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Full text of "RCA Ultricon & SIT Camera Tubes"

The RCA Ultricon® 
and SIT Camera Tubes 



RCA-Norbain Electro- Optics Ltd. 
Seminar 

Electro - Optics / Laser 
International '82 UK 

Brighton 23-25 March 1982 






I 
I 



THE RCA ULTRICON 

AN IMPROVED SILICON-TARGET VIP I CON 
FOR 
CLOSED-CIRCUIT TELEVISION 

I. Acknowledgements 

II. Introductory Comment 

RCA introduced the Vidicon camera tube about thirty years ago and with 
it — the industry of closed-circuit television (CCTV) 

With the ever increasing usage of CCTV, there developed greater require- 
ments on systems' capabilities; higher sensivity was foremost. 

^ To meet this need, RCA developed the silicon-diode photoconductor — the 
silicon- target vidicon. 

Now, after ten years' production and with new and very significant 
improvements, RCA offers the Ultricon — the most sensitive vidicon 
available today I 

The RCA Ultricon allows dawn-to-dusk CCTV operation. And night-time 
operation is achieved with minimal auxiliary lighting (just 3 x 10~ 3 
foot candle input illumination will produce full video output) . 

III. Ultricon Presentation 

(Following the format and content of AN6 9 94) 

IV. The RCA SIT 

An intensified silicon-target vidicon 

W COMMENT: For CCTV operation at illumination levels as little as that 

from a quarter moon (full video level with just 7.5 x 10~ 5 foot candle 
input) . 

V. SIT Presentation 

VI . Summary 

VII. Questions 

VIII. Demonstrations 



MB/A 



The silicon intensifier target tube: 
seeing in the dark 



G.A. Robinson 



Copyright 197 7 RCA Corporarlon 
All Rights Reserved 



The silicon intensifier target tube: seeing in the dark 



I 
I 



G.A. Robinson 



The SIT tube's excellent low-light-level characteristics have 
led to applications ranging from police surveillance to 

internal inspection of jet engine parts. 



IMAGE SECTION 



SCANNING SECTION 

1 



ELECT WON 

SUN 



— , i 1 r i 

FIELD MESH GUN FOCUSING ACCELERATING CONTROL 

(GRID Mo 41 grid G R 10 No.2) CH 10 I GRI D «to.2l G RIO (GRID No. 1 1 




SCENE 



FI9«fl OPTIC 
FACEFLATE 



IMAGE FOCUS 
GRIDS 



LOW VELOCITY 
SCANNING SEAM 



SILICON TARGET 



HIGH VELOCITY FHOTOELECTRON 
9EAM IMAGED ON TARGET 



Light enters the SIT tube through a fiber-optic faceplate, which transfers the flat-scene image onto the curved 
photocathode The light then travels through the focusing grids and strikes the target, which is a matrix of over 1300 silicon 
diodes per inch. The image is typically stored there and read out by the scanning beam every 1/30 second. 




George Robinson has contributed to the 
design of flying-spot kinescopes, 1. 5-inch 
magnetic, 1-inch hybrid and all- 
electrostatic vidicons since joining RCA in 
1955. His specialities include electron-gun 
work, high-resolution vidicons. and camera 
tubes for military systems and unusual 
environments. In his present position he is 
involved with applications at low light levels. 

Contact him at: 
Applications Engineering 
Electro-Optics Products 
Solid State Division 

Lancaster, Pa, 
Ext 2073 



The idea of using a silicon-diode-array 
target in an intensifier tube (SIT) has 
received wide acceptance in the last few 
years in cameras operating at low light 
levels. This paper discusses some of the 
characteristics of the SIT tube that make it 
the leading low-tight-level camera tube in 
use today. Elsewhere is this issue, R.G. 
Neuhauser 1 discusses how the silicon target 
is used m vidicon tubes. 

Photocathode + 
silicon-diode array 

The SIT tube (Fig. !) is a photodetector 
using a photocathode as the light-sensitive 
surface and a silicon-diode-array target as 
the surface upon which an image charge 
pattern can be stored. The SIT tube's gain 
comes from the high number of hole- 
electron pairs generated in the target when 
it is bombarded by high-energy electrons 
from the photocathode. In the silicon- 
vidicon target some fraction of the in- 
coming photons creates a hole-electron 
pair, but in the silicon target of the SIT tube 
each photoelectron can create many hole- 
electron pairs. A tube operating with 9000 
volts across the intensifier section will have 
an electron gain of about 1600. 

The relationship of gain to intensifier 
voltage is shown in Fig. 2. By introducing 
an energy-absorbing "buffer layer" in front 



of the target, the useful gain characteristic 
is kepi above 3000 volts, where the in- 
tensifier section performs best. The buffer 
layer selectively absorbs photoelectrons. If 
all photoelectrons had equal energy, the 




INTENSIFIER VOLTAGE- KIL0VOLTS 



Pig. 2 

Electron gain (solid line) is an essentially 
linear function of the intensifier voltage. An 
energy-absorbing 'buffer layer" keeps the 
gain above 3 kV, where the intensifier sec- 
tion performs best Deviation from linearity 
(the dashed line) is caused by high-energy 
photons penetrating the buffer layer. 



Final manuscript recaived Octoo»r 22. 1978. 



r 



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gain would be expected to continue its 
linear decrease as voltage is reduced until a 
cutoff voltage is reached. But as Fig. 2 
shows, some gain exists below the pro- 
jected cutoff voltage, suggesting thai some 
higher-energy electrons are getting through 
the buffer layer. 

An SIT tube with a gain of 1600 and a 
photocathode responsivity of 140 pAj Im 
will be approximately 50 times more 
sensitive to tungsten illumination than a 
silicon-target vidicon with a published 
sensitivity of 4350 nAi Im. 

Photocathode 

The photocathode surface is the basic S-20 
multi-alkali (Na-K-Cs-Sb), and is placed 
on the inside of a curved fiber-optic 
faceplate. Since fiber-optic plates have 
poor ultraviolet transmission, the tube 
response is low to the shorter wavelengths. 
The 340-nano meter cutoff can be seen in 



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Photocathode response is limited by the low 

uv transmission of the fiber-optic faceplate. 

(This can be corrected by using a uv- 

sensitive scintillator, however.) Tube also 

does not have the near-ir response of the 

vidicon. 



the response curve of Fig. 3. Some users 
overcome this deficiency by applying an 
ultraviolet-sensitive scintillator to the out- 
side of the faceplate. 

The response to the longer wavelengths is 
limited by tube processing of the S-20 
photocathode; the extended-red (ERMA) 
photocathode is not presently obtainable in 
the SIT tube. Because the silicon target is 
bombarded by electrons rather than 
photons, the basic near-ir response of the 
target, which is shown in the vidicon, is 
lost. 

Image section 

The image section of the SIT tube inverts 
the photoelectron image and focuses it 
onto the silicon target. The electron optics 
of this process requires a spherical 
photocathode surface, but a conventional 
lens system focuses the image of a scene 
onto a flat plane. Therefore, it is convenient 
to have a fiber-optic faceplate transmit the 
flat-scene image onto the curved 
photocathode. The faceplate, which is 
thicker at its edge than at its center, 
introduces a fixed 'shading** signal into a 
fiat-light field because of the transmission 
difference across the faceplate. This 
shading accounts for a drop in signal 
output of approximately 17% at the cor- 
ners. Also, geometric distortion increases 
by about 2% as a result of the transition 
from a plane image to a spherical surface. 
This distortion is displayed as "pin- 
cushion" effect on the camera monitor. 

Resolution 

The matrix structure of the silicon target 
limits the resolution performance of the 
SIT tube. The existing target has a density 
of over 1800 diodes per inch, or about 35 
line pairs per millimeter of resolution. In a 
nominal 16-mm optical image (I; 2 X 3/8 
in.) this condition will result in a limiting 
resolution of about 700 tv lines per picture 
height. Higher resolution is obtained by 
using a larger-sized target rather than a 
target of higher diode density. A 27-mm 
target with a limiting-resolution capability 
in excess of 1 000 tv lines per picture height 
is currently being used in l.5-in.-bulb-dia. 
tubes. 

The contrast transfer function (CTF), or 
square-wave amplitude response 
characteristic, can be useful in determining 
resolution performance. The complete 
curve shown in Fig. 4 can be obtained in the 



laboratory by viewing high-contrast 
patterns of parallel white and black bars. 
This curve shows the relationship of output 
signal to bar width. The signal reduction 
associated with small images is significant 
in that the signal- to- noise ratio is directly 
affected and is important in determining 
the low-light limitation of operation. This 
limitation may be reached at light levels 
higher than expected because actual scenes 
are not made up of parallel black and white 
bars. The effect upon amplitude response 
when looking at points rather than bars can 
be approximated by squaring the CTF 
characteristic curve. Fig. 4. 

Resolution also degrades as light level is 
lowered because lower output signals affect 
the signal- to- noise ratio. Fig. 5 shows the 
relationship of light level and limiting 
resolution; the curve was made using a 
static scene consisting of black and white 
bars. Two different contrast levels are 
shown: the 100% level is typical of a 
laboratory-type evaluation, while the 30% 
level corresponds more closely to typical 
outdoor scenes. 

Lag 

Resolution is only one of the important 
characteristics in low-light-level operation. 
A second very important characteristic is 
lag, which becomes worse as the signal level 
decreases. Lag is the residual signal 
measured in the dark and is expressed as 
the percentage of the original signal present 
after three fields of scanning in the dark. 

SIT tubes exhibit no photoconductive lag, 
but there is some capacitative lag resulting 
from the finite time it takes for the electron 
beam to remove accumulated charge from 
the target. A target with high capacitance 
will store relatively more charge with less 
voltage change than will a low-capacitance 
target ( C — d Q! d V). H o wever. it will take a 
longer time for the beam to discharge the 
signal because of the electron velocity 
distribution within the beam. It is for this 
reason that lag increases as light level (and 
charge) decreases. Fig. 6 shows typical 
"third-field" lag for a 4804 tube as a 
function of light level. 

It is possible to improve lag by artifically 
raising the "zero-signal" voltage so that the 
beam electrons can discharge the target 
more effectively. This can be done either by 
simulating an increased dark current (using 
bias lighting) or by actually increasing the 
dark current (increasing target voltage or 
raising target temperature). 



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2856 K FtCE PLATE ILLUMINANCE - LUMENS/ FOOT 



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10' ; 



TV LINES PER PICTURE HEIGHT 

Fig. 4 

Response to black-and-white parallel-bar pattern depends on 
bar width. Curve is cafled the contrast t ranter function (CTF), 
squaring it gives the effect upon amplitude response when the 
tube sees points Instead of bars. 



Fig. 5 

Low light levels lower resolution— 100% and* 30% 

levels correspond to laboratory and outdoor 

environments. 



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FACEPLATE ILLUMINANCE LUMENS^ POOT : 

Fig 6 

Lag is a measure of the residual signal present after 

scanning the field in the dark. Curve shows lag for a 

standard .4804 tube after scanning three fields in the 

dark. 



TARGET VOLTAGE VOLTS 



Fig. 7 

Dark current is caused by thermally-developed carriers in the 
target, and is seen as a background to the image. Dark current is a 
function of both target voltage and temperature. 



Dark current 



Dark current manifests itself as a 
background to the image. This background 
is a result of thermally developed carriers in 
the target and is usually not a problem 
except for a low-level grain or mottling that 
is visible only at extremely low signal levels. 
It is normally desirable to keep the dark 
current low so that the dark portion of the 
scene will have a voltage reference near 
zero. There may be circumstances when the 
dark current will be increased to com- 
promise performance, such as to improve 
lag, as discussed previously, if this is done 
by increasing target voltage above the 
nominal 8 V, then the maximum signal 



capability of the tube will be increased as 
well. Normally this will be of no concern to 
the user, because the tube generally has 
sufficient signal-handling capability. 
However, whenever the target voltage is 
increased, the maximum value should not 
exceed 15 V because of the increased 
prominence of target defects. Fig. 7 shows 
the typical relationship of dark current to 
target voltage. This curve is for a 30°C 
operating temperature; dark current in- 
creases with increased operating 
temperature. 

Operation at low light levels 

The SIT tube is basically a low-light-level 
device. Even though it has a variable-gain 



feature, as shown in Fig. 2, around-the- 
clock operation should not be attempted 
without auxiliary light-control capability. 
Rather than operate the tube at high 
illumination for long periods, it is better to 
incorporate the variable-gain feature of the 
tube into the camera design as a fast-acting 
automatic light control (ALC). As an 
example, the nominal operating voltage 
might be chosen as about 4500 volts, where 
the gain is about 200 (3 lens stops away 
from full gain). At this operating point the 
tube will have a good signal-to-noise ratio, 
the picture will be pleasing, and the tube 
will have long life. The voltage (gain) can be 
varied from this operating point to handle 
light levels changing up or down by as 
much as a factor of 8 in less than a second. 



Then, at a slower rate, lens-iris adjustment 
and, or filler insertion can bring the light 
level back to the value thai will allow 4500- 
volt operation. 

