bulletin board, the other way to get PD 
software Is from a PD house. Many advertise in Amiga Shopper, and you'll 
find a comprehensive list of names and addresses at the end of this article. 
Expect to pay between 99p and about £2.50 per disk - there's often a 
discount if you buy in bulk, too. 



RATING THE 
PROGRAMS 

Just to b« awkward, I use two 
{llfl^roiit rating systems. If I'm 
revtowing a single program, I 
give a 'Program rating' at the 
end. It, on the other hand, I'm 
looking at a disk full of utliKtes 
or something along those lines, 
you'll find a 'Value for money' 
rating at the end. Marks are out 
of 10. 



UTILITIES 



FILE & HD 
MANAGEMENT B 

PD Soft disk V574 

Following on from last month's 
review of a great utility disk from PD 
Soft which contained the FileMinder 
program mentioned above, I received 
File & HD Management Disk S, which 
contains more programs designed to 
ease the trials of actually using hard 
and floppy disks and keeping control 
of your files. 

This disk contains four programs: 
ATCopy, DosContral, PCExecute and 
PrFont. 

• AtCopy 

ATCopy Is a demo version of a 
commercial program, which 
"Replaces the Commodore Amiga 
Janus-Software-Parcel commands 
'ARead' and 'AWrite'." 



"DosControl wins a 
place on my hard 
disk hr its archive 
support 



// 



The documentation has been 
translated from the German by 
someone whose English leaves a 
little to be desired, but it appears to 
be a program which enables files to 
be copied between the Amiga and an 
XT or AT PC emulator card. It should 
work on an Amiga 1000, 2000, 
2500 or 3000 with such an emulator 
installed. Since my A500 Plus 
doesn't really fit those criteria, I 
moved swiftly along... 

• DosControl 

DosContot is another German 
program, and is (yet another) 
directory utility, ^ la SID. 

DosControl was written by Uwe 
Brosch, and since the menu comes 



(oatlnwil Ml i»g« MS 



AMN3A SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 




For a fast, reliable but foremost friendly service. 



AMIGA PD 

1-9 disks £1.20 
10-15 disks 99p 
15+ 90p 

FREE PROGRAMS 

Order 10 get 1 FREE 
Order 20 get 2 FREE 
Order 23 get 3 FREE 

061370 9115 

No mtniinuin order. 

All orders sent out 

the same day. 



AMOS 

APIX)14 IFF Pica Nol (Brill) + 
APD031 Screen Designer + 
APD033 Pink Goes J^t + 
APD036 Amos 1.3 Update + 
APDIOI Auto Player VI. 10 + 
APD123 Deadline + 
APD20S RDraw VI. 48 + 
APD303 Litter Busters + 
APD329 Fruit Machine II + 

UTILITIES 

U'ro46 Pendle Europa 
UT05LAinlhia3eV3.76 
UT057 A64 Emulator 
UTl 1 4 ASS Menumaker 
UT145 Vogue Utll'a (BrilJ) 
UTl 79 CU Tutorial + 
UTl 90 Video Graphics 

(3 Disks) 
UT214 Amateur Radio 

(6 Disks) 
UT237 Work Bench 2 

IA500+) only 
UT253 D-Copy 2 



GA008 
GA030 
GA067 
GA086 
GAISO 
GA182 
GA204 
GA205 
GA207 



GAMES 

Pipeline + 
Tennis + 

Tmckin {2 diaks)-)- 
Assassina 1-20+ 
Star neet + 
Killer Cars + 
Chess Tutor 11 + 
A5004- Games Pack i 
Cars Sharp + 



MUSIC 

MU017 Digital Concert 

(2 to 65 
MU025 Star Trekker 
MU034 Queen (2 Disks) 
MU055 Pro Tracker V2.00 
MU073Moiarts Flute 

Concerto 
MU077Puma Tracker (Brill) 
MU058 Mozart (2 Disks) 
MU054EFX Musk: Creator 



GRAPHICS 

001 M-Cad 
003 Print Studio + 
005 CUp-Art 1 to 13 + 
Original set uncut 
024 Colour Fonts (5 disks)* 
028 Walt Disney Clip-art* 
033 Graphics Otila + 



BUSINESS 

BU004 Clerk (BriU) + 
BU005 GenealOBr + 
BU007 Bankln' + 
BU016 Text Hus V3.00+ 
BU019 Analytlcalc V2.00 + 
BU021 AmlcashV1.0+ 
BU02S House Hold 
Inventory + 
BU026 Textenglne + 
BU031 BBase (Database)* 



SETS 

SPDOOl 
SPD002 
SFD003 
SPDOM 
SPDOOS 

sPDOoe 

SPD007 

sPDooa 

SPD009 
SPDOIO 
SPDOll 



Bc^nners 1 .|5 lUsiis - £5.80] 
Bcglnncis 2.(5 Mss - £5.801 
Clip-Alt 1.(4 disks - £4.eOI 
Clip-Art 2,(4 disks - £4.60) 
Games l..(5dislss- £5.801 
Games 2..,I5 disks £5.80) 
Clip-A]l3..(4diks-£4.6a) 
EDI (4 disks ■ £4.60) 
ED2 (4 disks - £4.60) 
Ed/Sdl (4 disks - £4.601 
Bus 1 (6 dlaka - £6.801 



WE STOCK OVER 2400 
DISKS 

including Scope. Macro 
and Topic. 



StarTronlcs 

4 Arnold Drive, 
Dioyalden, Blancheiter 
H3B SHE m^H 
VUA 

ACCESSORIES 

Large Mouse Mats .,£3.50 
Squlk Mouse £17.50 

DISK SPECIAL OFFER 

Sony Bulk £5.20 

KAOBulk £4,99 

■)■ = CompatlUe with Flo* 

PCMtage fc packing 70|» 

Add £3, IB per item for disk 

box, Plesse subEolt pn^raent 

by cheqtie or poital order 

Kdnlmum order of 3 disks 

required for ei^dlt 

can! paTineiit 

FBED PISH 1 - 840 
TSAGl -OSO 



AMIGA REPAIRS & SPARES || Sxprtss PubUc Vomaiti 



5721 Buster £16.00 

ROM V1.2 £30.00 

ROM V1.3 £30.00 

ROM V2.04 £45.00 

41256 Dram £3.00 

414256 Dram £7.50 

68000 MPU £24.00 

MSM 6242 Ctack .....El 2.00 



8371 ! Meg Agous £35.00 

8372A 1 Meg Agnus £50.00 

5719 Gary .„..£24,00 

3364 Paula £35.00 

8362 Denise £29,00 

8373Denise £39.00 

8520 CIA £17.00 

Workbench V2 Kit , £88.00 

Many other parts available 

Genuine Amiga 500 service manuals now in stock £19.95 

Avery limiteo stock of A500 + RevBAboarris E160.00 

(Rev 8A boards require Gary, Paula, Denise, BOM, MPU and 2 x 8520) 

Amiga Modulator £28.00 A500 Internal Drive.. £55.00 

i Meg Ram + Clock £33.00 ASOO PSU £45.00 

I Meg Ram £30.00 Amiga Mouse £30.00 

1 Meg Ram for ASOO Plus £54.00 Boot Selector .£20.00 

ROM Selector £30.00 

All prices include postage and packing. Fast Amiga repairs - Phone for details. 



ACE Repairs, Dept AS, Outways Farm, Pelynt, Looe, 
Cornwall PL13 2NW i"^ 



(0503) 220282 



ma 



AMIQA PUBLIC DOMAIN AND SHAREWARE SOFTWARE 
OVER 40001- TITLES TO CHOOSE FROM. 

UTILmES 19. PratractMrV£.2!>(P) 3B. Joumsl 

1 . XCopy VB.4 (P) 20. AcUon Replay (P) 39. Bank Book (P) 

2. OCopy Pro V3 IP) 21 . Form Daslaner {P) 40. Disk catalague {PJ 

3. PD 4opv V3 (P) 22. QEO (P) - , „ a„n_,rr-n 

S. Fl!.diskvi,6o(P) 24. AmIPasa Pro (PI J- 5?"^S'S'i; «™ 

7. RSIDemonnalierV2(NP) 2S. Nuke visa*) f fgf'iiu'E'i'JL-L;; "■"■ 

8. DtakX V3.M (P) 27. AmalflNt Hadloje) *■ f^Snmm fin so 

9. Sid V2,00 (P) 28. Flenibaee V2 (fJ rK«f « SSS.'i'-^iitahJ:; « iSL 

1 0. 600 BuBlnsBB LaHere 28. Spacira Pain! {f*J ^'J^ KS.S^»S?n™!S;5,^ 
"■»»(*) 30. vCanV5.12(h ^^Sia Sou^d^kto dSaMa 

1 2. Zoom V5.4 (P) 31 . Amiga Fox (P) ''^ "" ealalogus dlBH tor details. 

1 3. Virus Chacker V&A {P} 32. Icons Ovef 300 AOC^SORIES 

14. M«lV3.2C(Pt 33. C Manuals (4) 3 9 disk ., ,,3Spe(Kh 

15. NComm V2.03 (P) 34. Vlsicalc (P) 3.5 100 cap box Zeb.SO 

16. Tarm V21 (2) (PI 35. AHP Mouse Mat E2.B9 

1 7. Zerovlrxis 3 V1 .2(5 {P) 36. FT-X Accounts Duat Cover ASOO .£3-99 

IB, Syslnro Ve.EB [Pj 37. MCad (P) Cleaning Kit .£2.99 

All P.D. la S9p per dl^. Buy 10+ receive tree (dialog ua disk, Includss All our disks: 

3 Games. 2 Virus Killers, Charly Music DemO' and complota listing of [j Guaranlsod error (reel 
GraptilGs, Music, Demo, Domomalwrs, Adult, Businoss, Education, Arnos, US' Coinpletewittiawnlabalsl 
Utilities, Progrsmmins, D.I.Y., Previews, T-Bag, Fred-Fish. [j VirustreeH 

Please add 60p to order U.K., Europe El. 00. rest of world E2.S0 for P&P O 48 Hours DeSvery 

r.a.,ft UHMMt MM, MHT mUBHIWI. IHCBTW IE W, W ws iwlCMW Mar S.3m IH (86M| MTWl 



>\ 




DELTRAX PD 



fT^ 



^ 11 






PUBLIC DOMAIN TITLES. 



WE ALSO STOCK FRED 

FISH AND TBAG. ALL 

DISKS ARE VIRUS 

CHECKED AND TESTED 

PRIOR TO DESPATCH. 



No OF DRIVES. NOTE: ALL DISKS RUN UNDER 1.3 



UTILITIES 



Ui Ghositwriler ' 

\J2 Ent^rcDSlal Utility V2..Q 

U3 GrH43fiics Utilily 2 

U4 JazzbencTi 

U£ LDadsaiconis iP] 

U6 Brian Postnia s Sound Monitor 

U7 Diekma&lef V3.0 

US Midi Utilities 

U9 SoLirttf W(3rh«hH>p 

IJIO Icon IS1a>!ar 

Uii icannnania {P) 

U12 A-H§nd9r 

U13 Ma[Kl«il>rQt 1 &2{2) 

IJ14 Ciaric 

U15 C-Ligtil Re.y Tracer 

U16 Oeiuxe Draw 

U17 Slar Ch6rl&, Siartiythms (p) 

U 1 8 Demos Creators Ijislt 

tJ19 Bp^CG Wnt^r Demc Crsalor 

ir22 Reiationai Data Base 

U23 Ciip Art i:HBk 1 [P] 

U94 ClipArtDisli2iPi 

U25 Comn>soft 

UZ6 Commspanmin 

UZ7 Demciiisher Utilitlee 

U32 Opti Utiiitws (P) 

U34 Megados 

U35 AfTnga Compuiings Wort; Statkin 

U3& Utiiil^es 1 & £ (£) 

U37 Quarttum and Tempest U1«ii1ves 

U36 Digi!echU1ili1yOiSK1,l 

IJ39I VarioLifi Utiiilws 

U40 Zodiac Con^paddJST V2.<i 

U42 Disit Saiva^ 

U43 Various Utililaes 

U44 Master Virifs Kiilar Z.Q (HP-) 

U45 Full1ar^&Ulllltie&(lDta) 

U4e Dai/y Jones Fonts ^ 

U47 'C Language MariuaJ ■ (3) 

U4S Paul's Fr^ewars Collection 

lM9 'G' Language Compil&r 

U50 intr^i Pics 

U51 Art Parts £ - 

U5^ Deskber>cli icons 

\y53 Fuiilorce Mea& Uiilitlefi 2 

U&9 OulckberichPlus(P) 

U5& PnigramiTiirt^ Diefc 1 

U&& Games Music CreaiOr 

U57 G&nealagy' (P) 

U5S Anti FlicKa 

U59 WlncHiTAis Bench - iZ) (P) 

UeO Me$Sy Sid II 

U62 AZ'Comm 

U63 OBWPiay Trace package 

U&4 Mandel Meuntaine 



u 



U66 
UB7 
U5B 

1J69 
J70 
U71 
LI76 
U77 
U79 

ueo 
uei 
ue2 
ue3 

US4 
US5 
U86 
U87 
US8 
US9 
U90 
US1 
U92 
U93 
U94 
U95 

U97 

u»e 

U99 
U100 

U101 
UIOJ 
U103 
U1M 
UIOS 

utoe 
uios 

U109 
U110 
U111 
U112 
U113 
U117 
U118 
tJIIS 
U120 
U121 
0122 
U123 
U124 
U125 
tJ126 
LI128 
U129 
UI30 
U131 



Direct Action Animation Creator 

QdOE Bancn and Otttefs 

Fonts Die*; 

Sid VI .OS ■ 

The Comma disk 

Supen$x Modefn U1ill1ie& 

Modem Utilltieis 

Red Devil Ulililiee S 

Fl«d Dgvlle Uttllly 4 

Mandelbrot Glene^atot 

OuicKfiench 

Dynamic Duo LItillties 1 

Font Designer 

D Paint Fonts I 

D Palm Fonts M 

Journal - Acotjunle 

SpecmjT^ EntulslDT 4- 40 Gairwe (NP) 

ESA Uliis 2 

Gii Ketp + otnar? 

MCAD ' (P) 

Ultir^ata fiotstltjck Otilieclion 2 

Warnt>rs Virus Kdlers 

Eier^rocad Circuit Das^ner (P) 
Amitiase VS.?e [PI 
System Exerciser 
Bootbanclt V2.D 
CataJfhgue Workshop One (P^ 
Catalogue Worl^ahop Twt? {P) 
NIghl Flyflfs Utjiltias One 
Hard Disk Utiliti^ 
Amaleur Radio (61 (P) 
Bank N Accounts (P) 
AmicMh Bankjn Aoctjunia (P| 
QBese S Spraadeheet (P) 
VIsicaic Spreatfsheel (PI 
GF>: ytils 1 fP) 
PD.C. DiskAB J.C(31 

Anaiylic-aio ■ (2) (P) 

FI9XibBsaV2.0(Pl 

Ham Lab 

Special Brothers Vector Editor 

Bc-Fonran 77 

CliB II Art 3) (P) 

Clip (1 An 4 (P) 

Clip II An 5) (P) 

NComm 1 .92 (P) 

North C Disk A « B (2) (P) 

Business Cand Maker (P| 

Crossdos 

Squash I (A500^ on^J 

Scale & Wofdwriortt 

Wwdwriflht i, AmiBaepell (NP) 

Texiplus Wordprocessor VS.O [P) 

u-EdiiWompnacaasorlNP) 



U1i3 
U134 
UIJS 
U13« 
U1« 
U139 
U141 
U143 
Ut44 
U145 
U147 
Ut4« 
tJ149 
U150 
U15S 
Ut54 
U155 
U1S6 
U15B 
UtE2 
Uie4 

uiee 

U1GB 
U1E9 
U170 
U17I 
LH72 
U173 
U175 
U176 
U1T7 
U17B 
U179 
U190 
UtBI 
UIEB 

uies 
uies 

UIBS 

uiee 
uies 

U19t 
U192 

Uig3 

U194 
U1M 
U196 
U197 
U19e 
U199 
\IS» 
U201 
U29S 
U2t)3 
U212 



Texlplus WflfdpnKSS&or v'G.j iPj 

600 Business Lett#rs (PI 

QEO Te«1 EOilor IP) 

AmigalnxDTPVl.l (P) 

y^migaepeit (NP) 

AmlgalOK V^ .0 

Ae4 Emulatof (NP] 

laeM 

ST Emulator 

Scecltt^ Ennulalor (NP) 

Text Engine Va.t (P) 

P Copy V3.0 

A.Qene (PI 

Conin)«»3r« C640am»s Oak 1 (NP) 

C^rnotfjre C64ijam4sDi3k2<NP) 

Miibsss Prolessional II VI .2 (P) 

Speotra Paint V3.2 

KatVan^ Mciaiiion Utilities (PI 

Slldeahow ConslnjclTon Kit 

Micnjgnu&macs - Taxiedlior 

AZ Spell (P) 

ACU aeneral utilities 24 

ArT>l8fl Coders Club {$) 

CartoGfi Brushes 

Oasipner Disk Set (3) 

Door To Door 

lllirwis Latwl Primer 

Invoice Printer 

Magnalic images Clip-Art (S) 

Gorf Rectsrder 

Muili-Faii 

Printer Drivers i2) 

Ouick Slan III (2) 

Video Applioaliori Utile (21 

Vidi Fonts 1 

BEasall 

Future ConnpMer 

Hack Pack (2) 

Nag 

t;ierk V4.0 

Anti.Virus V4.2 

D Copy V2.0 (P) 

DeltraK Utiis 1 

Deltrax Utile 2 

OctamMI VI .(5b ■ (P) 

Anti-Virvs V4.1 2 (+ only) 

Llnle Bench i,* onlyl 

Bi^tnerDood Utile I 

Broinertiood utiis 2 

Bnjtnerticod utile 3 

ProtrackerV2.0 

Printer Driver (Senerator 

.Amidoc*; 

Floeclroute (An^erlcan) 

Muitiplot 

Label Designer 



GAMES 





oa5 


(!4 


MuBCall (P) 


067 


U9 


Fiaschbier 


GSS 


(ill 


Mora ■ (PI 

CDloB3alWorM(Pl 

CMll«OfD<K™(P) 


G69 


U12 


090 


C513 


Gai 


Qt4 


HolyQtBil(NP) 


GM 


<i15 


QolilenFleacB(P) 
Tmckin' (2) (2D) (P) 


093 


02(1 


QM 


U22 


card Oames (P) 
Super T^inlna (P) 


095 


n2a 


ore 


IJ24 


Roiierpede IP) 


097 


UM 


Wizzys Ouflst ' (P) 


S93 


Q.-M 


Return To Earth (PJ 


099 


n.l.'i 


L!amalroiiS12KStM80 


Q100 


U34 


Monopoly (MP) 


0102 


n.ifl 


Drip ■ (P 
BugBaenNP) 


S103 


GOT 


Qt04 


<J41 


Escape Fnom Jovi (NP) 


Ot05 


04a 


Orav Attack (P) 


Q106 


<jia 


Downtiill Challengs (NP) 


01 07 


344 


Batneteice (NPi 
Draoon Cave (P) 
Tha J.A.R. (rih 


QtOS 


n4.'i 


G109 


046 


QUO 


U47 
S49 


HinosOr2on'(NP) 
MsylMm (P) 


0111 
Q112 


U49 


Mecnright rpq 


Giia 


(iS? 


