(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Express Herald"



'-rf - 



TRY THE EXPRESS -HERALD 

FOR ' 



£r — --^S — ry I- - fZ^SM^S-// *r^. /v-^V tf« <?^ friiis ■';• 



"iftSs 



v??v^ 



>> 



a gate s - , ^T:f,:ar^ie5aujJ'u-'-' f -;>-,tf^>3.aB 



DISPLAY AND CLASSIFIED j 
ADVERTISING 
DISTINCTIVE j 
JOB PRINTING r 







■ 



A FREE PRESS 



NORTH YORK'S PRO'QEIES 

EQUAL RIGHTS TO ALL MEN 



ANGUS C. WEST, Editor and Publisher. 





RELIGIOUS LIBERTY 



BETTER THAN , 
A LETTER FROM HOME 

SEND YOUR FRIEND^ 
- JA SUBSCRIPTION Toj 
THE EXPRESS-HERALD 



NEWMARKET. ONT., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3. 1940 1940 



Judgment 





eservea on 
Liquor Charge 

IMPORTANT CASES 
REMANDED 



VOL. 28, NO. 40 



Camp Nears Readiness For Firs 



Class 



Helen E. Pipher of Newmar- 
ket, charged by Gertrude Widdi- 
field with assault, pleaded not 
guilty.. 

• "My mother was looking for 3 
ttiVl, and I knew Mrs. Pipher's 
daughter was looking for work, 
so I called Ruth in on Saturday 
night, Sept. 21, to ask her about 
it." testified the complainant. | 
"Mrs. Pyiher came along and told 
her daughter to gel out. She 
slipped me and scratched me. I 
called Constable Sloss in. I have 
had trouble with this woman be- 
fore, and reported it to the police. 
I wanted her to leave me alone 
and keep quiet. I just warded 

off the blow. My mother saw 

the whole thing. Ruth was just 
shaking aU over when she went 
out." 

"Mrs. Pipher grabbed at my 
daughter, bruising and scratch- 
ing her," stated Mrs. Bennitz. 
:4 She did an awful lot of swear- 
ing." 

"I was called about 10.15/' 
testified Constable Sloss. "I 
found Mrs. Widdifield crying. 
She showed me a bruise on her 
right arm. The left side of her 
face was red. I questioned Mrs. 
Pipher and she stated that she 
slapped Mrs. Widdifield's face, 
but didn't take hold of her arm." 

"To start with I have had quite 
a bit of trouble with Mrs. Widdi- 
field/' said the accused. "When 
my son was going overseas she 
came in my] house and said, 'Heil 
Hitler/ and the things she said 
about the British and French — " 

Crown Attorney Mathews in- j 
terrupted Mrs. Pipher and told 
her not to go into ancient hist- 
ory. He explained to the court 
that Mr. Bennitz was born in 

i 

Germany, had been naturalized 
and was a good citizen, but Mrs. 
Pipher had: been spreading rum- 
ours about them. 

■ 

- (Continued on Page 5, Col. 4) 










titute 

I 

Ceview' 




LOCAL BRANCH RAIS* 

ES $225; SENDS 

MANY SUPPLIES 

All who are interested in 
Home and Country should know 
these facts about the Ontario 
Women's Institute. 

It 




stltute to meet their felt need. 
The first president and secretary 
were Mrs. E. Smith, Stoney 
Creek, and Miss Nash, Stoney 

In September, 1005, eight vears 
later, tins movement had spread 
so that Newmarket learned of it 
realized that something 



was being offered to 



Next Tuesday the first class of trainee* will arrive 
for the opening of Newmarket's Military Camp. Over 
one hundred officers and staff are already here, and 
another hundred will arrive to-night at 7 o'clock. 

Upper tefl *hows Lieut. Richard A. Fisher, archi- 
tect who supervised construction; Major II. L. Robson. 
quartermaster ol the camp; and Capfain Frank Suther- 



land, weapons-training officeY; upper right shows Regi- 
mental Quartermaster-Sergeant R. J. Growcock, left, 
and Company Quartermaster-Sergeant A. Y .Waldrum, 
working on the forms to be used in issuing equipment 
to the trainees; lower, left shows the kitchen in one of 
the two large dining halls for the trainees, and lower 
right shows a group of the cottage dormitories erected 



for them. Inset is- Lieut.-Col. R. B. Darkness, officer 
commanding the camp, who rose from private to lieut- 
enant-colonel during the last war and won the Distin- 
guished Service Order and the Croix de Guerre with 
palm. Major B. Hanlcy Geary, V.C., is second-in-com- 
mand at the camp. — Staff Photos by Jack Smith. 



i 




-. 



and 

worthwhile 
women. 

Under Mrs. C. F. Doane, Yongo 

M the Newmarket branch of 

Women's Institute was organized. 
Mrs. Doane was first president. 
and ls how a life member. Mrs. 
C. F. Doane and Mrs. E. N, Pen- 
rose share the honor of being the 
two women who have been 
members of the Newmarket 
branch for the greatest length of 
time. 

The organization has grown 
tremendously since that time, 
and is now universal. The Wo- 
men's Institute is the second 
largest organization in the world. 

It is a non-political and non- 
sectarian organization, and is 
therefore able to function har- 
moniously. The motto has al- 
ways been "For Home and 
Country." Through this : organ- 
ization much has been done to 
raise the standards of living in 
the rural sections. ] 

The headquarters of the On- 
tario Women's Institute are at 
the Parliament Building, Toronto 
and is under the Ontario Dept. 
of Agriculture. 

Each year a project isj spon- 
sored by the government and is 
made available to each Institute 
branch in the district. One dele- 
gate from each branch attends 
the course, and on the completion 
of this course, the delegate re- 
turns to her branch and imparts 

(Continued on Page 5, Col. 4) 



unary 




NEWMARKET BRANCH 

QUOTA FOR BRITISH 

WAR VICTIMS 



FURNITURE, CHAIRS, 
GAMES URGENTLY 

EEDED 



n 



An S.O.S.; has been sounded to 
the people ; of North York by 
Major Geary, second in command 
of the military training centre, 
which will [open I in Newmarket 
next week. I 

While army headquarters pro- 
vide - the necessities, there are 
many little j Items for the boys' 
comfort that will be found lack- 
ing. The urgent appeal Ls for 
furniture for the recreation 
rooms of the three messes — 
trainees', sergeants' and officers'. 
Chairs, tables, ping-pong tables 
and equipment, table games, 
books and I magazines. Look 
through your attic now and see 
what you can spare for these 
boys of ours. Phone this office 
and we will arrange to have your 
donation picked up. 

The canteen at the local camp 
is being looked after by the Sal- 
vation Army and! Capt. Falle Ls 
now busy working on the pro- 
ject. The several camps in the 
district have been allotted to 
different organizations ■ who are 
pledged by the government to 
run the canteen on a no-profit 
basis. Profits, if any, will be 
turned in for the benefit of the 
troops. 

The Salvation Army represent- 
ative will be in charge of the 
recreational side of camp life in 
co-operation with the camp staff. 
A local committee comprising the 
representatives of various organ- 
izations, will be formed to look 
after welfare work, help provide 
entertainment and generally 
assist in making the boys' 
month's stay In town as pleasant 
as possible. ' (■ 

Moving pictures so many 
nights a week will be provided 

by the government, and looked 

■ 

after by the Salvation Army stall 
and the personnel will put on 
concerts, but concert parties from 

town and district will be one of 
the big needs. Newmarket Cit- 
izens' Band will co-operate and 
provide music at specified times. 
The 30-day training period for 
thfcvi: young men, who will be 
called up from month to month, 
Is going to be hard and strict. It 
ls up to the people of town and 
district' to do their share In seeing 
that their leisure hours are well 
provided for. 



REV. DR. A. E. RUNNELLS 

COMES TO TRINITY 

UNITED 

Rev. Dr. A. E. Runnells, j-etired 
minister, has been called to 
Trinity United to assist Rev. 
McMath till the end of, the con- 
ference year in June, as the 
present pastor faiLs to improve 
in health. 

Dr. Runnells, who comes to 
Trinity this Sunday, has been 
pastor of several of the large 
churches in Montreal, Windsor 
and Brockville. 



Camp Medical Officer 



A definite quota has been set 
for this branch to accomplish 
during September and October. 
Considering the urgency and 
need for haste, the branch have 
taken advantage of the local 
merchants' generosity, in giving 
articles at cost. 

It has been deemed advisable 
to purchase many of the follow- 
ing articles, while others are be- 
ing made by various groups. 



PLEASANTVILLE CLUB 
SENDS DONATION TO 
^SOLDIERS' COMFORTS 

We wish to acknowledge with 
thanks, a donation of $5 to the 
Soldiers' Comfort Fund from the 
Pleasantville Home Makers Club 
of R.R. 3, Newmarket. The 
money can be used to advantage 
as the monthly parcels sent over- 
seas cost in the neighbourhood 
of $90. 



GAS STOLEN 



Women 

Coats 



Size 
38 

12 
16 

10 



r +q"**wtt> 







Dresses 
Skirts 
Pullovers 
and Blouses 10 
Slips 16 

Nightgowns 16 
Jackets 16 

Layette 
Men 

Pullovers and 
Cardigans 14 
Shirts 11 



No. to be made 
10 
10 
20 

20 



20 
20 
40 

1 



10 
25 



DR. CHARLES EDWARDS 

of town, and Dr. Boulding of 
Aurora will look after the health 
of the boys at the Newmarket 
military camp. Dr. Edwards, 
who has the rank of lieutenant, 
served in the last war with the 
Royal Navy as a Surgeon Sub. 
Lieutenant, 

I —Photo by Budd. 



TO ADDRESS HIGH SCHOOL 
STUDENTS ON PRINTING 
AND NEWSPAPER WORK 

Through the cooperation of 

Principal J. B. Bastedo, of the 
Newmarket High School, the 
town papers have arranged for 
B. II. Mortelock, editor of the 
Brampton Conservator, to ad- 
dress the student body to-mor- 
row (Friday) morning at 9 a.m. 
ThLs year Ls the 500th anniver- 
sary of printing, and thLs week Ls 
Weekly Newspaper Week across 
Canada. - w 



Many ladies have joined groups 
in town, for sewing and knitting, 
and it is thought the public 
might be interested in knowing 
about the splendid work being 
done and given some idea of the 
magnitude of the task of the Red 
Cross Society. r j 

Under the leadership of Mrs. 
Spence, of St. Paul's W.A., this 
group has made: 10 suits of py- 
jamas, 5 box linings, also 26 
pieces of box linings, 18 pneu- 
monia jackets, 24 suits pyjamas, 
13 handkerchiefs, 24 towels, 12 
hospital gowns, 1 surgeon's 
gown. 

The Catholic Women's League, 
under the leadership of Mrs. 
Buckler, submit the following 
list: 2 quilts, 11 nightgowns, 5 
baby gowns, 38 prs. bloomers, 12 
baby jackets, 3 prs. girl's pyjam- 
as, 2 prs. men's pyjamas, 4 doz. 
handkerchiefs, 22 girl's dresses, 
8 skirts, 51 prs. socks, 8 prs. 
wristlets, 9 refugee sweaters, 1 
pr. mitts. 

Miss Lillian Daniel's group: 
50 diapers, I baby jacket, 3 baby 

slips. This work was accomp- 
lished in a couple of evenings, 
and during the summer they 
have made many surgical dress- 
ings. 

Mrs. Scott heads a group, who 
call themselves "We Are Six." 
composed of the following ladies: 
Mrs. Geer, Mrs. Harvey Terry, 
Mrs. Joe Cribbery Mrs. Frances 
McIIale, Mrs. Ivan Monkman. 
Their contribution recently Is: 
8 nightgowns, 8 prs. bloomers, 30 
doz handkerchiefs. 

The Christian Church ladies 
have made: 20 prs. pyjamas, 16 

doz. handkerchiefs, 2 quilts, 17 
towels. 

Trinity United Church ladies 
helped with box linings. 

Over and above these groups 
are the regular workers, who so 
faithfully carry on week in and 
week out, at the Red Cross rooms 
sewing and knitting. 



Aid. Frank Bowser had to 
walk to work yesterday morn 
ing. When Frank tried to start 
his car. he found that some one 
had helped himself to all the gas 
during the night. A mighty 
mean trick to play on one of our 
town fathers. 



EVANGELINE AUXILIARY 

i 

The regular meeting of the 
Evangeline Auxiliary of the W\ 
M.S. will be held in Trinity 
Sunday School rooms on Tuesday 
evening, October 8th, at 8 p.m. 
This will be our Autumn Thank- 
offering meeting and we arc 
looking forward to an interesting 
message from our guest speaker. 



UNITED INTERCESSION 
SERVICES] 

Interest is deepening in the 
midweek intercession services 
which are being held in the dif- 
ferent churches in town. Last ev- 
ening there was a very good at- 
tendance in the Friends Meeting 
House, and next week the meet- 
ing will be held in the Christian 
Congregational Church. 




ew 





nice 




O 



NEWMARKET WINS 

FIRST RUGBY TILT 

Newmarket High School rugby 
team defeated St. Andrew's Col- 
lege 'seconds' 12-8 in a closely 
contested game at Aurora Mon- 
day. ' 

Ed. Mcrritt and Gordon Hunt 
scored touchdowns for Newmar- 
ket, and the other Newmarket 
points were secured on a con- 
version and single point kick. 
Yesterday's game was the first of 
the season for Newmarket. 





OFFICERS AND STAFF TO 
ATTEND TRINITY UNITED 
CHURCH SUNDAY MORNING 

Headed by the Newmarket 
Citizens' Band, the officers and 
staff of the military camp will 
parade to the United Church on 
Sunday morning for the 11 
o'clock service. 



t-»* 



T-H 



**** 



COMING 
EVENTS 

FRIDAY, OCT. 4TH — Vanity 
Fair in the United Church 
Sunday School rooms, at 7.30 
p.m., under auspices of Young 
People's Society and Junior 
Choir. 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17 — 
War Work Committee of the 
Women's Institute will hold 
Its annual Fall Fair In the 
Market House, Newmarket, 
October 17, at 2.30 p.m. Fea- 
ture attraction Mrs. II. M. 
Aitken. 

DANCE at Cookstown Pavilion 
every Friday night, to Max 
Boag's Orchestra. tf38 

FRIDAY, NOV. 1— The annual 
dance, which Ls usually spon- 
sored by the Hospital Aid, will 
be under the auspices of the 
Newmarket Red Cross Society 
In' the High School Auditor- 
ium, with Art West's Orchestra 
In attendance, tf38 

THUS., NOV. 7— Watch for the 
"Market Basket." 



TEST HOLE SUNK IN 
NOVEMBER IS FIND 



For some time Engineer 
ttachar, the water and light com- 
mittee and Reeve Lundy have 
contended that there was more 
water to be had near the water- 
works. ThLs week Mr. Boadwin 
of Sutton was* employed for a 
day and a half with his equip- 
ment, and the result is that the 
town has an additional supply of 
50 gallons per minute, or 72,000 
gallons a day. This is a good 
30,000 more than needed for the 
military camp. | 

The new well was the first 
test hole sunk by the Internat- 
ional Water Supply Co., last 
November, and It does not affect 
the wells in the vicinity, or the 
Cotter Street flow across the 
pond. The Colter Street \yell 
flows at the rate of 31 gallons per 
minute, and with air pressure 64 
gallons a minute. j 

Mr. Rachar is confident that, 
with a ten-inch casing and pump 
the new well would produce 100 
gallons a minute. There is only 
a two-inch pipe and a five-Inch 
casing on it at present. | 

Thus it would seem that the 
town's water problem Ls settled 
for the time being at least. 



FRED HEWSON'S RINK WINS 

Newmarket howlers enjoyed 
the rare October afternoon yes- 
terday for a game of trebles. 
The winners were: 1st prize, Mr. 
F. II. Hewson, (skip) Mrs. Mar- 
shall and Mr. Stark. 2nd prize, 
S. Janes (skip), Mrs. Brown and 
Mrs. Lyons. 3rd prize, Mr. 
Brown (skip), Mrs. Nesbitt and 
Mrs. Cockburn. { 

A men's doubles tournament 
will be held on the local greens 
on Wednesday, October 9, at 1.30. 



New President of Vets. 




BERT GILKES GREATLY 
IMPROVED 



Bert Gllkes, who was severely 
scalded while at work at the 
Office Specialty some few weeks 

back, is making steady progress 

at York County Hospital, and 

will be able to be moved home 

this weekend. 