Tube life 

When caution is exercised in using the SIT 
tube, reduced thermionic cathode emission 
will end its life, as in other camera tubes. A 
calculated mean-time-lo-faiiure (MTTF) 
in excess of 5500 hours (to 90-percent 
confidence) has been maintained 
throughout the last three years of produc- 
tion. Faceplate exposure must be con- 
trolled for long life. By following 
recommended camera design con- 
siderations, the operating lime before the 
onset of damage will be 2000 hr. Protection 
must be provided against two types of 
damage mechanisms: target damage from 
high-energy electron bombardment and 
photocathode damage from ion bombard- 
ment. 

Target damage 

In addition to time and illumination, the 
energy of photoelectrons that bombard the 
target determines the extent of target 
damage. Excessive exposure will cause a 
permanent increase of dark current at the 
point of impact on the target. If the damage 
becomes severe, it will be evident in the 
dark portions of a scene or even in total 
darkness with the high voltage completely 
removed. Fig. 8. Damage can be related to 
signal level on the target and can be 
controlled by keeping the signal within 
bounds. 

Damage is most apt to occur where small, 
intense sources are present. However, in 



such an application it is usually necessary 
to obtain information from the dark 
background surrounding the small source, 
so it is not practical to reduce gain and 
signal level just to protect the target from 
the exposure of the small area. If prolonged 
operation is necessary under these con- 
ditions, it is best to mo ve the camera so that 
the small area does not remain in one spot. 

Target damage is most likely to occur in an 
unattended camera. In an attended and 
correctly operating camera, the overex- 
posure of a small spot will usually bloom to 

an unusable degree before a damage level 
is reached. If the over- illuminated area 
becomes large and takes up a significant 
portion of the picture area, the chance for 
photocathode damage increases. 

Photocathode damage 

Ion damage to the photocathode results in 
a poorly defined dark spot in the center of 
the picture. Fig. 9. This dark spot is 
actually an area of reduced photocathode 
sensitivity and cannot be seen in the dark or 
with the high voltage removed. The 
damage results from the bombardment of 
positive tons, originating from collisions 
between photoelectrons and residual gas 
molecules, that are accelerated toward the 
negative potential of the photocathode. In 
normal operation the number of photoelec- 
trons is never high enough to generate a 
damaging number of ions: it is only when 
the photocathode current becomes ex- 
cessive that the number of ions reaches a 
damaging level. 

ton generation is a function of numbers of 
photoelectrons rather than energy. It is 
possible to have such a small voltage (as 
low as 100 volts) on the image section that. 




Fig. 8 

Severe target bum caused by excessive 
exposure. Damage is evident here even with 
the high voltage removed. 



Fig. 9 

Photocathode ion damage produces a poor- 
ly defined dark soot in the center of the 
image. 



although no picture is present, photoelec- 
trons are flowing as a result of light 
exposure. Therefore, the only sure methods 
of photocathode protection are to com- 
pletely remove all photocathode voltage or 
to limit the light level. 

S/N at low light levels 

The degradation of resolution at tow light 
levels is closely related to signal-to-noise 
ratio. It is desirable to have a camera 
system that is so quiet and a tube so 
sensitive that performance will be limited 
only by the number of photons available 
from the scene. The SIT tube comes close 
to reaching this goal. Several factors are 
involved in evaluating the low-light-level 
limit of operation: the detector quantum 
efficiency and its integration with the 
spectral distribution of available photons: 
the reflectivity and contrast of the scene; 
the lens aperture: the solid angle cor- 
responding to the picture element: and the 
integration time. All these factors are 
important in establishing an S ,V at the 
target. 

When the camera system processes this 
information, it contributes its own 
additional noise, the significance of which 
depends upon the actual signal level com- 
ing out of the target. Fig. 10 shows a typical 
Si .V characteristic for a tube and camera. 
Note thai at the higher light levels the Si ,V 
does not continue to increase along the 
"photocathode-limited" line. When full 
signal output is obtained from the tube, any 
further light-level increase is accompanied 
by a gain reduction brought about by 
decreasing the in tens i fie r voltage. As this 
lower voltage cuts into the photoelectron 
energy distribution, the number of primary 
electrons entering the target through the 
buffer layer will only ■ be sufficient to 
maintain signal level, thus flattening the 
5; ,V characteristic. 

Signal integration 

The silicon target stores the charge image 
until it is scanned off. For broadcast 
systems and most closed-circuit systems in 
the United States this integrating time is 
nominally 1/30 s. If the photon flux input 
can be integrated for a longer time, more 
information will be stored: the results will 
have an improved signal-to- noise ratio bui 
a loss of motion perception. Operation in 
an extended integrating mode will be 
limited by dark-curreni build-up, which is 
usually proportional to integrating time. 



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Fig. 10 

Typical S/N characteristic for tube and camera. At higher illumination levels, intensifier 
voltage decreases to limit gain. This lowers the number of primary photoelectrons striking 
the target, so the S/N flattens out from the photocathode-limited line. 



When the tube is operated in this mode, 
increased dark current resulting from 
build-up can usually be tolerated up to 
about a one-second integrating time. 
Longer limes will require target cooling of 
about 20°C for each order increase in 
integrating time. In addition, for in- 
tegrating times in excess of ten minutes, it 
has been found useful to turn off the gun 
heater until just before ready to read out 
the information. Signals have been 
successfully stored in this manner for up to 
eight hours before being read out. 

Blooming 

Blooming is the spread of a highlight image 
and is associated with most camera tubes. 
It occurs when portions of the pictures are 
overloaded with excessive light: the 
overloaded area then appears larger than it 
should because excess charge on the target 
spills over into adjacent areas. Low-light- 
level scenes are particularly susceptible to 
blooming because the general content of a 
scene may have detail with a rather narrow 
contrast range exept for an occasional 
bright light or flash. 

Recently developed targets with a new 
reduced-blooming feature are now being 
used with significantly improved results. 
The 4804 H reduced-blooming tube, at 
extreme overload, can handle intensities 20 
times greater than those that can be 
handled by the conventional 4804 tube. 

However, spot intensities greater than 1000 
times full signal introduce additional con- 
cerns for the user of the reduced-blooming 



tube: either further distortion of the spot 
image as a result of lens flare (internal 
reflections) or potential damage to the 
target from overexposure. 

Alternate configurations 

Although most camera applications in- 
volving simple surveillance can use a 16- 
mm SIT lube with no modificaton, there 
are circumstances requiring additional 
features or characteristics. At extremely 
low light levels, such as those found out- 
doors with no artificial illumination, it is 
necessary to have the pickup device in- 
troduce as little noise as possible to the 
incoming image signal and to have enough 
gain available so thai the output signal-to- 
noise ratio is not degraded by amplifier 
noise. 

An image-intensifier tube can provide 
additional gain to an SIT tube so that 
operation can be realized up to the 
photoelectron noise limit. The fiber-optic 
output element of the image tube couples 
directly to the SIT photocathode through 
the SIT tube's fiber-optic faceplate. The 
additional while-light gain of over 20: 1 is 
the ratio of the SIT tube photocathode 
current to the photocathode current of the 
image-intensifier. 

For additional light collection, it is possible 
to increase the sire of the input aperture 
from 16 mm to 40 mm. In applications 
where space is at a premium, an SIT with a 
smaller, 2; 3-inch gun section may be 
useful. Tubes are also available for unique 
applications that require either gale or 
?oom in the intensifier section. Where 



improved resolution is required, a 27- 
millimeter target is available that provides 
resolution in excess of 1000 tv lines per 
picture height. 

Applications 

Many military, medical, and scientific 
applications, in addition to surveillance 
applications, have developed for low-light- 
level television cameras employing the SIT 
tube. 

Airborne cameras used in gunfire control 
take advantage of the tube's ability to 
provide useful information under adverse 
conditions of low contrast and low light 
level. Cameras on aircraft carriers 
operating under similar adverse conditions 
are used to help guide aircraft landings. 
Other shipboard cameras are used for night 
maneuvers and harbor piloting. These 
applications encounter less rapid motion, 
but present a challenge to blooming control 
because of bright lights in the harbor or 
running lights on other ships. Submarine 
periscopes are also being outfitted with 
low-light-level cameras. 

Parking-lot surveillance applications in 
both the private and public security 
domains are well known, as are the search- 
and-observe functions of the cameras in 
law-enforcement applications. 

Various businesses have found uses for 
low-light-level cameras, including observ- 
ing activity in lllm-processing plants and 
inspecting internal parts of jet engines 
during maintenance. Cameras go un- 
derwater to aid in oil drilling. Airlines use 
low-light-level cameras with low-level X- 
ray systems for baggage inspection. 
Fishermen use airborne cameras to locate 
fish schools in the ocean by observing 
plankton fluorescence. 

Scientists can use low- light -level cameras 
to observe the nocturnal habits of birds and 
animals or to advance their knowledge in 
astronomy. Medical applications find low- 
light-level cameras used in low-light X-ray 
systems and eye fundus investigations. 

References 

I, V-uiuuwi K.O : -lhe iilicon target vnlicoru. new feiium 
and c-ipunderi use*." ItNS i.mjc 

1. Enplrnm. K.W.; ml Robinsun. O.A.: Thome Ihe lut* lor 
I iv" EtmnfitptUal ivurmy Dftfifel. Jun l^l 

J Rodger*; ft I .. 111. "rfcam sawurj vilKiin lirgcis tut camera 

lube*." IEEE Inlercun. Mar 1973 
i Mc.ner. M . .inn SefWMiig. W .: -rlflul repon SIT jensor 

mciimrcrrwiH." R(. \ Aiirit-EleclriMto, unpuMnhcd 



nnn 



and Devices 



Camera Tubes 



4804/H Series 




SIT Camera Tubes 

16-Millimeter Fiber-Optic Types 

■ Improved Blooming Characteristic 

■ Improved Output Sensitivity 

■ Improved Discharge Capability 

■ Tightened Blemish Selection 

■ Improved Resolution 

■ Improved Dynamic Range (Gain Ratio) 



The RCA 4804/H Series types are sturdy, compact, 16- 
millimeter Silicon-lntensifier Target (SIT) camera tubes 
designed for use in very-low light level TV systems. 

All tubes in the 4804/H Series employ the silicon diode 
array target known for its low lag and its ability to 
exhibit low blooming when exposed to bright tight 
sources and intense specular reflections within a scene. 

The 4804/H Series consists of two premium grades 
(4804B/H/P-, 4804A/H/P-) and a surveillance grade 
(4804/H/ P-), 

The suffix P- indicates a specific potting configuration 
used on the image section of the tube. These potting 
variants are described in the outline drawing section of 
this bulletin. Other than for the potting, the tubes in each 
grade are mechanically identical. The major electrical 
differences between grades are the performance values 
for such characteristics as maximum voltage rating 
[which reflects in current gain capability, gain ratio 
(dynamic range) and tube sensitivity], picture blemishes, 
and photocathode responsivity. 

The improved dynamic range of the 4804/H Series is 
obtained by increasing the peak target current rating and 
by improving the beam discharge capability with greater 
beam reserve. As a result, the "comet tail" and blooming 
is minimized when viewing specular highlights without 
any sacrifice in picture quality or life. 

The sturdy, compact structure of the 4804/H Series lends 
itself to operation in applications involving environments 
of vibration and shock. A ruggedized version of the P2 
potting configuration, when assembled with the rugged 
RCA AJ2216 deflection/focus component, can be 



mounted to operate through the aircraft vibration 
schedule of Mil-Std-810 (11.9 g rms random, etc.) with 
little mechanical amplification and an acceptable level of 
spurious microphonic signal generation. 

These tubes operate at light levels near the 
photoelectron noise limit. Operation at the photoelectron 
noise limit is possible by coupling a single image tube. 
Coupled assemblies, such as the RCA 4849/H Series 
(ISIT), are available to meet the needs of most systems. 

Non-potted variants are also available on request. For 
greater safety, ease of use, and life expectancy, the 
potted variants are strongly recommended. 



General Data 

The majority of these data apply to all tube types in the 4804/H 
Series. Where exceptions exist, the data are labeled appropriately. 
Heater Voltage (AC or DC): 
Operational 6.5 V 

For standby with no other 

electrode voltages applied 3.0 V 

Heater Current at 6.5 V 0.1 A 

Capacitance (Approx.) 

Target to all other electrodes: 

P1 and P4 version* 10 pF 

P2 and P5 versions 12 pF 

Photocathode to all other electrodes 75 pF 

Focus/gate to all other electrodes: 

PS only 60 pF 

Unpotted tube ... ta pF 



For further information or application assistance on these devices, contact your RCA Sates Representative or write Camera Tube Marketing. RCA. Lancaster. PA 17804. 



Information lurmsried Oy RCA is behaved to be accurate end 
reliable. However, no res pona >t»i Hy la assumed t>y HC* lor its use; 
nor tor any infringements of patents or other rights o( third parties 
which may result Irom its use. No license is granted ay Implication 
or otherwise under any patent or patent rights of RCA. 