Qraystayar (P) 
Scum Haters (p) 


G114 


053 


Q11S 


(iM 


SlarTrBk2'(3)(P) 


Giie 


055 


Pom Pom Gurvner ' (P) 


Q117 


{i56 


FrullMachineMNP) 


0116 


057 


M9ch(orca(2)(NP)' 


S119 


USD 


sea Lance MP) 


0120 


C59 


Kkmd»io{P) 


3121 


uei 


Survivor (P) 
Air Ace 11(F) 


0122 


0(12 


0123 


0*3 


Advenlure Solutions t P) 


0124 


fKU 


Advenlure Solutions 2 P) 


0125 


S65 


Mervti»Meiriiaee(Nfi) 


0125 


066 


SnaRaprt(P) 


0123 


(J(i7 


Treasure Huni (6-Byr3) 


G129 


nii6 


Cheat List Games VI .0(P) 


O130 


ue9 


Wacko Jnr in Wormeriand 


Q131 


U70 


Panachute Joust (NP) 


G132 


071 


Crystal Caverns (P) 


G133 


U/3 


Zeus-Thse8me(P) 


Q134 


(i74 


Dungeon Delver (2) (P) 


0135 


07S 


Pick Up A Puzzle ■ (21 (P) 


Q136 


fivs 


Chainsa* Doalh ' 


Q137 


077 


Can YOU Picture II ■ (2) (P) 


0136 


n7n 


Crossfire * (P) 
Balioonacy ■ (P) 


ai3S 


079 


Q140 


(ifli 


Demolision Mieeion * 


0141 


G62 


Blackjack (P) 


0142 


(JS4 


Peter's Quest (P) 


0143 



LOW PRICES. (DETAILS OM CAT DISK) CATALOGUE DISK £1.00 FAST RELIABLE FRIENDLY 
SERVICE, 

*" 24 HOLiR DISPATCH **** 
i^^ES: i-5 =-tlr50PSR DISK ; 6-10 » £l.-2a FER PISR vU*h,.£1.oo,EBRJDISK- 



Tiiiki.iQ C;jlijj,ir,H BooK ;Fj 
Yetp P) 

T-ufrJcan II dtemo (Pf 
Amt^aiTian OdiTieB 
Bionix CiialEgfige II 

Snapee (P} 

Qa Looly 

S]ar Trfri^ Tna lN«xE Ganaralion 

Hack {PI 

Cs&Qon Tllas V£.5 (P) 

Qoani 'Q.eniSB 

Atlk Atak 

Avalarhct>e 

Bart Simpson 

BouldardasTi Collection 

CY.A.D, 

Dungaon M&9t&r Oompanlon 

Eat Mine 

Emarald Eat Mire 

Emerald Eater No 1 

ErTisraid Mirw pro No 4 

Errerald M^inas Editor 

Enieraid Miriam II Rscvcl»d 

Frairtic Freddie 

FliII Hcvusa Pol<er 

Hypnotic i-finds 

Lora Ot ConquesE 

The Durvgeon Ot Dundlan 

PD Gamaa Vol 1 

PD Games Vol 5 

PD Games Vol 6 

PD Oannas Vol 7 

PD Games vol e 

PD Games Vol 9 

PD Games vol lO 

PD Games Vol t2 

PDOaiTi$a VoF i3 

Pipe Hidar 

Ramtfy 

Rush Hour 

Tofln(espe*ei 

WeE Beaver Ganies 

Wisard World 

WorW Of Fools 

Marathon Mine III 

Card Sharp [Pv 

Totai War (P) 

Almnanla (P) 

Sitytiyer (t") 

Puggtes ^P) 

SqualtJs Hevenge ^P) 

Pair 11 

Qanras CDrnp. 1 

Atlantis 1 

Napoleonic WaffBre Sim 

Mission XRaJQPrt II 



PACKS 



BtiiJn«u P^h 1 {NP) Wemipiac&ssof 
flic, 5 Disits £6,00 

Builnui PkX 2 {P} DTP etc. 
7 Disks ^7,00 

Muek Pack 2 (P). Startrakhar/ 
eampias ^ Disks £s,0o 

Gamea Pack 1 (PI 

Arcade Type 5 DiSk& £5-00 

EducatEon Pack 2 i,P) 

Earfy Lflarning SDskaES.OO 

Qamai Pack (P) 

Arcada 3 Dhsks £S.OO 



DEMOS 



D136 SilentB 'ice' (P) 

D2a3 Hypnotic Hammer H (NP) 

D304 Utopia Total Conluaiion 

D305 Odyssay {S) (2D) 

D3CS Seeirtg ia Believing {2) 

D307 Crkmks hardwirad (2) 

OM>e Raior 1911 Voyage 



U.K. = Free Delivei-\' 
Europe = +25p Per Disk 
R,O.W. = +50p Per Disk 




36 BODELWTDDAN AVE, 

OLD COLWYN. 

CL\VYD. LL29 9NP 



<Mitiiwed friMti |»gi 143 

up with the message 'DosControl 
v3.1 - DEMO', I can only assume 
that it's shareware. However, it will 
take someone with a better grasp of 
the German language than me to get 
much further than that - all the 
documentation is in German, as are 
most of the commands on the 
buttons and in the menus. It's a 
shame, too - this program has a lot 
going for it. For example, buttons 
allow you to choose what information 
about a file is displayed in the 
standard window: date, time, size, 
attributes and so on. Then there are 
menu items which provide Amiga to 
PC (and vice versa) file translation - 
presumably removal of extraneous 
carriage returns and so on - and, 
most usefully, a menu which enables 
you to access your favourite archiving 
program from within DosControl. Just 
select the files you want to archive, 
choose 'Lharc Packen' from the 
Archive menu, choose a filename for 
the archive, and the program handles 
the rest (assuming you've got the 
relevant archiving program in your c: 
directory, of course). Arch I vers 
supported are Zoo, LHArc and Arc, 
and DosControl wins a place on my 
hard disk for this feature alone. 

There are other, supposedly 
more sophisticated programs about 
which provide archiving routines with 
a Workbench front-end, but all I (and, 
I suspect, most people) want to be 
able to do is create, extract and list 
archives - no more, no less. 
Congratulations to Uwe for spotting 
the user desire and doing something 
about it. 

If only DosControl were in 
English, and if only it didn't (very 
occasionally) crash my Amiga, I'd be 
able to recommend it without 
reserve. As it is, try it out - you may 
be able to live with its foibles, and 
it's certainly easier to use than SID. 

• PCExecute 

Third up is PCExecute, by Peter 
Vorwerk, which apparently "allows 
KOu to send a command to an XT/ AT 
board without opening the PC 
window." As with ATCopy, my setup 
doesn't include such a board, so the 
program's not much use to me... 

• PrFont 

Finally, PrFont, by Joel Swank, is a 
$10 shareware program which 
searches your Amiga for any fonts in 
the fonts: directory, draws a line of 
text in each of them and then dumps 
the screen to the printer. This would 
be useful as a reference, especially 
if you have got a lot of fonts Installed 
- glancing at a printout is far easier 
than trying three or four fonts until 
you find the one you were looking for. 
i say would, though, because the 
program refused to dump anything 



Nan 

Volune 



Stuff _ . , .tfolim.: 



files 11 Bvtes 32S38 ^ JSitJiJ 



flppLicanoHS 

f HeHUider 

Tavs 

Bp^^iC^TIOHS.info 
conf igf * le 
Disk. info 
Fi leHinder, 
Fi les. info 

HttCConriQ 
Tpvs, info 
Tracheal), info 
Virus Checker 5.36 



,inf Q 



28:4? I »■» 
28L52r44 

ei ;»fl;3S 
2i<:M:r> 
ia;11 ;36 
.'9147:15 

iimm 

19;36;28 
28:38:43 
28:34:16 
28:28:18 

28:34:16 
88:42:18 



[DSTT 



[jJlJ 



Dr8: 



Ofl: 



Stt8: 



OHi: 



»H2: 



MSI; 



«m: 






Syap i Copy I D«p£opv[ Kal<edir| Type { HeKtypej Bufl [ 



Hpu| 

FFTj _^___„ 

Oev\ PSflettI Hang j ttoveUp | Renane 1 Find | Pf int 1 Hprint | HanPregf 
flSj Bead I Invgrs j (lydatf | Protect) Ccnwentl Show | Prtir | PFcgi-anf 



Clear I CLS { Hcue | Peiete [ Birittml Editor [ riUInf| Execute! 



DosControl is another S/I>alike, but has some interesting and useful new 
features. Simple buttons allow you to select whether files are viewed by date 
of creation, time of creation, file size, number of blocks used and so on. 
Shame It's all In German though! 



out to my Canon BJlOex. ( 
experimented with a couple of 
different drivers, but I had no joy at 
all. Owners of other printers may (or 
may not) be luckier. 

All in all, this disk doesn't really 
live up to the standard set by Disk A, 



reviewed last month. However, 

DosCoritroFs neat features may well 

sway you, and there's probably 

something of interest here if your 

Amiga has a PC emulation card 

installed. 

Value for money 6/10 



FONTS ON THE CHEAP 



[^ow that DTP on the Amiga is finally taking 
off, with the release of much improved 
versions of the two main Amiga DTP 
packages - Professional Page and 
PageStream - the demand for htgh- 
quatlty fonts has increased. To this end, 
EM Computergraphic has released 
several volumes of PD and shareware 
fonts. Many of the fonts are taken from 
the PC and Macintosh arenas, where Type 1 
PostScript fonts are the 'norm'. The fonts have 
been converted on to Amiga disks, and come with 
preview files which display a sample of the font on- 
screen. 

The font library consists of four volumes, totalling 20 
disks, containing 281 different fonts. 

These fonts can be used directly from PageStream, version 2.1 
or above, and from Professional Page 3.0 after they have 
been converted with the FontManager utility. 

Of course, as with all font coilecfions, 
some are better than others; and 
because these fonts are PD 

and shareware, you 

should not 
expect the kind of 
quality that fonts from a 
company sucti as Adobe will exhibit. 
However, having looked at a range of the 
fonts offered, I must say that I'm quite impressed; by 
and: large the quality is perfectly good enough for anyttiing 
except top-quality publishing - and some of the fonts would stand 
comparison with any similar commercial versions. 

Some of the fonts are PD, while ottiers are shareware - it's up to the 
purchaser to check for any 'Read me' files containing details of shareware 
fees. However, these are clearly flagged, with conspicuous icons, so there's 
no excuse for ignoring them. 

Shown here are screengrabs of fonts from Volume 6, disks 1 and 2 (the 
whole of Volume 6 contains 5 disks, and costs £12.50), For full details of 
available fonts, contact EM Computergraphlcs at S Edith Road, Clacton on 
Sea, Essex C015 IJil; phone 0225 431389. 
Value for money ...9/10 



•^ 



8>^ 



.^^ 



■^ 



^ 



!^mm^ 



CRUISEWORD 1.2 

From PD Majik 
9 0e03 628906 

Cruiseword is a word processor 
written in AMOS by J Lucas, who 
requests a £7 shareware fee. 
Unfortunately, as it stands I can't 
really say that It's worth the sum 
asked for. 

As regular readers of Amiga 
S/iopper will know, we reviewed three 
PD or shareware word processors a 
couple of issues back, and sadly 
Cruiseword doesn't really measure 
up to any of them. Its one advantage 
is a built-in spelling checker, but 



''fn my test 

printouts, some of 

the text managed to 



disappear. 



n 




even that Is limited - there is no 
support for users to add words to the 
dictionary, so you're stuck with the 
one provided. 

The program has a few basic 
features, such as automatic word 
wrap, six predefined macros ("Yours 
sincerely", 'To whom it may concern" 
and some others - ideal for all the 
lazy typists amongst you), adjustable 
left and right margins, insert or 
overtype and the ability to 
enbolden. Italicise and 
underline text. 
However, none of 
these features works 
particularly well, and 
indeed on my test 
printouts, some of the text managed 
to disappear from the printed 
version - not a good sign. 
The Idea of integrating a 
spelling checker into a 
word processor Is a good 
one - it's high time more 
Amiga PD word processors had this 
feature - but Cruiseword really does 
need some more work before this 
benefit will outweigh the program's 
faults. The author claims to be 
working on a faster spelling checker, 
larger dictionary and mail merging 
facility. Personally, I'd rather see 
some basic enhancements like a 
Quit option (you have to re-boot the 
Amiga to leave the program) and an 
undedine facility which doesn't 
underline the blank space at the 
beginning of each line. 

Sorry, but this really isn't up to 
scratch at present. However, I look 
to version 1.3 (to be released later 
this year), when hopefully some of 
these complaints will have been 
addressed. 
Program rating 4/10 



5 



'o 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 




This should give some Idea of what the 
Electronic Baby Book is lilte. if you've 
bought a real booic ilite this, you'il iove 
the computerised version. But then, 
you probably lli<e Terry and June, too... 

CLASSIX 1 

Aardvark PD 
« 0509 210157 

Classix I is a collection of four tunes 
by Bach, arranged by Rob Bajcter and 
produced using the Aegis Sonix 
program. The disk is auto-booting, 
and tunes are played by hitting one 
of the function keys. 

Rob is obviousiy a bit of a Bach 
enthusiast, and his explanatory 
notes on the music, and Bach 
himself, are interesting and 
informative. 

The sounds used to piaythe 
music are reasonable - the proud 
boast is that no digitised sounds are 
used - although I don't know what 
Bach wouid think about some of 
them. Certainly the instruments used 
to pi ay the Fugue from the Toccata 
and Fugue in D Minor are interesting 
and work well, but the pipe organ 
sound for the Toccata is a little 



''No digiHsed 

sounds are used in 

Classix I - / don't 

know what Bach 

would think of 



thetn. 



II 



ropey. And talking about that 
particular piece, I have to say that 
some of the sections did seem to be 
played at quite exceptional speed - 
rather faster than was originally 
intended, I think! 

The four pieces are sections of 
the Brandenburg Concertos numbers 
3 and 4, the Prelude and Fugue 
number 7 and, of course, Toccata 
and Thing in D whatsit. Each tune 



Bg Undo lAodiMie' Luic 






-S-il '■\ 




A% 



l--;ii\^ai.s' 



Dat*? of Births 



. Time of Birth 






gpMaln 



I But^-SyE? 



Enter the name and vital details of 
your offspring, and you can 
blacltmaii them in the years to come 

takes 30 seconds or so to load, and 
can be interrupted by hitting the 
Escape key at any time. The four 
tunes are each fainy long, and the 
disk certainly represents a fair few 



basic, and allows only 300 
transactions per file, but should 
prove useful to anyone who really 

wants to justify the purchase of their 
computer because "it will help me do 
my home accounts." 

The program is a two-screen 
affair; clicking the right mouse button 
cycles between the two screens. One 
is a listing of all the transactions, the 
other has several buttons which 

allow you to actually 
enter the 

transactions. They 
are labelled with 
things like 'Interest', 
'Direct Debit', 
'Cheque deposit' 
and so on; click on a 
button and the 
program asks you for 
the date, details and 
amount of the 
transaction and then 
adds it to the list. 
There are some things that the 
program won't do which reduce its 
usefulness. For starters, it doesn't 
put the transactions in date order. 
So if you forget a transaction until 
you've entered others with later 
dates, you're stuck with the rogue 
one appearing in the wrong place. 



, Cantinue 



B1.f- -17X92 



DGsgaaOaFVP I 



St?i-i.»T «: 123456 



^B da^ipuner 



wf^mif^s^f f^F 



f» ciirdef' 



I 



Hddr>a&»* 



Hrga Codes | 



Cl. 


Ti- 


"ixt/.y I 




JJilt I 


fc 


ui: 


UtaUi 1 


Meu 1 


Uuii 1 



J 



The inventory section of Home Manager is fine 
stolen that Is! 



minutes' listening. 

Rob has clearly spent a lot of 
time on this disk, and I would 
encourage him to keep on with his 
efforts. The Brandenburg Concerto 
Number 3 in particular was well done 
- but do keep the freakier sounding 
instruments to a minimum, Rob! 
Value for money 6/10 



' as long as your Amiga isn't 



And editing the transactions is a little 
fiddly. 