FLOYD MAYBEE 

i 

who was elected president of the 
Newmarket Veterans on Thurs- 
day evening, Mr, Maybce en- 
listed with the 4th C.M.R.'s and 
served in France with the 3rd 
Toronto Battalion, being wound- 
ed in Sept. '18. Mr. Maybce 
owns Cousins' Dairy, Newmarket 



TORONTO MAN ACCIDENT- 
ALLY KILLED IN HOLLAND 

MARSH 

Joseph Fckete, 37 -year-old 
Toronto man, was injured fatally 
while hunting ducks in the Hol- 
land Marsh in King township, 
Saturday. Dr. .Lowell Dales at; 
tended the man, and Constable 
Ronald Watt investigated the 
accident. An inquest will be 
held. 



BROUGHT HOME THE GEESE 

. Tom Doyle and Jack King 
bowled at Alllston yesterday, 
bringing home setse. nerb 
Whyle and Bill Bosworth just 
bowled. 



CAMP OFFICERS 
RENT TOWN 
HOUSES , 



Real estate changes reported 
by E. A. Boyd, real estate brok- 
er, are as follows: | 

Mrs. Eliza Widdifield property, 
14 Prospect Ave., has been dis- 
posed of to Mr. and Mrs. D. II* 
Fines, Main street jeweller* Mr. 
Fines takes possession on r^ov. 1. 

Sergeant Whitley and family 
have leased 86 Prospect . Ave., 
Mrs. E. J, Hill house, taking 
possession Oct. 1. 1 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Sheridan 1 have 
moved to an apartment at 53 
Timothy Street. [ 

Lieut, and Mrs. D. E. Matheson 
have leased Mr. Cal Davis' fur- 
nished apartment at 163 .Main 
St., possession Oct. 1. ! 

Mr. and Mrs. Ken. JarvLs of 
Barrie have leased Mr. McKee'3 
bungalow at 38 Timothy Street 
Mr. McKee recently purchased 
this property from Mrs. i Gal* 
braith, who intends leaving for 
Winnipeg in the near future. 

Lieut, and Mrs. Woods of I Tor- 
onto have leased 5 Prospect jAve. 
the property of the late 'Miss 
Starr, and take possession j Oct* 
15. 

Mr, and Mrs. Ken Morton of 
Keswick have leased Mr. Palm- 
er's house at 18 Ontario St., and 
moved in Oct. 1, and .Mr. and 
Mrs. Faircy, who have lived here 
for some time, have taken an 
apartment at 10 Queen St. east. 

Q.M.S. House of Camp Borden 
and Mrs. House have leased land 
moved into 73 Timothy St.,; Mr. 

Rawn's house. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Budd riave 
rented 22 Timothy St. and moved 
in yesterday. | 

Mr. and Mrs. Ashby of Whit- 
church have rented Mrs. Huest- 
on's house at 34 Andrew St., and 
Mr. and Mrs. Morrow, who live 
there now, are moving to Huron 

St. west. t 

Rev. Capt. and Mrs. Dix have 
leased T. F. McMullen's house at 

25 Queen Street west, and moved 
In from Elmhurst Beach a few 
days ago. Mr. and Mrs. Telfer 
McMullen have moved to 
Toronto. \ 

Mr. an Mrs. Wm. Cole of Kes- 
wick have leased the J. J. Mc- 
Lean small farm at Bogarttown, 
and take possession at once. 

if i 

Mr. Boyd reports a shortage of 
houses at present, and also has 
applications for several good 
apartments. 



• 






TWO 



■-■ 



THE EXPRESS-HERALD, NEWMARKET, ONT„ THURSDAY. OCTOBER 3 f 1940 19 



10 



7 * 



l- 



t 



Is Published Every Thursday at the Office, 

Main Street, NEWMARKET, ONT. 

ANGUS C. WEST, Editor and Publisher 



Member of the Canadian Weekly Newspaper Association 

I 

I The Express- Herald is all Printed at Home. 

i 

J 4 

TERMS — 52.00 a year In advance - Single Copies 5c each. 



THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1940 1940 




THE SMALL TOWN REPORTER 



This is weekly newspaper week. To-day from coast 
to coast, the weekly press will blare forth with one voice 
reminding you people that the small town weekly that you 
so often laugh about is a mighty influence in your com- 
munity, and as an important a public utility as the electric 
power, telephone or radio. We are not going; to toot our 
horn unduly. For the past twelve years now we have 
heen endeavouring, through the columns of the Express- 
Herald, to present the news of the town and district, to 
give support to every worthwhile community enterprize 
and to make suggestions we thought were in the best 
interests to all. Fundamentally your editor is a small town 

guy, who does not care for the hustle and bustle of the, city 
streets, but enjoys his work of chronicling the daily events 

of his birthplace. Born on the Main Street, where the 

Post Office now stands, we love the old town and the 
people who make their abode here. Knowing 
practically every family in town and the sur- 
rounding district, our constant endeavour is not alone to 

print the things you want printed, but to keep out the 
things which, while having a certain news value, would 
hurt the feelings of you or yours. This is true of the vast 
majority of weekly editors. 

Yes, we believe the weekly press has a definite spot 
in the life of the community on a par with the church, 
school and industry. And we know that you enjoy our 
weekly letter whether you tell us in so many words or 
not. 

I It Ls our hope that the passing years find us at our 
desk recording the births and marriages of your children's 
children, and that when the time comes for your servant 
to lay down his pen and write '30/ that the editor of 
The Era will be able to depict in glowing terms the efforts 
of this small town reporter. 



THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPERS 



There can be no blackout of democracy while the 
Canadian Weekly Newspapers counter-attack propaganda 
with a barrage of well-aimed facts! 

As custodians of a Free Press, we the publishers, 
editors and staff member of this newspaper enlist all our 
forces to fight for recognition of this vital issue: A Free 
Press and Democracy are inseparable. Violate one and 
you crush the other. Silence one and you destroy the very 
foundation of the other. 

1 We have tasted one bitter fact from the cauldrons of 
totalitarianism into which have already been poured 
millions of live sacrifices: dictators don't begin by using 
the sword to delude their people; they first use the pen, 
making the columns of their newspapers the mouth-piece 
for their ill-directed lies and empty promises. 

But such delusion Ls not for those of us who are 
honestly, fearlessly, wholeheartedly Canadian. Thanks 
to a Free Press,- and a courageous and wisely directed 
weekly press, the Canadian people are the best informed 
in the world. Freedom of the Press Ls guaranteed to the 
people by our government and it shall not perish as long as 
the people maintain a Free Press! 

Stand with the publishers of Canada's weekly news- 
papers in the battle of democracy. With a Free Press as 
your most powerful weapon against dictatorial depotisni, 
there shall be NO SURRENDER for* Canada and 
Canadians. ! 

A Free Press constitutes the first line of defence in the 
battle for the maintenance of democracy. The weekly 



newspaper is an all-important factor in the upbuilding of 
the nation because it has such an intimate touch with the 
homes in the smaller communities throughout Canada. 

YOU COULDN'T READ THIS! 

- 
■ 

The 500th anniversary of the invention of printing by 
Johann Gutenberg is being celebrated during the present 
year of 1940, stimulated by the various trade associations 
and graphic arts groups. 

Printing has become as common-place in our lives as 
the rising and setting of the sun, yet it plays a tremendous 
role in the lives of every one of* us. 

You are awakened each morning by an alarm clock 
which undoubtedly has a printed dial. You arise from 
bed and dress in clothes that were undoubtedly bought 
under the stimulus of printed advertisements. Your 
weekly newspaper was made possible by Gutenberg's in- 
vention of printing. The cereal' on your breakfast table 
and the brand of coffee you drink were undoubtedly 
bought because of merits attributed to them in printed 
advertising. If you board a train or ride a street car to 
work, you hand the conductor a printed ticket or transfer. 
And it is more than likely that the selection of car, if you 
drive to work, was determined by the statements made in 
print. 

Imagine what chaos there would be in any office or 
factory if every piece of printing used in industry and 
commerce were suddenly taken away. Modern, inventions 
which we have come to look upon as necessities could 
never have become so widely publicized nor so highly de- 
veloped, had it not been for the service of the printing 
press. 

It is thus fitting that during the current year 1910 we 
should pay homage to Gutenberg, the inventor of printing, 
the man who gave mankind its choicest gift. Gutenberg's 
invention has even made it possible for you to read this 
editorial — a simple task which few people could have ac- 
complished before the days of printing and rise of popular 
education. 



f ^ivn: 3tt -^rrr 






'^zrz^^zi 



© 



From the Express-Herald of 
October 1, 1915 



EVERY WEEK IN THE YEAR 



* 



Here is what John Edwin Price ,(he noted American 

columnist had to say in reference to the service rendered 
by the local weekly newspaper. 

You had hardly let your first yell on this terrestrial 
sphere before the local editor ordered the fact of your 
arrival announced to a baby-loving world. 

When you reached the age of three or four and had 
your first real birthday party with invited guests, your 
friend, the editor told all and sundry who was there and 
what a fuss they made over you. « 

When you got on the honor roll at grade school he let 
all your admiring friends and neighbors know about it. If 
you got into any minor scrapes he apparently forgot about 
them as soon as he was told for he wanted to play up the 
things which might make you great. 

AH through your high school course he was keenly 
watching to see if you did anything worthy of note in 
athletics, letters or debate. And when you finally grad- 
uated he again seized upon the opportunity to put your 
name in print. 

If you decided to go to work then instead of going on 
to university he heralded the fact in such a manner that 
made any prospective employers realise that here was an 
ambitious lad who wasn't leaning unnecessarily on the 
folks. He wanted all whom it might concern to know that 
if work was to be done, here was a live-wire all set. 

When the supreme object of your heart's desire was 
won your editor-friend seemed to know about it almost as 
soon as the *Iucky" girl and warned all other aspirants to 
her sole attention to lay off as he printed the announce- 
ment of your engagement. Once more you were the con- 
quering hero, or thought so. The girl may have had other 
ideas on the subject. 

If after that you accomplished anything worthy of 
note, the world was told in letters bold: 

When those near and dear to you were, by death, 
taken out on (1 The Great Adventure," the Chief of the 
Columns apparently forgot their vices, and proceeded to 
laud their virtues and remind the world of their fine family 
connections — including you. 

When illness overtook you he let all the neighbors 
know so that mayhap the power of their prayers could be 
added to the forces of medicine. 

- And some day (should hpeehance outlive you as he 
has so many others) he, being kind and faithful unto the 
end, will once more use good paper and ink for you. He 
will probably tell mankind far and wide that one has 
passed who was a useful and a worthwhile addition to the 
race, that you have gone to join the glorious company who 
have become the "guests of God." 

Yes, from the cradle of birth to the casket of death, 
the Home Town Editor Ls your friend. He puts you on the 
map, and if you are worthy, helps to keep you there. 






The head office of the Office 
Specialty Mfg. Co. is being trans- 
ferred to Newmarket thLs week. 
Extensive alterations have been 
made in the present offices at the 
factory to accommodate the in- 
creased staff. 

Mr. Leslie Reilly returned from 
the West on Tuesday. 

Jt | ■ 

Mr. and Mrs. Metcalf of Barrie 
spent Sunday with their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. H. Hooker. 

s> 

Mrs. B. Ross and Miss Bessie 
Ross have returned after spend- 
ing a very pleasant holiday at 
Wasaga Beach. 

o* ! 

Lieut.-Colonel J. A. W. Allan, 
wife and daughter, left on Tues- 
day for New York City, combin- 
ing business with pleasure. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Evans 
spent the weekend at Kettleby, 
it being the occasion of Christ's 
Church Annual Harvest Festival. 

Pte. G. C. Proctor of Niagara 
Camp spent Sunday with his 
parents and bid farewell to hLs 
friends in town. Pte. Proctor 
leaves for Shornclifle, England, 
the latter part of this week. 

Mr. Harry Doyle had an agree- 
able surprise on Tuesday of this 
week when he was presented 
with a beautiful framed oak 

china cabinet by the foreman and 
office staff of the Office Specialty 
Mfg. Co., with whom lie has been 
associated for a number of years. 
Mr. R. F. Schmidt, in making the 
presentation, extended the best 
wishes of all his associates to Air. 
Doyle and his bride. 

.* !■- 

Work has been started on the 
installing of the clock in the 
tower of the new post office. Mr. 
S. C. McKeown has the job of in- 
stalling it. 

Mr. David Hartford has com- 
pleted the contract of cementing 
around the new post office. 

The Home Guards expect to be 
all in uniform for their drill at 
the Fair this week. Headed by 
the Bugle Band, they marched 
to the Exhibition Grounds last 
Saturday. Major Curran, Major 
Wayling and Col. Wayling, were 
present. 

Mr. George Lem of Toronto 
has purchased the Dominion 
Cafe. 



A reception was held on Friday 
night for Col. Allan, who has ob- 
tained leave of absence from 
England. Twenty automobiles, 
decorated with flags and loaded 
with friends, escorted the Col. 
and his family into town via 
Huron Street and were met on 
upper Main Street by the Home 
Guards, headed by the massed 
bands of Newmarket, Aurora 
and Sharon. 



/ v 



■::. ..„F ■■^ :: r^m 



BUSINESS 



BUSINESS 




PHEASANT HUNTING DATES 
ANNOUNCED FOR OCT. 25-26 



LITTLE steam lifts the lid of your tea-kettle. A lot of steam drives 
rains, machinery. Your bank deposit may be little, but it combines with 
millions of others to make a lot of "steam". It helps to run the nation's 
machinery of production, marketing, employment, business. It is important 
indeed to the country's war financing and war-time effort. The money 
is yours yet it helps provide the credit necessary to move the goods and 
services of the nation. <£ Canada's chartered banks thus perform func- 
tions of great usefulness. They receive the deposits of millions of Cana- 
dians, and extend credit to individuals, governments, businessmen and 
marketing organizations. The small depositor is important to the banks. 
The "little fellow", popularly so-called, is welcomed by any bank, as a 
Customer. 



In war, as in peace, Canada's Chartered Banks maintain, uninter- 
rupted, their useful services — safeguarding depositors' (unds; 
facilitating the nation's business — looking forward to peace 
with freedom as the only sure basis of enduring prosperity. 



THE CHARTERED BANKS OF CANADA 

! *fc 



Five hundred pheasants were 
let loose in the Townships of 
Markham and Whitchurch this 
week by the Dept. of Games and 
Fisheries of the Province of 
Ontario. These birds, added to 
those uow roaming the district 
should provide excellent shoot- 
ing for the annual pheasant hunt 
which is set for Friday, October 
25 and 26 next. 

- It will be the first hunt in 
Whitchurch since the township 

was made a game preserve this 
year, but for Markham -Township 
it will be the fourth season since 
the regulations of a game pre- 
serve were applied. 

The young birds were brought 
in crates from the hatcheries, and 
let free in small Hocks adjacent 
to various woods where they 
would have a chance of covering 
in their new surroundings. 



H»«L±*^< 



MM 




5 




ays 



A 



I 



Expenditure of $7,146 on a new 
switch-board, was authorized by 
council Monday night. 



There was only one major case 
at court Tuesday; 



Hill Jelley of the N.H.S. scored 
a total of 41 points out of a poss- 
ible 50 at the Inter.school meet at 
Itichmoud Hill yesterday. 



■*. 



Cutting off of power without 
giving citizens ample warning 
was strongly criticised by the 
mayor Monday evening. 



John Lister has enlisted with 
the Royal Artillery. 



The appointing of an extra 
police ofticer was discussed at 
council Monday evening. 



Murdoch Chapman of Baldwin, 
former resident of town, died at 
York County Hospital on Mon- 
day in his 88th year. 



FALL FAIR DATES 



Beeton Oct. 1-2 

Brampton Oct. 1-2 

Cookstown Oct. 3-4 

Markham Oct. 3-5 

Zephyr Oct. 2 

Bolton Oct. 11-12 



V 



.-■ • 



* * \ 



m . 






'/A'- 1 ** 



;w 



. Two Broadwayitcs sat in a 
restaurant. At the end of the 
meal one requested a loan. 

"Can I borrow $20 for a week," 
he asked. 

"Sure," replied the other, 
counting out the money. 

As they rose, the latter spoke 
again. "Remember," he remind- 
ed, "that's only for a week. 1 ' 

The borrower turned a vivid 
red. "You'll get your money," he 
screamed. "Stop hounding me!" 



i\~-* • tv- * - - 



Roadhouse & Rose 

Funeral 

Directors 

Main St. Newmarket 
Phone 70. 



George Haskett, well known 
resident of town, passed away 
Wednesday in his 69th year. 

Workmen striking an electric 

cable while drilling for water at 
the water-works Friday, had a 
miraculous escape from death. 

The Express-Herald is sent to 
all Newmarket boys overseas. 





THE VARIETY OF 
DESIGNS . 

In our collection of MONU- 
MENTS Is such that we can 
meet almost any require- 
ment both as to kind and 
eoat. Wo also make me- 
morials to order of every 
description. You'll find our 
work excellent always and. 
our service prompt and 
reasonably priced. | 

O. W. LUESBY 

MAIN 8T., NEWMARKET. 