Trademark (si • Registered 
•vtsrca(a) fleglstradats) 

Printed irt U.S.A./12-81 
Supersedes 9-77 4804/H Series 



4804/H Series 



General Data (Cont'd) 
Target: 
Maximum useful size of 

rectangular image 12.3 mm x 9,6 mm 

(0.50 in x 0.38 in) 
image Surface: 

Shape Rat, Circular 

Material Dark-Clad Rber-Qptics 

Pitch (nominal center-to- 

canter spacing) e pm 

Image Section: 

Focusing method Electrostatic 

Configuration: 

/PS : Triode 

All other IP- Diode-Connected Triode 

Internal focus bleeder (PI, P2, 

and P4 types only), nominal 1 to 2 Gft 

Scanning Section: 

Focusing method Magnetic 

Deflection method Magnetic 

Operating Position Any 

Absolute- Maxim urn Ratings 1 J 

Limiting Values 

Temperature: 

Operating (See Figure 6) -54 to +60 °C 

Storage -54 to +71 S C 

Image Section: 

Photocathode and focus electrode 
(with respect to anode): 

43Q48/H, 4804A/H types 12 -kV 

4804/H types 10 -kV 

Focus electrode (with respect 

to photocathode) non-potted 

and P5 -1500 to 250 V 

Anode voitage Normally operating near ground or 

thermionic cathode potential 
Exposure 3 , point sources 
(See Figure 9} .. 10* fc:s 

Illuminance 1 , average scenes 

(See Figure 9) 

Scanning Section: 

Heater- voltage tolerance 

(between pins 1 and 8) ±5 % 

Grid-No.4 voltage 4 VG3 to 500 V 

Grid-No.3 voltage* 500 «, V 

Grid-No. 2 voltage 350 V 

Grid-No.2 dissipation 1 w 

Grid-No.1 voltage -150 to V 

Heater-cathode voltage -125 to 10 V 

Target voltage (briefly 

during special cycling) . . . , 300 V 

Target voltage (during operation) 20 V 

Peak target current 850 nA 

Typical Operating Values 1 

With tube operated in an RCA AJ2216 assembly, or equivalent, 
faceplate image size of 12.8 mm x 9.6 mm [0,50 in x 0.38 in), and 
standard CCIR "M", or EIA, TV scanning rate (525 lines, interlaced 
2:1, frame time 1/30 second), and in a non-pulsed mode. 



10** lm/ft 4 (fe) 



Temperature 28 °C 

image Section: 

Photocathode voltage, Ep<, 

(with respect to anode) 1 4.5 -kv 

Focusing-grid voltage 

(with respect to anode) • Adjusted For Best Focus 

Anode voitage # . . . ^ero 

Scanning Section: 

Heater, for unipotential cathode: 

Current (ac or dc) 0.1 A 

Nominal voltage for current 

of 0.1 ampere' 6.5 y 

Grid-No, 4 (decelerator) voltage 4 500 V 

Grid-No.3 (beam focus 

electrode) voltage 4 325 V 

Grid-No, 2 (accelerator) voltage 300 V 

Grid-No. 1 (beam) voltage (approx.)* ,. -40 V 
Peak-to-peak blanking voltage: 

When applied to grid No.1 .75 Jk 

When applied to cathode 20 ^t 

Target current, for scene highlights . . . 300 nA 

Target voltage 9 v 

Focusing-coil current (approx.)» . , 1 10 mA 

Peak-to-peak deflection coil current: 

Horizontal 360 mA 

Vertical 270 mA 

Field strength of each adjustable 

alignment coil to 4x10"* T""> 



Performance; Data 

Under conditions shown under Typical Operating Values 

Mln. Typ. Max 

Grid-No. 1 Voltage for 

Picture Cutoff -120 -30 - V 

Photocathode Luminous Resoonsivity: 

4804B/H, 4804A/H types .... 130 160 - jiA/lm 

4804/H types 90 160 - ^A/lrrw 

Lag-Percent of Initial Signal W 

Output Current 1/20 Second 

After Illumination is Removed: 11 

(See Figure 4) - 7 10 % 

Dark Current (See 

Figures 5 and S) - 7 15 nA 

Contrast Transfer (Amplitude 

Response) to a 400 TV Line 

Square- Wave Test Pattern at 

Center of Picture, (See 

Figure 7): 30 34 - % 

Resolution, (See 

Figures) - 700 - TV Lines 

Current Gain, at Rated Epc 
(See Figure 10): 

4804B/H, 4804A/H types ....1600 2100 

4804/H types 1200 1600 

Gain Ratio for Photocathode 
Voltage Swing from Rated Epc to 
-2.5 kV (See Figure 10): 

4804B/H, 4804A/H types .... 600 950 

4804/H types 450 700 



4804/H Series 





Min. 


Typ. 


Max. 




Sensitivity (At Rated Epc): 










4804B/H, 4804A/H types . 


.. 325 


450 


- 


>iA/fc 


4804/H types 


.. 200 


350 


- 


^A/fc 


Geometric Distortion 1 * .. 


.. 


2 


3 


% 


Blooming '3 (See Figure 11) . 


.. 


4 


6 




Signal Non uniformity '« 




20 




% 



In accordance with the Absolute- Maxim urn rating system as 
defined by the Electronic Industries Association Standard 
RS-239A, formulated by the JEDEC Electron Tube Council. 

Voltages, unless otherwise indicated, are taken with respect 
to thermionic cathode. 

High incident light levels on the photocathode resulting in 
excessive photocathode current may, over a period of time, 
result in shortened tube life due to either target damage 
from photoelectrons or photocathode damage from ion 
bombardment. Therefore, overexposure for long time 
periods should be prevented whenever possible. For 
applications covering wide illumination ranges, suitable 
combinations of tens stops, light filters and photocathode 
voltage should be chosen to provide close to typical signal 
currents. Figure 9 shows the safe operating range o) 
exposure based upon illumination and time and shows the 
relationship of photocathode voltage to the safe operating 
range. 

Grid-No.4 voltage must always be greater than grid-No. 3 
voltage. The recommended ratio of grid-No. 3 to grid-No. 4 
voltage is 65/100 (applies to the tube in the RCA-AJ2216). 
Other magnetic configurations may dictate different ratios. 
The optimum ratio is that ratio providing the most uniform 
center-to-edge highlight discharge. 

A synchronous high-voltage power supply with 0.1% ripple, 
such as the RCA PF1040 is satisfactory for supplying the 
photocathode voltage. To obtain satisfactory performance 
from an assynchronous high-voltage power supply the 
ripple should be less, 0.01%. 

As the photocathode voltage is varied (for gain control), the 
focus voltage will remain at a fixed percentage of the 
photocathode voltage. This value will range from zero to 2% 
of the photocathode voltage and may be supplied with a 
fixed bleeder-divider between photocathode and anode. 

Heater voltage should be controlled between 6.4 and 6,6 
volts to prevent thermionic emission fluctuations which 
could degrade tube performance and shorten tube life. This 
precaution is particularly important in applications requiring 
unattended operation for long periods of time. 

Operating grid-No, 1 voltage should be adjusted for each 
tube to provide sufficient discharge beam to handle peak* 
signals two to three times normal highlights. This 
adjustment will minimize blooming and "comet tail" effects 
and assure satisfactory operation during long periods of 
unattended operation, varying input conditions, and 
environments. 

The polarity of the focusing coil should be such that a north 
seeking pole is attracted to the image end of the focusing 
coil, with the indicator located outside of and at the image 
end of the focusing coil. 

iT(Tesla) = 10* Gauss. 

For an initial signal output current of 300 nanoamperes, and 
for a tube with typical dark current. 

Fiber optic shear distortion is negligible in the 4804B/H 
types. It may be as great as 2 TV lines in the 4804/H and 
4804A/H types. 



Blooming is the ratio of two spot width measurements (a 
final to an initial) made at the 50% spot amplitude points on 
a line-select oscilloscope display. The initial spot width is 
measured for a spot image having a diameter equal to 1% of 
the picture diagonal and the light level set to produce 300 
nA peak signal. The final spot width is measured for the 
increased spot diameter when the light level is increased 
1000 times and the beam (EG1) is adjusted to saturate the 
signal at 300 nA peak. 

Each tube employs a fiber optic faceplate of nonuniform 
thickness since the electron optical design requires a 
shaped photocathode. This design results in a characteristic 
nonuniform signal output, with maximum signal near the 
center where the faceplate is thinest. It is possible to 
process the video information electronically to correct most 
of this nonuniformity with suitable parabolic waveforms. 
The deflecting circuits must provide extremely linear 
scanning for good signal uniformity. Any change in 
scanning velocity produces a signal uniformity error in 
proportion to the change in scanning velocity. 




ZONE 3 



D - Active Target Diameter 
H - Raster Height (4 x 3 Aspect Ratio) 
Zone 1 - Diameter = H/2. Area «• 15% 
Zone 2 - Diameter = H. Area =<■ 45% 
Zone 3 - Peripheral Area » 40% 

Figure 1 - Spurious Signal Zones 



Spurious Signal Test 

This test is performed with the tube carefully focused on 
a uniformly illuminated test pattern which identifies the 
zones as pictured in Figure 1. The tube is operated in 
accordance with "Typical Operating Values" with the 
target operating at 9.0 volts and illuminance is adjusted 
to provide a highlight reference signal current of 300 
nanoamperes. After completion of the setup adjustments, 
light is excluded and the picture examined to locate and 
measure bright spots. Thereafter, reference level 
illuminance is applied and the picture examined for 
additional spots and other blemishes. 

Spots: Spots whose resulting video signal current 
exceeds the specified value for each test level are 
acceptable within the size, "polarity" and distribution 
limits shown in Table I for the 4804B/H types, Table ft 
for the 4804A/H types, and Table III for the 4804/H 
types. The size of spots (diameter or length plus width 
divided by two) is measured in terms of the pitch of the 
raster lines in a 525-line system. 



4804/H Series 



Other Blemishes: Smudges, streaks, mottled or grainy 
background are acceptable only if their video signal 
current amplitude does not exceed 30 nA (10% of the 
reference signal current). 

Table I 

For 4804B/H Types 

Evaluation is made over a 200:1 range of illumination between Epc 

= -10 W and Epc =-3 kV 



Blemish Size 
(Equivalent 
Number of 
Raster Lines) 


Zone 1 
Allowsi 
Spots 
Wht 


i 
Totat 


Zone 2 
Allowet 
Spots 
Wht 


+ 1 
1 

Total 


Zone 3 + 2 + 1 

Allowed 

Spots 

WhL Total 


Over 4 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


Over 1 


None 


6 


2 


15 


4 


22 


1 or less 


Note 1 



Spots are recorded at video signal currents in excess of 15 nA (5% 
of the reference signal current). 

Fiber optic block lines are acceptable only if their video signal 
current amplitude does not axceed 30 nA (10% of the reference 
signal current). 

Table II 

For 4804A/H Types 

Evaluation is made over a 200:1 range of illumination between Epc 

= -10 kV and Epc ■» -3 kV. 



Blemish Size 
(Equivalent 

Number of 
Raster Lines) 


Zone 1 
Allow* 
Spots 
Wht 


1 

Total 


Zona 2 

Alio wet 

Spots 

Wht 


i- 1 
I 

Total 


Zone 3 

Alio wet 

Spots 

WhL 


+ 2 + 1 
i 

Total 


OverS 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


Over 4 


None 


None 


None 


1 


None 


2 


Over 1 


1 


6 


2 


15 


4 


22 


1 or less 


Note i 



Spots are recorded at video signal currents in excess of 30 n A (10% 
of the reference signal current). 

Fiber optic block lines are acceptable only if their video signal 
current amplitude does not exceed 30 nA (1 0% of the reference 
signal current). 

Table III 

For 4804/H Types 

Evaluation is made over a 10:1 range of illumination between rated 

Epc = -10 kV and typical operating value of Epc = -45 kV. 



Blemish Size 
(Equivalent 
Number of 
Raster Lines) 


Zone 1 
Allow*< 
Spots 
Wht 


I 
Total 


Zone 2 

Alio we 

Spots 

Wht 


+ 1 

i 
Total 


Zone 3 
Ailowei 
Spots 

Wht. 


+ 2+1 
i 

Total 


Over 8 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


None 


Over6 


None 


1 


None 


1 


None 


1 


Over 4 


None 


1 


None 


2 


1 


3 


Over 1 


2 


6 


3 


17 


4 


24 


1 or less 


Note i 



Spots are recorded at video signal currents in excess of 30 n A (10% 
of the reference signal current). 

Fiber octic block lines are acceptable only if their video signal 
current amplitude does not exceed 90 nA (30% of the reference 
signal current), 



Note 1 - Do not count spots of this size unless concentration 
causes a smudged appearance. 

Operating Considerations 

Assembling LGH Leads and Receptacles - The potted 
versions of the 4804/H Series are so designed to 
withstand environments of altitude and humidity. In such 
applications the high voltage coupling of the connector 
to the power supply receptacle may require special 
attention. For optimum high voltage coupling, the 
following procedure, supplied by AMP Inc., is 
recommended: 

a Using a clean cloth saturated with toluene, clean the 
mating end of the "0" ring type or molded end type 
tead. The surface area to be cleaned should exceed 
the barrel depth of the mating receptacle. 

b Apply a thin coating of Dow Corning High Vacuum 
Grease (DC-4) to the clean portion of the tead. 

c Apply a generous coating of silicone grease to the ™ 
inside surface of the receptacle. 