On the plus side, you can pnnt 
out the list just by pressing a 
function key, and the lack of too 
many features means that beginners 
to the Amiga won't get too confused. 

All in all, AmiCash is a simple 
program, to perform a simple task. 
I've always thought that people who 
need a computer to cope with their 
home accounts should simplily their 
accounting system, but maybe that's 
just me. 
Program rating 6/10 

THE ELECTRONIC BABY 
BOOK 

PD Soft disk V658 

This really has to be one of the most 
nauseating programs I've ever come 
across. On the other hand, I know 
people who will be delighted with it - 
it takes recording your baby's details 
into the computer age. 

You get some idea of what the 
program will be like when the 



''If your first 

Htought is 'Isn't that 

cutet' you should 

continue the 
program or seek 
psychiatric fiefp/' 



opening screen appears. If you start 
gagging immediately, now would be a 
good time to switch the computer off 
and go to the pub. If, on the other 
hand, your first thought is "Aaahh. 
Isn't that cute?," then you should 
either continue through the program 
or seek psychiatric help. 

Basically, the Electronic Baby 

(iMrtinii«<l on poge 1 48 



AMICASH 1.0 

PD Soft disk Ve30 

AmiCasti was written in AMOS by 
Keith Grant, who asks that a 
shareware donation be paid if you 
use the program. It's a basic home 
accounts package which the author 
says is for those of us who are 
forever losing track of how much we 
(don't) have in the bank. It's fairly 




timPr^trirmTtrrn^^ 



Home Manager's Address Bool< section is as fully-featured as some stand 
alone address tiook programs, and offers about everything you might want 



146 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 




CUT, TICK & POST.... CUT TICK & POST 



(0702) 466933 

on-Sea, ESSEX, SSI 2YD 



Telephone or Fax Hotline 

^ PD Sofr (AS16) 1 Bryant Ave, Southend- 



: 



VARIOUS UTILISES 



□jf V\t WAT t fi£AD (ft A cotfeciiori &f educotion 

programs for the unifer 7 year gM's. 

QJf VIA FOH TAMC JMULATOA A p^ Dgram 1Sq1 

SirnL^ales on aquarium. Visually pleosirw, 

OV VU worn WRKJHT & MUQA SPOL, CE>nk]ins 

ovef 9,000 words & mofe words can be adtted. 

Q)i:V41 DPAMTjBJtrConfillr^slixidsof p«clures(oryoij' 

10 mess oroufitf will, Locds mro your ttpalrir, 

i:ur V4B TV & VIDEO GRUfHCS |B] Packed wirh 

bcclcgfoynd Greens for your video pfodudions. 

Dtffarerr fypes of wapMc sryles. P«w, lakes art IFf 

Picture & seels ii down ihe screen. & Much Mwe 

our VM VKKO PftODUCTtON C2| Both disks org 

Ptsdcad with vic^ & tjenJock i/liliii^. 

QK VW9 PWNT STUDIO Exceltanl lor prmMng ptdures 

or text. An -exc^Heinr proaron^ For' oil pr^ier chvner;. 

QV Ym MA£T^ Vitus KKIER Virus Checker & KiKsr 

Willi Excdlent options. IrKfjud^ searcfii disk. 

□ VT?* THE BWUaTORS Corers Various W Fomiats 

whicfi Includes CPM. BM-PC A St l^ulrg' 2 drives. 

QX VT94 M.R1MCKUP KD An axcelteni Hard disV. 

bock up pro««n. &ock$ up all or ony port of the drive. 

i:V V195 GRAmK: MfBiCHANOE Intercfiar^e 

orapMcs Belwsen Alorl Sl^PC Gniphks to Ffie Amiga. 

□If VllS CHSKMASTtR «3.J Copies f^les iiom one disk 

to onolf^er. DISKSALV Coreds S* Ttpains. 

\a Vlftl tEXT?tU5 VWStON 5.0 This disk is not just on 

update butcompletly New UVard p^ccg^sor. 

□X ViiZ DUPUCAhOH t MCkuP: Super 

Duperjurtio copy. Sanity copy & PCopv. Four new 

copiers to bdckup your oriigiTiols fat st^ve keeplrig. 

i:Bf V277 roRTWU+-77 vl.Sc Corrplter, linker & run 

tfrne suppoil llbrory. F^TO 

UX VZH CROSSWORD CREATOR A pnagrorn tfiof 

crmfes crosswords. UPDATED VERSION. 

Utt V3S4 MCAD PROORAM T^e Defect Drcwing 

Program kw (tie Amiga.le CAD 

attyitS CDUCATIONU : TTHNO TUTOR A Simple 

typlnq vitilch mAcmjresyouE' spaed on the keylxiard. 

CBf Vin NORTH C Vli {2| Ttie most famous C 

longuwB on Hie Amiga EndudesaH files required 

i:tt'%»1 Pit OF THElOiOLfia HHTBOQK IrtC 

introducHnfi, Background, Mops, Slroiegy & SoMion 

UOC V3M CHAOS STTOKES bAcK HIKTBOOK Fnc 

IntTDdL^tinn, Bcickground, Mops, s\Taisg'f & SdMion. 

i::3: V3M A-GBC ^.IZS Loslesf verswn of Itie Family 

Tree program . Reviewed in CU Amiga. 

p}f VSai ANM.TKALC SPREAD SHET fH Tills Is the 

Dsst spread shee\ program to dafe on the AmIao, 

O V$30 RH> SiCTCR bCTRAS DBI^ W On tNs disk are 

: HI poinr FoMs, ]b Poim forvis, vecter stc^, Star fields & nwj^ 

Space .tourney lomo. ^ The ifeodione Troopers, 

UtC V332 AMKM PUKT PROGRAM Prodid wMch 

horse will win wttfi this hor» predicEiori wogrann. 

q V3U t1W«F0RMat v3.3 This b the Lt^ssf version 

otttte IBM Emulalor disk. Require on MS-Dg«.c&Sk. 

OK V339 SPtCtRUM EMULATOR DATA DISK 1: 

Adventure Classics rvseds v2l6 or ViM3. 

O VSM i™ VSCTOfl OESIGMER T>ie Speciol Bolhsrs 

presnets- The T5& Vector ■rfest^ner wl.l. This progr om wli 

oreaTetiilM vector objects, line vedofs & ESobs. 

DV VM1 CUP ARTCOuicnON 2; Eight more disb 

fully packed wrJh exeunt clip ort. (B) 

QX V3H KISiCSS CARD MAK^ Des^n your own 

Business conds on the Amigo. 

QX V3M fflEECOPT Removes prcHected games copy 

p<ic*e:^ 50 thai the lew can install them cm hfiJhar hard qisIl 

Q V3«S «H> StCTORMODUlES (MUSKD r Various 

mtisic nno<lules Itoi use v^Ph the RSi Oemo Maker . 

ait VSM MO BUSMESS LETTfitS There are over f,OQ 

Standard business ieners on this disk. Can be used os 

Ihev are, or insert some poris iniovour own teners/teid, 

QX V39Q THE D£^TOP PUBUSHNW; PROGRAM The 

firsi Qmiyo PO Pesk Top Pubfcshing program, includes 

vork^us extra leotures ever ttie olo Word processor. Test 

Edilor, Oroptiicsedilor & kKids more. 

i:Bf VW2 AMICASH MNNN The 0es6 banWn program 

thai i hoffi ever used on the Amiga, eosy controls. 

i:^ V19A CHEMESTETKS A pragrom Ihot cIroiAts 

molecules using the colotte model Excellent eflects. 

OK V401 VmOOWBBiCH vT.O (2) An exceiter^t Work 

oench lli replacement terall vi.3 usofs. f^ecomended 

Uft V4iO PPS UT1JT1ES No 1: PfOHTWO inUHES 

PPType, PPShaw. ASFD, Wew, Tiny PilfH, fAWJCT, A 

program for DesJttet 500 users you vt>anl lo i^e the 

r^sSulkir enlioncKd graphic set. <ivifPHrrt H , 

ax V4ia WORKBB^ Z & WORK STATK)N Th^s Is 

nol just Onoitierworldbench done Ifi o cotlecllan of 

unities with the i^orkbiefich theme [21 

QfC V413 von SCRShS:) Excellent bock ground 

pictures for video producEion work. JHke backdrops 

Otr V417 SUPSSmCH & extras m An SHLceNent re^ 

plQeementdBsk vi^fih more gttiilies Ihon the ortgunal WB 

^ V49D CURSOft BASIC CDMMSt Compile ony 

Amiga Bosk program wlih this utility disk 

a« V423 C- aMMAfClt$ This dislL is filled with utIlHle 

whkln con be used in Siortup-sequences 

gjf V424 PO&UTlJTK$ NO IB USIIitieS Indude, AnH- 

fldHrprogrpm, Said io stop ihe fllclcer in High Res. ST 

irmkridr Progrom to tujn yisur omiao into an ST. 

i:^ V431 lMPifXl0tv4.O Reduceslie size for soroge 

on hord drives our your own collectkin disks 

OX V4U AMMAnON STIKHO Ad axceOent AnlmoElofi 

crestor for you to moke your o*o 

i:iV VUV AMIGA C: mAnUAL N T^iis monual Is the 

osmplae C- myHJoi ior ttw Amgo & describes open 5 wxk 

with oil ports of the C. system, tl olso cofitfflns ran«B esamptes, 

some smpla & some mofKomptes dliha wcr^ through the 

(isks a Monol Is thsn to help you out. (4] 

i:tV V443 SPECntUM EMUUTOR v1.2 By KOB iV^oin 

upck^ed feo9ure ts. It no<A< has sound ability 

Qtf V444 PftNTER ORVER UK>ATE DISK If Now 

cofltoins ifistrudionon how to insloll Ihem, All provious 

drivers Included on this disk. Over 90 

QVf V443 JRCOMM vl.02 This is the ionest version ol 

me e«ceBerrt modewi based compuler program, 

t;^ V4«3 SUPBt C: COMMANDS The disk is nol as fiill 

OS Some others but comes witti full instnjstion. 

Q^ V4T$ P.SUTTE V1.4A coiiacrion oFprogroms called 

PTWirflii a SMTiple word processor, P-Dmw & P^ten " - 

I3ir V47« CH^ « CHESS UTIUTES A cotlectiOO of 

chess related Puzzles, Programs t iJtiiHes 

U V4B4 ADVETUItE SOU/TIONS E2t Another good 

collection of at^enture soJuiions lor various oames 

ax V4W AMBASe PROFESSIOHALN Tha \a\est 

updated version of the exceilem Doiobose pro^ofn. 

now Includes various exceU^ newfet^res 

UliirV4MMBSVSK>NTt^ Is Ihe loiesi version. Ilwin 

reod JViS-Dos disks and Confer any tadfites lo $. from the 

PC disk / Your Amiga. So you cgn do work on on ffif^l or an 

Amiga and swop text behween Ihem. 

Ijgr V493 DESKHMOf m This is on eKColienl 

Workbendi replacmeni with spec^l ylililies. 

UK V497 BEATRUC POHHI OJP ART An excellent 

coltectlon of clip art for any DTP program or Dpolriil. 

Q V4VB THIF SOUND RIPPCR VS.6 Pmds SIdrnon T. 2 

ftrtid], /Ham cracker, fuhure Composer, Sound monitor, 

Molse/Prot/ocker, Stortrekker, Delta sound system 

dovid U^iaker & Nolsepocker, 

I3>f V4W STAft CHAItr vl.2 Ttiks is on exceiienl slgr 



pTotHr^p pnjgram with soma IntrKHng feoiurs 
^ VSOV MSl'vS.2 This is another update to 



othe 



ZM VSIS THE AA4 PACKAGE v±,0 12) A very 
complete C 64 Emulator Actually njr^ fiadar ftiat M. 
Runs 6-4 basic. Tronsiers disks from your original 64 
disk drive wiih o shorewore leod. 
ax V317 VIDEO & AMM : VlDfO.DB, A program 
(or keep»n track on your wdeo tope calleaions. ffTAPr 
1^5 you ploy large Anims on smoJi Mam machines. 
Hdr VSia MAOE lab Performs mony ^ds (rom 
simple overogingi lo fast fourier trofisforms. Toob On 
TofiL Does fades, colourbors & gray bar gAverallon 
■JOt yS}9 STHiSrORE Used to create over the 
shoulder graphic inserts like the 9'0 dock news. 
jatV52Q OIWHICS : AORAPH Creoles colourtull 
pie, bar ortd llr>e graphs. PfCBASE^ Sh-iows reduced 
versions of all your IFV pictures. ** Requires V522 
ax V521 PLOTTMG A 0RAPHK5: niiFTXT, A 
powerlul hjll Featured plohirTgi prog, PLANS, A 
computer aided droffing prog.** fequires V522 
pur VS21 UP V\A : Cgnmon vl.4, n^oik^ rrwny 
irn-provemenis lo AmigaDos & makes yoi^ system 
eoster to use. mdutdesTull u$9S developers guide, 
an VS23 DICE C COMPIlBt [2) Matthew DJIlDns M 
Seoi-uf«f powerluii C compiler ienwroment system. 
LIK V52S LABEL MAKER v1. 3 An KKcellBnt dtsk 
pnnling proorom will^ various new features. 
ax V^2V RAaAL ft 5CUlPT4d: T>H4d Cr«0es 
sC'Lpi 'id treas with lEoves Contour A6, JFSGen & FtaaiiOL 
ax V530 WXXXl A progrom to help manoolng 
personal (inonces. The Is a update to disk v£$D, 
i:iK VS34 CATMjOGUE IMJTES A colec^cfv of u<«itffis 
used toCoMiDguG disk; Video/ Tape coitions S] 
ax V54» WSK STATWN m An excellent worJtbench 
repkicement with, built in utttitlesi like S*d and otf>ars 
ax V54* KIDS PAINT A ptf nSftg program designed kf 
children. Includes various cdours and speech. 
OX VS4« ElfCTROCAD v1|,4 Another Updated or^ 
tne cad drowning preview written in Ames. 
Q VSIO KffREFa POMSt LmUTHS ; NtWTOfKo, 
Pmn r Footle Creole. Edit or chortge any 9xS or >6xl6 
fonts. Wlndcnv^ Chonge size oi dps windows, 
a VSS4 R.S.I. MUSK MODULES 2/3 Anolher 
setedton of mu& from t?ed ^edlon. |^ 
a VU« RSI SfOOR HEIP DSK Amrher disk to 
ihelp you use Iha Red Ssdoc Demo Creator. 
a VS60 DUPUCATfONft BAOOJP I AccHectlon of 
copiei^ likg omtgnCopy, Codv copy, Pcccry, Rcrttiecapv. 
[j|( VS67 PfiiiTES Mn« oe«ftAi^ 
01 utilities '-vSh vorious eMeBert Printer DrK^r Cenerotors. 
i:iK VS69 DUNGEON MASTHt MAPPK A lltjietool 
thol Creoles mc^sof dunoeoiutand eventually (owns) 
whkih can beused tryo oMfor usein AO&Ogon^. 
i:ttr VTTd Cm» HAMS imUTlES : DMWORK VlSV 
Excelleol! file copier sImuEal lo diskmrster &Sld but 
contains more commands to hor^.. Reconrimend 
i:ur V371 WHOM I V2.02 12] An update to the Or.Who 
database proorom. Ijves. ol info oth Dr.^Vho progs 
i:iir V573 FU & HARD ORM MANAGEM&tT (1) : 
HDCUCK v2:.0, A program selector to mctM^ Mord 
disk Menuis. Sforls with gadgets.fU MMDB^ Utility br 
ireinalnlf™ fcs 1 Directories. DOSCDHtTOtTwithof 
connbioes the fundionolily of many senrole tools. 
ax VI7S HOME BUSMSS pACKjA) An excelent 
setedion of utilliies based oni word' processing, l^ita 
Management, Soreod Sheets^ jSrfxounts & Printing. 