9 

Business — ■ Professional 

Directory 




INSURANCE 



J. L. R, BELL 

Insurance! 

Agent for 
ACCIDENT, SICKNESS, 

BURGLARY, AUTO, 

FIRE, ETC. 

*>« 

Bank of Toronto Bldg. 

Phone 358 - Newmarket 



AUCTIONEERS 



F. N. SMITH 

Licensed Auctioneer for the 

County of York. 

dt 

All sales promptly attended to 

Charges Moderate 
Nothing too great; 

Nothing too small. 
Phone 187J - Newmarket 



GORDON PlirLLIPS 

LICENSED AUCTIONEER 

County of York 
Prompt Attention to all kinds 

of Sales 

Aurora — Ontario 
Phone 363 



MEDICAL 




DR. S. J. BOYD - 



i 



R.W.J 




,Y 



Plumbing & Heating 



DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE 



Nights, Sundays and Holidays 

call 442. 

* t 

Phone Z8. 
AT MACNAB HARDWARE 




GEER'S 
CARTAGE 

J 

LOCAL AND LONG 
DISTANCE MOVING 

General Cartage 



■ 
* 



COAL, COK 

and WOOD. 

Reasonably Low Priced 




yOUR RADIO NEEDS 

STEWART . . „ 





d 



am® ^erviiee 



RADIO TUBES, BATTERIES, 
PARTS, ETC. 

.. NEW AND USED RADIOS .. 
Electric, Battery and Car 

113 MAIN ST., NEWMARKET 
PHONE 355 




TRY 

R. Osborne & Son 

FOR 

Plumbing 
Tinsmithing 

AND 

Furnace Work 

3 OF OUR SPECIALTIES 



Job Work promptly attended 

to 

- 

STOVES & TTNWARB 
PBOKQ m 







PERRIN'S FLOWER 

SHOP 

FLOWERS FOR EVER* 
OCCASION 

Member Florist Telegraph De- 

- livery Association 
Flowers wired to all parte of the 

World 

FUNERAL FLOWERS 

A Specialty . 

118 Main Street Newmarket 

Phone 135w. 



Graduate In Medicine of Tor- 
onto University, also Licenti- 
ate of the Royal College of 
Physicians and a Member of 
the Royal College of Surgeoru 
of England. Former clinical 
assistant in Mocxrefleld'a Eye 
Hospital, and University Coil 
lege, Ear, Nose and Throu 
Hospital, London, England 

Eyes Tested, Glasses Supplied 

Telephone 110 

Hours: 8-10; -1-6; 7-9 



DR. L. W. DALES 

Surgeon and Obstetrician 

X-RAY 

Jt i • 
Coroner for County of York 

Main St. - Newmarket 

Phone 199 



■«* 



OH. J. 11. WESLEY 

Main St. - Newmarket 

Coroner 

Radiologist for York County 
Hospital 



Office Hours: 10-12 a.m 

4-8 p.m. 
Sundays by Appointment 



DR. J. CIIAS. R. EDWARDS 

DR. MICHAEL 
McCAUSLAND 



Newmarket 



Phone 31 



Office Hours; 

8 - 9 a.m. 

2-4 p.m. 

7 - 8.30 p.m. 

Sundays and Holidays 

by appointment only 



DENTAL 



DR. BARTHOLOMEW 
Dentist 

X-RAY . 

m > * 

» 

Over Patterson's Drug Store 
Phones: Office 215; Res. 46* 

• Evenings by Appointment 



DR. R. L. HEWITT 



Dentist 



■"*. 



McCauley Block, Opposite 
Post Office 

jt 

Evenings by Appointment 
: PHONE 269\v 

In Mount Albert every 
Tuesday a.m. 



LEGAL 



ARLEIGH ARMSTRONG 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary 
Public, Etc. 

ARMSTRONG BLOCK 
Phone 585 - Newmarket 



CASE & WEBB 

Barristers, Solicitors and 
Notaries Public 



309 Northern Ontario Bldg. 

Bay and Adelaide Sus. 

Telephone ELg-in 5929 

Branch Offices: 

324 Kecle St. W., Toronto 

Junct. 0454 , 

Corner Tyler & Yonge Sts., 

Aurora. 



KENNETH 51. R. STIVER 

B. A. 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary 
Public, Etc. 

Bank of Toronto Bulldina 
Botsford St., - Newmarket. 

A. M. MILLS 

Barrister, Solicitor and 
Notary Public 

Jl 

51 Main St. 
Phone 461 - Newmarket 



■ - 






MATHEWS, LYONS & VALE 
Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries 

. * 

Solicitors for 

Town of Newmarket 

Township of East Gwillimbnry 

Bank of Toronto 

Office: 100 Main St. 

N. h. Mathews, R.C. 

B. E. Lyons, B.A. 

Joseph Vale 

Phone 120 - Newmarket 



VIOLET ROBINSON 
MacNAUGHTON 

Notary Pnblie 

Imperial Bank Building 

Newmarket - Ontario 



.* < 



'.V 



* fc \ 



«TE EXPRESS-HERALD, NEWMARKET, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 19401940 



THRE8 



Tfwm id 7W dtfwL 
to&tcco JUST LIKE 




BIG GRAVEL PR0GRA3DIE 
PLANNED BY WHIT- 
CHURCH TWP. 

Adopting the recommendation 
of the DepL of Highways Whit- 
church Township will pay a flat 
price for gravel placed on its 
roads th& fall of 90c per yard. 
As. the gravel cost 50c per yard 
3i the pit, the truckers will re- 
ceive 40c for delivering it. The 
price is not regarded as very 
attractive :• for long hauls, but 
those truckers who make (he 
long hauls will be entitled to the 
short hauls which is calculated to 
average out a fair price. 

It is expected that between 
2,000 and 3,000 yards will be 
placed on the roads. This con- 
siderable amount with the grader 
work now going on. Is expected 
to place the roads in first class 
condition again after a rather 
unusurily hard summer. 



CIDER MILL 



! 



Half mile west of 

GLENVILLI 



Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays 



RUSSELL 
SOMMERVILLE 



COUNCIL MEET MONDAY 

A regular meeting of the town 
council will be held Monday 
evening in the council chambers 
at 8J>0. 



CHRISTIAN CHURCH JUNIOR 
LADIES' AH) 

, The regular monthly meeting 
of the Junior Ladies' Aid of the 
Christian Church will meet at 
the home of Mrs. D. Godson, 14 
Simcoe Street, on Wednesday, 
October 9th, at 7.30 p.m. 



PAPER COLLECTION 

SATURDAY, OCT. 5 

The Boy Scouts and Wolf Cubs 
will collect newspapers and mag- 
azines on Saturday, Oct 5. If 
anyone wishes to have the papers 
gathered together, or carried out- 
side for the collection, simply ask 
any Cub or Scout, or call J. 
Hamilton, 116, or J. Malcolm, 
679. The collection will start at 
1.30 Saturday afternoon. 

The Wolf Cubs are collecting 
leather to be made into leather 
jackets for our men in the navy. 
If anyone has old leather purses, 
doves, school-bags- or leather 
pillows, would they kindly get 
in touch with any Cub, and he 
will call and pick the leather up. 
: . 

r 

X.H.S. CLUBS NAME 

NEW OFFICERS 

Miss Jean Smith was elected 
president of the Newmarket High 
School Literary Society at a 
meeting of the association held 
Friday. Other officers elected 
were: Honorary president, D. O. 
Mungovan; 1st vice, Denne Bos- 
worth; 2nd vice, Meta Middle- 
brook; secretary, Hugh Garrett; 
treasurer, Jim Otton; and pianist 
Miss Mary Margaret Webb. 

Joyce Smith was elected pre- 
sident of the Girls* Athletic So- 
ciety, with Grace McDonald vice- 
president, Jean Hill treasurer; 
Helen Hamilton, secretary. Gor- 
don Hunt, was elected president 
of the Boys' Sports Association, 
with Howard Hamilton vice- 
president. 



Death Car And Toronto Victims 




BOY SCOUT APPLE DAY 

Saturday, October 12 is Apple 
Day for the Boy Scouts. Buv 
an apple or two from the boys 
and help along this worthy 
cause. 




WAR ORDER RECEIVED BY 
T. SISMAN SHOE CO. 

The T. Sisman Shoe Company 
Limited of Aurora have received 
from the Dominion War Purch- 
asing Committee an additional 
large order for ankle boots, mil- 
itia and also for canvas rest 
shoes. This order will keep the 
factory busy for some time. 



T. SISMAN SHOE COMPANY 
TO ERECT NEW FACTORY 

The T. Sisman Shoe Co. Ltd., 
have let the contract to the Au- 
rora Building Co. for an addition 
to their factory. The new build- 
ing will be a one-story structure 
40 ft. by 150 ft. It will be of 
brick construction with large 
steel sash openings housing a 
double car garage and flooring 
uill be concrete. The work will 
commence immediately and the 
building will be erected west of 
factory No. 1 Moslev Street. 




lhe above wreck is all that remains of a motor car 
In which six soldiers, two from Toronto, met death when 
It plowed into the rear of a truck at the traffic light on 
Ton?e street highway at Eagle avenue, a mile from New- 



market, 'lhe soldiers were on their- way to Camp 

Borden. A seventh was Injured seriously. The two 

Toronto victims are A. C. Carter (inset left) and L, A. 

Chapman.:* „ . r \ 



IN THE NAVY 

Joe Gladman, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Herb. Gladman of town, has 
joined the navy as a wireless 
operator. 



FIRE PREVENTION WEEK 

Next week from October 6 to 
12 is fire prevention week. 'See 
to it that your premises are 
cleared of fire hazards. 



DONATION APPRECIATED 

In response to an appeal for 
funds for thz Soldiers' Comforts 
Fund, last issue, we received a 
letter Friday morning with $2.50 
enclosed, from "Well Wishers." 

Thanks "Well Wishers," wish 
there were more like vou. 



PRESENTED PICTURE OF 

THEIR MAJESTIES 

TO CAMP 

On Saturday evening last, two 
members of Newmarket camp 
staff called at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Hays. Thev 
were Sergeant Broelie and Driver 
Feltham, in search of a picture 
of H.M. the Kins, to decorate the 
sergeant's mess, being newly 
opened this week. 

Mr. Hays had a small framed 
picture of the Kin* and Queen 
hanging up, which he offered to 
the boys. They were quite pleas- 
ed to accept a sift from a veteran 
and expressed their appreciation 
:*s they went away, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Hays felt only too glad to 
render them this small sen-ice. 



LOCAL MARKET 

Butter, lb. 27o 

Eggs, doz 33c, 28c, 30c 

Chickens, lb. 23c 

Elderberries, qt. box 10c 

Plums, sin I. bskt. 25c 






O "The Bank of Toronto loaned me money to buy 
seed and to buy livestock. Several times I have 
been able to hold my crops and stock for more 
favourable prices through my bank's help. Yes 
— I would say that The Bank of Toronto has 
helped me to make farming profitable/ 7 

* 

You cure cordially invited to discus* your 
loan problems v/ith the local manager of 




lncQTt>orated 185S 

II E. LAMBERT NEWMARKET 

Manager. BRANCH 





TELLS OF JOURNEY FROM 

NEWMARKET IN 1880 

Paul Rice in the HunLsvillc 
Forester writes: 4t Wc have a bet- 
ter conception of the condition 
of the road between Graven hurst 

and Himtsvillc in 1880 after 
listening to Win. Payne, who 
drove a horse from Newmarket 
to HunLsvillc in October, 1880. 
'Loaded on the wagon/ said Mr. 

Payne, 'were two pigs, 12 hens 

and a rooster, and at night the 
horse was tethered to a tree 
While I slept under the waggon. 
At Allen-wille it snowed seven 
inches in one night and we were 
delayed for a couple more days. 
" 'On reaching Huntsville, the 
bridge was raised up to allow 
"The Northern" to pass through, 
so our belongings were' ferried 
across on a scow, and we pro- 
ceeded to Jerry's Lake. We 
crossed the creek to the Kalian- 
tyne grist-mill, and on to Jerry's 
Lake. Here we had to unload, 
and transport our livestock and 
baggage by rowboat to the other 
side of the lake. From here we 
had to carry everything to our 
new home on Winter's Rapids on 
the Big East River, even the 
pigs. Sinclair township was then 
settled like a town, with some- 
one on every lot'." 




a 



-V\^ .. -V '■ 






D 







">., 



Z- 



D 



A 4 



WHITCHURCH FARM 

OF 100 ACRES SOLD 



Located Close to Historic Village 
of Vandorf East of Aurora 



8 p.m and 10 p. m., Saturday 7.3 p.m., - Daylight Saving Time 

TO-DAY— THURSDAY 
Faye Uainter - Vim. Holdcn - Guy Kibee in 

"OUR TOWN" 



FRI. & SAT., OCT. 4-5— TWO FEATURES 

Ruck Jones - Chester Morris - Anita Louise in 

"WAGONS WESTWARD" 

. . AND 

'THE FARMER'S DAUGHTER 

with Martha Raye - Charles Ruggles 



(i 



MONDAY & TUESDAY, OCT. 7-8 
Joan Crawford - Frederic March In 

SUSAN AND GOD" 



l 



* 



WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY, OCT. 910 
John Payne - Linda Darnell in 

"STAR DUST" 



Mfc 







C. R. Purcell Co., farm realtors 
this week report the sale of 100 
acres in Whitchurch township, 
being the fourteenth lot in the 
fourth concession and located 
close to the historic village of 
Vandorf, east of Aurora. 

This farm, located in the once 
noted white pine timber belt, 
was originally the Atkinson 
estate. Senica Baker, one of the 
early Whitchurch settlers and a 
lifelong resident of the district, 
recalls that white pine trees 
averaging 30 to the acre and con- 
taining about 1,000 feet of lum- 
ber per tree covered much of this 
district. . > 

This early timber was in de- 
mand for masts and spars on 
ocean-going vessels and was 
drawn by horses to Frenchman's 
Ray or down through Scarboro 
township on the old Mast road 
to the Rouge river and from 
there floated to Lake Ontario. 

About 15 acres of the old At- 
kinson farm is still wooded and 
adjoining this is a 10 -room tim- 
ber residence, two basement 
barns and several other build- 
ings. The vendor Is Percy Allin, 
of Aurora, and the purchaser G. 
Hoshel, of Richmond 11111/ who 
recently sold his Bayvlew Ave. 
farm to G. 0. Leltch, of Toronto, 
Possession will be- given In 
September, 



.IT!-' 



THE COMMUNITY PAPER 



Picking up the papers that 
record the happenings of the 
little towns around us, one 
gains renewed faith in life. 
Here are set forth only that 
which uplifts a community— 
the activities of the business 
men, the church items, the 
happy social gatherings of the 
people, the marriages, births, 
and deaths, farmers* items 
and all the thousand and one 
daily occurrences that make 
up the simple annals of the 
great common people, who 
are really the foundation of 
this broad country of ours. — 
Papyrus. 



W.M.S. HOLD MISSIONARY 
RALLY AT SUTTON 



Miss Winnifrcd Thomas Is 
Guest Speaker 



The annual rally of the north- 
ern section of Toronto Centre 
Fresbyterial Woman's Missionary 
Society, of the United Church, 
was held at Sutton West Wed- 
nesday, Sept, 25. 

In the absence of Airs. W. J. 
Thompson, vice-pres. of this sec- 
tion, Miss Annie Bishop, prcs. of 
Toronto Centre Fresbyterial, 
presided. 

Mrs. O. W. Wood, Toronto, pre- 
sented "The Challenge and 
Opportunity of Special Objects" 
in the W.M.S. work. Miss Col- 
lins of Sutton contributed a 
beautiful solo, "At the Name of 
Jesus Every Knee Shall Bow." 

Miss Winnifrcd Thomas, Gen- 
eral Secretary of the Dominion 
Hoard, was introduced by Miss 
Bishop, as the speaker of the 
afternoon. Miss Thomas spoke 
on "The Need of Missionary 
Work in Time of War," stressing 
the demands of our country and 
of our church. 

"A time of crisis calls out for 
greater loyalty and service." The 
best service we can give to our 
country is to carry on the work 
of the church. The deepest needs 
arc those which only Christ and 
his church can meet. There Is 
no other medium in Canada to 
bring various groups to gather 
into a real national union. We 
are fighting that we may live as 
a free nation within the British 
Empire. - 

It is essential .that the Church 
of Christ be strong and vigorous. 
We are committed to carry on in 
Christ's World Church, and in 
this way may contribute most to 
our country. 