SILICONE 
GREASE 




Caution: Too much grease wilt prevent the lead and receptable 
from fully mating. 

d With a back-and-forth twisting motion, insert the tead 
into the receptacle until the lead end bottoms. This 
manner of insertion causes the silicone grease to be 
forced over the entire circumference of the lead and 1 
receptacle. 

e With the washers and "O" ring (if applicable) in 
place, install the cap until the "O" ring or molded 
shoulder is compressed. This forms a complete seal 
between the top of the receptacle and lead. 

f Remove all excess grease from the mated lead and 
receptacle with a clean cloth. 

Target Voltage 

The sensitivity of these tubes is not affected by target 
voltage. Target voltage provides a collecting potential for 
cathode current and permits a voltage swing of the 
scanned side of the target which generates the video 
signal. 

Optimum target voltage is determined by trading off the 
increase in maximum discharge current and decrease in 
lag with increased dark current and the intensity of some 
spots. Beam-landing voltage errors will affect this 
optimum voltage value. In general, optimum target 



. 4804/H Series 



voltage is in the range of 8 to 12 V for the recommended 
yoke assemblies. 

In normal operation, the target voltage should not 
exceed 15 volts because (1 ) excessive voltage causes 
excessive dark current with no increase in signal, (2) 
excessive voltage makes target detects more prominent, 
and (3) operation at high voltages may result in the 
deposition of a charge on the dielectric between the 
diodes causing clipping of signal highlights at normal 
operating voltage. If such a charge is deposited, it may 
be removed by brief operation with the target set at +300 
volts - see recommended procedure below. 

Procedure to remove charge pattern: 

1. Use maximum scanning (which results in least image 
magnification to the picture tube). 

2. Set for maximum beam current (Grid No.1 should be 
-5 to -10 volts). 

3. Set target voltage to +300 volts, 

4. Cut off beam completely after one or two seconds of 
operation at the high target voltage. 

5. Reset target voltage to normal operating voltage 
(about 9 volts). 

6. Increase beam current to normal target discharge. 

The minimum target voltage is that required to allow the 
beam to satisfactorily discharge the picture highlights. 
To obtain this operating condition, reduce the target 
voltage to about 3 or 4 volts until the picture highlights 
are clipped. If the highlight signal is clipped more in one 
part of the picture than another, symmetry about the 
center may be obtained by use of alignment. If, when 
symmetry is obtained, the picture corners do not have 
about the same amount of clipping as the center, the 
ratio of grid No.4 (mesh) voltage to grid No. 3 (wall) 
voltage may be readjusted (while maintaining electron 
optical focus) to best bring out the corners. The 
optimum value of this ratio depends on the design of the 
focus and deflection coils. 

At a normal operating target voltage, about 9 volts, 
neither the features associated with low-voltage 
operation nor those associated with high-voltage 
operation are significant. 

The anode provides considerable shielding around the 
target. In normal operation it is grounded at the first 
video amplifier stage. 



Recommended Start-Up Procedure 

Upon receipt and after any idle period of ninety (90) 
days, or more, it is recommended that the tube be 
operated for one (1) hour, or more, with only heater 
voltage applied. Following this heater warm-up period, it 
is further suggested that the tube be operated for an 
additional one-half (1/2) to one (1) hour with no high 
voltage (Epc) applied. After tubes have been installed in 
cameras and the above conditions can not be 
conveniently applied, it is suggested that the camera be 
operated for one to eight hours before being placed into 



service. During this period all light should be excluded 
from the faceplate. This procedure will minimize possible 
photocathode damage from excessive ion generation. 

Pulsed Operation of the /PS Configuration 

The /P5 suffix indicates a specific potting configuration 
that does not include an internal image-section focusing 
voltage-divider network. It has a separate high voltage 
gating lead internally connected to the focusing 
electrode for pulsing the image section which makes 
these devices highly useful in active systems using 
pulsed illuminators, e.g., laser ranging, and in passive 
systems operating over a wide dynamic range of light 
levels. 

In pulsed operation, only one value of gate voltage will 
provide optimum focus for a given photocathode voltage. 
This optimum value, for an operating photocathode 
voltage of -8 kV, will be within the range of +180 to zero 
volts with respect to photocathode. Gating grid cutoff 
voltage is -900 ± 300 volts. Accordingly, a voltage swing 
of approximately 1 100 volts will be necessary at the dc 
level of -8 kV from ground to shutter the tube. If the 
operating photocathode voltage is changed, the voltages 
required for optimum gate focus and cutoff will change 
in direct proportion. Under cutoff conditions, the cutoff 
ratio will be in excess of 10 4 :1. Cutoff ratio is defined as 
the ratio of signal current in the focus mode to signal 
current in the cutoff mode for the same illuminance 
level. 

Satisfactory tube performance can be obtained with 
pulse widths as short as one microsecond. Shorter 
widths may be utilized with power supplies which can 
accommodate the gating-electrode capacitance with 
sufficiently fast rise and decay times. Light control 
applications can operate over a 500:1 range with little 
danger of over-exposure during cutoff conditions. 



Warnings 

Failure to observe the maximum dc electrode voltage 
ratings can drastically reduce the life expectancy of 
these tubes. When operated within ratings with the 
recommended deflection-focusing coil assembly, the full 
performance capabilities of the silicon-diode array target 
will be easily realized. Normally, a tube life expectancy 
of thousands of hours of useful service can be obtained 
when the tube is operated within the specified maximum 
ratings. 

The factory-potted tubes employ a guard electrode in 
the form of a transparent conductive coating on a cover 
glass plate which is in contact with the outside surface 
of the fiber-optic bundle. This guard electrode is 
operated at photocathode potential. The fiber-optic plate 
is thus in a field-free region and the cover glass prevents 
atmospheric particles from accumulating in the focal 
plane of the optical system. Because of the spacing from 
the optical plane, due to the cover-glass thickness, any 
small particles present will be sufficiently out of focus so 
that they will not be resolved in the resulting picture. 



4304/H Series 



If for some reason it is impossible to use factory-potted 
tubes and un potted versions are procured, the system 
designer must consider the following: 

Metal flanges connecting to the photocathode and 
focus electrode will be operated at voltages (with 
respect to ground) up to -10 kV. Clearances and 
connecting structures should be spaced, shaped or 
coated to provide personnel protection, prevent 
formation of leakage paths, especially during 
periods of high relative humidity, and prevent 
corona. These flanges (and the anode flange) 
should also be protected from extended exposure 
to a corrosive atmosphere such as salt air. 

The focus electrode operating voltage can be 
derived from a high impedance voltage divider. 
External leakage is the only significant load. Note 
that in the factory-potted tubes, this voltage divider 
is customarily 10* ohms total resistance. 

Fiber optic faceplates should not be subjected to 
high voltage fields between the surfaces. Because 
the inner surface bears the photocathode which 
operates 10 kV below ground, the outer surface of 
the fiber faceplate must be guarded from ground, 
In a high voltage field, individual fibers in the 
faceplate will undergo electrical breakdown 
resulting in a field of scintillations which excite the 
photocathode. Allowed to continue, this breakdown 
can lead to catastrophic tube failure due to air 
leakage. 



Warning 

Notice of Warranty Restrictions - RCA highly 
recommends the purchase of tubes which are 
completely potted with high voltage protection and 
connectors. Such assemblies are exceptionally easy 
to use and offer guaranteed service over a wide range 
of conditions. 

Because the photocathode of this intensifier camera 
tube operates at a high negative potential, there is a 
high probability of permanent damage to the device 
unless adequate corona discharge suppression 
precautions are employed. Consequently, all 
warranties are void where evidence of external arcing, 
corona discharge or high voltage breakdown is 
present. 

RCA designs and manufactures these sophisticated 
vacuum tube devices to be as durable as is practical. 
However, because of their nature, the glass-to-metal 
and ceramic-to-metal seals can be stripped with the 
application of excessive thermal or mechanical 
stresses. Care must be exercised, therefore, when 
making connections to the various electrodes and the 
target pin. Although the devices are assembled under 
ultra-clean conditions, there is always some risk of 
adding blemishes if the tube is handled photocathode 
end down, as is often necessary in potting operations. 
Any evidence of thermal or mechanical abuse also 
must void ail warranties. 



Warning - Personal Safety Hazards 

Electrical Shock - Operating voltages applied to this 

device present a shock hazard. 










4804/H Series 




WAVELENGTH - NANOMETERS 




Figure 2 - Typical Photocathode Responsibly - 
Multialkaii (NaKCsSb) as Modified by 
Fiber Optic Window 



SO 100 150 J00 ISO 300 

TIME AFTER ILLUMINANCE IS REMOVED -MILLISECONDS 



Figure 4 - Typical Persisience Characteristics 



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Figure 3 - Typical Transfer Characteristics 



Figure 5 - Typical Dark Current as a 
Function of Target Voltage 



4804/ H Series 




20 40 60 

C#t MflM TEMFERAruHE - "c 



Figure 6 - Typical Dark Current as a Function 
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Figure 8 - Typical Resolution Characteristic 



TV LINES FIR FICTURE HEIGHT 

' Contrast Transfer Function measured using tne RCA P2000 slant-line 
burst pattern with horizontal cantor response balanced on the 400 line 
cnevrons. 

Figure 7 - Typical Horizontal Square Wave Response 

(Contrast Transfer Function) 



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Figure 9 - Faceplate Exposure Limits 




*• J « 5 a 7 a s u ii t 

PHOTQCATHODE ACCELERATING VOLTAGE l.hVl 

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SATURATION 
POINT 



10X 100X 

SPOT INTENSITY (AFTER ON SET OF SATURATION! 



Figure 11 -Typical Blooming Characteristic 



Figure 10 -Typical Gain Characteristic 



4804/H Series 



, 31*. 



ii.isoi.moi < T - 

jjU^ INUMJESICTION 



McsnAre 



] — r 




a ASTER 



TARGET 

CONNECTION ^ I 
STUB I NOTE 4) 



[1.0501 
IMAGE 
SECTION 
FACEPLATE 



stntJi , 

2 an t .01(1 ' 

INOTEZt 



I1.M t 0151 
S« I 

tWT*IL"*-4 



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IMAGE PLANE 



4-40 HOUND MEAO 
SCREWS 131 




ANOOE 
CONNECTOR 
lot 14) LONG 



PwOTOCATHOOi 
LEAO 22S 111 LOW]. 
CCNNECTOR HATES 
WITH AMf INC. LGH 
1/2 L OR HOWS NO. 
ALA 15 IS flECEPT 




IW.7S 1 lit 
{7.JM t .1401 



ELECTROSTATIC 

SHIELD 

177 191 LONG 

I GREY) J 

[NOTE 21 ' 




OUTER SWELO- 
4N00S 



JttOTCCATHOOE 
LEAD 229 19) LONG, 
CONNECTOH MATES 
*l TH JMP INC LCH 
Ml L OH ROME INO. 
ALA IS 13 RECEFT. 



Approx. tube weight: 264 g (9.3 oz) 

Dimensions in milli meters. Dimensions in parentheses are in 
inches. 

Note t • Cover glass Corning type 7056 44.4 (1.75} dia. x 3.18 
(0.125). Index of refraction at 589,3 rsm is 1.49. 

Note 2 - Concentricity within 0.76 (0.030) to center of raster. 
Figure 12 - Outline Drawing for Types 4840B/H/P1, 
4804A/H/P1 and 4840/H/P1 



Approx. tube weight 264 g (9.3 oz) 

Dimensions in millimeters. Dimensions in parentheses are in 
inches. 

Note 1 - Cover glass Coming type 70S6 44.4 (1.75) dia. x 3.1^ 
(0.125). Index of refraction at 5S9.3 nm is 1.49. 

Note 2 - Connect to grounding lug on yoke. 

Note 3 - Concentricity within 0,76 (0.030) to center ol raster. 
Diameter applies only to front 51 (2,0) of tube. 

Note 4 - Soiderable terminal is designed to match AMP 61276-2 
soiderless terminal supplied with each tube. 

Figure 13 - Outline Drawing for Types 4804B/H/P2, 
4804A/H/P2 and 4804/H/P2 



10 



I 
I 



4804/ H Series 



TARGET 
CONNECT 10 M 
STUD (NOTE II 



M -*T nt* 
!1DM> OIA 



OUTER SHIELD 

GATtNG/FOC USING 

ELECTRODE 

140 (S.S) LONG — 



ELECTROSTATIC 
SHIELD LEAD 
1« IS 5) LONG 
IGREVI 
INOTE 2! 



ALTERNATE CONNECTION 
OUTER SHIELO GATING/ - 
FOCUSING ELECTRODE 



G ATI HGI FOCUSING 
ELECTRODE LEAD 
Z29 .91 LONG 
CONNECTOR MATES 
WITH AMP INC. LGH 
1/2 L OR ROWE IND. 
RLA 1S15RECEFT 



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IMAGE PLANE 




TARGET PLANE 



ANODE LfcAO 
1*0(5.5) LONG 
(BLACK) 
41 02 | 31 



OUTER SHIELD 
ANODE 

PHOTOCATHOOE 
LEAD 229 (91 LONG. 
CONNECTOR MATES 
WITH AMP INC. LGH 
1/2 L OR ROWE (NO. 
RLA Wit HECEPT. 