OK v£sf PDs MilrrMa N« ) : PftMiet DRnm 

HP LJes^^el 500 & 500 Colour, Conon &J10e. aJ130, 
0:1300. NQc24p, OUJ^p, i<ip, pQil'ip, Pan<lSD0ic9 
S^kOShO?, HPMOD^ For use with Desldel 500 
i:Uf VSJIt DB A DatflbQSe with upto 50 fiek*s.nKix of 
abouf 1.2 minion records. CUCKDOS N, An Amiga 
Dos enhacement ullllry. HtSMD 1 SUPSMEW ^.C 
ax VS&S iCONffilTat it vi.ti, Con create Icons 
upto «flOK200 pixels. DOCTORICON vl.O. Imports 
tmoges as Icons, Edit a. Create any Amiga icons 
oar V344 QMKMTKm ; FASTTACTS, Everylhing you 
ever needed to knew oboyl the solar system. 
VV0RU> map. Produces dUfenenl sorts olworld mops. 
PLANETS, inslard k-coHons of plants MATH MDUNriJN 
ax V5V5 AACH^^RS Aseledkjn od moslorchtvers, 
like IKArc, Zoo, iHWorp, F>ak, il. PitAZip. 2«i, ZiMry, 
JXVSSi FONTS « C; COMMANDS : DBKSUV^ 
Repoirs damaged disks. SiAiE^, Free uMJsed oiocolecf 
mamory.. FOHTASSiGH Assigns fonts to the SfS path. 
-jV V5Q7 OELKMITE FONJft (2) A sefecllon of (onts 
for use with ofry DTP Package or Dpoini di^. 
^ VS9Z TEXT B«MNE v3^ Anotl^er excellenr wofd 
proce^or progrom Sin^ple but will cbs the job 
rw V59a DAfABASE WII Th.s program will record 
oil your Names & Address. Easy Dolobose program. 
CW V5M BftASE If ¥3,3 Th'S cfok ts one o( Ihe mosf 
well known dofobose progrom. Recommend 
n VftOS POOL FORCAST vTO PErm-Check is designed to 
cneckloolbt^ plans fof winning lines nwib) 
Q Vi04 W COPT wj,0 Nt^v disk zopi with some 
ejrfig commonds & quick copy modes huii in . (IWbl 
OX V4M PftOCALC vl,0 Oilers theC orModwwcode 
progrmTimer o ifl'XC or FFP colcuiolor when i$ use IliVlW 

□ WO* SAMni MAKK v1,0 This mirka speciolly fcf 
those who ore nol oble to make samples with o sampler, 
a V«07 PRO TUdfBt v2.Q Written by Lors Zap Homre. 
Ajto*w updole lo the Uttimote sound making progrom. 
i:yr vatb gole scores vi.a4 irs wa recon^ eoch 
fouikJ you play. Store it, tfv*e up oneclBdic score NEW! 
You o3n also show graphs of scores & peifornvanEe 
against par. NEWER! tlwill nowworitout sfableford points 
:j)rV611F0<7reALi LEAGUE EDfTORvId Wonllo 
update youf teams leogue position os Iha results come in 
paf V*ao ASPICe ¥3.2 circuit AnoJysis. A full 
feaiured progrom for electric circuit onolysis 

ax V621 B3W0R0 v2.2 is o fully leotured & 
operational Wo'd processor v^-hich oHersoti 
standard feodures & More Hce PowerM one:s 
Q; V624 H« COPCft v2.0 VUl ccpy In AmigoDos. Index 
Nibble nirO(ies, search rt»de & ^mcIoI porometer copy 
ax V*ZI NCOMM ¥2A Conlgins, IHArc v2 LHArca 
vl.02, 2oQm v5 4(1. DMS vl .03. IHA. vl .11, LKftSnt vl 11 
i:iX V*27 DPAINT FONTS Not 1-3 01 The kitest 
selaction Fonts hsr use with any IFF DTP Progrom 
CMf VWOAMICASH Basically AmiCoSh joslT^eeps 
track of your fronscafions wilh your occour^/eonk 
such OS Oired debits. Cheques Wilhdravi-ls 
QVA3£I&*M EMULATOR PACKAGE vl.OS IBePAIs 
a CGA Colour IB/i/i-PCemuiatof v^rritren to njn on any 
Amiga This Is a demoslrofion version with a time 
limit of 15 mingle. The shoreware cost is USS30, 
:jOt Va36 SHADES & FADE& ANWtFADBl A utllrty 
fo fade screens in & out. SUPERVKW^ Will dispkiy 
IFF pictures. TURBOTm^ Will creole subtitles 
OK V«37 TWM EXPKSS vl.la |2] Tivts ony file direct 
Fom unAmiga orlBW Pc, &y conrwci™the2 mochlnes tfl 
gather wft o nulf modem cdile. Sowfrote 135ZOO, 
ax V63V RADMNCH PUIS wl^lNs Is not on upfate 
but a completly new sa of otWlies & m fecfacenvefil. 

< V«40 PAGESTREAM fOHT PACK T A selection ot 
_ lis for ise ^Mlh Pagastr«irrh ot other DTP Packages |S} 
i:3Jf VMS UmiT^ii,Oa word Processor wilhleam 
modes. Online He^, A leach f^tode. Split wirwlovrs, 
copy & p(Kle, undo & other more standard features. 
QV V64« SO v3.0 FIE MANAOat SkJ can b$ used 
fctf vortouscpwotlons, The best is prob«rty the tile copier 
ax V447 1MMUENCH HACKS A saledlon of 
Hacks that hctve t?een reviewed In CU Affiigo 

□ VMB TTTANKS CAUNCHOt vl,0 Cruncher with 
help &i various protect moiies H>cludes SM*d changes 



ax V649 WP&SPBLCHECKNG AColectlon erf 

uiillHes. PPV14, Decrurtches Power pockefflto as 
they one loaded. SUPBtSPSl v\X SPHlCHECKBt 
Id J, TEJORA rt.n Word wocessor SOWMilBtvO.l 
ax V650 CHKKBOOK ACCOUNTANT Will monoge 
your bank account with easy, vefygoi>d Indeed. 
gX V651 THE SUPER KILiERS V2.^ BOOT X v4.4S, 
This Is the best vinjs klUer dl^to date kilts ov^r 240 
virus & moy be more, Induds excellent killers. 
Including VC vfiJw Zvavtau Hl:v1.ia A VT v2.3V. 
ax V6» PAd^TREAM FONT PACK 2 A seledk^of 
fonts tor use with PaoMtretMn or other DTP Padiogas (St 
a Vi$7 PC TASK Ts softwore IBM-PC Erftulator. it 
allows you to run Fhe rrvotoritol \RfA software with rto 
odditloncil hardware O&A colour. FUlLveeiON. 

■ax V6S9 CDMPUm DIAONOSTXS vV.l Is Iheres a 
problen^ with your comp>uier them whot is it. 
ax V6«0 t^OME MANAGBt This is a great alt In one 
addrss book with on Irrvertory database & To^lo Ist 
QX VMl MOOCllwe iVBTTK Allows vou to create 
3d ohjecls without using the X, Y & Z VNev/s. Loads 
Sculpt 3d/4d, Turbo Silver & more Forn^ts MAGC 
TWEEH 'fVill metamorphosi^e any tvvo prctures. 
J VMZ DCOPf v3.0 PROFFCSSIONAL You can 
select ttw speed of tfw disk drsve. Copy modas, Dos, 
Nibcopy, ver & scrfecopy. Loods of oiher leolures. 
i:Br V6«6 MOOBIMG DUEOS Contolns wer 20 vector 
Qb]ects In irrwge fcimwi, Petfed for use w«h Disk V»i 
GX V667 STAR TKf. OBJECTS Contains the USS 
Reliant, NCCI701D S ferengi plus ci Porsche Cor. 
ax VA68 PIKMJUCTTVTTY/IUSiHESS Skick AnaVsIs 
progrom SliftSTOM iogv<M0!ir«s with search scons 
OX VM9 CELLULAR ALJTOMA This eleclronlc model 
will olowyou to simulate cellular circulls. 
OX V670 ANDROHS FOWS 1^7 Stfl Instollina font 
disks for USB vmh DPoInt progroms (^ Drives iiec, 7 Disks]. 
QX V677 ANDRODS ViKO lACK GROUNDS A 
selection ol Backgrourwl Prerures In Ff Format.. 
OX V«ri DRAW MAP v4.0 (2) WlH now generote ony 
16 cokjur potefle with user control. New feottiras indkide 
lorger mops with inallonol boundortes, fnprcvedlheJ^ and 
printing. 2iVlb jltl\^b version V^ftJ, 1.2M!b version V536l?D. 
Q VA w» oPTuuzBt v)hQ This latest version of the 
iDisk. Optimizer. Re-CrecAes Qiste for faster Loading. 
i^ V681 GAME TAMER vS.2 Get a hold of that extro 
fwrtf gome & Ctwof wuh Gonw Tamer v2 .2 . 
ZM VAa2 DEK3»iA,QS Hexa & ^11 Editor Icir use 
wilh your Amigo's Software Shareware S15 
a VMS SUPS LOCK vVm Seol your daks / Hard 
drives lor your eye's only, Proteds v^th o Posswo/d, 
ax VAB4 FONT FARM A collection ol uhblles. based 
oround rhe subied fonts. Character Editor vl.O, Font 
n^osrervVO, 5howFontv3.3, Sel font v2.5 & more. 
■DX VABS ASTRO PRO ASTROUK^ The best 
Astrokigy progioni on Ihe Amiga by 4ar. 
■^ VAU MULTIDOa vl,.12 This is onother must for 
pflop^ with PC disks. AJlter this program has been 
Insuriled your Amiga drives con reod \QM Disks 
ax VAB7 VIDEO WIPES A coltedion of IFF Snjshs 
and back ground grophical effects 
OX VABB MAGNETK FAGB v1.30 This Shorewore 
program vt< create cfek boss] mogozioes m^ graphics. 
QX VU9 WALT DONer CUP MT A CoHedlon oi 
plduFBS from vcvkius Dbney Films. 
UX VAVa 1M0BKUNCH vS.04+ UTMTKS This ts the 
best colleclion o^uliftles for use with WBv^.D4. The 
disiu will only work on version 2 mochines. (2) 

IGXVA92 RACE RATBl 1/1 .d An excellent program for 

people whowhol intormotionobout racers. 

ax VA93 t^ARLfOUM VSEO AFTTa FOffT EKSK3 

Anott>ervldaa_producllon background set of disks (3t 
ax VA96 POST vl.7 An excellent PtHlScrlpt Inter- 
preier for the Amiga which Implements the Adobe 
longu^e. Requires ¥39* & ConMon vl.3+. UPDATE 

tj!i*.-tf.iji7i!«jij4ji.i;i — 

ax ATOS KllHBCM EI7 CBUSiK trsi lapsilixs 

passKH by. fKC-WM REUAHT. veryaxd cnlm Inctecd 

OK a™ BfllBHBCtS, leaws Itie Star Sallon dotk. 

"~C ITOV^ Tbe tiassic original AnMnafton. 

QJ(An7 THE TWO« NCC-IMO, Bellgnl & the NCC 

ITbl-A-EnlSpiiSe. MPISCH ROBOTK. 

ax AT1B IWOK.O, Anim NCC tUO Al««r& HOC 

vm-trtrilma^ NCC HW9 Crisstm 

i:iK AT22 AmOACHMQ VSSaSt Anlmollon. 

Binary Flight Wifefromekindscopa by I.FfchTer 

ax AT2S STAR TREK HST MANEUW NCC-1 im 

Fly over & by animtiSion. ^^cellenl classic 

Ogt AT33 THE F«OSE K Anirrwllim. BRD OF PK*, 

Animalibn from Star Trek, KiMdONNTT. 

ax ATM lEAVMS SPACE OfnCE. Andmalun 

DOOOHGi Aflimslion fltiln aw lreJ( ATTACK MODE, 

fiird dT Prey Scour hip irt atlotlt mode. 

i:ir lOM JTAR T«lt TKC h«Xt CmeWTTON. ItlJs 

gome is by Te'ry A. Mc into^^. vl A7 ' 

□« I0B1 THE UTITWIATC STAR TSW (!) Cams try 

Tobias Pichler Ncrww,1h Englrsh inslrudions. 

Ugr 2222 STAR -nst THIlJeirt OBtBtmOM This E 

lhelarsrr|LjlEDarTie boscd on tha Nsxt gonerorjon Bl) 

opr maxm The star TRSC Oame t>y Eric 

Guswfsiin IB InfHjrt reajires IMb & B| disks. 

U SMAUGT54 T^e STM TRBC Gime ty JimtPO Bartxr 

TTieAn^FCOnversign 1AU} & [2] disks 

:^ VJ67 STAR IKK NKMMATION A Ootabose oi 

oil (he DrigtrnI series Very Detailed. 

zai TUXi AHn IfUMINS Anim Requires (21 IMb 

^ ma I« OATIHO 5A«£ Anim ta 3m1i 
3( 1M2 SHUTTIE COCK Antmawm (IMti] 
:Dr liSO IATE mow B. lOMWIAlAnm tlMl^ 

!JX ZOTJ ASiturr Animonon disk nm 

ox 2021 VIETT4AM CONFUCTAnirnntion [IMbI 

ax 2T33 GULf WAD CWniCT nMH 

OX 2307 AMT AT THE MOVES I (4) IMtl Ontf 

OXlSTIAMYvsTHEWAlKBIIt t2|]M> 

□K J3M AMT AT THE BEACH (2) Prohley Ihe liesr 

cnirrfllion by ESIo dale. Excellem 3Mb 

ax 2427 CAMOUDRASE AMM 1Mb 

QX HIB MR POTATO HEAD ORCM ACT {21 Ef 

Chns Utt Krww Ihis ^ (K^ an £5 Anm bu it upfQ Ws srordonj 4 

Matures w« {)f hfi dnrodETS The Honigf. &^^enl s^ 

OK 2UD SKLINK$ « HUNKSiPOOO U AMM 1Mb 

Dof 2474 AMWIST Introduces An^ ttie squirrel 

^JOl 247S BATMAN. Anolhe^ Animalion.VTOC 

oboul ri Harrier vs Pnspflller plane contest. 

OX 2474 HOW TO (BJH, Hew 10 njn Into a vrall. 

Very ft^nrryAnlffrtilPnbyEriG Sctvworlz. 

QX 2477 AMVWAIKS Anim ol Amy Ihe siiuiif ef 

UTaltlnn. AMVJOOS OiAmylheSqjIrrelWolkJng 

GX 24n LKeKMTMO Mb Slnriog lhiA»Tliur>a« 

Central llcencewore Keglsler o NeArcollKtion (rom 
the Amaa F>D ubrorys £1 tKl to ^e progrommef. 
□X atf TOTAL CONCtFTS; DtH<KAURf(21 
OV CU2 TOTAL CONCEPTS: GEOLOGY ID 

ax ctui vma mai ax cluj feh iweker 

ajfOJUSTYFIMG TUTOR OX OOl NOfifilS 

3X002 DAiiK THINGS axcioaFWAaz 
□X aD4 >!-STSiEM opraojiBuaaNONitti 

□ CIO* OBIITEIULTION QX 7 WILLYS WATES WOeKS 
□X CLOe THE NEW DRAGON T1LE5 
□X OOT MOTOR EIUEL 



THE GAMES SEUCTION 



□ W% TCmS QMOMALThls Is the closAsl ^me to the 
orfginol tJetirls cornpLfter gome, A Classic 

ax U20 OTOS rnis istheb^ 2 PIc^rTelrra gome, 
i:^ MS4 MH3iA BALL An excellant Arkonoid gsne 
OX WBA SOUTAIRE & SOLJTARE ROYAL CckJ gomes 
ax 1561 "FHTWU This Is the best version of Tetrison the 
Amjga. with ^ ptoyer, 2 ployar & 3 Payer options, 
gx i7iS ASTPVQDS THE ORlGir^' Another old 
classic. This Is the original classic compuler gomfl, 
a 1747 LLAMATROi/ tSAME 2001 By ieff A&^ 
BriSorit stuff & An exceiler^t production Shoot to kill 
\iac 174« SCRAMBLE 'The Orl^lnal'Remember that old 
classic well is now on the AmnttO The SiToof em yp, 
Uir 1B70 PATI^CrS, This Is me best version to date. 
DOMJNOK, Pkr^vs the compuler or ohother ptoyer. 
ax 1V77 POMPOM GUNNER Shoot dovm IhiG inccm-ing 
VAykt'wcr Holr ptartes In tteOpemAmWoHtype^nv! 

□ 2018 JETHMAN Another Spednjm classic converted lo 
the amlgo. irs JeiPak wirh al! the original sounds. 

i:iX 20f2 SCIV UU<E. TT>e tirsr Silent Service type sot> 
wargaiTiewflhlrk our Amigo PO coHecMon. 
i::iX 2054 ATIC ATAC A rendition of the game fron^ rhe 
criginoil Spectrum con^puter, Graphic Mazeodventure 
i:iX 21A2 BATTU OF BRfTlAN WAR GAME 2 Strategy 
war games which botti need loading through Wb, 
i:iX 21A4 DUNGEON OH NADAOJ ITiis is l^e besi 
Dungeons & l^aaons Public domain r^pe game 
a 2t73 CARDGAMES^ Vorious card games titled 
Crlbboge. BbjeMoooL Klrrg. Patience li hiearts. 
ax t\f% SUflVlVOft A socce based odveture gomre 
within Ihe Aliens theme. Nice cohxirluD gnaphics 
□X 21B0 SKODA CHAU^^GE An eJcCeW A ployer 
holRod gorrve vv'^iren ifi Amos. Simple but good fun. 