Rev. Mr. Anderson brought 
the meeting to a close, after 
which a happy social hour was 
spent with the Sutton West aux- 
iliary as hostesses. 
^ There was a good representa- 
tion present from churches from 
Aurora to Sutton. 



DE LA SALLE COLLEGE 
FIELD DAY 

The annual De La Salle College 
Field Day sports will be held on 
Saturday, October 5th, 2 p.m. op 
the college grounds. 



HARVEY McCORDICK 

IN CIRCULATION AGAIN 
Harvey McCordick, the oblig- 
ing caretaker of the Newmarket 
post office, who has been confined 
to the house for the past month, 
with sciatica, Is navigating the 
Main Street once again, with the 
support of a cane. Harvey will 
be off duty for another two 
weeks or so. 



MR. AND MRS. Plin, HAMIL- 
TON CELEBRATE SILVER - 

WEDDING 
Mr. and Mrs. Phil Hamilton 
entertained at their home, Huron 
St. E. r last Saturday, Sept. 28, In 
honor of their 25th wedding an- 
niversary. In the afternoon Mrs. 
Jacob Smith and Mrs. Milton 
Hamilton of Sutton, poured tea, 
while Mrs. Fred Hamilton, Mark- 
ham, and Mrs. Thomas Cleland of 
Llstowel presided during the 
evening. 

Many friends and relatives 
called to offer congratulations 
and best wishes. 



RESERVE THE DATE 
Reserve Wednesday, October 
30, for the annual hot turkey 
dinner at Kettleby. 



Office and factory forms of the 
Davis Leather Co., Dixon Pencil 
Co., and the Dorland-Bender 
Casket CO.., are printed by The 
Express-Herald. 



NEW ANGLICAN PASTOR 
FOR AURORA i 

The Rev. R. K. Perdue of the 
Parish of Lakeview, has accepted 
the invitation of Aurora Angli- 
cans to become their rector. lie 
is a young man of 32. 



K. M. R. STIVER 

JOINS MILITIA 
K. M. R. Stiver, local barrister, 
has joined the Queen's York 
Rangers with the rank of second 
lieutenant. Mr. Stiver is train- 
ing, in the evenings in Toronto, 
and will carry on his law practice 
as usual. 



A SLIGHT MISTAKE 
A bold display heading in The 
Star Monday evening, announc- 
ing that 15,000 attended Schom- 
berg Fair on Saturday, should 
have read 1,500. Even I if ( the 
last figures were correct, we 
think that the secretary. Dr. Mc- 



Leo>d, would have been 
than satisfied. 



morr 



MARK HAM FAIR 

THIS WEEK-END 



MEDICAL MEN MEET TO-DAY 
AT AURORA 

The Ontario Medical Associa- 
tion District No. 5, comprising 
York, Simcoe, Ontario and Peel 
counties, of which Dr. C. J. Dev- 
ins of Aurora is Councillor, will 
hold their annual convention at 
Aurora to-day. A business ses- 
sion was held at the High School 
this morning. This afternoon 
there will be a scientific meet- 
ing from 2 to 4 o'clock. ! 

The ladies will be entertained 
at bridge at the home of Dr. and 
Mrs. Devi ns or those wishing to 
play golf will be entertained at 
the golf club. Later the mem- 
bers will visit Lady Eaton's home 
3t King. About. two hundred are 
expected to attend and a banquet 
will be served at 6.30 o'clock at 
the' high school. 



2 Shows Nightly, 7.30 & 10 

p.m. Standard Time 

Admission 25c Saturday 30c 

Management: 

Wilson Hobberlin. 



Thurs., Fri., Sat. - Oct. 3-4-5 

DOUBLE BILL 
Bing Crosbv in 

"THE STARMAKERj' 

with 

Louise Campbell - Ned Sparks 

Linda Ware 

2ND FEATURE j j 

Joe E. Brown - Martha Rave 

"SI, 000 A I ' 
TOUCHDOWN" 

with j 

Eric Blore - Susan Hayward 
A laugh riot! | j 
Paramount News of the world 



Mon., Tues., Oct. 7-8 

The glorious adventure 
romance 

"BEAU GESTE" 

with 

Garry Cooper - Ray Milland 

Robert Preston I 

You have read the book — 

Now see the play. 



Wed., Thurs., Oct. 9-10 
Wallace Beerv in 

'THE MAN FROM 
DAKOTA" 

with 

Doris Del Rio - John Howard 
Beery in a new surprising role 




The Express-nerald sponsored 
the Soldiers' Comforts. Fund 
which the boys overseas ! appre- 
ciate so much. ~ i 




The fair attraction of this dis- 
trict will be held at Markham 
this Friday and Saturday. The 
features for Friday are the; Black 
and White Show sponsored j by 
York County Junior Farmers, 1 ex- 
hibits and competitions, ' boys' 
colt class, and pony races. I On 
Saturday there will be a Iltin! 
Club programme of jumping and 
riding, pony races, etc. 






;S :; 



BRITISH-ISRAEL 

Last Sunday evening .the 
monthly evening meeting was 
held in the Strand Theatre' at 
8.30, after the evening services 
at the churches were over, Mr. 
Edgar Webb of Toronto being 
the speaker. His topic was 
"Britain's Great Ally," and j he 
gave a stirring address to his 
many listeners. I ! 

Mr. Webb was handicapped jby 
a severe cold, but he gave a 
splendid address covering the 
whole situation, and his leMstr, 
definite line of thinking and 
reasoning left no doubt in his 
hearers' minds that Britain 1 is 
indeed Israel, and of the ultim- 
ate result since God is Britain's 
Great Ally. 

Mr, Webb will go far in British 
Israel circles, and as always, was 
a welcome visitor to Newmarket. 

Rev. E. J. Spriugett has return- 
ed from his western trip and will 
be heard in person over CFRB 
next Sunday. j 

The Sunday afternoon meet- 
ings are held in the Presbyterian 
Church at 3.30. 




YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE RICH! 

Our convenient budget terms will allow you 
to thrill he* with o gift ske'll bo proud to own — 
"Canada'* Finest Silverware" in the latest 
patterns, "Adoration", "Firil Lovo"j and- 
"Lovolaco". Wo will bo pleased to anango 
terms to suit you, 

STARTING SERVICES 

in handsome prevenl-famisb 
cheds from $34.7$ up 



SERVICE FOR 3 













rilONK 488 




tiinr 



Registered Optometrist 



NEWMARKET. 




PHONE 

NEWMARKET 

478" 

i 

MATINEE 

EVERY 
SATURDAY 




LAST TIMES 
TODAY 

"FORTY 
I-ITTLE j 
MOTHERS" 

also ! 

"j*B. ci mis-; 

TI.VX MKETS 
THE WOMAN 



l* 



FRIDAY - SATURDAY 





Ray Milland* Patricia Morison 
Akim Tarnlroff ;< 




* HIT 



MONDAY - TUESDAY 











T.Mny Kfllf 

t*kby JOIDAH 

Ootid HOIT 



I 




.._.1A ftjSPEHSKAYA 



A 



WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY 

I 



2ND FEATURE 





S 



. 2ND ATTHACTION 

EXPOSING SABOTAGE 




FREE' TO 

the LADIES 



EVEBt! MONDAY & TUESDAY. 

Wm. A[ Rogers Silverware 



. : p. 

EVERY WEDNESDAY d THUBSDAX 

DlNNERWARE . 




■• 

f - 




--■ 



- : 



• 



- *■ 



THE EXPRESS -HERALD, NB 717MARKET, ONT. THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1940 1940 






t 



\ 



Are You Having 

Difficulties In 

Balancing 

i 

Your Budget? 

LINDENBAUM' 



HAVE GARMENTS TO 
SUIT YOUR PURSE! 



ADVANCE STYLES 



trimmed with Persian, squirrel, 
jap mink, sable and beaver. 

| If you have a fur you 

would like to use up, we can put 
it on a coat for you. 



Special 








CHAMOISUEDE 
GLOVES 



69c 



Reg. SI.OO value! Beautiful 
hand-stitched c h a m o i s u e d e 
gloves in natural, black and wine 
Sizes G to 1\<£. • ! 




TWEED 
JACKETS 



Plaids, checks, 
stripes in fine 
sport jackets. 

398 



STURDY 
SHEERS 

69c 

Clear, sheer «y. 

stockings, rein- &;-: 
forced at points.' 
of wear, newest 
shades. 



L- .ww'fTj 




mmpw 










BONNY. 
BONNETS 

Perky hats with 
large feather 
trims. All shades 

to harmonize 
with your outfit 



LINDENBAUM 
OUTFITTERS 

Tor Quality and Satisfaction 

1 NEWMARKET 



Church 
Services 



r^r 



THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Pastor, Rev. A. Greer 
Sunday, Oct. 6, 1940 
11 a.m. — Communion Service 
7 p.m. — Second in series on 
"Greatest Words," GOD'S 
FAVOURITE WORD. 
2.30 p.m.— Rally Day in the Sun- 
day School. 
Come and receive a blessing. 




ST. PAUL'S CHURCH 
The Rev. Canon J. D. Paterson, 
Rector of AH Saints', Peterboro, 
took both morning' and evening 
services at St. Paul's Church last 
Sunday, while Rev. A. J. Pat- 
stone took the services at All 
Saints', Xext Sunday, October 
6, will be the annual Harvest 
Thanksgiving sen-ice at St. 
Paul's Church, with special music 

by the choir. 

Next Thursday afternoon at 
three o'clock the Woman's Aux- 
iliary will hold their monthly 
devotional and business meeting, 
and the president asks for a good 
turn-out of the members to do as 
they have done each month, join 
in special intercession for suf- 
ferers in the war, with prayers 
for our troops and for peace. 

The Red Cross sewing unit, in 
connection with the W.A., met at 
Mrs. Marwood's last week and at 
Mrs. Gamble's this week. The 
other organizations of the church 

are planning their season's work 
and are off to a good start. 



WON EUCHRE PRIZES 

At the Thora Rebekah Lodge 
Euchre held in the Bugle Band 
Hall on Tuesday evening, Mr. 
Ernest Dobbie won the gent's 
prize, Mrs. Bill Young the lady's 
prize, Mrs. Joseph Brammer the 
lone hand, and Mrs. Dick Call- 
aghan the consolation prize. 



THELMA PRICE SnOWERED 
BY GIRL FRIENDS 

On Thursday evening Misses 
Edith and Mary McClymont en- 
tertained at a china shower in 
honour of Miss Thelma Price, a 
popular bride of this month. 

To the strains of the wedding 
march, the bride was ushered to 
her chair beneath a horseshoe 
and pink ribbons, which formed 
an arch where a large basket was 
filled to capacity with gifts. 

A delightful lunch was served 
in the dining-room .which was 
beautifully decorated in pink and 
white. The tea table, attractive 
with its silver appointments, was 
presided over by Mrs. II. Price, 
mother of the bride, and Mrs. J. 
A. Maitland. 

Everyone joined in making a 
scrapbook of the bride's and 
groom's life, to be kept as a mo- 
groom's life ,to be kept as a me- 



IN MEMORIAM 

BROWN — In memory of Joseph 
Watson Brown, who passed away 
three years ago on Oct. 5, 1937. 
No pen can write, no tongue can 

tell, 
My sad and bitter loss, 
But God alone has helped so well 
To bear my heavy cross. 

— Fondly remembered by his 
wife .Myrtle. 



IN MEMORIAM 
FIRTH — In loving memory ot 
a dear wife and mother, Pearl 
Agnes Firth, who passed away 
Oct. 5, 1939. 
A wonderful mother, woman and 

aid, 
One who was belter, God never 

made; 
A wonderful worker, so loyal and 

true, 
One in a million, that, mother, 

was you. 
Just in your judgment, always- 
right, 
Honest and liberal, ever upright; 
Loved by your friends and all 

whom you knew, 
A wonderful mother, that, 

mother wxs you. 
— Sadly missed by husband 
and family. 

— _ 

IN MEMORIAM 
WHYLE — In loving memory of 
our dear brother, William Graver 
Whylc, who passed away Sept. 
30, 1933. 
There's a face that is haunting us 

ever;. 
There's a voice that we're longing 

to hear, 
There's a smile we'll remember 

forever, 
Though we try to forget every 

tear. 
There's a sad ,but sweet remem- 
brance, 
There's a memory fond and true, 
There's a token of affection, dear, 
And heartache still for you. 

— L o v i n g I y remembered by 
Margaret and Herbert. 




a 



n 




ersanal 



MARRIED IN ENGLAND 




Private A. W. (Mickey) McJ 
with the 1st Division Ammunitio 
Edith Bridger, of 58 Victoria Rd., 
married on the 17th of August. 



ann, Newmarket boy overseas 

n Company, and his bride, Gladys 

Aldcrshot, Hant. Mickey was 



Mr. George Rosamond has ac- 
cepted a position in Hamilton, 

leaving town last week. 

* ♦ • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bothwell 
and Mary, and Mr. A. E. West 
spent Sunday in Midland with 
Mr. and Mrs. George West. . 

* # • • 

Messrs. Aubrey Davis and E. J. 
Davis of Newmarket were at the 
Seigniory Club in the Province 
of Quebec recently accompanied- 
bv Messrs. J. R. Rumball and R. 
II. Carter, both of Toronto. 



IN MEMORIAM 

TERRY— In loving memory of 
a dear husband and father, Har- 
Harvey Terry, who passed away 
October 4, 1938. \ 

The one I loved has gone to rest, 
His fond true heart Ls still, 
The hand that always helped me 
Now lies in death's cold chill. 

— Sadly missed by wife and 
son. 



IN MEMORIAM 

II ASK FTP— In loving memory 
of a dear husband and father, 
George Haskctt, who passed 
away October 4, 1939. 
Vou arc not forgotten, father 

dear. 
Nor ever shall you be, 
As long as life and memory last 
We shall remember thee. 

— Ever remembered by wife 
and sons. \ 



EDITH A. HAWTIN 

* 

Optometrist 
75 Main St. Newmarket 

Evenings By Appointment 
Phone ifcfc- 



F.38S 




Sergt. Albert Lindcnbaum is 
home from Kirk land Lake on 
leave. 

V V » • 

Pte. Leonard Coupland of 
Camp Borden spent the weekend 

in town with his parents. 

• * • • 

Miss Geraldine Hoare is spend- 
ing a month's visit with friends 

in Winnipeg. 

» • • • 

Miss Helen Blendauer spent 

the weekend in Ottawa and Hull. 

• ♦ • • 

Mrs. T. O. Townley left last 
week to spend the fall and winter 
months in Ottawa with her son, 

Phillip. 

• • • • 

Pte. Doug. May was home from 

Camp Borden for the weekend. 

• * • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Melville Brough- 
ton and little son, Darrcll, of 
Brockville, spent the weekend in 
town with the former's parents, 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Broughton. 

• • • • 

Josephine Isobcl, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Smith, cele- 
brated her birthday at the home 

of her parents on Sunday. 

• • • • 

Miss Jeanne Jennison of Tor- 
onto spent the weekend with her 

aunt, Miss E. Peter m an. 

» . * • 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Darby of 
Toronto spent the weekend at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. 

Smith. 

• • • • 

ENGAGEMENTS 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Smith, of 
Hamilton, announce the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Iris 
Blanche, to Private Carl Preston, 
of the Irish Regiment of Canada, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Preston 
of Toronto, the marriage to take 
place Saturday, October 5, in 
East Toronto Salvation Army, at 
7.30 p.m. Adjutant Boulton will 
officiate. 



BIRTHS 

GEORGAS— At York County 
Hospital on September 29, to Mr. 
and Mrs. Alec Gcorgas, of New- 
market, a son. 



GRANT— To Mr. and Mrs. W. 
L. Grant (nee Dorothy Reed), 
Newmarket, Ontario, on Wednes- 
day, September 25, 1910, at the 
Grace hospital, Bloor street, Tor- 
onto, a daughter. 



MORRISS — At Ravcnshoc, 

September 23, to Mr. and Mrs. 

James Morriss, (nee Clceda Wat- 

sonj the gift of a son, Robert 

James. 

• • • • 

DEATHS 

MADILI^-At Sloufivlllc, . on 
Wednesday, October 2, 1910, 
Theophilus Madill, beloved hus- 
band of Sarah JarvLs, In his 83rd 
year. 

Funeral from his late residence 
on Friday, October 4, at 2.30 
'standard time). Interment 

Stouffville cemetery. 



Mr. Ross Fountain is home 

•rom Kirkland Lake on holidays. 

* • • • 

Mr. and Mrs. George Kyle of 
Toronto spent the weekend with 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Best. 

• • • • 

Ptes. Bob Fountain and Roy 
Chant were 'omc frvn Camp 

Borden for the weekend. 