Approx. tube weight; 264 g (9.3 oz) 

Dimensions in millimeters. Dimensions in parentheses are in 
inches. 



Figure 14- Outline Drawing tor Types 4804S/H/P5, 
4804A/H/P5 and 4804/H/P5 



Note 1 - Cover glass Corning type 7056 44.4 (1.75) dia. x 3.18 
(0.125). Index of refraction at 589.3 nm is 1.49, 

Note 2 - Connect to grounding lug on yoke. 

Note 3 - Concentricity within 0.76 {0.030) to center of raster. 
Diameter applies only to front 51 (2,0) of tube. 

Note 4 - Sofderable terminal is designed to match AMP 61276-2 
solderless terminal supplied with each tube. 



11 



4804/H Series 



RASTER 



""TSIL* am Swage sEcrto« 

Dl *- FACEPLATE 



MI 

(NOTE 11 

IMAOE HANI 




3UTER 

SHIELD ANOOE 
xa 111 WIN. LONG 



PHOT OCA THOOS 
LEAD IU.4I5 2S1L0N6. 
CONNECTOR MATES 
WITH AMP INC. LGH 1/2 L 
OR HOWE INO. HLA ISIS 
RECEPTACLES 



M.10- 3 
<1 500 I 019) -"■ 
DIA. 
IS. 17 




• *OCLS« 

— CQNNfl 

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PHOTOCATHO06 
CONNECTION 



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connection 



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moeo 

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111 



2S-0* . 

n.a«" 



JEDEC Ha. ES.11 . 
( INOTtZI 



ttMMM 

Aporox, tube weight: 128 g (4.5 azi 

Dimensions in millimeters. Dimensions in parentheses are in 
inches. 

Note 1 - Clearance of 44.83 (1.755) is required to pass all 
protrusions. 

Note 2 - A typical socket for use with this base is the TRW Cinch 
type 8VT (133-98-11-015). or equivalent. 

Figure 16 - Outline Drawing for Non-Potted Versions - 

Types 48048/H, 4804A/H and 4804/H 1 



Appro*, tube weight: 236 g (8.3 oz) 

Dimensions in millimeters. Dimensions in parentheses are in 
inches. 

Note 1 - Cover glass Corning type 7056 44.4 (1.75) dia. x 3.18 
(0.125). Index of refraction at 589.3 nm is 1.49. 

Note 2 - Concentricity within 0.76 (0.030) to center of raster. 

Figure 15- Outline Drawing for Types 48043/H/P4, 
4804A/H/P4 and 4804/H/P4 



TAAOfT 
IC_ t JRK>N»J 




ic • iwtipnal oomkctioh. Hwrmi 



Figure 17- Basing Diagram, Bottom View 
' All Types 



CD. HEWC0MER 
LANCASTER 



Fill 



RCA| Solid State Di vision | Electro Optics and Devices) Lancaster, PA 17604 



CMCB/7D 

Solid State 
Division 



Electro-Optics and Devices 

Application Note 

AN-6994 



The RCA Ultricon™ 

An Improved Vidicon Camera Tube for 

General Closed-Circuit Television Applications 



by CD. Newcomer 

The RCA Ultricon is the most sensitive vidicon cameratube 
available today for general closed-circuit television (CCTV) 
applications. It achieves nearly 100-percent quantum 
efficiency in the visible spectrum with a broad spectral 
response extending from the near ultraviolet (UV), through 
the visible, and well into the near infrared (IR). In addition, 
the Ultricon has new a nti -reflective features that very 
effectively reduce the spurious effects resulting from intense 
specular highlights within a television scene. 

The Ultricon combines new and important performance 
features with the excellent performance characteristics 
previously established by RCA silicon-target vidicons: 

- High sensitivity 

- No after-image effects 

- No image burn-in 

- Low lag 

- High resolution 

- Excellent blooming control 

- Broad spectral response 

- Minimal comet- tailing 

- Excellent signal-discharge capabilities 

- Low dark current 

- Adaptability to special applications 

While all of the various vidicons utilize the dual functionsof 
photoelectric conversion and field storage to generate the 
CCTV video signal, both of these functions are achieved in 
the Ultricon target in a very different way, and it is this 
difference in the image-to-signal conversion that produces 
the Ultricon's unique performance characteristics. 

THE ULTRICON TARGET 

Construction Features 

The Ultricon target is a rectilinear array of silicon diodes 
having a density of 74 diodes per millimeter in each 
dimension. (In the standard one-inch vidicon format of 3/8 
by 1/2 inch, there are more than 664,000 diodes in the 
matrix.) The diodes are formed on a wafer of single-crystal 
silicon by processes familiar in the manufacture of inte- 
grated circuits and similar solid-state devices, as follows: 

1. The silicon wafer is polished and cleaned. 

2. An oxide layer is then formed on one surface of the 
wafer, 

3. Using photolithographic methods, the oxide layer is 
perforated in a precise hole pattern. The holes are 
small, just a few micrometers in diameter; each hole is 
the site of a diode. 

4. A p-type dopant is introduced through the holes and 
into the silicon substrate, 



5. Again using photolithographic methods, conductive 
beam landing pads are formed over the remaining 
oxide coating in precise registry around each diode 
site. These conductive pads prevent the scanning 
electron beam from landing outside the diode sites and, 
therefore, prevent the surface around the diodes from 
becoming charged by the electron beam. 

6. Additional proprietary processing in the n-type 
. substrate of the silicon wafer results in the near- 
quantum yield of the Ultricon. 

The manufacture of the silicon target involves a series of 
complex and precise procedures that account for the 
unique performance advantages of the Ultricon. Because 
the diodes are small, and because of the landing-pad 
feature, dark current is low. For these same reasons, the 
target capacitance and, therefore, image-lag, is also low. 
Resolution is excellent because there is no lateral leakage 
of the image charge pattern. And the target has excellent 
signal-discharge capability. 

Target Operation 

The target is made to operate in the reverse-biased mode by 
the positive target potential applied to the front (n-type) 
surface of the wafer and the more negative potential 
developed at the rear (p-type) diode matrix surface by the 
scanning electron beam. Reverse-biased operation results 
in a depletion region extending from the diode junction into 
the silicon substrate. 

A scene illuminating the front surface of the wafer will 
generate electron-hole pairs within the silicon substrate 
proportional to intrascene brightness variations. The 
minority-carrier holes are swept toward the diodes (the 
electrons toward the front surface) by the potential field 
through the wafer. The holes move into the nearest diode 
site and discharge the established bias in quantum. When 
the scanning electron beam again restores each diode 
charge, a signal voltage is developed across the target- 
circuit load resistor in the camera system. 

Performance 

The important performance characteristics of various 
vidicons used in CCTV are compared in the following 
photographs and graphs. Where applicable, these 
comparisons were made with the tubes installed in an RCA 
TC1005 CCTV camera at equivalent operating conditions. 
The comparisons typify the performance of the 4532/U, a 
popular one-inch (25-mm) tube (refer to the product 
bulletin on the RCA Ultricons for detailed operating 
conditions and performance specifications'). Most, but 
not all, comparisons apply to two-thirds-inch (18-mm) tubes 
as well. 



Trade mark (s) ® Registered 
Marca(s) Rsglstrada(s) 



Information lumtohed by RCA is believed to be accurate and 
reliable However, n ores pons I bin ty is assumed by RCA (or Its 
uaa; nor tof any infringements of patent) or other right* of 
third parties which may result from its use. No license is 
granted by im plication or otherwise under any pel en t or 
patent rlgfiia of RCA, 



Printed in USA/1 0/81 



AN-6994 



I 



« 

e 

2 

I i 


UNIFORM 


ILLUMINATION ON A SCANNED AREA OF ! 






IE-8RMI > 9.6 mm (0 500 IN. ■ 0375 IN ) 










FACEPLATE TEMPERATURE- 30 C APPRO*. 

1 Ml 














ULTRICON 




- N 


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LNICON 
















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1 
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■ 


; 
1 


-1 


6 


i 
1 


2 4 ( 


a 


2 < 




6 a 

100 




I 



500 700 900 

W9VE LENGTH -NANOMETER 



1100 
S2CS- 34391 



FOOTCANDLES (LUMENS/ 111 



10"' I , 10 

LUX I LUMENS /m z ) 

S894 K TUNGSTEN ILLUMINANCE 



100 



Fig. 1(b) - Spectral response. 



32CS-343B3 

Fig. 1(a) - Conversion characteristics. 



Fig. 1(c) - Sensitivity 
A split-screen-monitor com- 
parison of the sensitivity of the 
Ultrjcon (left side) and the 
Newvicon (right side). The test 
pattern was back-side illuminat- 
ed by a tungsten lamp. The 
photograph illustrates the data 
of Figs. (1)a and 1(b) tor the 
Newvicon and Ultricon. 





400 600 

TV LINE NUMBER 



92CS- 34392 



Fig. 2(a) - Resolution 
The amplitude response to alternate and uniform black- 
and-white lines at specified spatial frequences (1" 
tubes only). 




Fig. 2(b) - Resolution 
A split-screen-monitor comparison of the resolution capa- 
bilities of the Ultricon (left side) and the Newvicon (right 
side). The iens apertures were adjusted to produce a typical 
peak signal current of 200 nanoamperes. This photograph 
illustrates the data of Fig. 2(a) (1" tubes only). 



I 

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II 

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ii 

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11 
ti 
11 

it 

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AN-6994 



100 

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1 3 

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INITIAL HIGHLIGHT SIGNAL OUTPUT CURRENT 200 nA 
FACEPLATE TEMPERATURE ■ J0C APPR0X 

SCANNEO AREA OF FACEPLATE : I2,6mmi9 6mm 

10.500 IN iOS75IN) 














\ NEWVICON 'AND CHALN ICON 

\\ / II 

,\\ / DARK CURRENT <a 20 nA 

\\y / ANTIMONT TRISOtFlOE 








ULTRICON 

























12 FIELD PERIODS 



IK) vi. i ISECONDS [829 SYSTEM 



60 120 180 MILLISECQN0S1625 SYSTEM) 

TIME AFTER ILLUMINATION IS REMOVED 

92C5-34JS0 




Fig. 3(a) - Image tag. 



Fig. 3(b) - Comet Tailing 
The monitors illustrate the comet-tailing characteristics (the 
long-term retention of specular highlights) of the Ultricon 
(left side) and the Newvicon (right side). Typical tubes were 
exposed to a background illumination simulating night-time 
conditions (camera system AGC activated). The specular 
highlights produced peak signal levels just three times the 
normal operating signal level of 200 nanoamperes. 





Fig. 4 - After-image 
The monitor displays illustrate the after-image character- 
istics of the Ultricon (left side) and the Newvicon (right side). 
Typical tubes were exposed to produce 200 nanoamperes 
of peak signal current for a period of one hour. The camera 
lenses were then capped. (The camera-system's AGC cir- 
cuit produced 10x gain.) The photograph was made ten 
minutes after capping. 



Fig. 5 - Image Burn-in 
The monitors illustrate the image burn-in characteristics of 
the Ultricon (left side) and the Newvicon (right side). For 
this comparison, typical tubes were equally exposed to 
an incandescent reading lamp for a period of five hours. 
The lamp was then turned off while camera operation 
continued. The photograph was made twenty-four hours 
later. The cameras operated at standard gain; AGC was 
turned off. 



I 
I 



AN-6994 




E 9 



SATURATION 2 

POINT IOX IQQX 

SPOT INTENSITY (AFTER ONSET OF SATURATION) 

32CS-343BB 



Fig. 6(a) - Blooming at specified overexposures. 




Fig. 6(b) - Blooming 
An image of an intense specular highlight within a television 
scene will "bloom" larger than its true dimension as a 
function of its brightness. Here, the blooming character- 
istics of the Ultricon (left side) and the Newvicon (right 
side) are compared with specular highlights twenty-five 
times the normal operating peak-signal level. This photo- 
graph illustrates the data of Fig. 6faJ for the Newvicon and 
Ultricon, 






Fig. 7 - Reflection of Highlights 
The monitors illustrate the spurious images that result 
from the reflections of intense specular highlights within 
a scene. The Ultricon (left side) effectively attenuates these 
effects. The Newvicon image is displayed on the right side. 



Fig. 8 - "Dark Scene" Surveillance 
The split-screen-monitor display demonstrates the "dark 
scene" surveillance capabilities of the Ultricon (left side) 
and the Newvicon (right side). The scene was illuminated by 
tungsten lamps filtered to exclude the visible spectrum. 
The tens aperture (f/stop) was the same for both cameras. 



I 



SET-UP AND OPERATING PROCEDURES 



The various vidicons made for general CCTV application 
can usually be used interchangeably in camera systems. 
The cameras provide common operating conditions and 
the set-up procedures are standard. The requirements for 
the Uitricon are essentially equivalentto those applicable to 
the Newvicon, Chalnicon, Plumbicon, and the various 
silicon-target vidicons. These tubes are operated at a fixed 
target voltage and use an auto-iris lens to maintain video 
signal level for changing scene illumination. Additionally, 



because these types have linear conversion characteristics 
(unity gamma), compensation is usually provided for in the 
camera system to complement the non-linear drive 
characteristics of the monitor picture tube. 