UX 21BS BATTLECARS ExcEilSent Solid 3d GrophiCS. 

travel around, rracfcdov^n the orher cars & destroy 
□X tm PAKACHUTt XWST You ore foiling cfaw to 
earth. & must lake the Porochulc from the other playef. 
QX 23S0«mATEO<C OAM£$, Etemol Rome. Uirds of 
l-tosts. In frtoonsfilne. An Ejtcelienl colFeclion.o) garrires. 
□X aWl Mi« OAMt$ t\ Of the l>e£i witnd gomes to 
cfwilerma your mind not your shooting stalls, 
n 22S4 SWORD Of THE WARLOCK A Sards tales / Eye 
of the Beholder iqdventuiire qame pocked on three disk.^;. 
TT^ besF Shareware rolepwying gome on the omigo. 
Excellent Adveiure m \m \1 E>M 
i:iX 2272 81ACK JACK LAB FVt^ f^arrkm Lfh 7 f>k»^s. The 
wflip^ plofi boniBr S bov.5 ttie popuki WWTO rf tfs gon^ 
i::iX 2276 CMD SHARP Avery profKslonally pres«nled 
seledion of scilitowe type Cord gan'ws, EwslbBit versions 
i:iX 2279 SUB ATTACK vl.OConlrod rbe torpeddes & 
sink the enemy ships as ttiey soil post. lawmI«. 
i::tX 22BO DF1j0MANCYv2,D a classic strotegy gome 
loosely based on ^orld Wor (. A very deioiled gonte 
i:iX 2313 RCVB4GE OFTHE MUTAhrr CAMBS By Jeff 
Minter The ride al o life time with niutont comets 
i:iX 23S7 SPACE POKBI TheoHematlve Poker Game 
\JX 3411 TOTAL WAR The boorct gome version ol EISIC 
i:iX 2412 PORMIAA 1 SIMUlATdR Anadltlve simulator 
laX a4aa GOLDEH QUM^ GOloga, Oolosaons, Spoce 
invoders, Asieriods, Qolty, Missie Command & Blimeline. 
i:iX 2447 AMOS OOMOROP FRUIT MACHINE Excelter^l 
slmufoior with varidus oomWe mode;. Greoi fun. . 
ax 2450 SMASH TV - THE M> OFf ^mular to the 
Originol OrCode machine With neoi gnopglcs 3r sound 
ax 245S MAYHEM GuliSe your space ship through Ihe 
Spoce COvems, shool things & open ihe spoce gofes. 
i:^34SA terrWXAnewTelrisvoriahtwihereyDu 
posilon tiles within a leher. time limit so be tet about It. 
i:iX 24B0 AMOS FRUT MACHME M As near as 
pQssc^ile to ttie (ryti nwchine foumd in Pubs ■& Arcades. 
i:iX 24B1 AMI MORUvS,22 Tbls !S the latest upda^e to 
the Original Wono odventure gome. Better grophlcs, 
and Ihe larKi adventure to date. EKcellent 
OV 1402 DfSCtNOCft Is a clone of the clossic orcode 
game lemp^cornplete vvlih vectorized graphics, 
LDC 34B3 HTRLDS Is a MuttI level Berserk done, 
features smDoihoc*n«*ay, great grophics & sound. 
Lilf Z4B4 CATACOMB AgroF^lcatodvBnturegameselona 
smoit bfcnd In Ih tniddlB of Im ikind ol EXCHBl^ Your qust 
Is 10 discover secrets & treosurs ol thte underground maze 
Otf MBS RUN OAOS -NAPOLB4C WAR^tMbl This Is 
another upckiie to the eKeilent Strategic War Came (2) 
QX 24B7 CLASH OF THE EMPffiB (1^b| Another 
BKceBent Sirateolcol WorOome 6y T.ASeor. Qj 
GX 24B9 THE COLOSSAL CAVE v1.0 An adventure by 
Donald i/iJoods &. Will Crowther S> iswrtualjv' identical to 
the original moin frame classic. Ported by Tony Beldlog 
QX 24™ RUMMT AAOlher Card gome with graphics 
ax Z491 L£GB«I OF LOTHAM v1.02 Is an odvenlure 
gome In the vien of Ihe Ulfwria game series, iRcludK 
coloL^I grcKihlcs. Hordes isl monsters & puzzles to soh?. 
QX Z4H BATTLfiMaJTS - HUNCHB^ This is a 
convsrslon of threoM dossic goms. Excellent gome 



».mHrJLHi]m«UIJ.|.).lMil.HM.I:).IJ:JJrl.l.l 



AMOS 8 FRED FISH DISKS 



I^VAPDIJI UHDBt$TANEWM AMO$ The Amos 

Tutorlol Progrom Disl(, A musf 
a Al>D39A KJWBDASE vZ.O This rs an efxsi. hwndlv and 
Pcwer^illv dalotMse which con hondte lO.OW records, 
jjir FS4V VStSEWtSE vl.O Gospel \fAMX & J) of the 
aible view, output, search prog^o m. jump to onry verse, 
QX F5A2 SHOW GURU v2.1b Recognizes 16B differeni | 
gunj numbers & honsloles them into English 
ax FS71 MULTVLOT vM One ol the mosi pcwerful 
doio^oltfno padca^es available. Exceltent abllltlK. 
nox F§74 tCWZAP v3.S A ihrd gensf olten wfM purpose 
Jriie sector ecAtrig utility, includes on eKcellent searcti fsoi^jre 
OX F5B0 WOMD DATABANK v2.2 Using o dalo boSe I 
^mi the ClA, thisprogiram will plot world mops. 
i:iX FSV3 ANALYRNM |2] An intergr^tion of AnolytCok 
spreadsheet & RIM^S Datobcse manag«nent. 
i:3X FA21 MULTiPLATSC vl-tf Music player progroffi 
which ptays soundtrackef/h4DJsetracker modules. 
ax ^79 CLBPvl.OI Cannn Loser Printer Driver. 
Includes extra preferences with addiftonol options 
Lix HtJ AOOC V7-04 A Help unkty for the Amiga. You i 
Vniil have pennanent help on any subject you wont. 
QX FA3B i^OeO OF LOTHIAN vl.ftl Is on adventure 
game in the vwn of the LHIimo game series. Indudes 
colour^l gropbics. i^rdes of monsters & puzzles to solve. 
QX FA30 BKS vl.lO BoDf Imn Consliuction S?l Q tod to oeolB 1 
srrioii WTO o(t Ihe booftliodc,wffidioppeor when a disk ij inserted, r 
QX FA31 AHDM v3.B<K[ Horc disfc menu syst'on^ of^rs 
o sMsen page n»enu, ecKh page having upta ten 
possible odlons. Just double dfek on the opilon. 

QX FA32 PMNmLES vO.9 A print utility to replace The 
Sfondord worktDenchprinffiles commond. WM Only 
QX FA34 SUCER v2.0 1'VIII create abstract art bosKJ on | 
mofhemofical functions, such os rnoodetbrot set. NBA" 
P(W^v2.1, A pnagrom for formatting tsflfties so that 
they con od[ us.i_oir trie n-argins, 00110001 shoreware. 
QX FA3S BOOTPtC v2.0^ Allows you to install near^ 
ony IF? Rcture ihoi yoy like inploce ol the WB haf>d, 
QX FA3A ALERT tV<i, Gives clelalled Infornvillon aboui | 
Ihe meonir™ of various Amiga oterls. PIVPRIMT vl,5 
IQX FA37 LAZl Al a utittty for use with archlvers. You 
can odd, deieie, eKtract^ update sirigie or n^ulripte 
fiEes. LHA ^2% Latest versicn ttom 5>%tan Bobiyg. 
QX WSe POWetMAXe *1,1S a powerful mooFrtie 
tagume tevel debugger fo' the serious Amiga Procrommer. | 
Cuf FAS2 fiEMEmS v3i.O A very nice interoctrve di^loy | 



oTihe Periodic Table of Etemems, Shareware. 

QX FAS3 RLE SOKTvt.O A ^le requester which is 

small tasi has some excellent new leahjres. 

QX FASS HAKTAR vUA A kind of odM^nti^e Conslnjct- 

ion Vi\ on an easy to leorn Inlerpreler languooe. 

QX FM1 CITADa ^JH A fulE feotured Amlgol£S 

pnraram wirh oil necessary files to setup your own 6E£. 

UlX FAA3 DiSKJET v2.1A ^ecl an Internal tent to print 

One or rriore tiles Will onlycantral a HP Qeskjeil ^CW's 

IQX FAAA KME vT,2 is anofher lceyrt>ap editor, that you 

con use 10 edit the Amigo keymobs used by Setmop, 

;iltI J>:Vtf.rJTii^ — 

QX CAi OiP^tT PACK 1 (91 Spoils' Flogs, Aninwfs 
toons, HumonDus, Xmas, Jewish borders. Hallo-ween, 
volaitiies, eyes, alphabets, bonds, zodiac, cars & mona 
QX CAI OJIMT PACK 2 |5] iV^, woman, llhjminated 
A to 2, orrcws, stars, e>iplosiorB, humorous, cartoons, 
pointing bonds, fi^ & loods more 
QX CAl aiMT P*CK a 151 Fruit, Herbs, Meal, Atii^, 
Sfpeciol Ocassions. Vegelobiss, KItcften UlerKils,, Cups, 
Glasses, Art Oeco & ereoWosts. 
QX CAI OJP^n PACK 4 (3^ More Art I^o, bable, bo^ 
girls, lotsof i^L?noufoug, Illumfrioted A to Z, scrolls, more 
special occasions &: calligraphic ornomBnls. 
QX CAI CUP-IT PACK a 151 Oirisimos PockOi^O & ZOIh 
centurv fnsm lather chn'sintas to borders to treK & borders. 
QX CAI OJIMT PACK A |5| Mythological A^onsters on 
excellent pock of creatures fVom olf over Ihe worid: 
Jopon, Europe, India, North Amefico, S America eel. 
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COMPiETE The Complete Fred Fish has been 
mEOFISH professional printed, bound & includes 
o sorted Index of Oilljhe disl(5. It now stands ol over 
ISO+Pages. It olso comes with free update pages as 
the new disks ore released. Please note that the 
updates are only ovoiloble from PD-Soft. FRED FiSH is 
collection of Amiga Games, Utilities & Aluch, More_ 
Each disttstotoVpadkedwlrhproorants.*. _-j I 
All Fred Rsh disks corrwwiihluBinstrucfora "^^-^^j | 



iw^ffiw^^iW^^gS 



Any other disks Required, 
■line BucJget Software! 



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mpog* 146 

Book, which is a $10 shareware 
program by Linda Lullie, is a 
computerised version of the "record 
every tiny detaii of your baby's 
development" sorapbooks sold to 
guiiible (or sadistic) parents. Whether 
you're guilibie or sadistic can be 
determined by asl<ing yourself 
whether you are iil^eiy to get the bool< 
out when your offspring brings their 



''Now could be a 
good fime to swifc/i 
ffie computer off 
to to the 



andgt 
pub. 



// 



giri/boyfriend home to dinner. 

The idea is that, as your sprog 
grows, you type in aii its relevant 
details - date of birth, weight, name 
of the doctor present, when it first 
vomltted over the babysitter and so 
on. The program has a number of 
'pages', ranging from 'Firsts' (smile, 
tooth, haircut and so on), through 
'Mom's notes and medical notes' to 



13 RH.5 53% fun, 4K free, 833K in use iBldl 



Icons 



t«5 



HsrkArt; 



■poo 



ne_First 



DropCloth i!>\\i 



M^ 



Backdrop 



The.Bin 



Pandora's_BoK Gallery 



Start le PowerPacker 



The Aml^holics club disk has some utilities and programs on the disk, 
although th«re Isn't the variety that you And on some 



'Baby's first Christmas'. Details can, 
of course, be printed out. 

If this is your kind of thing, I have 
to say that it's been fairly weli done. 
Apart from an occasional difficulty In 
selecting a text field to type in to, the 
program worked well, the fonts are 
reasonable and the graphics are weli 
drawn. Personally, I just think it's 
sad there's a market for this kind of 
thing. The rating depends on whether 
you agree or not. 

Program rating 1/10 

or 9/10 



UPDATE... UPDATE... 




FT-X AccQUirta now has an Improved user Intmrface and many new features 
- recommended I 

You may recall that tn the June Issue I raved about a program called FT-X 
AccoimtB, by Fred Trigg. Well, Fred has been In touch with me to tell me 
that he's radically itpgracle<) the program, which Is now at version 2.01. It's 
now far faster, twcause he's re-wrltten It In complied HISoft Basic rather 
than Amiga Basic, and added sotne features like Rxed Costs and a faster 
reconciliation feature. 

Fred has now included a requester telling you that the version you have 
is unregistered, and which counts down from about 40 - in seconds - so 
that's a good incentive to register. The user interface has now also been 
improved - the whole thing is much more attractive and professional-looking. 

In the June issue i said that I'd recommend FT-X Accounts; with the 
Improvements that Fred has made, I'd say that this is doubly the case. 

The shareware fee for the program is £20; Fred can be contacted at 25 
Cecil Aldin Drive, Tilehurst, Reading, Berkshire RG3 6YP. 



HOME MANAGER 2.0 

PD Soft disk V660 

Home Manager is an $1S shareware 
program by Len Piatt, who goes 
under the pseudonym of Lord Sutch 
Productions. It started out as 
personal database called Home 
Sweet Home, but grew as more 
features were added. It now has 
eight sections: Appointments; 
Personal Inventory; Address Book; 
Notepad; The Wallet; Area Codes; 
and Important Phone Numbers. 

The program works in Interlace 
mode, although It only takes up the 
NTSC portion of the screen. Until you 
register, a small 'nagging Requester' 
appears at frequent Internals 
reminding you to register the 
program - this requester holds up 
program operation for about five 
seconds each time it appears, so 
you'll soon get sick of it. 

As with the home accounts 
package reviewed earlier, your views 
on the usefulness of this program 
will directly reflect your opinion of 
whether computers are better than 
standard paper-and-pen methods of 
organising your life. Given that you 
think they are, though. Home 
Manager i s ce rta I n ly f u 1 1 y-fe atured 
and should keep you happy. 

Taking a brief look at each of the 
sections to the program in turn, the 
first is the Address Book. This has 
as many features as some stand- 
alone programs, including the facility 
to print address labels, an individual 
entry, a list of all names or the full 
database. You can also search for 
strings In any of the fields. You can 
have two separate address 
databases, designated Business and 
Personal. 

The Appointments module Is a 
combined calendar/appointments 
diary, with the calendar on the left of 
the screen and an appointment book 
on the right. Although automatically 
set up with time slots at half-hourly 
interifals, the appointment diary can 
be altered at will. 



Area Codes doesn't seem to be 
editable, but contains phone codes 
for a large number of countries, as 
well as many (If not all) American 
States. The American States 
information might not be too useful 
to us here In the UK, but I'm sure 
that someone out there will be able 
to make use of them. 

The Inventory section of the 
program allows you to list and 
describe all your valuables - 
presumably for insurance purposes, 
in case your home is burgled. 
However, since the Amiga is likely to 
be one of the things that's taken. It's 
a good Idea to print out the list, 
rather than just leave it on the 
computer. Fortunately, there's the 
facility to do Just that - as well as 
printing a single entry or printing a 
list of items without any detail. 

The Notepad is a basic note 
taker - the documentation says that 
it's not Intended to be a fully-fledged 
word processor, although you can 
load, save and print documents from' 
this area of the program. Phones Is a 
list of regularly-used phone numbers, 
which can be dialled if you have a 
modem connected to your phone 
line. I've seen this sort of routine on 
just about every computer ever 
made, and I still wonder... does 
anyone actually use it? 

ToDo's is the section of the 
program where you enter any things 
that you need to do (surprise, 
surprise). Every time you start the 
program. It scans to see if there's 
anything In the list and, If there is, 
lets you know. 

Rnally, The Wallet Is described in 
the documentation as a "credit card 
database with dialler". Unfortunately, 
It refused to run on my machine - 
every time I selected that module, 
the program just terminated and left 
me back In the Workbench. 

Home Manager needs the fatter 
(1Mb) Agnus chip to run, and works 
in Interlaced mode - something 
which makes it less useful for me 
(and, 1 suspect, many people) since 1 
don't have a flicker fixer, and staring 
at an interlaced screen for more than 
five minutes at a time gives me a 
dreadful headache. 

It constantly amazes me that 
people write such high-quality 
software for the PD and shareware 
marketplace. Home Manner could 
easily be sold as a full, commercial 
piece of software. It looks 
professional, has no bugs that I 
could find (with the exception of The 
Wallet), has comprehensive on-line 
help and is cleariy the product of a 
great deal of development work. I 
can only hope that Len keeps on 
writing shareware - he's already 
written six or seven other programs - 
since he's obviously very talented. 

nMitlflirad on poge 1 50 



48 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 1 6 • AUGUST 1 992 



OLYMPIC DISCS 



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EDUCATION PACK 1 (P) 5 DISKS £4.9$ 

Germait. Gif^. Grotitne.Dnrwmap. Evitljuion, Claudi, FormaSa. 
Airfoil. Grtniiy 5™, WenfMr. Wa\.t Maker and mare!! fn\iipaek is one 
of OUT bea sfllrrt and ii incredible faltufitr tafiaty). 

ASTRONOMY PACK (P) 4 DISKS £3.W 

This superb pack nav,'in:litdft; Star Chart, Amigazer. Tofal 
Contepts Astronomy. Gravity Wrli GravSim. Orhii, Planet and 
Past facta on the sotar system. 

PRINTER USER PACK (P) 4 DISKS £3^ 

Ejsrntialfbr ali printer owners' tactudes. Label Designer, Label 
Printer. Printer Driver Generator. Print SfUdio, Pita More! 

PUZZLES PACK n (•) (P) 2 DISKS £1.98 

Superb new pack for fans ofcrosswordt;fpepu:iirs, includes: 
HiwiifMorfA ' Ptader - Wdrdhat - Wardgame - Crosswords - CWP 
- Daeorch 

SIMULATIONS PACK (•) ^P) S DISKS £4.95 

Alt of the best PQ simtilofions in one pack! Metro -Be a city 



planner. King Oil - you .irt JJ(.! Nuke - fiFuclear arms rget. 
frnprtiumMom^tfiHrn - Grab ancient Mediterranean pott^er, 
Sealance - Save the world udth vow nuclear sub. Truikin - Rufl 
your own truetin company. DCiO - Learn i&/ly a DCiOJet, Lore 
^Conquest - TWo pbiyers: lake OVer the galtayl insiders Cluh - 
Super/t siocisrtarket simuiation, Air Kirrrior - Toie you pict from 
a ha^e range of aircraft viffl this excellent fiight simuloior! 

EASY BUSINESS PACK {P) $ DISKS £4.95 

Ml programs included are powetfui but easy! Includes: Text 
Engine VI iThe very latesi WOrdproceisorf. Spread Vi 
i'Spreadsheetf. ^ase (Simple Dafabasei, BBase if (Good 
Databaseh Bankn (Great accounts packagei, X-Spell (Speli 
checker i. Prim Studio. 

INTERMEDIATE BUSINESS PACK (P) 

SDfiKS £4^ 

WorAvrigkf (WordprOcessi^ including fdoil Merge and MacrosH 
S-CaSc iGood Spreadsheeti, Amibasr Pro 1 (Stunning Pt> 
Database - New!], AmigasptU (Spell Checkeri. LS Label (Infinite 
label controli. Messysiil V2, (Antiga FUt Management * PC Pile 
Tran^rK Amiga fo* {Deitfitp Fubtishingf 
DISK EXPERT PACK (P) 5 DISKS £4.45 

If you want to learn more C^ttt yMr Amiga, gel this pack! - You'll 
be a disk expert in no time! Includes Power Packer (Easy file 
COmpacterj, Sid {BrilUani CU Replacement TooHi. Icormiania 
(Change any Icon in seconds), Fixdisk. Viruschecker VS3. D-Copy 
tCopies. Repairs. Formats and more}, CU Tutorial (AH >W( i»mJ 
to hmviandlO^ (tlhrr utilities!'! 