» • » * 

Among those who attended the 
silver wedding of Mr. and Mrs. 
Phil Hamilton on Saturday Ixst, 
were Mr. Hugh Richmond, Mrs. 
T. CIcIand, .Mrs. R. Park, Misses 
Elinor and Ruth Cleland of Lisl- 
owel, Mr. and Mrs. B. Sinclair, 
.Mr. and Mrs. Roy Brown, Sher- 
iff and Mrs. Howard Cane, Mr. 
and Mrs. Clifford Richmond, 
Toronto, and Dr. W. II- and Mrs, 
McCormack, of Mooreiield. 



Weddings 



McKEOWN— MARSHALL 

In. Trinity United Church, the 
marriage of Eva Elizabeth Mar- 
shall, and Mr. Joseph Walter 
McKeown, took place very quiet- 
ly Saturday evening, Rev. R. R. 
McMath, officiating. 

The bride, given in marriage 
by her father, looked lovely in 
an afternoon dress of blpe crepe, 
with port wine accessories, and 
wore a corsage of § !isman roses. 

She was attended by her sis- 
ter, airs Harold Ainsworth, of 
Ottawa, attired in jacquered 
wine crepe, with black accessor- 
ies. Her corsage was Johanna 
roses. Mr. Victor McKeown was 
his brother's best man. 

Immediately following the cer- 
emony a small reception was 
held at the home of the bride's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. | Newton 
Marshall, Mrs. McKeown, moth- 
er of the groom, receiving with 
Mrs. Marshall. After a short 
motor trip, the happy couple will 
reside in Toronto. 




DORIS ROSS BRIDE 

OF DAVID BROOKS 



Wychwood Church Vows and 
Gray Gables Tea 



i 



Wychwood Presbyterian 
Church, Toronto, was decorated 
with standards of white and 
fuchsia gladioli for the marriage 
of .Miss Deris Isabelle Ross, 
daughter of Mrs. Ross and the 
late Stronarh Ross, Cannington. 

to Mr. David Dclos Brooks, Port 
Carting, son of the late Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest Brooks of Newmar- 
ket. Rev. John Lindsay of Whit- 
by officiated, and Miss Sheila 
Stewart played the wedding 
music. I 

Given in marriage by her 
mother, the bride wore a gown of 
antique faille taffeta, with leg-o'- 
mutton sleeve and full sweeping 
skirt. Her embroidered net veil 
fell from a halo of orange blos- 
soms, and she carried white 
roses. Miss Alice Ross was her 
sister's attendant, wearing fresco 
rose taffeta, with fusehia velvet 
hat, and carrying fuchsia gladioli. 
Mr. Robert Brooks of Newmar- 
ket was groomsman, and Mr. 
Thomas Watts of Newmarket 
was usher. 

After a reception at Gray 
Gables, Mr. and Mrs. Brooks left 
on a wedding trip, and will live 
in Port Carling on their return. 



THELMA PRICE IS WED IN 

SAME CHURCH AS PARENTS 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO 



1^3 




o 



nee 



Aqatit 



we offer the ladies of 
Newmarket the very latest 
in permanent waves. 

The New Creme Wave 
lotion contains no ammonia, 
no borax, no alkalis. Given 
with or without machines. 

An exceptionally fine Per- 
manent Wave, especially 
suited for line and baby 
fine hair. Leaves the hair 
soft and shiny. 

Call or phone, and ask us 
about this new wave. 

SPECIALLY PRICED 
AT $5.50 






THOMPSONS 

BEAUTY SALON 

Member of T.L.H.A. 
6 Main St. Phone 284-W 



V- *.»••* .^jil* *«W> 



f^*^«*^.*y»-rf>fc* ^« ■■^ILll^^^J 



Bronze and blue autumn flow- 
ers formed a lovely setting in St. 
Paul's Anglican Church, last 
Saturday afternoon for the mar- 
riage of Thelma Louise Price, 
elder daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harper Price to Albert William 
(Bert) Coles, only son of Mr. W. 
Coles and the late Mrs. Coles of 
Toronto. j 

Rev. A. J. PaLstone, the rector, 
officiated. Mrs. J. O. 1 Utile 

played the wedding music, and 
Mr. Lome Price, cousin of the 
bride, sang "Still As Ihej Nieht" 
before the bridal parly entered 
the church, and "ItwauSf" dur- 
ing the signing of the register. 

The bride, given in marriage 
by her father, 4 wore a gown of 
lieavenlv blue mousseline d*» soii* 
over taffeta, lace jacket buttoned 
from the neck to waist and a full 
skirt. Her lace hood was held in 
place by roses and swansonia. 
She carried an arm bouquet of 
sweetheart roses and swansonia. 

The bride was attended by her 
only sister. Miss Eileen -Price. 
who was gowned in dusky rose 
georgette over taffeta, shirred 
jacket, and wearing a large black 
velvet off-tuc-face hat. and car- 
ried a colonial bouquet. Mr. 
John French attended the groom. 
Mr. Harry Price, brother of the 
bride, and Air. Herbert Dunham 

acted as ushers. 

At the reception held at the 
home of the bride's parents, the 
bride's mother received wearing 
a blue printed crepe frock, black 
accessories, and a corsage of red 
roses, while Mrs. Coles wore a 
soldier blue wool dress and a cor- 
sage of cream roses. ! 

The happy couple left for a 
wedding trip to Northern On- 
tario, the bride travelling in a 
grey dressmaker suit, burgundy 
accessories and blue coat. On 
their return Mr. and Mrs. Coles 
will live in Toronto. • 



i 







Fall Coats, { 
Dresses, 



Sweaters, 



Etc. 



and accessories 
for all ages 



at 




$ 



I Main St., Neiomacket 



i 



Phone 222 ! 




AT HOME 
Mr. and Mrs. William Thomp- 
son, Belhaven, will be At Home. 
to their friends Sunday afternoon 
October »ith. frewn 3 to 5.30 p.m., 
on the occasion of their Diamond 
Wedding anniversary. 



MISCELLANEOUS SHOWER 

A miscellaneous shower was 
given at the home of Mrs. Harold 
Gordon, Gorhum Street, on Tues- 
day evening, by Mrs. Gordon, 
Miss Bertha Winkworth and Mrs. 
Park, in honour of Miss Violet 
Lovelock, a bride-to-be. 

The rooms were attractively 
decorated in pink and while, and 
Miss Lovelock was seated under 
a large white bell in the archway. 
About 25 guests were present 
and many lovely gifts were re- 
ceived. A delightful evening 
was spent playing bingo, Chinese 
checkers and cards, after which 
a dainty luncheon was served. 



Office and factory forms of the 
Davis Leather Co., Dixon Pencil 
Co., and the Dorland-Bendcr 
Casket Co.. are printed by The 
Express-Herald. 



4 « 

Ladies Attention! 

If there is SEBORROHEA or 

Dandruff on the scalp . . . 
If the HAIR is thin and fall- 
ing out, or . . . 
If the Hair has become dull 

and lifeless . . . 

This can be corrected by 
Treatments 

For these conditions 
CALL 335 - MRS. ROLPH 

NEWMARKET 
BEAUTY SHOPPE 



e 



&M- /^ r©m raw 





rfas**?S£5 







CIAI 



NEW PYJAMAS 

Flannelette and Silk — Ladies' and Children's 

LADIES' AND MISSES' SNUGG1ES 
.Moody and Tiiriibull Brand. Prices ranging from 20c to S1.2f>. 

CHENILLES BED SPREADS 

Largest Size. Very beautiful patterns and shades. 

NEW STOCK OF LACE TABLE COVERS 
Unfadeablc Chintz and Shadow Cloths. 



Full Size 



SATIN SPREADS 



S3. 85 each 



The Express-Herald advocated 
the Old Boys' Reunion of UKtt. 
and hopes to advocate another 
such event in HMI. 



D & A \WsETS, GIRDLES — ELASTIC AND SATIN 

NU-BACK 

Will not ride up — §3.95, $5.00 and up. 

Fancy Plaids and Plain WOOLCOT BLANKETS 

Hose, Gold, .Mauve, Blue. 



OPEN EVERY WEDNESDAY 




□ 




u Lti 




"The Ladies' Store" 
Main Street - Newmarket 



**-^i^^g 




DO YOU SUFFER 
WITH NERVES? 

Many have found relief 
through 

CHIROPRACTIC ADJUST- 
MENTS AND ELECTRIC 
TREATMENTS. 

CONSULTATION ■ FREE 



J. E. GOWLAND DC . 

Chiropractor and 
Drugless Therapist 

19 Park Ave. Newmarket 

PHONE 350 

Every dav BUT Wedno 



*T 



MARRIAGES 

' BROOKS-ROSS — At Wych- 
wood Presbyterian Churchy Tor- 
onto, on Saturday, September 28, 
Miss Doris Isabelle Ross, daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Ross and the late 
Stronach Ross, Canningtoii, to 
Mr. David Delos Brooks,: Port 
Carling, son of the late Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest Brooks of Newmar 
ket p Rev. John Lindsay of Whit 

by ofllciating. 

• • • • 

WOODCOCK -HARDEN — At 

Newmarket on Saturday, Sep- 
tember 28, by the Rev. Burton 
Hill, Alice Ida, eldest daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Zebedee Harden, 
to Kenneth Hugh Woodcock, eld- 
est son of Mr. and Mrs. Joel 
Woodcock, of Newmarket. 

HUGHES-GOULD — At New- 
market on Friday, September 27, 
by the Rev. Arthur Greer, Mary 
Helen Evelyn, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. W. J. Gould of Glen- 
ville, to Mr. Thomas Russel 
Hughes, son of the late Mr. and 
Mrs. W. J. Hughes, of Ne\ -mar- 
ket. 

• • « • 

COLLS-PRICE— At St. Paul's 
Anglican Church, by the Rev. A. 
J. Patstone on Saturday, ' Sept. 
28, Thelma Louise, elder daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Harper P.rice, 
Newmarket, to Albert William 
(Bert) Coles, only son of Mr. W. 
Coles and the late Mrs. Coles of 
Toronto. 




CELAK 




SEAL" 



Price $23 




FOR DOWNRIGHT LUXURY, 
COMBINING WARMTH AND 
YOUT H F ULNKSS, AND 
STILL WITHIN MODERATE 
REACH, WE SUGGEST RICE 
LAKE HUDSON SEAL. THIS 
IS THE ONE COAT SUIT- 
ABLE FOR EVERY OCCAS- 
ION. A COAT WHICH WILL 
LAST FOR YEARS, ALWAYS 
MAINTAINING ITS 'SMART 
APPEARANCE. CUS T O M 
MADE AT NO EXTRA COST 
AND WITH OUR BUDGE?* 
PLAN AVAILABLE. IF 
DESIRED. 



707 VOnDE STREET 



■1 






i 



THE EXPRESS-HERALD, NEWMARKET, ONT., THURSDAY. OCTOBER 3, 1940 1940 




3,000 COAT HANGERS FOR THE MEN AT 

THE MILITARY CAMP 

You will have a number around the house that have come with 

clothes from the cleaners. 

KINDLY LEAVE AT THE 

EXPRESS-HERALD OFFICE 



>V 



^X#r**W^(^ 



H _TtiL!??^-?^*^'^ v *>*^^ y ^l 



6LENVILLE 



Mr. and Mrs. William Gould 
and family visited in Mackville 
on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Jones and 
Donald spent the weekend in 
Owen Sound with Mr. and Airs. 
A. Jones. 

Mr, and Mrs. Cecil Wray had 
dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Jeff- 
erson on Sunday. 

Mrs. Jim Webster has returned 
after having spent -a few days 
with Mr. and Mrs. Orser in 
Barric. 

Mrs. William Keffer has re- 
turned home after spending: a 
couple of weeks visiting her 
family in Toronto. 



Mr. and Mrs. John Crispin, 
Mrs. Clarence Croker, Mrs. 
Charles Crokcr and Miss Carol- 
ine Crispin of Windsor attended 
the funeral of Mr. James Somer- 
ville on Thursday last.. 

The W.A. held a special quitt- 
ing at Mrs. Fred Webster's on 
Wednesday afternoon. 

Mrs. Errol Gould and Miss 
Loreen Keffer entertained a few- 
friends on their birthday oh 
Monday evening. 

Mrs. Fred Webster spent Fri- 
day visiting in Newmarket with 
her sister-in-law, Mrs. Thomp- 
son, and Mr. and Mrs. Wellington 
Curtiss. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gartshorc and 
family of Sharon, and Mr. 
Mrs. Ernest DeaviM And fanvlv 
of Newmarket were Sundav 



SHARON 



.Mr. Ross Fountain of Kirkland 
Lake, spent a few days with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. Foun- 
tain. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Parker of 

Toronto, visited Mr. and Mrs, Jas. 

Parker on Saturday. Mr. and 

Mrs. Lickley, also of Toronto, 

visited Mr. and Mrs. Parker on 

Sunday. 

-■ 

Mr. and Airs. Edgar Francis 
and Mr. Jackson Francis of Can- 
ningfon, Mr. and Mrs. Jarvis, 
Keith and Pearson, and Mr. Ken- 
neth Shaw, all of Toronto, visited 
Mr. and Mrs. Afan Shaw on Sun- 
day. 

air.' and Mrs. Brown entertain- 
ed friends from Hanover, Ont, 
on Sunday. 

Anniversary services at Sharon 
United Church will be held on 
Sunday, October 20th. Further 
particulars next week. The usual 
Sunday service will be held this 
Sunday at 7.30 p.m. Sunday 
School at 10 a.m. Everyone wel- 
come at both services. 

Mrs. Alan Shaw, Mrs. R. Shaw 
and Miss Nora Shaw visited Mrs. 
John Moore in Mount Albert 
last Thursday. 

Mrs. John Gray entertained a 
i ! number of Aurora ladies at a 
< mi bridge-supper at Shar-A-Xook on 



Mr. and .Airs. Fred Webster, 
ami Mr. and .Mrs. Gordon Web- rvisitors with their parents, Sir. 
stcr and Jean were Sunday vis- ind Mrs. William Deavitl. 



flora at Mr. am} Mrs. Herb. 
Webster's. 
Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Doan 

railed on friends at Bond Head 
on Sunday. 

Mr. and Mns. Tom Modems of 
Sand ford visited their daughter, 
Mrs. Lcn Milne, on Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Flanagan and 
family of Toronto spent Sunday 
at Fred Webster's. 



HOLLAND LANDING 



The Holland Landing Church 



Friday last. 

Mrs. Frederick Johnson, Mrs. 
Don 'Id John on and Mrs. Ross 
Johnson, Wcstmount. Que., were 
Sunday fines Is of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thr*s Collins. 

The management of Mount 

rV!fc**t II- H are living the entire 

proceeds of a dag?! to H " held on 

will .?vm-ne* **~ir meet- 1 Friday, Octcbvr Illi, to the East 

m-s opening with a ra*&il on i^wWI— Jmitv Red Cross. The pro- 

Thurrtlay, October 10. it 7.30 S.T cceds will be used for Xmas boxes 

A?c limit 14 years and over. AM for our men overseas. Plan to at- 

•n-ina nron'e r>ni adults v-i»lrom* tend this dance. 



f 'ui!:! 






r~:a 




of 



Scott McHale and Slate 



r 





>; - 



JUST ARRIVED 




. . Featuring . . 





Military plan toes and the famous 

e - Shoe Maker Finish 
Brogue Shoe 



Spad 



Prices 

ranging 

from 




SO 



to 




Come in and inspect these outstanding shoes form 



en 




MEN'S WEAR 

Largest Exclusive Men's Wear Store in North York 



Phone 158 



63 Main St. 




Newmarket 



'*-' %.v_ 



Q 



;«>.*;, 



* !V\ ?. 



-•-**. 



'■* J 



r-oc 



;<?- 



- • *" 















*V^ - 



. -_ — •* 



'' .^^-r^^: 



m 



. - y *_ 



- ■:.«. 



:* : - . * 



, *; f- - 



i' 



- - - ••-: 



Di 



- /- J j.-;p4'4 ^i>***r-< \s^^ -4 ' ■■■- 



J* 






-i o 



= >*»^/ 






» c 



■«'-*' . 



<.' 



- - * A " 



- -- •*■*! :^ 



v. 



*/j 



IT 



¥^'V -•- 






«»■. - 



M 



- *! 



- M 






m 






^-t-i 



1 ■>, •-- - 



^8 



*&mK 



N* •*. 



>B«*. 



r /-yv 



ff*-' 



''- 



y^^r-^y 






•^*-, 



wm% : 



■ y y > 



im;g 



*^':Vi - 



j -:i. 'vr" 



>-r 



'»^v- 



1 



'^-Vrt 



^''-^. , - "_'_*- -'j 



aj:*; 



./. 