A review of standard set-up procedure follows. Refer to the 
RCA bulletin on the Ultricons 1 and the service manual for 
your camera system for detailed operating conditions and 
performance specifications. 



I 
I 



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AN-6994 



Step Adjustment 
1 Target Voltage 



2 Set-up (preliminary) 



3 Beam Alignment 



3.1 Beam Alignment 

(Alternate Procedure) 



4 Beam Focus 



5 Image and Scan Format 
and Scan Linearity 



I 



Procedure 

The Ultricon is operated at a fixed posi- 
tive target voltage of 8 to 10 volts. 
Note; Target voltage is the potential 
difference between the target and the 
cathode. Since the cathode is not at 
ground potential in many of the camera 
systems, and because the vidicon 
beam-blanking pulses are often applied to 
the cathode, the measurement of target 
voltage is made using an oscilloscope, 
and is referenced to the "unblanked" 
(beam-on) interval of the blanking 
waveform. 

With the vidicon exposed to a suitable 
test pattern, bring up the vidicon beam 
to produce picture information. Now 
proceed to adjust beam alignment, optical 
focus, and beam focus to produce a 
reasonably good picture. Adjust the 
input illumination to produce typical 
picture signal level. 

Adjust the beam-alignment controls to the 
point where the picture does not exhibit 
lateral movement but rotates about the 
center point as the beam focus control is 
turned back-and-forth through best focus. 

Illuminate the vidicon to obtain a 
"token" picture at very low target 
voltage. Now adjust the beam alignment 
controls to produce the greatest signal 
level consistent with the best signal 
uniformity. 

Caution: Never misalign a vidicon beam 
to achieve better signal uniformity to 
compensate for non-uniform input 
illumination. 

Reminder Reset the target voltage to 8 
to 10 volts. 

Adjust the beam-focus control to produce 
the highest and most uniform resolution. 
For example, do not peak the resolution 
in the vertical wedge of the test pattern 
to the point where it results in a loss 
of resolution in the horizontal wedge. 

Using a suitable test pattern; 

a. Make the necessary optical system 
adjustments to center the image 
format on the vidicon target. 

b. Adjust the vidicon scan size and 
centering controls to make the scan 
format coincident with the image 
format. 

Using an electronic test-pattern 
generator, adjust the vidicon scan- 
linearity controls to make the test- 
pattern image coincident with the 
electronic test signal on the picture 
monitor. 

Notes: 

1. An adjustment of the linearity 
controls will usually require the 
readjustiM^pT6f the size and 
centering controls. 



Function 

To establish the proper tar- 
get voltage for the Ultricon. 



To establish preliminary 
set-up and operation. 



To align the vidicon beam 
precisely coaxial with the 
beam-forming and focusing 
electrodes of the tube to 
establish best beam qualities. 

This alternate beam- 
alignment procedure will also 
produce good results. 



To obtain the highest and 
most uniform resolution. 



To establish proper image 
and scan formats on the 
vidicon target. 



An error in scan linearity 
will produce a corresponding 
error in signal uniformity. 



AN-6994 



Step Adjustment 

6 Beam Setting, Final 

7 Beam Alignment, Final 

8 Beam Focus, Final 

9 Gamma Compensation 



Procedure 

Set the vidicon beam to discharge a 
signal level twice the normal 
operating-signal level. 

Repeat step 3 or 3.1. 



Repeat step 4. 



Comment: The picture monitor must dis- 
play brightness variations proportional 
to those variations within the original 
"scene." To achieve this fidelity, the 
video amplifier in the television camera 
has a control (gamma) that permits the 
adjustment of video-signal gain linearity 
to compensate for the non-linear transfer 
characteristics of the picture tube. 

Compensation is most conveniently - 
achieved by the use of a test pattern 
having linear steps of gray scale: with 
the test pattern in place, adjust the 
exposure to produce a typical video- 
signal level. Now adjust the gamma com- 
pensation control to achieve the best 
definition of gray scale on the picture 
monitor. 



Function 

To establish a beam setting 
with an adequate reserve 
capability. 

A final beam alignment is 
advisable following the pre- 
ceding set-up steps. 

A final beam focusing is 
advisable following the 
preceding set-up sets. 

To achieve the best 
reproduction of intrascene 
variations in contrast. 



• 



Additional Operating Considerations 

The excellent IR sensitivity of the Ultricon allows for unique 
industrial and surveillance applications. In more general 
CCTV application, the IR response can substantially extend 
the low-light-level capabilities of a camera system. 
However, IR is absorbed or reflected differently (depending 
on materials) from illumination within the visible spectrum, 
and it is sometimes important (or desirable) to reproduce 
intrascene contrast values as they are seen by the eye. The 
spectral response of the Ultricon is conveniently matched 
to visual perception by the use of an IR blocking filter. Either 



the Schott-Jenaer KG3 or the Fish Schurman HA1 1 may be 
used; both are available to fit standard lens-filter adapter- 
rings. 

SELECTION AND INTERCHANGEABILITY GUIDE 

Table I, the selection guide, and Table II, the 
interchangeability guide, provide a convenient cross- 
reference for the popular high-sensitivity heterojunction 
and silicon-target vidicon types. Refer to the RCA Imaging 
Devices Catalog for more complete interchangeability and 
selection information. 2 



Table I — Selection Guide 



T»pa 

Number" 

Ullrlcons 


D meniioni and Outlines 


JEDEC 

Ba«e 

Deslo- 

nallon 


Haattr 

Currant/ 

Power 

A/W 


Man. 
Image 

Diagonal 

mm/ In 


Focua 
Mai hod 


D«- 

II action 
Mat hod 




Typical Operation (2856 K Sou tea 




Approx, 
Bulb 
Din. (A) 

mm/ In 


Mai. 

OveraR 
Lenolh (B) 

mm/In 


Mai. 

Clearance 
Ola. (C) 

mm/In 


Sensitivity 


Detail Responie (4x3 Aepecl) 


A1 

Dark 

Current 

nA 


Output 
Signal 

nA@ 

Inv'tl 1 


Al 

Math 
Volt. 

V 


AmpHtuda 

Responie 
« 400 TV 
Llnaa/PH 


Limiting 
Resolution 

TV-Lines 


Two-Thlrdi Inch (i* mm) 








4833/U 
4833A/U 

487 5/U 


16/07 


107 4/4 23 
107.4/4.23 

1(13.1/4 06 


19 870.78 

19.B/0.TB 

19.8/0 78 


E7-91 
E7-91 

E7-91 


1/06 

0.1/0.6 

0.1/0.6 


1 1 0/0.43 

11,0/043 

1 1 0/0.43 


M 

M 

E 


M 

M 

M 


_ 


346 @ 01 

346 @! 0.1 

345 (510.1 


480 

480 

460 


B0" 

60" 

SO" 


450 
450 

425 


Ons- Inch (25 mm) 










4532,'U 

4532A/U 

4S32B/U 


25/!,C 


162.0/6.38 
1 62.0/6.38 
162.0/638 


29.071.14 
29.0/1 14 
29.0/1.14 


E8-I1 
E8-11 
£8-11 


0,1/0 6 
1/0.6 
0.1/06 


16 0/0.63 
16.0/0.63 
160/0.63 


M 
H 
M 


M 
II 

M 


- 


720 C<S 0.1 
720 @ 0.1 
720 @ 01 


480 
480 
480 


45 
4S 


700 
700 
700 



Notes 

■Quality Grades: 
/u — Industrial (3rd) Level 

AAJ — Commercial (2nd) Level 

B/U — Premium (tsl) Level 
"A1200TVL 
"'Using RCA P200 slant-line test pattern. 



AN-6994 



Table II — Interchangeability Guide 



TYPE TO BE REPLACED 


Photoconductor Type 


REPLACEMENT 


Type No. 


Name 


Ultrlcon Type 


1. S4092 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc seienide 


4875U 


2. S4102 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc selenide 


4875U 


3. 4904 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc selenide 


4875U 


4. E5071 


Chalnicon 


cadmium selenide 


4875U 


5. XQ1275 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4875U 


6. 4875 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4875U 


7. 4875/H 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4875U 


8. S4075 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc selenide 


4833U 


9. S4113 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc selenide 


4833U 


10. 4905 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc selenide 


4833U 


11. XQ1274 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc selenide 


4833U 


12. E5022 


Chalnicon 


cadmium selenide 


4833U 


13. E5072 


Chalnicon 


cadmium selenide 


4833U 


14. E5052 


Chalnicon 


cadmium selenide 


4833U 


15. 4833 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4833U 


16. 4833/H 


ST. Vidicon 


si I icon -target 


4833U 


17. 20PE15 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4833U 


18. N747 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4833U 


19. P8124 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4833U 


20. Z7927 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4833U 


21. 9231 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4B33U 


22. S4076 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc selenide 


4532U 


23. 4906 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc selenide 


4532U 


24. XQ1440 


Newvicon 


zinc telluride, zinc selenide 


4532U 


25. E5001 


Chalnicon 


cadmium selenide 


4532U 


26. E5091 


Chalnicon 


cadmium selenide 


4532U 


27. 4532 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


28, 4532/H 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


29. 20PE14 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


30. N736 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


31. E5036 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


32. E5058 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


33. TH9828 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


34. P8125 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


35. P8126 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


36. S1200, 1,2,3 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


37. XQ1200 


ST, Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


38. Z7975 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 


39. 9901 


ST. Vidicon 


silicon-target 


4532U 



References 

1. Camera-tube data sheet lor 4532/U,4833/U,4875/U 
series, "Ultricon — Improved Silicon-Target Vidicons," 
RCA Electro-Optics and Devices publication, June 1980. 

2. "Imaging Devices," RCA Electro-Optics and Devices 
catalog IMD-100. 



RCA Sales Offices (as of 8/81) 



International 

Belgium RCA S.A., Mercure Centre 

100, Rue de la Fusee 
1130 Brussels 



(02) 720.39.80 



Brazil RCA Solid State Uda, 

Av, Brigadeiro Faria Lima 
1476-7' Andar CEP-01452 
Sao Paulo-SP 011 210-4033 

Canada RCA Inc.. S303-30th SI. S.E. 

Calgary. Alberta T2C 1R4 (403) 279-3364 

RCA Inc., 21001 No. Service Rd. 

Trans-Canada Highway 

Ste Anne de Bellevue 

Quebec H9X 3L3 (514) 4S7-2185 

RCA Inc. 1 Vulcan St. 

Hexdale. Ontario M9W 1L3 (416) 247-5491 

France RCA S.A , 32, rue Fessart 

92100 Boulogne (01) 603.87.B7 

Germany RCA GmbH 

Pfingstrosenstrasse 23 

aOOOMuncfien 70 (089) 714.30 47 



Mexico. 



UK. 



RCA S.A. rJeC.V 

Apartado Postal 17-570 

Mexico 17, L>F 

RCA Ltd.. Lincoln Way - Windmill Road 

Sunbury-on-Thames 

Middlesex TW16 7HW (09327) 855.11 

Hong Kong RCA International Ltd. 

PO Box 112, 1027 Prince's Building 
Charier Hoad 



399-72-28 



234 181 



U.S. (OEM) 



AmUi'-m 

Arizona . . 

Calilomia 



Colorado . 



RCA. Holiday otttce Canter, Suits 41 

3322 So Mamorial Parkway 

Huntsville. AL 35801 (205) 88 1-4100 

RCA 8900 E Camaloack Rd.. Suile 460 

Scottsdala. AZ 65251 (602) 947-7235 

RCA 482? Sepulvada Blvd . Suite 420 

Sherman Oaks. CA 91403 (Z13) 46B-42O0 

RCA 4546 El Camino Real 

Los Altos. C A 94022 (415)948-8996 

RCA, 8333 Clairemom Mesa Blvd. 

Suile 105 

San Diego, CA 921 1 1 (7141 279-0420 

RCA. 17731 Irvine Blvd. 

Soils 104 Magnolia Plaza 

Tultin. CA 92690 (7141 832-5302 

RCA, 6767 S. Spruce SI. 

Englewoofl.CO 801 12 (303) 740-8441 



Florida : . , RCA. PO Box 1 224 1 

Lake Park, FL 33403 (305) 626-6350 



RCA. 1850 Leo Road, Suiio 135 
Winter Park. FL 32769 



.[305) 647-7100 



minors RCA. 2700 River Road 

Das Ptaines. IL' 60018 (312) 391-4380 

Indiana RCA Corp.. 44 10 Executive Bivo. 

Suite 13A 

Fl. Wayne. IN 46606 ,. 1219)484-6460 

RCA, 9240 N Meridian SI 

Suite 102 

Indianapolis. IN 46260 ;3l7) ?67-63<'3 



Massachusetts RCA. 20 William SI. 

Wellesley, MA 05131 



(617! 237-7970 



New Jersey... . 



Michigan RCA. 30400 Telegrapn Rd. 

Suite 440 

Birmingham. Ml 46010 (313) 644-1151 

Minnesota RCA. B750 France Ave.. S. 