"V PROGRAMMERS PACK (^ 6 DISKS £S34 

A Complete "C" language arid sttperb instruction momial pruvide 
all yoa need SO learn the "C language, includes North C (2 disks} 
and the C Manual (4 diLksf 

MED V3a MtSIC PACK (P) 4 DISKS £3.9ti 

MED iS videly recognised as the beit music package. PD or 
otherwise!! This pack Contains Vi.2. the latest version complete 
with loads t^ digital samplts. a disk full cfMED mitrie scares and 
some great MED music to load and play! Usien to what tour 
machine is capable of? 

500+ CLASSIC GAMES PACK (P) 5 DISKS £4.95 

An incredible colletlion t^ superb commercial ifuallty arcade 
fomet! Hours of fun for both kidi and adults. IneludtS.' Defender, 
Galaxions, Scranible, Missile Command. PaC'Man, 3i-Planes, 
Dripl. SpitCe in^-aders.Ajteroidt, Breakout, Tetrii + more! 

CARD + BOARD GAMES 2 (P) 4 DISKS £3.9* 

AiKther outsninding collection! 1$ very good "Thin^ng' Games!: 
Chess ^7. Backgaittmon. blackbox. Toveri, Pipe, Zerg, MSit. 
Cluedo. ConRecft. Dominoes, Draughts, OtheKo.GoMokit, 
Dragon Tilts, Klondike, Canfield. Mastermind, Wordsean-h. 
Hangman, Pontoon and many more. 
rteue Dole all pick disks mty ht bdORbt stngif il 99pl 
SINGLE DISKS AT ONLY 99p! 
BUSINESS 

B32iiFftSS'^)Amiga^tEngliih DeskTop PuNlshingf 
B322 (Fi (93%t 600' Businessd^ettert (St^rb! - Ready to use} 
flJJO (Pi (^%) Amicash (Superh new bank account manager^ 
BSSUPii92%fQED (Very good wotdptocestor for begintutsi 
Siii iPi(90^!l U'Edit ViM (Latev and greatest wardpro) 
B333 fP\ (m%\ A/nibaie Fn^ssioml 1 jNm PD! - Super danAase} 
Bi34 iFl Appt^mmeivs (ite^er jniss nnf.' Let your Aji\iga remind you} 
B335 (P) f92%i Poroa tmlimited (Design invoices etc, qmcklvand 

tasityli 
BI39 (P) A^faph (very easy to use - make bar + line graphs and 

pie charts!! 



S?mpiy phon& your orOw thnugh or »»tul a ch^^ue/postal ordtr. Pi^an 



BS2? (Pi fS6%i Text Erigine V3 (great looking wordproceiiOK easy 

yei povirtful) 
B140 i(P!t(S^%}BBaselfV5J. Latest Database now includes 

better printouts and mailing labets! 
B341 (F} Phone-Plus fSiorephone numbers. print address labeis. 

good!) 

UTILITffiS 

tH13 (P) ({00%} Sid v1j6 (makes ^ti a master ofCLIi 
U4I6 (P) (70%) CU TuiOritd (Learn all about Hi 
i'4i7(PK9i%)D-Copy V2.iNo>vatt even better disk copierl\ 
U47i X Copy Ul (PD version of commercial prog: Save £3^!!i 
U47S (Pi Typing Tutor (New! Great features ) 
U494 (Pi Pascal (2 t^ks ■ brtlUant language) 
U49i ^7*J VUwchecker V6jt)4(P) (The iveti -Forthepki tool) 
U496(Pi(9S%\Meu:FSidV2 (Reads and writes PC dlsksi 
U497 (P) (S5%i ASi}0+ UtiiUies (For the ASOO-t onlyli 
U4ii04 (Pi Pools PreiUctffr (significantly impnoves yoMr chances) 
U400S (Pi f75%i Turbo Invloder f«ii«M Imds mote onto a diski 
U4006 IP) Fancy disk label designer (the best around, in colour 

ioc!) 
U4007 iP) (93%) Disk Opiindstr (bt^lliansly simple! Any disk loads 

t^ to 15 times faster i 
U4008 (P) Sid V7 (It's si^rb!!! Fully functional!) 
U4009 (P) Amiga Tutorial (A beginners manual on disk, superbli 
U40tO(Pi(9&%)MDCIick V2 + File Minder. Superb hard disk 

menu maker + Directory uHllty (NEV^'!) 
mon (Pi Race Rater Horse race predictor - Good (NEWH 
IMOtl (Pi (i}2%i Magnetic Pages VU. ProdtiCe your awn superb 

disk magaiines (NEW!) 
imi3 (Pi (SS%i Power logo. Full language (NEWIi 
U40i4 (Pi Lazi. Easy to use UiatC, Art ^ loo! (NE»!) 

GAMES - r=IMEG) 

G60i3 (Pi Chess Tutor (improve your sfnH} includes a full 

chess game! 
G60i9 (P) A500+ Games (2 1 Games for the Plus!) 
G^2l (P) (90%) Tanx (great Jm! get it now ' yctu won't be 

disappointed) 
G6022 (PiCluedo(100% acctirate version of the board game) 
G602S (P) Monopoly (excelled American plus compatible 

version!) 
G6027 (Pi(9{%)L>ihian. Superb ultima me adventure ^ great 

graphics • hordes c^ monsters! (N^) 
G602S (Pi (9.^%) D^ender! Abnosi eian arcade comrersion - 

Brilliarif! 
G677 (P)(<>0^)AmigoSds (The best Asteroids Gamei 
G624 (Pi Btiaard {*) (PD's best rftwr em up) 
cm (Pi Pom Pom Gunner V2 (Laiest ^ New levels) 
CHILDRENS 

C701 (P) Learn * Flay (2 disks-super education for 4- 1 Oyrsi 

C7S2 (Pf Colour Pad (New colouring book for voun^sters) 

C7!3 (P) (90^i Peters Quest (lots d^. platform gamei 

C7i4 (94%) Storylandfl (Brilliant kids game) 

CJiS (Pi Composer (simply st^tb music maker for i2yrs + J 

C71 7 (Fi Frogger! {frantic jrog fun/of under lOsi 

C71S (Pi(n%i Centipede (v.'oaderfjtl graphics, brilliant game 

fOragesStoadultH 
C7I9 (Pi fS7%J Total Concepts (2 DfrtJ.j (Astronamy Jt iJjiuMsur 

Education Pack ' Good!i 
C720 (Pi Colour ihe<l4phabet (Great education for early leamersiyi*! 
C721 (P) Languages! (Practice French, German and Spanish!) 
C724 (Pi (95%i Doody. l*fy much like Mario Brot and very good 



add 60p to cover p09t mnd packing. 



Anglia 


anj 


^ angi 
;lia 
1 angl 
;lia 



FISH DISKS IN 

STOCK 350-650 

ONLY 99P EACH! 



DEJA-VU 

IN STOCK 1-85 
£3^0 EACH! 



PUBLICII 

ANGLIA PUBLIC DOMAIN LIBRARY 
(EJept ASH), 115 Banelagh Road, Feli>stowe, Suffolk. IP11 7HU 



TELE 



UJ 



Intinwtlonflf 
OTBlert WAleamt 
but p4«H a 
30p pw dl«k 

poii^packlnfl. 



Old 

ifCREDITgi 



0394 

283 
494 



puBiyjiiyuyN 



CMiHMMd from paga lU 

It's another good reason to pay your 
shareware fees - to keep guys like 
this interested. 
Program rating 9/10 



DISK MAGS 



Please do keep your disl< magazines 
coming in, even if I don't review 
yours every rnonth. Each coiumn 
from now on I'll pick out one or two 
that I haven't iooked at for a while, 
so it's in your interests to make sure 
that I keep seeing yoursi 

AMIGAHOUCS NO 5 

The Amigahollcs disk magazine 
number 5 starts with some pretty 
reasonable music and a picture 
which siowiy draws itself on the 
screen. After a while you realise that 
you need to hit a key to continue 
and, having done that a scrolling 
message appears with the histoiv of 
the disl<. Hit a key again (it would be 
good to be told that that's what you 



need to do) and you're into the 
program selector. 

The editorial was an interesting 
read, as was the Letters section. 
Unusually for a disk magazine with a 
menu, only the text files were 
included on the menu - for access to 
the rest of the files, you have to exit 
to the Workbench. 

The programs included weren't 
too spectacular, but the range wasn't 
bad. The disk I received was the 
February edition (why 1 didn't get a 
later one 1 don't know), but I'm 
assured that the magazine is going 
from strength to strength. 

Amigahollcs can be contacted at 
29 Wolfe Crescent, Charlton, London 
SE7 STS. 
Value for money 6/10 

DREAMERS 

Dreamers Is unusual for a disk 
magazine in that its front-end was 
written in AMOS (of course, as usual 
that means that I can't screen grab 
the bloody thing!). The presentation 
Is very elegant, with text scrolling in 



the middle third of the screen, the 
magazine's logo at the top and Icons 
for the different subjects at the 
bottom. 

Much of the disk is taken up with 
text files, and the editorial content 
certainly seems up to scratch. There 
are reviews of 3D drawing packages, 
tips on drawing techniques for 
popular programs such as Deluxe 
Pamt, a review of a DTP package, a 
discussion of memory expansions 
along with reviews of a few units, 
games reviews, news and so on. 
There Is also a 'picture of the 
month'. Unfortunately, there's not 
much (if anything) in the way of PD 
software on the disii, so be aware 



that you're paying mainly for 
editorial. However, in future there will 
be two disks - each costing £2, or 
both for £3 - one of which will be the 
mag, while the other carries a 
selection of PD. 

Dreamers issue 3 has been 
made public domain so that people 
can see what it's like; normally the 
disks will cost £2. Issue 3 was 
supplied to us by PD Soft - it's disk 
number 2425. Or, if you want to get 
the latest issue, send a cheque for 
£2 (or £3 for both the mag and its 
associated collection of PD software) 
to Paul Harthen, 43 Boyds Walk, 
Dukinfield, Cheshire SK16 4AX. 
Value for money 6/10 



Next month I will, as always, be seeking out the best software to review. If 
you've got a particular sub}ect that you want me to cover, or if you've come 
across a good piece of PD or shareware that you think deserves a mention, 
drop me a line here at PD World, Amiga Shopper, Future Publishing, 30 
Monmouth Street, Bath BAl 2BW. Or you can contact me on CIX as 
'iwrigley', or on the Internet as 'iwrigley@cix.compu1ink.co,uk'. 



(A 




(A 




o 





fr 

^ 




3 Amigos 

16 Marsett Way 
Leeds LS14 2DN 
a 0532 733043 

Amlganuts United 

169 Dale Valley Road 
Hollybrook 
Southampton SQl 6QX 

AMOS PD Library (also Daja Vu) 

25 Park Road 
Wigan WN6 7AA 
« 0942 495261 

Anglla POL 

115 Ranelagh 
Feltxtowe 
Suffolk IPll 7HU 
a 0394 283494 

Blitterchlps 

Cliffe House 
Primrose Street 
Keighfey BD21 4NN 
n 0535 667469 

CIS 

PO Box 7 

Bl etch ley 

Milton Keynes, MK2 3YI 

« 0908 640763 

Ci^y Joa's 

145 Effingham Strset 
Rothertiam 
South Yorks S65 IBL 
« 0709 829286 

Dottrax PD 

36 Bodelviydctan Ave 
Old CoSwyn 
Clwyd L129 9NP 
a 0492 515981 



DIgttt 

PO Box 144, Mexborough 
South Yorks S64 9SL 
w 0709 571748 

EdUb 

Scotland Farm, Stockwood Road 
Brislington 
Bristol BS4 5LU 
• 0272 7234S9 

EMPDL 

54 Watnall Road 
Hucknall 

Nottingham NG15 7LE 
» 0602 630071 

Essex Computer Systems 

lis Middle Crockerford 
Basildon 
Essex SS16 4JA 
■B 0268 553963 

George Th(Knps(»i Setvlces 

Cucumber Hall Farm, 
Cucumber Lane 
Essendon 
Herts AL9 SJB 
w 0707 664 654 

Goldstar Computeis 

PO Box 2 
T^desley 

Manchester M29 7BN 
a 0942 895320 

ICPUQ 

PO BOX 1309 
London N3 2UT 
a 081-346 0050 

Kemow Software PO Ubrary 

51 Ennors Road 
Newquay, Cornwalt 



NBS 

1 Chain Lane, Newport 
Isle Of Wight P030 5QA 
a 0983 529594 

Neural Images 

4 Flint Walk, Hartlepool 
Cleveland TS26 OTE 
vt 0492 263508 

Office Choice (OC-PD) 

30 Town St, Kirkintilloch 
Glasgow G66 INL 
ff 0236 737901 

PDSoft 

1 Bryant Ave, Southend-On-Sea 
Essex SSI 2YD 
« 0702 612259 

Pontile PD 

lOa Hag Hill Lane, Taplow 
Maidenhead, Berks SL6 OJH 
a 0628 666641 

Public Domlnator 

PO BOX 801, Bishop's Stortford 
Herts CM23 3TZ 
a 0279 757692 

Rherdene PDL 

30a School Road 
Tile hurst, Reading 
Berkshire RG3 5AN 
a 0734 452416 

Telescan Computer Services 

Handsworth Road 
Blackpool FY5 ISB 
a 0253 22296 

Sector 10 

160 Hollow Way, Cowley, Oxford 
a 0865 774472 



Seventeen BK Software 

PO BOX 97, Wakefield 
West Yorks WFi IXX 
a 0924 366982 

Software Expressions 

Hebron House, Sion Road 
Bedminster 
Bristol BS3 3BD 
a 0272 637634 

Softvtile 

Unit 5, Stratfield Park 

Etettra Avenue, 

Waterlooville 

Hants 

P07 7XN 

a 0705 266509 

Start Computer Systems 

Barbican House 
Bonnersfield 
Sunderiand, SR6 OAA 
a 091 564 1400 

Startronlcs 

4 Arnold Drive, Droylsden 
Manchester M35 6RE 
a 061 370 9115 

Unique Computing 

114 Setters Road, Gosforth 
Newcastle on Tyne, NE3 3UP 
a 091-284 7976 

Valiy PD 

PO BOX 15, Peterlee 
Co Durham SR8 INZ 
a 091-587 1195 

Wtrral PD 

PO Box 4, Birkenhead 
Merseyslde L43 4FW 
a 051 651 0646 



150 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



SAFE SHOPPING 



BUYING ADVICE 
FOR SHOPPERS 

Whether buying over the phone or at a local store, 
here's our advice on how to get what you want 



BUYING IN PERSON 

• Where possible, always test any 
software and hardware in the shop 
before taking it home, to make sure 
that it works properly. 

• Make sure you have all the 
necessary leads, manuals or other 
accessories you need, 

• Don't forget to keep your receipt. 

BUYING BY PHONE 

• Be as clear as possible when 
stating what you want to buy. Make 
sure you confirm all the technical 
details of what you are buying. Some 
things to bear in mind are version 
numbers, memory requirements, 
other required hardware or software 
and compatibility with your particular 
model of Amiga (that is, make sure 
you know which version of Kickstart 
you have). 

• Check the price you are asked to 
pay, and make sure that it's the 
same as the price advertised. 



• Check that what you are ordering 
is actually in stock. 

• Check when and how the article 
will be delivered, and that any extra 
charges are as stated on the advert. 

• Make a note of the date and time 
when you order the product. 

BUYING BY POST 

As with buying by phone, you should 
clearly state exactly what it is you 
are buying, at what price (refer to the 
magazine, page and issue number 
where it's advertised) and give any 
relevant information about your 
system set-up where necessary. You 
should also make sure you keep 
copies of all correspondence both to 
and from the company concerned. 

MAKING RETURNS 

Whichever method you buy by, you 
are entitled to return a product if it 
falls to meet any one of the following 

three criteria: 



A CHECK LIST FOR 
MAIL ORDER BUYING 

1 Make sure you know exactly what ycu want. Draw up a checklist of the 
specifications you are looking for and what you want it to be able to do. 
Check with the suppliers that their product matches your list 

2 Will the product you have In mind work with your existing set-up, and 
anything else you are planning to buy? 

3 Can you see a demonstration? Many products are on display at computer 
shows around the country. 

4 Are there any hidden extras? Does ft need 1Mb to run, or a hard disk? 

5 What technical support Is provided by the supplier? Does the 
manufacturer offer after-sales advice? Check before you buy, 

« Check the guarantee terms. How long is the free warranty? What does it 
offer? 

T Draw up a list of these details and make them a condition of your order. 

8 Check the price and delivery details when you order, and make a note of 
them. 

9 Note down when you placed the order and who you spoke to. 

1 When it arrives, check everything carefully, if anything Is missing, don't 
use the product at alt - contact the supplier. If It doesn't work, mtake the 
obvious checks such as the fuse, if It still doesn't work don't try to fix it - 
contact the supplier. 



• The goods must be of 
'merchantable quality'. 

• The goods must be 'as described'. 

• The goods must be fit for the 
purpose for which they were sold. 

if they fail to satisfy any or all of the 
criteria, then you are then entitled to: 

• Return them for a refund. 

• Receive compensation for part of 
the value. 