■■':> 



r^,'..mm* 



'•-;>»> 



A BIG NEW STYLE IDEM 

Ihrf h«m.« .w* OST , 



gtmef/* 



SMEST CAR EVER Willi 



M HO EXTRA 



©no 



b»ow« 






if olirt 



VAIUE WITHOUT EQUAll 



» • 






Hudson Offers Fine Automobile* in Every Popular Prlco Class ; ; ; AT NEW PRICES STARTING 
AMONG CANADA'S LOWEST ... New Hudson Six and Super-Six (In the low price field)- 
New Hudson Commodore Six and Eight (in the moderate price field). MORE CAR for LESS 
1 ' j MONEY in Every Popular Price Class 



Right now, ai the nearest Hudson show- 
room, you can be one of the first to sec 
the \<Jii style sensation . ; ; Hudson's 
Symphonic Styling. 

Symphonic Styling is at notable ex- 
ample of engineering leadership which 
has made Hudson responsible for some 
of the most important advancements in 



the history of the automobile industry. 
This same engineering leadership makes 
these 19^1 Hudsons the safest cars ever 
built . . . and the year's best investment 
in all-around VALUE. 

Before you choose your new car, come 
in . . . discover how much more your 
money will buy in a I'M I Hudson! 







Phone 599 



6 Water 



St. , 



N 



ewmar 



ket 




JUDGMENT RESERV- 
ED ON LIQUOR 
.. • CHARGE 



Continued from Page 1, Col. 1 



I 






Magistrate Woodliffe bound 
both Mrs. Widdifield and Mrs. 
Pipher over in the sum of $50, 
to keep the peace for one year. 

A charge of swearing arising 
out of the same case against Paul 
Bennitz was dismissed. 

.Mrs. Pipher, the complainant, 
testified that after the trouble 
with Mrs. Widdifield was ovcr< 
and she was going home, her 
daughter called to her that she 
was wanted. The accused came 
up to her swearing, and told her 
to leave her hands off his 
daughter. 

Mr. Bennitz denied swearing, 
but stated that he merely warn- 
ed the woman to leave his daugh- 
ter alone. When an older 
daughter of Mrs. Pipher's, who 
was standing with a three- 
months-old baby in her arms, 
asked her mother to go home, 
Mrs. Pipher struck her across the 
face. 

••When she called me a fool, I 
hit her a little slap," admitted 
the complainant. 

Eleven-year-old Margaret 
Swan was the <mly witness call- 
ed. "1 was just going home and 
heard the racket and savs to my- 
self 'What's going on?' and went 
;lown to see," testified Margaret; 

She stated that she didn't hear 
any swearing. . 

Harry Kitchen of Schomberg, 
charged by Constable Flctiry with 
driving while intoxicated and 
careless driving, and charged by- 
Constable Gus. Farquhar with if-' 
legal possession, pleaded not! 
guilty at Newmarket Police ! 
Court on Tuesday. j 

"On Monday, Sept. 16th, from 
information received, I went to 
Schomberg about 6.40 p.m., tes- 
tified Constable Fleury. "About! 
9.40 p.m. I saw a ear proceeding 
south on Main Street of Schom- 
berg, wavering a bit. I called the 
driver by name and told him to 
stop, and he stepped on the gas 
and pulled ijito the laneway. I 
jumped on the right side of* the' 
car and took the keys out. Kit- 
chen got out and leaned up a-« 
gainst the car. On the front seat i 
of the car I found a part bottle 
of liquor. 1 noticed alcohol on 
his breath and he was in no con- 
dition to drive a car. I took him 
to Aurora to be examined and by 
the time we got to the doctor, 
which was three-quarters of an 
hour later, some of his intoxica- 
tion had disappeared. Constable 
Farquhar was with me at the 
time." 

"That is a bad laneway he 
turned into? asked defence coun- 
sel W. I). Horkins of Toronto. 

"Yes." 

"And he didn't bump into any- 
thing going in?" ? 

"No." 

"Hut yon did?" 

"No, that was going out." 

"Then he made a better job of 
it than you did." 

"Did it occur to you to have [ 
him examined by a doctor in 
Schomberg?" j I 

"He's pretty well known there." | 

Constable Farquhar gave the 
same evidence as Constable 
Fleury and swore that Kitchen 
was under the influence of liquor/ 
He said that he suggested not 
taking Kitchen to the home 
doctors because he didn't believe 
they would care, to have the job. 

"The accused was brought to - 
my oflice between 10.30 and 10.45," 
testified Dr. Williams. "I tested; 
his powers of co-ordination. He 
had the odour of alcohol on his 
breath and admitted drinking. 
His power of co-ordination was 
not bad. He walked fairly well.! 
There was no particular slur on 
his speech. He answered the 
questions I asked him fairly well. 
In my opinion he was under the 
influence of alcohol, and alcohol 
and gasoline do not mix. When a 
person is under the influence of 
liquor he should not drive a car." 

Kitchen stated that there was 
considerable play in the steering 
wheel which might cause the ear 
to waver. He had just had about 
an ounce and a half of liquor and 
was not intoxicated. He had also 
had a couple of pints of beer in 
the morning. 

"Did your wife try to stop you 
from going?" asked Crown At- 
torney Mathews. 

"No," replied accused. 

"Didn't she tell you that yon 
were in no condition to take the 
car out?" 

"No, not then. She might have 
in the morning." 
(Continued on Page 7, Col. 5) 



j 




IN QUALITY FOOTWEAR FOB ALL THE FAMILY 



ivc pi 
>od U 
minute shoes for everyone. 



Indicative of the new FaU Season— in style and quality— U PoHock's neigh- 
bourhood family shoe stores now present exceptional values in up-to-the- 



MA& 



i 



HEALTH SHOES 




9 Built-in Arch 

O Combination 
Fitting 

Dress Heels 

n 

OXFOKUS 
1' UMPS 



Width 

A 

to 



Smart Fall Footwear 




Bright Fall days, with a Ung in the air — 
call for snap and rhtc in footwear — and 
here's the wry thin* In the finest selection 
of styles you've ever seen — Charmers. 
Cin-Der-F.Ias. Wedcees and such popular 
lines popularly priofd. 



This pomilur line, | exclusive 
wirii pollack's, offers the un- 
usually attractive combination 
of quality, fashionable styling 
and true-comfort fitting — In 
a modern priced shoe. 





POLLOCK'S KCONOMV 

increasingly popular 

economically 
priced at 



POLLOCK'S BON-TON 
Extra Quality — Itc.il 
value. Uig variety 
at . Pr. 



SAVK 



59* 

YOUR HOKIKKY COUPONS 



69< 



iris' Full 



Fur scliuul ur Street wear. 

brown calf leathers— very' 
able, also saddle shoes 
in combination leathers. 
Kangc of sizes. Prteed 
at 



■ i • 






HF.WESTON'S 

uuuv 



Comfort, service and low 
price mark these good-look- 
lns Oxfords. They come in 
sturdy brown or gunmetat 
all-leather with ruboer heels, 
for women, growing elrls or 
bo>s and n no 

children <u*v?0 



up 



POLLOCK'S 'ARCHMASTER' 
SHOES for NURSES 

In bl.uK ur while kid leath.r>, with 
flexible Goodyeat welt soles, con- 
structive arch 
aci d walking 

heel. Comfort 
genuinely insur- 
ed. Tops In 
ifuallty. Priced 





MEN 



Sismau's Thoro-llilt — be»t 
that money can buy in this 
Cites of boot. Priced ... 

Other Sism.tn Hues arx; 
[■rued from 

POLLOCK'S Kconomv with 



4 




Panco soic% t at 

Leather 



* . - i .I 




2.98 
1.98 
2.48 



HEWESTON'S 




SHOE 

In women's, growing girls' 
or children's sizes — fitted 
with or without o oO 



tap plates 



u| 



ECONOMY 



Greatest value anywhere 
In giKid looking, stout 
wearing inea's oxfords. 

■ 

at 
BOYS' BOOTS 

Sturdy, reinf'ireed lea- 
ther boots for boys. 

1.98 




In SHMS 

11 - 5!~. at 



Boys' OXFORDS 

In snappy lasts and 
quality leath- -I Ho 
ers, 11-13!£ ItOO 
Sizes I'-sti .... 1,68 




Quality SSI 





Complete nnjre tt 
sixes la the new 
Kail lasts and 

sturdy brogues. 



LONG WEAK 1-78 1.98 

See Them Kilted. We also carry 
a compl-t.' Une of Jack & JUl 
Shoes. 

STRAPS and OXFORDS 

A great selection of well-built, 
properly fitted shoes at "| .jo 
this k>w price of JU*iO 

MISSES' IWTENTJ 

Pumps aud Tte«; Ideal 
shoes! Sixes 11 • Z. 
SpeeUUy priced at ... 



dress 



1,58 



PRKBf A glider U given 
each pair of school shoe*. 



wIUi 







NEWMARKET 3 

SAVE OUR COUPONS— TIIKY'KK JUST IJKIi CASH 

I I 




:....' 



'• ■• " I 



WAR WORK OF WO- 
MEN'S INSTITUTE 
REVIEWED 



(Continued from Tape 1, Col. 7) 



(he knowledge .she has gathered 
to her fellow members. 

In Ontario alone, there are 
over 73,000 members, living their 
motto "For Home and Country." 
The following is the war time 
activity report of the Ontario 
Women's Institute for the first 
four months of the year 1910. 

Report 
Activities reported by Insti- 
tutes, January to April, 1940, 
follow: 

No. of Institutes in Ontario 1,374 
No. of Institutes reporting 048 
Of these, 470 are working en- 
tirely for the Red Cross Society, 
57 have established their own 
War Charities Fund, 11 are sup- 
porting the Salvation Army and 
several aro supporting local pat- 
riotic organi/atioas. 

Money raised $11,022.10 

Expenditures 

Supplies 3,092.98 

Red Cross Society ' 4,182.93 
F.W.I.O. Cent'al Fund 262.9G 
Salvation Army 411.40 



17,188 

2,679 

2,072 

2,879 

147 

290 

45 

1G 

200 

2 

3,473 

1,786 

373 

132 

204 



^ ■ *■* tii 



ivj ■■*■#■ y 



Other organizations 



KNITTING 

Socks (prs.) ,.... 

Sweaters 

Scarves 

Wristlets (prs.) 

Helmets 

Knee Caps (prs.) 
Seamen's Stockings (prsj) 
Gloves (prs.) 
Wash cloths . 
Afghans 

SEWING 
Pyjamas 

Hospital gowns ..., 

lied jackets 

Dressing gowns ... 
Surgeons' gowns .. 
Surgeons' caps 
Pneumonia jackets 

Masks 

Pillow cases 

Sheets 

Quilts 

Bedding . 
.Mattress pacts 
Hampton pads 

Towels 

Bed socks 

Water bottle covers, etc.!.. 

Bedpan covers Ll 

Bandages L 

Surgical dressings 

Hospital shirts L 

Personal property bags 

Handkerchiefs 

Wash cloths 

Refugee garments L 

The Newmarket branch holds 
a charter from the Federal Gov- 
ernment, authorizing it | to raise 
funds under the War Charities 
Act. By dint of hard work this 
branch has raised $221.40. 

In order to raise this fund, the 
members ran a Fall Fair last 
year, catered for several ban- 
quets, held teas, and demonstra- 
tions, and received a few dona- 
tions, one of them being: a gift 
from the local branch of j the Red 
Cross Society of six pairs mitt- 
ens, six helmets and seventeen 



II be more 
In prepar- 



1 * t * W * * ' 



' - -• t*i 



* t * • ■ 



The following is a report for lifebuoy soap, razor blades, pipes 
your approval of the years work shoe laces, stationery! handker- 
of the War Work Committee. chiefs, and knitted go<[cts, sutjh as 

125 prs. sox, 24 sweaters, 17 sox. sweaters:, helm?-!.4, wiisUcts. 
wristlets, 13 helmets, 11 prs. Now that cold weaihetf is at hand' 
mittens. These have all been more sweater?, helmets and mills 
distributed amongst our local will go forward. ] j I 

boys in the army overseas. | In .May 17 boxes were shipped. 

Six sailors' scarfs donated to in June 15 boxes (two hoys' re- 
the Salvation Army to assist with turned), in August 21 boxes, in 
their work in the navy. I September 29 boxes. 

One bale sent to the Red Cross Each month there w 

headquarters in Toronto, consist- ' boxes to be shipped. 

ing of 3G prs. pillow eases, 12 ab- . alion for this the women of the 

dominal bands, 16 triangle band- Institute are holding a large fair 

ages, 19 ice bag covers, 19 hos- in the .Market House October 17- 

pital gowns and a donation- of You are all asked to] keep this 

93! $25 to the local Red Cross branch date in mind, and you arc also 

1,031 ! The majority of the Institute cordially invited to attend at 2 

176 members arc also paid members p.m., when the doors will be open 

2,783 of the Red Cross Society. I for business. j 

ssssss sss.OsO 42twen ly-fivemS/sj There will be many useful and. 

One of the responsibilities the ; necessary articles for sale, as 
Institute has taken upon itself; well as a general market booth, 
for the duration of the war, is to run by the rural members, 
work j^ conjunction with, the Practically all foodstuff either 
Veterans, and see that one box, grown or raised on the farm will 
per month is packed and ship* be offered for sale. As the supply 
ped to each local boy serving^ w iH be limited, it will be well to 
overseas. (This work is similar market early. Euchre will be 
to the Field Comforts of the last piaved in the evening at 8 p.m. 
war). 



i 



284 
528 
11 
771 
137 
014 
100 
881 
131 

5,171 
400 
127 
391 

2,359 
77 

1.951 



»t 



407.05 i pairs of sox. 



The Veterans supply all the 



There will be a gift shop and 
a very fine display of Inndcraft. 
contents of the boxes, except** the! Some of these pieces will be for 
knitted goods. The Institute- sale, some will not. Do make a 
women have undertaken to see j point to see the handcraft, it 
that all the boxes are nacked, promises to bo most interesting, 
taped, sewn up in factory cotton | a* 3 n.m. Mrs. II. M. Aifken. 
labelled and addresses waxed forj f (j, e Cooking School jof the Air 
shlument, so that water will not j fame, will be with uJ She will 
obliterate the name. ; speak" to the afternoon tea guests. 

For variety sake and with the "(reserve your table) on a subject 
hope of a pleasant surprise to the of great interest to all women, 
boys, each month the box is >y rs ' t >i ? .r;« Lyons Draper and 
made up slightly different. j f IC r Glee Club will, entertain 

This is a sample of the con-; with several musir^l selections at 



the tea hour, upon the conclusion 
of Mrs. Aitken's address. 

I 



tents of an overseas box as ship- 
ped jointly by the veterans and 
Institute women, 

1 lb. canned butter, 1 can to- 
mato juice. 1 can peaches, choc- .Letters from our bovs overseas 
olate or chocolate syrup, cheese - :-, the Express-Herald 

wafers, meat sandwich spread, each week. 



r 



. I 



V - « 



- \ . 






I . 



t - ^ 






THE KXFRESS-HERALD, HB ^MARKET, ONT. THURSDAY. OCTOBER 3. 1940 1940 



— 




SYE 
CHAPPELLE 

Purchaser of H. Blair 
buoineon 



.6 



PROMPT DELIVERY 



on 



GASOLINE 

f COAL OIL 

FUEL OIL 

and 
MOTOR OILS 

Phone 202 j 3 




NEWS FROM KING CITY 

AND DISTRICT 



Honourable Angus Iv. Macdonald. 

.Minister of National Defence for 

Naval Affairs. 



Letters from our boys overseas 
appear in the Ex press-Herald 
e.uh week. 



CHANGE OF TIME TABLE 



EFFECTIVE SINDAY. OCTOBER 6TH 

LEAVE TORONTO 
Standard Time) 



LEAVE NEW .MARKET 

(Eastern 



aG.25 


al0.45 


3.35 - a6.10 al2.25 


d4.20 


ixlAO 


V.M. 


6.05 7.30 12.55 


D.00 


S.35 


12.10 

2.00 


8.10 -. alO.OO 2.05 


».40 

10.00 




a daily except Sun. & Hoi.; b— Sun. & Hoi. only; 






e — Sa t. 
Co pic 


only; d — daily except Sat.. Sun. & Hoi. 






•s of the new time tables are available 








at all offices and agencies. 





Tickets and Information at 



KING GEORGE HOTEL 



PHONE 
300 





Annual fall Sale 

of — 

Fa a a 
mwshm 





PER QUART 



Sovereign Quick Drying Enamel 
Sovereign Floor Enamel Sovereign Velvet Finish 

Sovereign Mouse Paint 

Sovereign Flat Wall Paint 

Sovereign Varnish Stain and Clear Varnish 

Manufatured by- Canada Varnish Company Limited 
Loasldo, Toronto, Canada 




mSih 




Phone 39 



88 Main St. 




Miss Helen Ross Is progressing 
following an operation at Western 
Hospital. 