Suite 122 

Minneapolis. MN 55435 (612) 929-0676 

Kansas ,RCA. 8900 Indian Creek Parkway 

Suds 410 

Overland Park, KS 66210 (913) 642-7656 

. RCA. 1998 Spnngdaie Rd. 
Cherry Hill. NJ 08003 (609) 338-5042 

RCA, 67 Walnut Ave. 

Clark. NJ O7066 (201)574-3550 

Now York , , RCA 160 Pennion Hill Office Park 

Purport. NY 14450 (716)223-5240 

RCA. One Hunlinglon Quadrangle 

Suite 2C14. Hunlinglon station 

LI. Ny 11746 1518) 293-0180 

North Carolina RCA, 531 1 77 Centar Drive 

Charlotte. NC 26210 (704)525-3424 

Ohio RCA, 29525 Cnagnn Ellvd 

Pepper Pike. OH 44122 -(216) 831-0030 

Texas RCA, 4230 LBJ al Midway Rd. 

Town Nortn Plaia, Suite 121 

□alias. TX 75234 



Virginia RCA, 1901 N Moore St- 

Arlington, VA 22209. 



!214) 661-3515 
(703) 558-4161 



U.S. (Distributor) 

Distributor & Special Products Division, Deptlord, NJ 

Eastern Hegion RCA 2000 Clements BriOga Rd 

Oeptiord NJ 06096 (609)963-8000 

western Reqion RCA, 6363 Sunset Boulevard 

ego Hollywood. CA 90028 (213(468-4092 



nC^JI Electro 

Imlmffl optics 



Lancaster, PA 17604 



n A 41 Electro Optics 



and Devices 



Camera Tube 



4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U Series 



4532/U 



4833/U 



487S/U 



u 



. 



W 



l-»95 



L-994 



Ultricon™ — 

Improved Silicon Target Vidicons 



Low Blooming 

Image Burn Resistant 

Low Lag 

Anti-Flare Features 

Extremely High Sensitivity 

Broad Spectral Range 

Electrostatic and Magnetic Focus Types 

Low Dark Current 

Excellent Discharge Capability 



The RCA Ultricon camera tubes employ unique processing 
that makes them the most sensitive vidicons available for 
general Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) application. 
Improved sensitivity in the visible spectrum is achieved 
without loss of the excellent near infrared (IR) response that 
is characteristic of the RCA silicon-target types. 

The special Ultricon processing further reduces the 
blooming effects caused by intense specular highlights 
within a scene. The discharge capability of the tubes is 
excellent, i.e., they have minimal "comet-tail" effects. Other 
features such as low dark current, low lag, exceptional 
resistance to image burn, and good resolution capability 
make these tubes an excellent choice for CCTV pickup 
systems where the superior features of the silicon target are 
required. 

The RCA 4532/U, 4532 A/U, and 45328/U are 25 mm (1 inch) 
diameter magnetic focus and deflection types; they are 
identical in all respects except for spurious signal (blemish) 
criteria. The 4532/U is the premium type for use in the more 
critical systems while the 4532A/U is intended for high 
quality commercial use. The 4532/U is for general CCTV 
applications. 

The RCA 4833/U and 4833A/U are 18 mm (0.7 inch) 
magnetic focusand deflection types; they are identical in all 
respects except for the spurious signal (blemish) criteria. 
The 4833A/U is intended for use in more critical 
applications. The small size of the 4833A/U and 4833/U 
makes possible the design of compact CCTV cameras. 

The RCA 4875/U is an 18 mm (0.7 inch) electrostatic focus 
and magnetic deflection type intended for use in more 
general CCTV applications. The small size of the 4875/U 
makes possible the design of lightweight hand-held CCTV 
cameras. 

























600 












i/ 










t 

< 500 








4l 














E 

2 400 






4& 




V » 


N 


ULTRICON 
V 1/ 






I 

B 

l-j 300 








A 


f 


\ 


\ 








§ 

1 ™ 






/ 

II 
It 


s 


\ 

t vinir: 


JM 


V 
I 


\ 






100 




J, 


ft 
1 

r 


















4 
£-^ 





















500 700 BOO 

WAVELENGTH - NANOMETERS 



uv 


VISIBLE 


INFRARED 




B 


G 


R 




< 












< 


vEseua* nultivj*o£ 




I 


feQEMUM V ArMJ'J 


1 


I, FLUORESCENT iDftTt-inHT^ 


> 1 


TUNGSTEN tIRMT 






I I 1 







mS-5763R1V[ 



Figure 1 -Typical Spectral Responsivlty 
Characteristics RCA Type V 



For further information or application assistance on these devices, contact your RCA Sales Representative or write Camera Tube Marketing, RCA, Lancaster, PA 17604. 



Information (urnisrrid t>V RCA is believed to be accurate end 
reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed by RCA for 

its use; nor for any infringements of patents or other rights of 
third parties which may result from its use. No license is 
granted by implication or otherwise under any patent or 

patent rights Df RCA, 



Trademark (s) » Registered 
Marca(s) Reg 1st radars} 

Printed in U.S.A./6-80 
4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U Series 

Supersedes 12-78 



4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U 



General Data 

Electrical 
Heater Voltage: 

Operational , 

For standby with no other electrode 

voltages applied 

AC or DC Heater Current at 

6.3 Volts (Nominal value) 

Focus Method 

Deflection Method 

Direct Interetectrode Capacitance: 1 

Target to all other electrodes 



4532/U, 4532A/U, 

4532B/U 



6.3 
3.0 



Optical 

Spectral Response 

Target: 

Normal scanned area 

(4x3 aspect ratio) 

Maximum useful diagonal of 

rectangular image 



Mechanical 

Dimensions 

Deflecting Yoke - Focusing Coil 
Alignment Coil - Assemblies 1 . 



Operation Position 
Weight (Approx.) 



0.1 

Magnetic 

Magnetic 

5.7 



See Figure 1 

12.8x9.6 (0.50x0.38) 
16 (0.63) 

See Figure 16 

Cletronics VYLFA-959. 
Penn Tran 1465 
Any 

57(2) 



4833/U 
4833A/U 



6.3 

3.0 

0.1 

Magnetic 

Magnetic 

3.5 

See Figure 1 



4875/U 

6.3 

3.0 

0,1 

Electrostatic 

Magnetic 

3.5 

See Figure 1 



8.8x6.6 (0.346x0.260) 8.8x6.6 (0.346x0.260) 
11 (0.433) 11 (0.433) 



See Figure 18 



See Figure 20 



Penn Tran CY-1 07-1500, Chuomusen KV 19B 

Cletronics 5135-012244 

Any Any 

24 (0.85) 24 (0.85) 



Unite 

V 
V 

A 



mm (in) 
mm (in) 



I 



V 



I 
I 

: 

1 

I 



g (oz) 



Absolute-Maximum Ratings 3 
Limiting Values 

Heater-Voltage Tolerance (Operational) . . ±5 

Grid-No.5 Voltage* 

Grid-No.4 Voltage* 500 

Grid-No.3 Voltage" 500 

Grid-N o.2 Voltage 350 

Grid-No. 2 Dissipation 0,5 

Grid-No. 1 Voltage (Positive value) 

Grid-No.1 Voltage (Negative value) -150 

Heater-Cathode Voltage (Positive value) . 10 

Heater-Cathode Voltage (Negative value) -125 
Target Voltage (Briefly during 

special cycling) 8 300 

Target Voltage (During operation) 8 20 

Maximum Target Current 750 

Faceplate: 

Illuminance 7 6xl0 7 

6x10 s 

Temperature: 

Non-operating and storage -54 to +70 

Operating Note' 



±5 


±5 


% 


- 


500 


V 


500 


350 


V 


500 


350* 


V 


350 


350« 


V 


0.5 


0,5 


w 








V 


-150 


-150 


V 


10 


10 


V 


-125 


-125 


V 


300 


300 


V 


20 


20 


V 


350 


350 


nA 


6x1 7 


6x10 7 


Im/fr* (fc) 


6x1 0" 


6x10 s 


lux 


-54 to +70 


-54 to +70 


-c 


Note" 


Note 8 


°C 



Warning - Personal Safety Hazards 

Electrical Shock - Operating voltages applied 
to these devices present a shock hazard. 



I 

I 
•I 

i 

i 



i 



4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U 



I 



I 
1 



4532/U, 4532A/U, 4833/U, 

4S32B/U 4833A/U 4875/U Units 

Typical Operating Values 

With the tube operated in the specified or equivalent assembly; specified scanned area; faceplate temperature of 30° ± 3° C; and standard 

CCIR "M", or El A, TV scanning rate (525 lines, interlaced 2:1, frame time 1/30 second)." 

Voltages are with respect to thermionic cathode. 

Grid-No.5 Voltage* - - 480 V 

Grid-No.4 Voltage* 480 480 35 to 75 V 

Grid-No.3 Voltage* 410 290 300* V 

Grid-No.2 Voltage 300 300 300» V 

Peak-to-Peak Blanking Voltage; 

When applied to grid No, 1 75 75 75 V 

When applied to cathode 20 20 20 V 

Target Voltage 10 8 to 10 8 to 10 8 to 10 V 

Focusing-Coil Current 11 12 40 95 - mA 

Peak-to-Peak Deflecting-Coil Current:" 

Horizontal 200 100 120 mA 

Vertical 20 12 30 mA 

Field Strength of Each Adjustable 

Alignment Coil 1 * to 4x10"* {0 to 4) to 4x10"* (0 to 4) to 3x10"* (0 to 3) G (T) 



Performance Data 

Under the conditions shown under Typical Operation. 

Peak Radiant Responsivity 510 

Grid-No.1 Voltage for Picture Cutoff" -50 to -100 

Dark Current 8,5 

Average "Gamma" of Transfer Characteristic ... 1 

For a Signal-Output Current Between 4 and 400 

Lag-Per Cent of Initial Value of Signal-Output 
Current 1/20 Second After Illumination is 

Removed" (See Figures 11, T2) ,. 8 

Limiting Resolution: 

At center of picture 700 

At corner of picture 500 

Amplitude Response to a Square-Wave Test 

Pattern at Center of Picture 15 (See Figure 8) ... 45 @ 400 TV lines 

Sensitivity to Tungsten Light Source 1 ' 

Conditions- 
Faceplate Illumination (Highlight) 0.1 

1.08 
Performance- 
Sensitivity 5500 

Typical Signal-Output Current" .„ 700 

Sensitivity to Visible Light" 

Conditions- 
Illumination from 2856 K Light Source Incident 

On Infrared Absorbing Filter (Highlight) 0,1 

1.08 
Performance- 
Sensitivity 1030 

Typical Signal-Output Current 17 135 



510 


510 


mA/W 


-35 to -95 


-35 to -95 


V 


4 


4 


nA 


1 


1 


- 


2 and 200 


2 and 200 


nA 



450 
350 


425 
325 


TV lines 
TV lines 


60 @ 200 TV lines 


50 @ 200 TV lines 


% 


0.1 
1.08 


0.1 
1.08 


Im/tt 2 (fc) 
Jux 


5500 
350 


5500 
350 


/uA/lm 
nA 



0.25 
2.7 

1030 
162 



0.25 
2.7 

1030 
162 



Im/ft 2 (fc) 
lux 

^A/lm 
nA 



4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U 



Spurious Signal Test 

The allowable spots for each tube type are shown in Tables I 
through V. The tables define the acceptable distribution of 
the spots by zones, size and their polarity. 

This test is performed with the tube carefully focused on a 
uniformly illuminated test pattern which identifies the 
zones as pictured in Figures 2 and 3. The tube is operated in 
accordance with "Typical Operating Values" and 
illumination is adjusted to provide a highlight reference 
signal current of: 

4532B/U, 4532A/U, 4532/U 300 rtA 

4833 A/U, 4833/U 150 nA 

4875/U 150 nA 

After completion of the setup adjustments, the light is 
excluded and the picture is examined for bright spots. 
Thereafter, the reference level illumination is applied and 
the picture is examined for additional spots and other 
blemishes. 

Spots: Spots are countable when their signal level exceeds 
10% of the reference signal level and are acceptable within 
the criterion shown in the Tables. The size of the spots 
(diameter, or length plus width divided by two) is measured 
in terms of equivalent raster lines in a 525-line system. 

Other Blemishes: Smudges, streaks, mottled or grainy 
background are acceptable only if their video signal level 
does not exceed the reference signal level as follows: 

4532B/U 3% 

4532 A/U. 4532/U 5% 

4833A/U, 4833/U 5% 

4875/U 5% 

It should be noted that in using narrow band illumination in 
the near IR region some additional spurious signal effects 
may be evident. 