• Get a replacement or free repair. 
When returning anything, ensure that 
you have proof of purchase and that 
you return the item as soon as 
possible after receiving it. For this 
reason it is important that you check 
the hardware or software as soon as 
it is delivered to make sure 
everything you ordered is there and 
works as it is supposed to. 

HOW TO PAY 

Paying by credit card (s the most 
sensible way, whether buying in 
person, by post or on the phone, 
because you may be able to claim 
the money from the credit card 
company even if the firm you ordered 
from has gone bust or refuses to 
help sort out your problem. 

Otherwise, you should pay by 
crossed cheque or postal order - 
never send coins or notes through 
the mail, 

GEHING REPAIRS 

Always cheek the conditions of the 
guarantee, and sen/icing and 
replacement policy, so that you know 
what level of support to expect. 
Always fill in and return warranty 
cards as soon as possible, and 
make sure that you are aware of all 
the conditions contained in the 
guarantee. 

BUYING PD 

Even though PD software is relatively 
inexpensive, you should still apply 
the guidelines set out above, making 
sure that you confirm all orders as 
clearly as possible. 

Shopping around is still 
important when buying PD because 
different houses charge different 
prices for the same disks. There is 
no set pricing structure for disks, but 
bear in mind that PD houses are, in 
theory, supposed to be non-profit 
making operations. {JQ 



ADVERTISERS INDEX 



1st Choice (Leeds) 49-51 

3 Amigos 149 

16 Bit Centre 80 

316Supplies 20 

Accelerators Unlimited 72 

Ace Repairs 144 

Advanced Electronics 94 

Anglia PD 149 

Artworks 65 

BCS 68 

Coombe Valley 90 

Cortex.. 4 

Delta Pi 90 

DeltraxPD 144 

Diamond 126-129 

Digicopy ..,,.65 

Digita , 9 

Direct Computers 94 

Dynamite 110, 111 

EMC 65 

Evesham Micros 120, 121 

Express PD 144 

Futureworld 38, 39 

G2 Systems , 72 

Grapevine 90 

Hanwoods 55-61, 77 

Hisoft 155 

Hobbyte 100, 101 

Home Based Business 90 

Intracom 72 

Ladbroke Computing 96 

Merlin , 69 

MJC Supplies 46 

Olympic Disks 149 

Omega Projects .....118 

PDSoft 147 

Phoenix , 12 

Povi^er Computing ...2, 33, 156 

Sector Software 102 

Shadow Softwfare..., 102 

Silica Systems...1 05, 113, 117 

Softstore 85 

Start ronics , 144 

Switclisoft ....94 

Trilogic 106, 107 

Ultimate PD 142 

Vortex 25 

Weserve 6 

WTS Electronics 102,93 

York Electronics 94 

Zye Technology 17 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



151 



.*k 


,„ 


'TIM 1 


■H^HM^^^fr 1 


PRODUCTS^ 


^r _ ^ _ ■ 


LJ3 


•t-] 


M^riN' 1 



HARDWARE • HARDWARE • HARDWARE • HARDWARE • HARDWARE • HARDWARE • HARDWARE • HARDWARE 



Welcome to the Amiga Shopper Buyer's Guide, your regular guide to what's hot 
and what's not in tile Amiga marltet place. It's designed as a simple-to-usa yet 
comprehensive guide which will help you to make the right buying decisions, it 
may not include each and every product ever produced for the Amiga (that would 
take up virtually the whole of Amiga Sitoppeii), but you can rest assured that all 



mstlor brands and models are here. 

TTie Buyer's Guide will run each and every month and as new products are released 
and others discontinued, we'll be updating it acconJingiy. Ttits month we bring you what 
is possibly the most comprehensive guide to hardware for the Amiga owner. Next month 
we'll he listing Amiga software... 



AMIGAS 




















Model 


Price Memory 


Total Ctilp 


Total Fast 


Pracesaor Speed (M Hi) Hani Disk (Mb) Floppies 


Comment 






A600 


£399 t r^b 


2MB 


4Mb 


68000 7 


No 


ixesok 


Replacemenl for no 


discontinued ASOOPIUS 




AMOHD 


£499 I Mb 


2Mb 


4Mb 


eeooo 7 


20 


IxSSOk 


A60a witti bullt4n 20 Mb IDE 




A1500 


£999 1 Mb 


1Mb 


9Mt) 


68000 7 


r*o 


2);880k 


More expandable than ASOO 




AZOOOHP 


£12»9 1 Mb 


1Mb 


9 Mb 


68000 7 


40 


UiSSOk 


ExacUy the same as A1500, but now Inctuilet hard disk | 


A2S00 


£???? 1 Mb 


1Mb 


9 Mb 


68020 16 


40 


lxSS01( 


Same as A2000HD 


but comes with processor card 1 


A3000 


£3160 2 MS 


2Mb 


16Mb 


6S030 10/35 


SO/100 


ijisaok 


Available In several hart dtsk/ processor c 


uiflgurartlons 


Note; A500 ant) A1500 now denote 2.0-based machines, A2500 only avaiiablE in ttie US. 












^ARD DRIVES 




Price 


Machine 










Rating 


ISSIffi 


Modsi 


Supiillor 


Cafiaclty (Mb) 


RAM Expansion 




RocHard 


Zye Technology 


£379 


ASOO 




52 


8Mb 




***• 


13 


impact 11+ 


Silica 


£399 


ASOO 




50/110 


8 Mb 




***** 


1,2,8,13 


A690 


Commodore 


£399 


ASOO 




20 


2Mb 




**• 


1,2.8,13 


OataFlyeiEOO 


TTlkigic 


£350 


ASOO 




48 






*• 


1,2,8,13 


5O0XP 


Surface UK 


£4a9 


ASOO 




40 


2/8 Mb 




♦♦♦* 


1,2,8.13 

a 


FHlTrak 


Tliird Coast 


£599 


ASOO 




40 


- 




*** 


Novia 301 


Power Compxiling 


£399 


A500 




20/30 






*** 


8 


Prima 


Power Computing 


£499 


ASOO 




50/100 






**• 


8 

8 


Trumpcard 


Third Coast 


£399 


ASOO 




40 






PnitarHP 


Protar 


£299 


ASOO 




20 


8Mb 




**** 




Impact IIHC+a 


Silica 


£299 


A15O0-* 




40-300 


8 Mb 




***• 


1,2,13 
1,2 
1,13 
8,13 


OatanyeiaoOO 


Trtlselc 


£3 GO 


AlS0O-» 




4S 






*** 


WorflSync2000 


Surface UK 


£450 


A1600-J 




52 








A20914D 


Commodoi« 


£200 


M.500-J 




40 


* 






Neigs HC 


Power Computing 


£350 


AISOO-^ 




40 


8Mb 




4*** 


8.13 
8 


SyeOuest 


Omeea Projscta 


£690 


SCSI 




88 


~ 




'*** 


Optica IDrive 


Power Computing 


£1199 


SCSI 




128 










TapeStrsamar 


Omeea Projecta 


£600 


SCSI 




m 








■ 


NOTE: Trumpcard ca 


-1 be used on both A500 and Aisoo-i- 
















EXIERHAL DRIVES 
IModel 


SuppllH 


Pilco 






Capacity 


Disable Swttch 








Machine 


Sl» 


Ratmg 


iMoe 

8 
0,1,2,3 

0,1,2.8 
0,14,8 


PC880a 


Power Computing 


£55 


Any 


3 1/2- 


880K 


Ves 




"* 


RF332C 


Silica Systems 


£60 


Any 


31/2- 


880K 


Yes 




**** 


RF542C 


Silica Systems 


£S0 


Any 


5 1/4- 


8S0K 


Yes 




**** 


AlOU 


ComiriDdore 


£100 


Any 


3 1/2" 


SSOK 


No 




*** 


Ziilec 


Evesham Micros 


£65 


Any 


31/2- 


esoK 


Yes 




*** 


0,1,23 

0.8 

S 

8 

0i,2,8 

8 


CAX354 

aA-iD 


Cumana 

Golden Image 


£75 

£65 


Any 

Any 


3V2" 

31/2- 


8BaK 

880K 


Yes 

Yes 




**♦* 


AEHD 


Applied Engineering 


£140 


Any 


31/2" 


1.52 Mb 


No 




**** 


Interna 12000 


Power Computing 


£50 


A1S0O-. 


3 1/2- 


SSOK 


No 






DuaiOrtve 


Power Computine 


£iaO 


Any 


31/2'- 


2)(S8DK ' 


Ves 






Floptical Dish 


Digital Micronics 


£660 


Any 


3 1/2- 


20 Mb 


Yes 






NOTE: PC880B corres with built-in disk copier. 
RAMEXPAHSIDHS 

Model SuDDlifif 


Floptical Disk not yet available In UK. 






















Issue 


Price 


Maehlns 


Slie 


MaxSlza 


Power SuBPlyT 


Fitting 


Bating 


500RX 


Surface UK 


£198 


ASOO 


2Mb 


8Mb 


Optional 


Expansion Bus 


***** 


5 
8 


ProRAM Plus 


Datel 


£25 


ASOO 


S12i< 


- 




TrapDoor 


*** 


RAM-Master 2 


Datei 


£100 


ASOO 


l.SMb 






TfapOoot 


*'* 




VZDOO 


Virgo 


£104 


ASM 


ZMb 


- 




TrapDoor 


***** 


- 


iydecl.5 


Z^ec 


£79 


ASOO 


1.5 Mb 


- 




TrapDoor 


** 




Bas«Board 


EPO 


£300 


ASOO 


4Mb 




■ 


TrapDoor 


* 
***• 


8 


Ashcotli512k 


Ashcorr 


£3B 


ASOO 


512k 






TrapDoor 




Ashcoml.SIMb 


Ashcom 


£155 


AEOO 


l.SMb 




' 


TtapOooi 




8 


Cortex2 


Cortei 


£199 


ASOO 


2Mb 


8Mb 


Yes 


Expansion Bus 


***** 


GVP Series^ 


silica 


£1E9 


AlSOO-t 


2Mb 


8Mb 




Card 




S 
B 
8 


A2068 


Commodore 


£159 


AISOO^ 


2Mb 


8Mb 




Card 
Cant 

Card 


**** 


AdRAMZOdO 


Power Computing 


£179 


A1500^ 


2Mb 


8Mb 




***** 


CorteK2000 


Cortex 


£176 
Price 

£850 
fNA 

£1449 


AISOO- 

Medline 

Any 
A1500--> 

A1500-» 


2Mb 


8 Mb 






PROCESSOR ACCELEiUTaSS 


IModsl 

38 Special 
40/4 Magnum 
Zeus 


Supplier 

Omega Projects 
Omega Projects 

Power Computing 


Procoasor 

68030 
SS040 

68O40 


Speed 
38 MH! 
28 MHz 

28 MHz 


Mat 324)lt HAM 

8Mb 
16Mb 

64Mb 


Maths Co^iro 

68881 
68882 
68882 


Rating 

**** 

***** 


iHue 

13 

la 

14 
14 
14 


040/SOO 


Power computing 


£725 


ASOO 


65040 


2SMHI 


8 Mb 


66882 


**** 


040/500i 


Power Computing 


£NA 


ASOO 


68040 


28 MHz 


16Mb 


68882 

SS881 




14 


Meicuiy 

G-Force 


Power Computing 

Silica 


£1249 

£599 


Aaooo 

A160O 


6B040 

68030 


26 MHz 

25 MHz 


32Mb 

16Mb 


**** 


16 


Turtwsaooo 


BytesaPtecee 


£45 


ASOO 


58000-16 


16MH2 




No 

rto 


**** 


3,5 


AdSpeea 


Silica 


£173 


ASOO 


68000-16 


16 MHz 






VXL.30 


ZCL ltd 


£409 


ASOO 


£8030 


25 MH: 


8 Mb 


¥e« 


***** 




2000/40 


Maream 


£1937 


AlS0O-» 


68040 


50 MHz 


32Mb 


Yes 
Yss 


***** 


3,E 


ASDOl 


mca 


<179t 


AISOO-^ 


6803O 


SO MHz 


32Mb 




G-Force 


Silica 


£1999 


A300O 


88040 


28 MHz 




Ves 

Yes 
Yes 






FusionForty 


Power Computing 


£1999 


AISOO^ 


6S040 


SO MHz 


32 Mb 

8Mb 
4Mb 


*«** 


3,5 
3,5 


CSA MegaMidget 
AEO(»0-ie 


Byles&Pieces 
Solid State 


£389 
£295 


ASOO 
ASOO 


68030 
6S02D 


33 MH; 
16 MHz 


**** 


BS0O0-2S 


Solid State 


£595 


ASOO 


6S020 


25 MHz 


16Mb 


Yes 


***** 




0500040 


Solid State 


£1162 


AlSOO-> 


68030 


40 MHz 


32Mb 


Yes 
Yes 
Yes 


*** 


3,5 


Harms Pro30 


Bytes&Pieces 


£1099 


AISOO^ 


68030 


28 MH! 


4Mb 


**** 


A2630 


ComnxHtoro 


£1200 


A1500^ 


68030 


25 MHz 


4Mb 






NOTE: Although sa 

SUHNERS 
IModel 


me 68030 cards appear to 


run faster than the 


T '040 eauivalents 


Uiis may not necessarily be 


the case. All '040 ca 


rds will run faster internally. 


















Supplier 


Pries 


Mactiine 


Typo 


Colour 


Resolution 




Rating 

*** 


Issue 

14 


DaataScan 2GS 


Pandaal 


£125 


Any 


Hand Held 


No 


400dpl 
4O0dpl 

400dpi 
400dpl 

200dpi 






14 


Powar Scanner 2 


PoY«f Computing 


£99 


Any 


HandKeld 


r<o 






14 


AlfaScan 
Hanity Scanner 

Sharp JX-100 


Golden Image 
Pandaal 

Silica 


£199 
£140 
£696 


Any 
Any 

Any 


Hand Held 
HandHoM 

Hand Held 


No 
No 
Ves 




*** 


14 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 



» 1 B 



.irfflKl-v 



i»J Mil«l ■ ^•I'f ^1 



I 



PRODUCTS 



GeniScan 


Dotal 


£130 


QoMcnlnwc* 


GDhfAnlnuga 


£im 


Sharp JX-300 


Silica 


£3SO0 


Phindifti Seiniwr 


Pindul 


tlK 


PcwerScanrhsr 


Power Computing 


£99 


DiemsERS 


Msilsl 


ShppUh 


Ma 


OlglViev) 4 


Silica 


£150 


CohwrPIc 


JCL 


flea 


VIDMmlga 


Rombo 


£130 


VMhhi 


Powar ComiHrtlng 


£200 


FremeGrabber 


Marcam 


£ES9 


VMHDIgltlui 


l»(t(l 


«0 


SOUND SAMFLERS 


Modal 


svppii« 


Mm 


StereoMfister 


MicroDaal 


£40 


TvchnoSound 


N»w DlmarufaR* 


£3S 


AuctlD Engineer 


HB Maftteting 


£199 


Parfsct aounO 3 


HB Ma(«i«tlr« 


£«0 


SampleStudiO' 2 


Datel 


£70 


&Hjnd M-nttor 


HB Martwtinc 


£130 


Mlcr^Sampdar 


Oatsi 


£25 


$wit^rap3 


Omvfa ProjKta 


£30 


AMASZ 


MIcroDeal 


£100 


StvnSamplafS 


TrIlDCIc 


MO 


GVP OSS 


Silica 


££0 


ADIOU 


HB Martuittng 


ETBA 


AD1016 


HE Marketing 


£TBA 


Audition 4 


HB Marketing 


£49 


Audio Scglptune 


SMG 


£49 



Any 
Any 

Any 

Arty 



NOTE: AD1012 and A0X016 ere far A1500-* only 
GENLOCKS 



MICroQen 



Power Computing 



RtwOan 


Silica 


n9(iQen+ 


Silica 


A8S02 


Marcam 


ABBSta-Vm 


MB«am 


A8S0e 


Marcam 


QSTSoM 


Thlnj Coaat 


VldeoCentre2 


G2 


VloaoCantreS 


at 


Vld6oM85tarVM-2 


Power Computing 


VIKsocofflU 0-100 


silica 


Image Master 


Netlkl 


PtoOan 


aardon HufWDOd 



£199 
£M 

£117 

um 

£300 
£100 

£900 
£ISO 
£11T0 



£799 



Mia 



CBIvt MiHiae 

Nuitilu 

Optical 



Commodore 
Nskaha UK 
Golden Im^e 



Beetle 



Geetelner 



Daatamouse 
LaKlM«i» 