.Mr. and Mrs. John Waldon and 
family of Guelph, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. C. Cighlfoot. Mrs, Earl Thomp- 
son of Toronto, visited at W- 
RoHtng's on Sunday. 

Mrs. S. MeVittle of Toronto. Is 
visiting: Miss Tinline. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Willis. Mrs. 
G. II. Stone and Mrs. Thos. Proc- 
tor spent a recent week-end at 
Sudbury and Levach. Mrs. Stone 
visited her sister. Mrs. Campbell, 
3t Sudbury, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Willis visited their nephew. Mr. 
Bruce Palton at Levack. They 
report a very pleasant trip. 

Mrs. Silk has removed to her 
own house, which has been 
greatly improved. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dent have 
moved into the Leece house. Mrs. 
C. Campbell is occupying Clark 
Archibald's house. The Archi- 
bald's will live in Toronto dur- 
ing the winter months, where 
Clark has employment. 

King Women's Institute are 
visiting Vellore W.I. this week. 
On Oct. 8 King W.I. will cele- 
brate its first birthday in Mc- 
Donald and Wells Hall, at S p.m. 

Master Harvey Gass of Toronto 
who spent several summer weeks 
with his aunt, airs. A. McClure. 
left recently for the West, where 
he will live with his grandmoth- 
er. Mrs. Harvey Wells. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Campbell 

are visiting in (he Canadian West 
Privates Jack Ball and Leslie 
Kerr of the Toronto Scottish Re- 
giment, leave for Three Rivers. 
Quebec, for training. Eversley 
wishes" them good luck. 

Woodbridge, Kleinburg, Noble- 
ton, motorcycle course for Re- 
liability Trials proved an ideal 
39 miles when the British Em- 
pire Motor Club swept along 
sideroads to the tune and hum 
of the cycle speedsters. 

It was an ideal day for Schom- 
berg Fall Fair on Saturday and 
the attendance was good consid- 
ering the harvesting season. 
Many of the exhibits were fewer 
in numbers, but the type was 
excellent. The children's classes 
were doubled over last year, with 
more variety and interest dis- 
played. 

Thirteen from Kversley Mis- 

! sion Band attended the Rally at 
Willowdale on Saturday last. 
They contributed three numbers. 
*o a 5 very line program. June 
Mesley gave a reading. Joyce 

1 Ilately a piano solo and the band 
a hvmit chorus. In the fall of 
1911 the sectional M. B. rally will 
be held at Kversley. 

On October IS, Kversley 
W.M.S. will hold its annual rally 

I visitors from sectional auxiliaries 

• to attend. Also several from 

Toronto I'resby terial executive. 
Rev. Mr. McLean and Mrs. Me- 

! Lean from Willowdale. and Mrs. 
Goldwin Smith of Toronto will 
be speakers. Others contribut- 
ing will be Mrs. Hall, Presbyter* 
ial president; Mrs. Hugh Fergus- 
on. L. M. secretary: Mrs. Woods. 
Mrs. Anderson, visiting auxiliar- 
ies will give a number each. ' All 
are welcome to join the group. 



; 



The fall training school will 
be held at Aurora United Church 
Oct. Z to Nov. 6, each Wednesday 
evening. Inclusive. 7.45 p.m. S.T. 
Those Interested in Young 
Pedple's work, those interested 
in the personal business of living 
the full Christian life, are urged 
to attend the classes.' Program 
outline. "Youth Action and Per- 
sonal Religious Living, Rev. Mr. 
Stewart; "Worship Committee In 
Action/' Rev. W. A. Wescott; 
"Shaping the Future." Rev. Dr. 

E. J. Thompson; "Youth and Cit- 
izenship," Rev. W. J. Burton; 
"The Art of Glorious Living/' 
Jean Middleton; "Building Young 
People's Programs." Vera Hunt- 
er. On October Z .Murray Hunt- 
ley will speak on "New Y.P.I'. 
Hymnal." and on October 9. Rev. 
Gordon Lapp will give an ad- 
dress. 

Rev. P. W. Roberts and Mrs. 
Roberts of Colborne were wel- 
come guests at AH Saints' 
Church on Sunday, when Mr. 
Roberts preached in the evening, 
the day of Harvest Home Thanks 
giving. The Roberts were enter- 
tained by Mr. and Mrs. Crawford 
Wells. 

Rev. A. C. McCallum of York 
Mills, and his choir will lead in 
Harvest Thanksgiving services ai 
St. John's Church. *Oak Ridges, 
on Thursday, Oct. 3, and on Sun- 
day morning Rev. C F. Heath- 

cote of Palmerston will be the 
speaker at the Thanksgiving ser- 
vice. 

Captain McLean, Chaplain at 
Camp Borden, addressed King 

Anglican W.A. at Miss Bur- 
rough's last week. 

Strange W.M.S. will be held at 
the home of Mrs. J. S. Lawsori 
on October 9th. 

- Mr. Elwood Patton-has reurned 
from Winnipeg and expects to 
be placed at Malton airport. 

Mr. and Airs. J. Walsh have re- 
turned home from an extensive 
honeymoon trip through Mani- 
toulin Island, North Bay and 
many other interesting points. 
They will celebrate a wedding 
anniversary in October 20, made 
sure of the trip when holidays 
were available. 

The house was decorated with 
mixed autumn flowers. The tea 
table was centred with small 
African marigolds on a liand- 
crochettcd lace cloth. Mrs. Ar- 
thur Caldwell of Shanty Bay, and 
Mrs. Evelyn Mortsoii of Victoria 
S«|iiare poured tea, both after- 
noon and evening. 

Assisting were cousins of the 
bride. Mrs. Donald Bain. Mrs. 
Henry McDonald, Mrs. Clyde 
Cairns. Misses Dorothy and Jean 
Keliey, Mrs. Neall wearing a 
wine dress, received with the 
brl&h who wore blue sheer. Mrs. 

F. Armstrong, Sr., and Mrs. Al- 
bert Keliey assisted. In the 
trousseau rooms were Mrs. Roy 
Neal and Miss Ella Dibbs. 

Mr. and Mrs. Williamson of 
Teston recently celebrated their 
15th wedding anniversary t»y 
taking their parents, Mr. and 
.Mrs. Ed. Bowen. on a motor trip 
through Eastern Ontario. Pres- 
cott way and back through 
Callander. 



Pleasantville 

News and Views of People and Things by Isabel Inglis Colville 







- AT - 

Walnut = View 
endezvous 




Mulock's Corners 




VERY FRIDAY 




ROUND AND SQUARE DANCING 



Music by 

Eddie Gibson's Orchestra 



People 

The teacher of the Bogarttown 
school has asked me to submit 
this plan "Cash for Charities," to 
the Pleasantville and Bogart- 
town readers of this column. 

''The members of the Junior 

Red Cross Of Bogarttown school 
are collecting Camay soap wrap- 
pers, Crisco labels and Chipso 
box tops, and would be glad to 
have any members of the com- 
munity using these products, 
save the labels, wrappers and box 
tops as the Proctor and Gamble 
Co. are offering cash for them, 
the money to be used for charit- 
able purposes. 

Mrs. John McClure spent Sun- 
day with Mrs. George McClure, 
Newmarket. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Starr, 
.Mrs. M. F. Starr, .Miss Huldah 
and Master Stewart Starr attend- 
ed the Friends' quarter!/ meet- 
ing held at Pickering on Satur- 
day and Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Moore and 
Master Robert of Toronto were 



cuts, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Toole, 
over the weekend. 

We are sorry to report that 
Mrs. II. Ostley is ill in hospital 
in Toronto, and extend a wish 
for her speedy recovery. 

Mr. Fleming Young and Mr. 
Albert Ridley took tea at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Leslie 
Harper on Sunday evening. 

Mr. John Irwin of Marksdale 
visited over the weekend at the 
home of Mrs. Gordon McClure. 

Things 
"Giving Pleasure" 

When you are sick and He in 
bed, while dismal thoughts Hit 
through your head, though eyes 
and nose and bones all sore, and 
water from your eyes does pour, 
yet you can conjure up a .smell, 
when friendly deeds your 
thoughts beguile. For to the 

bed where you lie still, with first 
a fever, then a chill, comes such 
a glowing, lovely sight, you feel 
a thrill of real delight, for there's 
a glowing gorgeous mass of 
autumn Mowers, that soon must 




supper guests of Mrs. Gordon j Kg* V. ut ere Uiey nxss v *."?> *\ e 
.McClure on Sunday. 

Miss Florence Tucker of Tor- 
onto, with her mother, Mrs. A. 
Tucker. 

The anniversary services held 
on Sunday at the Pine Orchard 
Union Church, were well attend- 
ed and worth while. In the 
afternoon. Rev. Mr. Simpson of 
Toronto delivered an excellent 
address. The music by the home 
choir, assisted by members of the 
Newmarket Presbyterian choir. 

In the evening the Rev. Burton 
Hill of Newmarket gave a fine 
address, and the music was fur- 
nished by the choir of the White 
Rose church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Harper, 
and Miss Irene Harper and Miss 
June Hill of Newmarket 'were 
dinner guests of Mr. Fleming 
Young, Newmarket, on Thurs- 
day evening, when Miss Irene 
Harper was guest of honor, the 
occasion being her birthday. 

Mrs. R. J. Rogers' of Sharon 
spent Thursday evening with 
Mrs. Douglas McClure. 

A social, sponsored bv -the 
Willing Workers, was held at the 
Pine Orchard Hall on' Monday- 
evening. 

The collectors for the Red 
Cross in this district, report a 
pleasing response to their appeal 
which is as it should be, for who 
can turn a cold shoulder to a 
need so great. 

Mrs. Robert Storey, who has 
been 111 for the past week. Is still 
on the sick list. { "I can't get the collar over the 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Forbes of J mute's head," called back the 
Toronto visited Mrs. Forbes* par- boy; "his ears are frozen." 



left with you a sense of friend- 
ship sweet and true. 

Or maybe its a box of fruit, 
that seems to go right to the 
root of that uncomfortable sen- 
sation, that kills all feeling of 
elation, and makes you wonder. 
If at all, you've left one friend 
great or small. But when the 
peaches, blushing red. and or- 
anges glisten from their bed. 
mid grapes of black and green 
and white, you just can't help but 
feel delight. 

And though your bones may 
ache on still, you feel some back- 
bone in your will, and think that 
maybe some day soon, perhaps 
before another moon, you'll pull 
yourself with might and main 
from the "slough of despond" 
again, and this great miracles 
been wrought because some 
friend or neighbor thought, that 
they would do a kindly deed, 
which is indeed a neighbor's 
creed. And so, the smallest kind- 
ness done, can brighten life just 
like the sun. 



A farmer had a city lad work 
for him. The lad was called one 
winter morning before dawn and 
told to harness the mule. He did 
not light a lantern, and in the 
dark he didn't notice that one of 
the cows was in the stable with 
the mule. The farmer, impatient 
at delay, shouted: "Billy! Billy! 
What are you doing? 



ADVERTISED GOODS 



People know more about 
advertised goods than about 
those that are not advertised. 
If you ask what Is a good 
thing to buy for some need, 
people will usually quote 
some widely advertised arti- 
cle' that everyone has heard 
of. If you ask about some 
competing article that is not 
advertised, they will usually 
say they never heard of It, 
consequently they are not 
likely to buy it. 

People not merely buy the 
advertised goods they have 
heard of. but they are more 
likely to buy at the stores 
that are well advertised. 
These concerns appear con- 
stantly before the public eye 
by their widely read notices. 
A concern gets a big advan- 
tage over its competitors by 
the relatively small expense 
of advertising. 



CANADA'S WAR EFFORT 



Weeklv Review of Developments on the Home Front; Week of 

Sept. 19th-26th. 






Told in Summary 



i 



KESWICK 



last week 
her aunt. 



r me. 



»» 



.^-A^t^^ 



HI 



Miss Helen Smith left 

"i 

for an extended visit to 
at Brandon. Man. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kissick. Mr. and 
Mrs. Slesser and family of Barrie. 
and Mr. Ted. Warriner of Toronto 
were guests on Sunday of Airs. 
R. M. Connell. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Miller and 
Miss A. Foster of Orillia, visited 
at Mrs. Wm. Terry's. 

Miss K. Peel of t h e Western _ 
Hospital, Toronto, W a s at home 
for the week-end. 

We hope for a continuance of 
the glorious October 1st, an ideal 
sunny,' mild fall day. 

Air. and Mrs. Art Pedlar were 
guests of Airs. Thos. Maun on 
Saturday evening. The Pedlar's 
who have sold out here, are mov- 
ing to Toronto in the near future. 

The sale of Mr. Frank Draper's 
household goods Was held on 
Tuesday last. Mr. Draper is going 
to Conniston, near Sudbury, to 
live with his son, Luther. 
Mr. Ted Warriner of Toronto, 
who has been spending his two 
weeks' bank holidays at Mr. Jack 
Smith's, returned to Toronto on 
Monday, 

Mr. and Mrs. Filyer of Ring- 
wood, and Mr. and .Mrs. Kirkland 
of Toronto, were guests at Rev. 
Serrick'.s on Sunday evening and 
attended the Christian Church 
services. 

Mrs. D. V. VaiiNorman has 
been spending a few days at Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. King's before oc- 
cupying her new apartment in 
Newmarket. 

Rev, and Mrs. Serrick and 
Other Christian Church friends 
here attended the Baldwin Ladies* 
Aid Tea at Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Anderson's last Wednesday even- 
ing. 

Mrs. A. Felton of Toronto, isljY/afV? 5/. 
visiting her sister, Mrs. Wm. Da- \ 

vison. 

The Keswick branch of the 
Canadian Red Cross are holding 
their drive for funds this week. 
Please contribute generously. 
The Keswick Red Cross Society 
will hold a business, meeting on 
.Monday evening, October 7lh. in 
the schoolhouse. The meeting 
will begin at 7.30 p.m.. Standard 
Time. All are urged to attend 
this meeting. This is your work. 

On Wednesday evening, Oct. 
9th. the Field Comforts Commit- 
tee of the Keswick Red Cross 
will hold a social evening at the 
Royal Simcoe Hotel. Cards and 
games of all kinds will be played. 
The evening's entertainment will 
begin at 7.30 Standard Time. The 
admission will be a gift suitable 
to put In a soldier's box to be sent 
overseas. 

Next Sunday. October Gth. .Miss 
Collins, student pastor of Bethel 
and Egypt charges of the United 
Church, will occupv (he pulpit of 
Keswick United Church at the 
morning service. Kev. .Mr. Lapp 
will have charge of the evening 
service. 

All services of the United 

Church will be on Standard Time. 
On Sunday. Sept. 29th, the 

morning service of the United 

Church was in charge of the 

Sunday School. The pupils of the 

Sunday School marched Into the 

Church from the Sunday School 

room singing the processional. In 

which the congregation joined. 

The members, of the Sunday 

School and their teachers occu- 
pied the choir seat and sang a 

selection in a very delightful 

manner. Miss Kva Gilroy and 

Miss Muriel Willoughby trained 

the Sunday -School choir. Perry 

Winch, Jr., read the scripture 

lesson. Miss Marian Rye led the 

responsive rtading. Donald and 

Gordon Winch took up the collec- 
tion. The theme of the service 

was the ".Miracle of the Feeding 

of the Five Thousand by the Five 

Loaves and Two Fishes," the gift 

of a small boy. Miss Betty Ma- 
honey told in a very arresting 

way of this miracle a n d other 

miracles of Jesus. Rev. Mr. Lapp 

told the life series of Dr. Robert 
McClure, famous Canadian mis- 
sionary to China, and another 
young man of his acquaintance. 

The Women's Missionary So- 
ciety of the United Church will 
hold their October meeting on 
Thursday afternoon, October 10. 
The time of starting will be 2 
o'clock, Standard Time. Another 
chapter of the Study Hook on Iu- 
dla will be reviewed. 

The Baseball Club met on Mon- 
day night and decided to have 
their annual dance this year. The 
date of the dance will be an- 
nounced later. 

Miss Kathleen Peel of Toronto, 
spent last week-end with her 
parents. 

Mr. and airs. Kenneth Boothby 
attended church here last Sunday. 
Mr. Arnold of Gravenhurst, 
was in town last Sunday, 



1. Canada takes over six of the 
fifty American over-age destroy- 
ers transferred to Great Britain 
in return for the lease of air and 
naval bases. They raise Canada's 
destroyer strength to thirteen 
and will be given names of rivers 
common to both the United 
States and Canada. 
t 2. Canadian forces on active 

service, both home and overseas: 
Army. 161.000; Navy, 11.149; Air 
Force, 26.500. 