Table I - Type 4532B/U 



Blemish Size 
(Equivalent 
TV Lines) 


Zone 1 

Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Zone 1 A 2 
Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Zone 1, 2 ft 3 
Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Over 6 
Over 4 
Over 1 
1 or smaller 






■ 






■ 






■ ■ 




2 

■ ■ 



V 



Table II - Type 4532A/U 



Blemish Size 
(Equivalent 
TV Lines) 


Zone 1 

Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Zone 1 ft 2 
Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Zone 1, 2 ft 3 
Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Over 6 
Over 4 
Over 1 
1 or smaller 






■ 






■ 




2 

■ ■ 






1 5 

■ ■ 



Table III - Type 4532/U 



Blemish Size 
(Equivalent 
TV Lines) 


Zone 1 
Allowed Spots 

Bright Total 


Zone 1 ft 2 
Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Zone 1 , 2 ft 3 
Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


OverS 
Over6 
Over 4 
Over 1 
1 or smaller 






1 
■ 





5 

■ 




1 
3 12 

■ ■ 




2 

5 20 

■ ■ 




ZONE 3 




D - Active Target Diameter 
H - Raster Height (4x3 Aspect Ratio) 
Zone 1 - Diameter - H/2, Area • 15% 
Zone 2 - Diameter - H, Area — 45% 
Zone 3 - Peripheral Area "■ 40% 

Figure 2 - Spurious Signal Zones - 4532/U Series 



D - Active Target Diameter 
H - Raster Height (4x3 Aspect Ratio) 
Zone 1 - Diameter - H, Area =• 60% 
Zone 2 - Peripheral Area =* 40% 

Figure 3 - Spurious Signal Zones 
4833/U Series, 4875/U 



4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U 



Table IV - Type 4833A/U 



I 
I 



Blemish Size 
(Equivalent 
TV Lines) 


Zone 1 

Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Zone 1 & 2 
Allowed Spota 
Bright Total 


Over 6 
Over 4 
Over 1 
1 or smaller 




2 

■ ■ 






1 4 

■ ■ 



Table V - Types 4833/U and 4875/U 



Blemish Size 
(Equivalent 
TV Lines) 


Zone 1 

Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Zone 1 & 2 
Allowed Spots 
Bright Total 


Overr 8 








Over 6 





1 


Over 4 


2 


1 3 


Over 1 


2 8 


4 12 


1 or smaller 


■ ■ 


■ ■ 



Notes for Tables I Through V 

Mini my m separation between any 2 spots greater than 1 raster line 
is limited to 16 raster lines. 

■Spots of this size are allowed unless concentration causes a 
smudged appearance. 



This capacitance, which effectively is the output impedance of 
the tube, is increased when the tube is mounted in the 
deflecting-yoke and focusing-coil assembly. The resistive 
component of the output impedance is in the order of 100 
megohms. 

The magnetic components are made by: Cletronics (formerly 
Solar Systems and Cleveland Electronics), 1684 Medina Rd,. 
Medina. OH 44256: Penn-Tran Corp.. P.O. Box 508, 1155 2ion 
Rd., Bellefonte, PA 16823; Chuomusen Co.. Ltd. 762-5151 , 9- 
12. 1-chorne. Ohmori-Nishi. Ohta-ku. Tokyo 143, Japan. 

In accordance with the Absolute Maximum rating system as 
defined by the Electronic Industries Association Standard RS- 
239A. formulated by the JEDEC Electron Tube Council, 
4532/U Series and 4833/U Series: Grid-No. 4 voltage must 
always be greater than grid-No. 3 voltage. The grid-No.3/grid- 
No 4 ratio should be 0.85 for the 4532/U Series and 0.7 for the 
4833/U Series. 

4875/U: Grid-No. 5 voltage must always be greater than the 
grid-No.3 voltage. Thegrid-No.3/grid-No.5 ratio should be 0.7 
for the 4875/U. 

These ratios are determined by the electro-optical 
characteristics of the target-mesh region. These ratios should 
provide optimum performance with regard to dark current 
uniformity, signal uniformity, resolution uniformity, and 
geometrical accuracy with the typical focus and/or deflection- 
coil assemblies referenced herein. When using other 
assemblies, the voltage ratio should be adjusted for optimum 
performance in that assembly. 



5 Gi and Gi connected together internally, 

* If operation is attempted using target voltages typical of sulfide 
vidicons (30 to 50 V), the surface of the silicon target will 
develop a negative (unwanted) charge. This condition is easily 
corrected by briefly increasing the target voltage to about 200 
volts while overscanning the target and with the beam turned 
fully on. The beam is then cut off completely before reducing 
the target voltage to its normal 8 to 10 volt value. 

7 The tube can typically withstand the illuminance contained in a 
focussed image of the sun without permanent damage. 

' Dark current approximately doubles with each 9° C increase in 
temperature. (See Figures 4 and 6.) 

9 The tube is normally positioned in the deflection-focus 
assembly with the index pin {short pin) horizontal at the 3 
o'clock position (viewed from the front). Some rotation not 
exceeding ± 10" is allowed, 

'• This range of target voltage provides an optimum operating 
point consistent with maximum target discharge capability and 
optimizes other performance characteristics such as dark 
current uniformity, lag, and blemish content. It is highly 
recommended that the operating target voltage be set to and 
maintained at 8-10 volts. 

" With a compass located outside of and at the image end of the 
focus coil, the polarity of the focus coil should be such that a 
north-seeking pole is attracted to the image end, 

1* These components should be selected to provide minimum 
beam landing error (best signal uniformity). The alignment coil 
should be positioned so that its axis is coincident with the axis 
of the tube, the deflecting yoke, and the focus coil. 

The deflecting circuits must provide extremely linearscanning 
for good signal uniformity. Any change in scanning velocity 
produces a signal uniformity error in proportion to the change 
in scanning velocity. 

13 With no blanking voltage on grid No.1, 

u At the recommended target voltage and at an initial signal- 
output current of: 

4532/U Series - 200 nA 
4833/U Series - 250 nA 
4875/U - 250 nA 

19 Amplitude response is the signal amplitude from a given TV 
tine number expressed as a per cent of the signal amplitude 
from a low frequency (large-area) picture element. In practice, 
the large area reference of 15 TV lines is set equal to 100 per 
cent signal amplitude. The TV line numbers are determined by 
the number of equal-width black and white lines that will fit into 
the physical height of the image focused on the camera-tube 
faceplate, 

11 Light source is a tungsten-filament lamp having a lime-glass 
envelope. The lamp is operated at a color temperature of 2856 
K. 

17 Defined as the highlight target current (signal current) after the 
dark current component has been subtracted. 

With the same light source specified in footnote (r) except an 
infrared absorbing filter (Schott Jenaer KG-3, 5.5 mm thick 
available from Fish-Schurman Corporation, 70 Portland Road, 
New Rochelle, MY 10802) is interposed between the light 
source and the faceplate of the tube. 

For sharper infrared cutoff, the Kodak Series 305 Infrared 
Rejection Filter may be used. This series is available from 
Eastman Kodak Co.. Special Products Sales, Rochester, NY 
14650. 



M 



4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U 



Operating Considerations 
Warning 

Failure to observe the maximum dc electrode voltage 
ratings can reduce the life expectancy of these tubes. When 
operated within ratings with the recommended deflection- 
focusing coil assemblies, the full performance capabilities 
of the silicon-diode array target will be easily realized. A 
tube life of many thousands of hours of useful service may 
be obtained when the tube is operated within the 
recommended ratings. 

Variants of the 4532/U Series 

RCA types C23231 and C23246 may be used for 
applications in the near UV region (to wavelengths as low as 
250 nanometers). 

C23231 - Enhanced UV response (90 mA/W @ 300 nm) 
C23246 - Enhanced UV response (20 mA/W @ 300 nm) 

Although the 4532/U Series have useful response to 1100 
nanometers, RCA types C23250 and C23250A should be 
considered for applications where response in the near IR 
region is of primary concern. 

C23250, C23250A - Enhanced red and near IR response 

(60 mA/W@ 1060 nm). 
C23250A - Premium (1st) Level 
C23250 - Commercial (2nd) Level 

Ruggedlzed, Reduced Length Versions 
of the 4532/U Series 

C23174, C23174B - Commercial (2nd) Level 
C23174A, C23174C - Premium (1st) Level 
C23174B, C23174C - Bonded Target Versions 



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10 20 30 

TAHGET TEMPER ATU HE - °C 



Figure 4 - Typical Dark Current vs. Temperature 
4532/U Series 



Application Notes and Other Technical 
Literature Relating to Silicon Target Vidicons 

AN-4974 Modifying TV Cameras for Use of Silicon 

Target Vidicons 

IMD-100 RCA Imaging Devices 

PE-696 The Silicon-Target Vidicon 

{Copies available by writing RCA, Box 3200, Somerville, 
NJ 08876.) 



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TARGET VOLTAGE - VOLTS 

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Figure 5 -Typical Dark Current Characteristic 
4532/U Series 



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TAHGET TEMPERATURE - °C 

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Figure 6 -Typical Dark Current vs. Temperature 
4833/U Series, 4875/U 



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2 3 15 6 

TARGET VOLTAGE - VOLTS 



Figure 7 - Typical Dark Current Characteristic 
4833/U Series, 4875/U 



ILLUMINATION 2956 K TUNGSTEN. FILTERED TO ELIMINATE INFRARED 

[BY 5.5 mm, KG-J GLASS! 
HIGHLIGHT TARGET CURRENT-JOOnA 1*532/01; ISOnA <4B33/U,4B75/U> 
TARGET VOLTAGE - * 10 VOLTS 
TEST PATTERN : RCA P2O0 


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500 700 900 

WAVELENGTH NANOMETERS 



Figure 9 - Typical RCA Type V Spectral Response 
Characteristics as Modified by the Filter 
Characteristic of Figure 10 




3O0 400 500 600 TOO 800 

WAVELENGTH NANOMETERS 



900 



9SLS - 2994R4 



Figure 10 - Typical Transmission of Schott KG-3 

Infrared Absorbing Filter, Thickness: 5.5 mm 



TV LINES PER PICTURE HEIGHT 



Figure 8 - Typical Amplitude Response 
(MTF) Characteristics 



4532/U, 4833/ U, 4875/U 





TIME AFTER ILLUMINATION IS REMOVED - MILLISECONDS 

MUMSttM 



50 100 ISO 200 250 300 

TIME AFTER I LLUMINATION IS REMOVED Ml LLISECONDS 

MHWH 



Figure 11 -Typical Persistence (Lag) Characteristics 
4532/U Series 



Figure 12 -Typical Persistence (Lag) Characteristics 
4833/U Series, 4575/U 



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4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U 



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2858 K TUNGSTEN ILLUMINATION AT FACEPLATE - LUMENS/H* (FOOTCANDLESI 



Figure 13 -Typical Light Transfer Characteristics 
4532/U Series 



SATURATION 
POINT 



10X 10GX 

SPOT INTENSITY IAFTER ON -SET OF SATURATION) 



SJLS-SXIHIV1 




II 

n 



Figure 15 -Comparison Between Low-Blooming 
Ultrlcon Types and Conventional 
S-T Vldlcons 



' itt 3 ' • ' *io-> - - - -10-' 

FACEPLATE ILLUMINANCE - FOOTCANDLES [LUMENS PER SQUARE FOOT) 

iii 1 1 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■>' ■ ■ ■ 



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FACEPLATE ILLUMINANCE - LUX ILUMENS PER SQUARE METER) 

Figure 14 -Typical Light Transfer Characteristics 
4833/U Series, 4875/U 



10 
LM~4B73ff? 



4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U 





V 



Figure 17 - Bating Diagram, Bottom View 
4532/U Series 



Socket for JEDEC E8-11 Base 
Cinch N0.8VT (133-98-11-015), or equivalent. 



Made by: 
TRW Cinch Connectors 
(312)439-8800 
1501 Morse Ave., Elk Grove, I'L 60007 



l! 



BASE 

EOECNo.ES-11 



92LM-53WW3 



Dimensions in millimeters, dimensions in parentheses are in 
inches. 

Note 1 - Faceplate glass is Corning No. 7056, or equivalent. Its 
index of refraction at 589.3 nm is 1.49. 

Note 2 - Optical distance (front of faceplate to target). 

Figure 16- Dimensional Outline 
4532/U Series 



10 



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4532/ U, 4833/U, 4875/U 



tf 



t 





Figure 19* Basing Diagram, Bottom View 
4833/U Series 



Socket for JEDEC E7-91 Base 
Connector Corp. No.546A103, or equivalent 



Made by: 
Connector Corporation 
6025 North Keystone Ave, 
Chicago, IL 60646 



Dimensions in millimeters, dimensions in parentheses are in 

inches. 

Note 1 • Faceplate glass is Corning No. 7056, or equivalent. Its 

index of refraction at 589.3 nm is 1.49. 
Note 2 - Optical distance (front of faceplate to target). 

Figure 1fi -Dimensional Outline 
4833/U Series 



f 



I 



1 1 



4532/U, 4833/U, 4875/U 





GSiJ 



7)04 



Figure 21 - Basing Diagram, Bottom View 
4875/U 



Socket (or JEDEC E7-91 Base 
Connector Corp. NO.546A103, or equivalent 

Made by: 
Connector Corporation 
6025 North Keystone Ave. 
Chicago, IL 60646 



Dimensions in millimeters, dimensions in parentheses are in 
inches. 

Note 1 - Faceplate glass is Corning No. 7056, or equivalent. Its 
index of refraction at 589.3 nm is 1.49. 

Note 2 - Optical distance (front of faceplate to target), 

Figure 20 - Dimensional Outline 
4875/U 



RCA | Solid State Division | Electro Optics and Oevices! Lancaster, PA 17604