COLOUR CARDS 



Pandaal 
Ugltach 



Power Computing 



fiembranrJt 

AVIdaoU 

AVIdeo 24 Ctiaokmate 

HMK Clwcknwla 

DCTV Silica 

aVFIVM Slllaa 

Hartaouln ACS 

NOTE: ASoo devliffls can ba usM on all Annlgas 

TOUCH TABIEIS 



PodBtat PT-3030 
OanltlEar 
Chen> Mk4 

DOT-UATRIX PRINTERS 



HB Marketing 

DaM 

ChBn> 



P20 
l.24d 

Swift 9 
Swift S4 
LX850 
10400 
LQS50 



LC24 



NEC 

CHltan 

CItlien 

CHIian 

Epson 

Epaon 

Epaon 

Star 

Star 

OM 



£1150 
£130 



£3S 
£28 
£52 
£2S 
£30 

Six 

£40 
£2T 



MaoMna 

A1500-t 

«,BO0-t 

A15O0-^ 

ASOO 

ASOO 

A1900-4 

AlBOO-^ 



£179 
£U0 
£450 



£351 

an 

£2B0 
<43S 

£289 
£2«S 

£375 
£304 
£304 





Hand Held 


No 




4Q0dpl 








Hand Htid 


No 




400dpl 








Rat3ed 


Yas 




300dpi 








HandHaM 


No 




400d|ll 








Hand Held 


NO 




400dpi 




















Raaltlnia 


Colour 




Realtbna Colour 


AnlmatlcHi 


Rstinc 


No 


Yes 




No 




No 


^*** 


Ya* 


Ym 




Yat 




No 


tm* 


Vaa 


Ym 




No 




Yes 


***• 


N« 


Vaa 




Na 




Na 


*** 


Yaa 


Ym 




Yes 




Yea 


***** 


Vm 


Vaa 




No 




No 


• ••• 




Starae 


Voluma Adjmt 




Reaolirtlon 






Rating 


Yes 


Yea 




8-Wt 






*^** 


Vaa 


No 




8>Ht 






**** 


Vaa 


Vas 




S-b« 






***** 


Vat 


Va* 




Mil 






**# 


Vaa 


{to 




frblt 






** 


Tta 


Vaa 




Bm 






***** 


rai 


No 




84ltt 






* 


Na 


No 




MiN 






**** 


Vas 


Yes 




&tllt 






+*•• 


Vaa 


Vaa 




MAt 






**** 


Yai 


Yat 




8-blt 






***« 


Vaa 


Vat 




u-wt 






***** 


Yes 


Yas 




16-blt 






*«««« 


Vaa 


Yat 




»4]lt 






**** 


Y«s 


Vaa 




e-bit 






** 


Flada 


CHaaolva 




8-VHS 




ROB Rata thni 


Rttbig 


Yea 


Yaa 




Mo 




Yes 


«*•* 


Na 


Na 




Na 




No 


** 


¥« 


Yaa 




No 




No 


*«** 


Vaa 


Va* 




No 




Yaa 


***• 


No 


No 




No 




Yes 


*** 


Vm 


Vat 




Vta 




Yaa 


**« 


Yn 


Yaa 




Yes 




Yes 




y<* 


vat 




Yat 




Vat 


**** 


Yaa 


Yaa 




Yea 




Yes 


***♦ 


Yte 


Yat 




Yat 




Vaa 


**** 


Yaa 


Yaa 




Yes 




Yea 


*** 


Va* 


Vat 




Yat 




Yat 


***** 


Yaa 


Yea 




Yea 




Yas 


**« 


Na 


No 




No 




Yat 


*** 



***^ 
**** 



3 

11 



11 
S 
5 
10 



ID 

12 



S 
lA 



SO 



£1499 

£2SS 

£599 

£289 

£499 

£179« 

£1400 



flKl2" 

SxB* 

9«ia" 



24 

a* 

9 
M 
9/24 
M 



***** 

*** 

**** 



Type 

24-1)11 
12-blt 

24-bH 



34 
24 
34 



Faeucfo 
344ltt 

244lt 



RtuMutkHi 

***** 

**** 

***** 



lpi«KCPSt 

lis 

UK 

121 

tsa. 

106 

121 

109 

•1 

130 

127 



Colaur Palatta 


Max natahrtkin 


24-blt 


1024X1024 


12-bli 


7ea)(SS0 


24-hit 


7681(680 


244«t 


sesisso 


24*11 


368x580 


24-lltt 


SlOxBTS 


24*lt 


9101576 



• «** 



Rating 



****« 

**** 



13 
13 

15 
B 
12 
12 

11 



tttn 



SK 

BK 

3K 

•K 

4K 

8K 

SK 

leK 

16K 

SK 



W«at 

• #*» 
***** 

• ** 
**** 



SUPPLIER USI • SUPPLIER IIST • SUPPLIER LIST • SUPPUER UST • SUPPLIER LIST • SUPPLIER LIST • SUPPUER LIST • SUPPUER LIST • SUPPLIER LIST • SUPPLIER LIST • SUPPLIER LIST • 



ACS 031 557 4242 

App.EnglneerIng 01012142416060 

ASAP 0724280222 

Aahcom 0530 411485 

Bytes & PJeces 0263 734218 
Checkmate Dl|ltal Ltd 071 923 0658 

Cltijen 0S9S 72621 

Commodore 062S 770086 

Cortex 051 236 0480 



Cumana 0483 503121 

Datel Eleotrottlca 0782 744707 

Digital Mlcronics 0101 619 431 8301 



EPD 

Epson 

Evesham Micros 
G2 video Systems 
Gasteiner 

Golden Image 



O602 641640 
0442 S1144 
0388 766600 
0252 737151 
081 365 1151 
081 618 7373 



Cordon Hanvood 

US Marketing 

JCL Business Systems 

Marcsm Ltd 

MIcroDeal 

Nskshs UK 

NEC 

NerikI 

New Dimensions 



0773 8367S1 
0753 685000 
0S92 518181 
061 941 6117 
0726 66020 
0925 56398 
081 993 9631 
081 SOO 1866 
0291 690S33 



Okl 

Omega Projects 

Panaeai Marketing 

Power Computing 

Protar 

Romtio 

Silica Systems 

SMS 

Solid Steite Leisure 



0763 31392 
0925 763946 
0234 S5S666 
0234 273000 
0923 54133 
05O6 414631 
081 309 1111 
0274 562999 
0933 650677 



Star 0494 471111 

Surface UK 081 566 6677 
Third Coast Technologies 0257472444 

Trilogic 0274 678062 

Virgo 0276 676308 

WTS Electronics 0582 491949 

ZCLLtd 0543 2S1275 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUi 1 6 • AUOUST 1 992 



15: 



COMPETITION 



WIN • WIN • WIN • WIN • WIN • WIN • WIN • WIN 



Snatch a piece of 

the AMOS Action 



Vie have IS copies of Easy AMOS ■ 
Just when yau thought It was safe 



- over £500 worthl - to give away* 
to program, It^s even safer... 



It's Just the opportunity all you 
would4)e programmers have 
|}e«n waiting tar. Nothing 
could be easier than 
programming with Easy AMOS. 

The program sprang from the 
original AMOS, one of the most 
popular versions of the Basic 
programming language for the Amiga. 
What distinguishes AMOS from most 
other Basics Is the incredible ease 
with which it can be used to create 
stunning graphical and audio effects. 
Easy AMOS makes these sorts of 
effects even easier to achieve. The 
package was designed specifically 
with beginners In mind. It includes a 
complete tutorial, along with 
numerous examples, to take the 
novice right through to producing 
slick games with smooth animation 
and brilliant colour. 

Also included are a number of 
aids to programming, such as an on- 
line help which explains the meaning 
of every single AMOS Instruction, and 
a single-step mode which enables 
the programmer to see every 
instruction as it is being executed 
and to simultaneously watch the 
effects it has on the main display. 

In short, if you've ever wanted to 
get Into programming, then this is 
the way to do it. Thanks to Europress 
Software, we have fifteen of these 
packages to give away. Just ponder 



the three questions below and send 

your answers on a postcard or the 

back of a sealed envelope to: 

Easy Peasy Compo 

Amiga Shopper 

29 Monmouth Street 

Bath BAl 2DL 

The closing date is August 7. 

Remember that only one entry per 

household will be permitted. C© 



THE CHALLENGE 



QUESnON 1 

What was the predecessor of AMOS, 
written for the ST, called? 

a) AMST 

b) STOS 

c) There wasn't one 

QUESTION 2 

What word would a French person 
use to describe something as 'easy'? 

a) Tt&a blen 

b) Slmpllstlque 

c) Facile 

QUESTION 3 

What la the name of the creator of 
the AMOS package? 

a) Fran^lse Lionet 

b) Francois Lionet 

c) Francois Pascal 



GUARANTEE YOUR COPY OF 
AMIOA SHOPPEtt - RESERVE IT AT 
YOUR NEWSAGENT 



Please reserve/deliver me a copy of Amiga Shopper 
Name 



Addrau , 



111 IHE lilWSAOEtn - Mmlta Shoppw geei on Mile Mw flwl flmrfdiiY In ••A 
It's by f Hlvra PuUiihhii and mdlabte from your '^"'jllJI^f'f^l;^:.. 



■- ~. I . ~ ■ — ■-■. I ■=-- '-1 ■ •-, 

I ;/• n a ' | m ' l 

Editins Ejsii_i:>i3iwTes;Bobs/Iabsi_AK0S,Abl( -1 bob 




Easy AMOS makes programming In AMOS, er, easy. Even absolute beginners 
will be messing about with sprites and scrolling screens In no time at all 



PRINfIR PALAVIRI 

The Amiga Shopper editorial team 
are proud to announce the winner 
of the June competKton; P Hughes 
of Uverpoot, who will be receiving 
a CKIzen Swift 24e printer with 
colour kit kindly donatecl by 
Citizen Europe. 



CALLING ALL Gf A 
BASIC WINNERS 

(or, It's the Aml^ Shopper, Yoa'ro 
tiroti - Ed, admin ooek-up comer) 
If you wera one of our GFA Basic 
winners, could you please get In 
touch with your full names and 
addressee as soon as possible. 



IN NEXT MONTH'S ISSUE 

• Amiga Shopper's definitive desktop pubiishing round-up, 
We review all of ttie main contenders for thie position of best 
DTP package. 

• Continuing in the DTP vein, Jeff Waiker starts a new 
series on just wiiat it's all about and teiis you liow to get 
the best resuits, while Ciiff Ramshaw takes a iook at 
Epson's new 24-bit colour scanner and a iaser printer from 
Star for the Amiga power user. 

• Jason Holbom gameiy tries out Visionary, the adventure 
authoring system from Oxxi. 

Plus regular columns on Amiga Answers, video, 
AmIgaDOS, education and much more 

On sale Thursday, August 6 



15A 



AMIGA SHOPPER • ISSUE 16 • AUGUST 1992 




Some reasons 
to bQ chQcrfal 



HiSoft is renowned for its range of language systems, utilities and 

entertainment programs on the Amiga. We have been writing for 

the Commodore 680x0 computers since they were first introduced 

into file UK and thus we know both the hardware and software 

intimately. Our company pohcy is always to offer the highest 

quality software at an affordable price with a complete range of 

backup support options - in these uncertain, difficult times, we'd 

like to put a smile on your face. 



The ultimate assembler 
language system" 

Amiga Format 
Gold 4/92 



ProFlight 



from / a Soft 





The professional C develo|>ment package 

includes free Stiver Support service 



The most accurate flight slm yet . 

HiSoft BASIC 

version 2 



^^PreSi 



Highspeed 




§@®® 
® ® ® 

J®®®®®® 

^ @®®®® 

^uibo Dow«r tof va 



M 



SelF 



Tuibo pow«r tof your 
AflOOO computvr 



The new PqicqJ compiler with 
Turbo Pascal® compatibility 



sv 



o9 



-VA 



Q. 



S*> 



Coming soon to on flmlga near you! 



HiSoft 



High Quality Software 



for more information on any of 

our products, please call HiSoft 

on 0525 718 181. or fax us on 

0525 713716 or write to us at: 

Ttie Old School, Greenfield, 

Bedford t\AK.-45 5DE UK. 



VVc arc delighted to nummiice that, pUowing an exclusive agreement 
with Kiimn Computers Ltd, wc have taken over the diftrihutkm, 

suppm-t and dei'ciopment offhi'ir i^jpulnr Aniif^n products. Existing 
K\fiiM i:usiiymers should write /(> iis or call us for dcltiils of our sii;>;wrt 
schemes and infurmatiou on our pluiifi for thefutWL' ofKuma software. 

■' Af tlw iipment xvc lia'ce lire popular K-Spread 4 spreadsheet and 
K-Da!d"MTabaseaimlatife($t'i> duf order forin on the -righf );"-'■ 

Wf also have slock of ail the ird Edition Amiga ROM Kernel manuals 

fivm Addis<.m Wesley, together ivith the excellent 3rd Edition of The 

AmigaDOS Manual (Bantam Press). 



Free 
gifts! 



(subject to 
avaOabifity} 






^11 



si 
p. 



5 &„S 

H. g ±|.£ y, 
1^ ^ "^ =■ ^ ^' 
>"< 3 2 5 S, 

^ ;; S-a -J. g 



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G VP 



Series 

( ABOO) 



2 HD 



V-c 



Up to 8MB Fast 
S2QMB0MU i569 
52QMB2MB SA19 
52QMB iMB £469 
S2QMB8MB £599 




105QMB(JWnWf9 
10SQMB2MB £529 
105QMB tMH £579 
KHQMBSMH £719 



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C5VP 






A530 Turbo HD 

(A500) 

•tOMHz 68050EC accelerator 

Optional 68882 maths co-processtir 

Up to 8MB 32-bit Fast RAM on toard 

68882 Upgrade kit £2J9 

S2MB OMR £729 lO'iMB OMH JE869 ilUMB 0MB il069 




GVP Series 

Up to HMB Sinim KAM on hoard 
Suppfjrts external SCSI devices 
ForA150(),A20f» 
Bare £199 
^2QMB0MB £279 
^2QMB 2MB £J}9 
52QMB4MB £399 
=;2QMB8MB £469 



2 HD 



105QMB0MB £479 
10=iQMB2MB £539 
1DSQMB4MB £599 
10SQMB8MB £749 





GVP G- Force 

68030 Accelerator board ^' ■ 

68882 Maths co-processor 
25MHz 1MB RAM £579 

lO.MHz ^MB RAM £949 

50MHz -IMB RAM £1349 

Hard drive mount kit £35 ^ 

Chips 

2%K X 4Dfl\M SA.50 4MB x asimm H50 83^2 Faaer 
1MB X IDRAM M.95 1MB x HSimm «0 1x4 Zip 



iVIagneto Optical 

Hard Disk 



Progressive 



Peripherals 
040/3000 



! 



\: 




New style case with built-in power supply 
-^:i I li^li power cooling fan 
V/ SCSI ID switch for instant ID switch 

<SQ -!5-Way & "iO-Way SCSI ports (mw nuy us«lus ihrupuni 

V*' Compatihle with all major SCS! controllers 
Up la 12fiMB on each removable cartridge 

umpaiibie in speed with many hard disks 

28.\1B 1[|) (internal tlltingl £999 
12HMB HI) (external cased I £1199 

28MB i'/:~ optical cartridge £39-95 each 
SCSI controller card for AiSOO, A20(I0 £199 

" Avicleo24 

-^ 2t-bit graphics for the A5ai 

*^i "68 X 5H0 quality^ resolution 

^, 16.8 million colour frame buffer 

A< Small easy to fit circuit board 

^tf Overlay Amiga graphics & animations 

^^ l-ullv genkx'kabie 

^^ Runs on a standard A500 1 1MB of chip RAM) 

Allows picture in picture £599 (mciuJfsTV v^mn 




Progressive 

28MHz Motorola 6W)hU 

Directly accesses 32-bit memory on AiOQi) Over 
Four times the speed of a standard A3000 
AmigaDOS 2.0 compatible 

■iMB £999 

Progressive 040/2000 

28MHz Motorola (iW)iO 
Built-in maths co-processor 
Expandable up to 32MB of R,\,M 
j Software compatible w ith 68001) proces,sors 
4MB £1295 

^ Progressive 040/500 

^ ior ihe Amiga 500 
^ ■ iS.Mliz ()81J(0 with prtx-essor 
jH Up to -^0 times the speed of the standard A500 
^ i\m of high speed 32-bit R.4lM 
I ^stJOO fallback mode 
^ Kasy to fit. no soldering 
P^ I pgrade to 33MHz and 8MB of high speed RAM 
28MHz 4MB £849 

Zeus 040/2000 

For die Amiga iOUl) 

CompletL' workstation on a single card 

28MHz or 33MHz mut) accelerator 

Built-in floating point processor 

(hMB high speed 32-bit RAM expansion 

1 ast SCSI-2 DMA hart! drive confroller 

28MHz tMB £1899 33MHz -iMH £2189 



A3000 Static column R.\.M 
Simm M x 1MB-60 
Simm 32 x 4MB-60 
2.0-1 Kickstart uhipHniyi 



£22 

£65 iMjiy*ln>GVT.H<WO> 

£234 'Miiljlik- (in- GVP A' 

£39.95 



Comes with 24-bit paint package 

Agnas i39 Cr ' 

'.ip £19-95 7^ For A HI 



lb' 

^^ 

IB 

^^ Rembrand-t 

^5 24-bii colour 

^ 16 million colours 

|r^ 8MB nf high speed video RAM 



Nexus Hard Card 

Up toKMH Rj\M on Ixjard 

00, 2000 



Bare £199 
52QMB0\1H £279 



<^\'2 



2.04 Kickslan ROM chip, worklwnch software 
install disk 2.04. font disk & extras 
With ROM share £115 





105QMB0MI5 £479 

i)5QMB2MB £539 

in5QMB4MB £599 

105QMBHMB £749 



« 



Real time 24-hit image capture 
Software supplied 
A1500./A2000 



£2699 




Framegrabber v2.0 




Amiga genlock 




New software 


£399 


Bare SCSI Hard 




Drive 




52 Quanlum £199 105 Quantum 


£299 


iMirul.li' fi.i (,\1' (, Kiin-f. CAT Mi: Iff Nfxus MCi 




f faw m^ kZ 


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TJ 



Sc'nd your order to Power Compuung Ltd, Unit H Railton Road. Vibhurn Road Indu.slrial Estate', KeinpMon. Hedtord MKii \'\ 
Ring your credit card order through on 0234 843388 (10 lines) or Fax 0234 840234 Technical helpline 0234 841882 

All pria-s indude VAT. driivcrj' and are sutijctl to tIangK SpedficaiiuriN irt- suhjitl to change withoul notiir. Ntxl day dt-livi-n i i SO (t'.K. mainLind imly), ail lrjdemark.s acknowledged 



Wnribuior for hnrei Conqiwlng m lulv !) K K sKl 11)142 Rinu. 

\u lJii,.i..1>i H.ainmsi-Knj a Tel OKil SWM«1 WJ Fan VMOdtt 






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