3. Daylight saving time inde- 
finitely extended as war meas- 
ure. Purpose: To save electricity. 

4. During the week ended 
September 7th, Munitions and 
Supply Department awarded 1,- 
251 contracts totalling $5,515,317. 

5. Subscriptions to Canada's 
second war loan totalled S342,- 
248.300. Thev exceeded the ob- 
jective by $ 12,248.300. 

6. Organisation of Air Cadet 
Corps announced. New corps 



will operate along lines of army 
cadet corps in schools. Purpose; 
To interest hoys of fifteen to six- 
teen in the Royal Canadian Air 
Force. [ 

7. Justice W. M. Martin. Sask- 
atchewan Appeal Court, appoint- 
ed rentals administrator for the 
Wartime Prices and Trade Board. 

8. Standstill order issued by 
the Wartime Prices and Trade 
Board, pegging house rentals in 
certain designated areas at the 
levels of January 2nd, 1910. In- 
fective on and after October 1st, 
1940. 

9. Commission appointed to ad- 
minister National Unemployment 
Insurance: Chairman, Dr. Joseph 
Slrois, former j chaliiuan Royal 

Commission on Dominion- Pro- 
vincial relations. Members — 
Robert J. Tallon, secretary* 
treasurer. Trades and Labour 
Congress of Canada; Alan M. 
Mitchell. Chairman Robert Mit- 
chell Co., Ltd., Montreal. 



The preacher was reading the 
Scripture when an old lady- 
broke in: "What kind of a Bible 
are you using, parson?" 

"I'm reading from the Revised 
Version." he answered. 

*'IImI" she said, . "The King 
James* Version was good enough 

for St. Paul and it's good enough 
to 



''Would you mind walking the 
other way and not passim* the 
horse?** said a London cabman 
with exaggerated politeness to 
the fat lady who had just paid 
a minimum fare. 

••Why?" she Inquired. 

"Because If he mts what hr'i 

been carrying fir a shilling he'll 

have a fit." — Toronto <il«»hr. 



■ 

Wc are as Close to You 
As Your Phone t 




QUALITY 




AND 




•^r*r^ --■>^Tt 



PHONE 

— foc- 



95 



t i 





FRESH DAILY-. 

Prompt Delivery 
ROSS 

Caradonna 



Choice Quality Meats 
Prompt Delivery 





BUTCHER SHOP 



Newmarket Main St. 



r^v^r,-.ar--- 



Newmarket 



•''AttTrzjg^f^cF;*-**^--'-^*! 




Am ¥©ui Still Pioneering 



? 



T IKK 

J i a ceo 



lo$f houses, iron pumps and outside sanitary 
rommodation are relics of pioneering days. 
They are out-of-date, inconvenient, unhealthy — and 
your family should not have to put up with them. 

Running water under 
pressure enables you to 
replace such antiquated 
arrangements with a 
Modern KMCO Bath- 
room, ami up-to-date 
kitchen and laundry fa- 
cilities. An up-to-date 



BUR0 Waies 
Supply 

System 




will furnish all the water necessary for these home 
improvements and it will also supply running: water 
to barns and other buildings where required. 

The Duro Special System, capacity 250 
gals, per hour, complete with 25 gal. Galvan- 
izedTank and 25 or 60 cycle Motor costs only 



S 86.00 



I*or a lovelv bathroom, as illustrated, the 
EMCO Built-in Bath, Shower, Toilet and 

Lavatory with trimmings costs only $136.00 

(Soil 3nd iron pipe and fittings extra) 

Other Complete Bathroom equipment as 
low as _ .... $ 83.00 

Can be purchased under our 
Easy Payment Plan or the 
Home Improvement Loan Act* 



Why not subscribe to The 
Kxpress-IIerald — It costs but 4c 
a week. 



Another way to keep cookies 
and doughnuts safe from juven- 
ile hands Is to lock them in the 
pantry and hide the key. under! 
the soap on the washstand. 




for sale bv 



RAY 

Phone 28 



JELLEY 

Newmarket 



DURO SPECIAL 

Can alio b* lupplUd for 
Gaiolina Engine oparatton 



, ... —,,- 



2S&£ 



r*^- ^»j r* 



-^ 



EMPIRE BRASS MFG. CO.. LTD. 

London Hamilton Toronto Sudbury 

Winnipeg Vancouver 

240 

1 • TTT - nr ?i g" •" '"* ~ — " * v "-' ** * -"* 



h i i; ^v- 



I 



* ■ 



■_ -'•' ^ 



»* 



* 



THE EXPRESS HERALD, NKWMAKKET, ONT^ THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1940 1940 



:**■*.* 






;-.r 



' - 






* 



'. ^ 



■ . 



SEVEW 



WHEN IN TORONTO 



Eat at 



The 
Biltmore 



Opposite Simpson's 




KETTLEBY 



Harvest Thanksgiving: services 
will be held at Christ Church on 
Sunday, October 13, al 11 a.m. 
and 7.30 p.m. The services will 
be in charge of the Rector, Rev. 
F. V. AbboU. The preacher a( 
the morning service will be the 
Rev. Professor F. \V. DillLstone, 
M.A., and in the evening the' Rev. 
Professor F. D. Coggan. B.A. 
Uolh preachers are members of 
the staff of Wycliffc College, Tor- 
onto. A cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to all to attend. 

Mrs. R. Hughey was the week- 
end guest of her daughters, Mrs. 
11. Sibley and Mrs. R. Hunter of 
Toronto. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Wilson 
were guests of Mrs. El wood Bar- 
radell on Sunday. 

The W.A- and W.M.S. of the 
I'nitcd Church met on AVednes- 
day of this week at the home of 

Mrs. Roy Gecr. 
. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Curtis and 

Jean were visitors of Sir, and 

Mrs. Walter Cl.irkson on Sunday. 






rom uverseas 



i 



The Express-Herald advocated 
the Old Boys' Reunion of 1939. 
and hopes to advocate another 
such event in 1914. 



"Do you think the candidate 
put enough tire into his speech?" 

"Oh, yes. The trouble was, he 
didn't put enough of his speech 
in the fire." — Boy's Life, 



TMTTT 7~T~ 



. J. A. PERKS 

SHTR-GAIN FEED SERYICE 
Dealer for 

NEWMARKET DISTRICT 

HAY - STRAW - SALT - LIME 
Phone 657 Box 315 



Each week we are pleased to 
publish letters from our soldier 
boys overseas. If you have any 
overseas mail from the lads or 
relatives in England, would you 
kindly send them in. ♦ 

The following letters arc from 
Don Lyal, Art Brymer, Jack 
Harman and Jim and Ross 
"Blcncowc. • 

Somewhere on the Water, 

Sept. 3, 1940. 
Dear Mother and Family,— 

Well, folks, we arc well on our 
way, and expect to land to-mor 
row or Thursday. I hope you 
are all in the best of health. " 

How is 'Cuddles?" I hope she 
is a good girl and that John and 
Bruce arc good boys. 1 guess 
Ferg. is still working and grow- 
ing as much as ever. 

Well mom, how is dad doing? 

We have a nice time on the 
train, and the food was extra 
good, just like the Royal York. 

We are on "D" deck on the 
boat, and four of us in a cabin a 
good size. We have hoi and cold 
water. The beds arc real good, 
and we sleep all day and night. 
We have one hour of drill and 
life-boat drill every day. Some 
of our boys from "R" Coy. were 
taken off the boat the. day we left 
as one or two of them had scarlet 
fever, and I guess the twenty or 
so of them are pretty vexed. 

AVe left dock on Tuesday, Aug. 
27, at 2 p.m. They gave us all a 
L'l, 50 cigarettes, a chocolate bar 

and a package of gum, so thai is 

pret'y w*4 The cigs. were from 
the Y.M.C.A. The money out of 
our pay, of course. We got SI.10 
for our £. I invested ttvne in 
cigarettes as they cost 30c for 50 
on the boat, and sky high over- 
seas. Cigarettes worth 3d on 
boat cost about 6d on land over- 
seas, so I think a did right. 

American cigarettes cost 15c 
for 20, so they are cheaper here 
on boat than in Canada, but very 
dear overseas. 1 wasn't sea-sick 
on the trip, but I had a tooth out 
last week and feel O.K. now. I 
have two more to come out when 
I land. The water has been like 
a small pond all the way across, 
but its kind of rough and very 
foggy today. We had six troop 
ships, one battleship, two de- 
stroyers all the way from Can- 
ada, but today we met a convoy 
from Britain and there are five or 
six more, but can't see them for 
fog. 

Well, I guess that's all the news 






1941 GENERAL ELECTRIC BATTERY RADIO 



O Four Tube Circuit 

O Walnut Plastic Cabinet 

O Low Upkeep Cost 

G Compact Table Model 



ONLY 





Complete with Batteries 




WART 








RADIO SERVICE 



113 Main St. 



Phone 355, 



i 

Royal Albert 
Finest English Bone 






! 



SEVERAL OPEN STOCK PATTERNS 

TO CHOOSE FROM 

SALE OF LENDING LIBRARY DIS- 
CARDS 25c EACH, COMMENCING 
MONDAY. 




ter<g 



Phone 417 Newmarket 



DR© 





nan 



And Look Over Our 




UIT and 




ALL 





amples 



SEE THEM TODAY I 



Agents foe 
BOLTER BROS. WHITE tf SONS 

"BETTER MADE CLOTHES" CLEANERS AND DYERS 



c. 



WILLI 




* I 



Tailoring and Men's Wear 



Phono 160, 



49 Moh^t, 



for now. 1*11 write* 05 soon after 
we land as I ean. Tell "Cud" to 
be good till I get home, and I'll 
send her a souvenir when I get 
on land. 

Your loving son, 

Don. 



\ 
Lenther Head, Eng., 

Sept. 11, 1940. 

Dear Sister Hilda,— 

It gives me great pleasure in 
answering your most kind and 
appreciated letter that I received 
to-day. Glad that you are all 
well, as this letter leaves me the 
same. 

I am glad that you received the 
cards that Reg. and 1 sent you, 
and thai you like them. I hope 
you do not think that I have for- 
gotten you, for I have not, for I 
always think of you all at home 
and wish that I was home with 
you all. 

We are having Very cool wea- 
ther in the day time, and it gets 
cold at night, for I am writing 
you this letter with my overcoat 
on, for I am on night duty tikis 
week, and we are still in the 
open and sleep in tents yet., 

-Welti how to give you a little 
hint of what it is like over here 
while 1 am writing you, the Ack* 
Ack guns are firing, and the 
planes are overhead, but IVey do 
not worry me any, ami don't yon, 
for I am alright, and 1 know you 

are. 

1 have hod a good time lately, 
as you can see by mother's let- 
ters, for 1 have been out to tea a 

lot lately. 

^ I am glad that you had a good 
time when you were up at Bob's 
and Jennie's with mother and 
dad/ Well Haw, I received a 
letter from Libbie and Norm., 
and they were all fine at the time 
of writing. 

. Well sis, old dear, I think you 
are a good girl to take the money 
you earned and bought your 
shoes with it instead of spending 
it foolishly. You tell Alary and 
Grace that 1 hope they get a job 
at Dixon's, or one some place 
else. 

Well sis, I will have to bring 
my letter to a close, for 1 want to 
write to mother, and leave some 
news for her. So 1 will say so 
long for now. Oh, yes, you are 
the fourth handsome Harman of 
the girls. 

From your ever loving brother. 

Jack. 
The second handsome Harman. 



V 



54 Lincoln St., 
Kingsthorpe, Northampton, 

Sept. 12, 1910. 
Dear Mrs. Harman. — 

Thank you so much for your 
'.kind letter to me, I was more 
J than pleased to hear from you. 
Reg. and Jack have told me so 
much about you and the family. 
They came on leave in July, for 
seven days, and 1 am sure they 
enjoyed themselves. I used to let 
them sleep as long as they liked 
in the mornings, and they really 
enjoyed the food. 1 did my best 
for them and gave them a good 
wash-up with the socks, etc. 

Reg. used to make me laugh 
when he told me how he washed 
his shirt. They were good boys 
Mrs. Harman ,and behaved them- 
selves well. They sure are two 
sons to be proud of. I haven't 
heard from them since they went 
back, but they were expected to 
be moved, so perhaps that is 
why. 

1 should like to send my kind 
regards to Mrs. K. Harman and 
mamy, hoping they are both well. 
Reg. showed me all the snaps of 
you and the family, and the baby 
looks a fine little fellow. 

I do wish this wicked war 
would end. We are just begin- 
ning to realize here there is a 
war on. We get the' German 
planes over here, and the sirens 
go, and we have to get up some- 
times from 12 o'clock until 3 in 
the morning; and go in the air- 
raid shelter, which we have in 
the garden. 1 have to wrap the 
children in blankets. We have 
no time to dress. Bombs have 
been dropped quite near, we hear 
them quite plain. 

They are building air raid shel- 
ters in the streets now. 1 am 
sure it makes you dread the 
winter coming. 

Well, Mrs. Harman, you will 
see I have enclosed two snaps of 
your boys, which I took in the 
garden the day they were going 
back to camp. I think they are 
very good, so now I will close 
my letter, hoping that God will 
spare your boys and bring them 
safe home to you, and give you 
health and strength to welcome 
them, so good-bye for now. 1 
should like to hear again from 
you soon. 

Your sincerely, 

Mrs. Britten. 



Somewhere in Iceland, 

Sept. 3, 1940. 
Dear Mother: 

Was real glad to hear from you 
so soon again. The mail just 
came in about five minutes ago, 
the second in two weeks. 

It was real nice of you to think 
of Phil, and I expect a parcel 
would be greatly appreciated by 
him. He has been temporarily 
placed in Brigade H.Q., but his 
address is the same as mine, ex- 
cept for his number, which is 
B67055. 

Everything is coming along 
fine up here, and there is abso- 
lutely no cause whatsoever to 
worry. As yet, we are sleeping 
in tents, but expect to be moved 
into huts anytime now. 

Yesterday (Sunday) we had a 
parade to commemorate the first 
anniversary of the Royal Regt. 
on active service. There was a 
speech by Major Jones, the sec- 
ond in command, and he spoke 
for the colonel, who Is in the 
hospital. 

Helen must be getting to be a 
pretty good driver (not that she 
was otherwise) by now. She 
certainly is getting plenty of 
practice, driving up to Sudbury 
and everything. 

By the way, tell Winnie I am 
sorry for not writing, but will 
write sometime this week. We 




Major-General II. D. Crerar, 
Chief of the General Staff. 



THE WORLDS LOWEST 

PRICED SALESMAN 



Canada's lowest priced 
Salesman, NEWSPAPER AD- 
VERTISING, interviews more 
people, creates more good- 
will than a dozen men work- 
ing full time, with never a 
door slammed in the face. 

NEWSPAPER ADVERTIS- 
ING talks to people in the 
comfort of their own homes, 
when they are most receutive 
to a selling message. 

NEWSPAPER ADVERTIS- 
ING shouts aloud to the 
world, through a voice that 
people respect and believe in, 
that you have goods you are- 
proud to be able to offer. 

NEWSPAPER ADVERTIS- 
ING is the cheapest and most 
effective salesman obtainable. 
11 SE NEWSPAPER ADVER- 
TISING _-= CANADA'S 

CHEAPEST SALESMAN! 
It Pays to Advertise. 



are kept fairly busy and haven't 
a greai deal ox time to ourselves. 
Please give her my love and tell 
her not to do anything I wouldn't 
do (which isn't vfcry much up 
here). t 

Hoping you and the folks are 
well, with love, 

Your son. 

Art. 
P.S.— Please excuse the pencil 
and the- scribbling. Am writing 
this by the light of a little coal- 
oil lamp 1 bought in oue of the 
towns near here, and on my 
pillow. Give my best to grand- 
pa and tell him that 1*11 keep 
that date Jo go fishing with him 
next summer. 



Somewhere in England, 

Sept. 10, 1940. 
Dear Mother and Dad, — 

Just thought 1 would write and 
let you know we are line. We 
just got back from our five-day 
landing leave, and we had a 
wonderful time. Our cousins 
were very glad to see us, and 
treated us wonderful. 

In Kanbery a lot of the people 
had never seen a Canadian, and 
most of them had never seen any 
Scotch Canadian, as they* call us. 
One of our cousins works for the 
two old maids who own and run 
the Brown Cake Shop, where the 
famous Hanbery cakes come 
from, so when they heard we 
were from Canada, they asked us 
to come and see the place. 

It's an old, old place, built in 
the year 1G38. They showed us 
the old fireplace and ovens, and 
told us all the history. Our cous- 
ins live in villages just outside of 
Banbery, and one is the oldest 
and quaintest place you ever saw. 

We have a few thatched -roofs 
in England, but over half the 
houses are like that in this vil- 
lage. It has a very old church, 
but in the other village, there 
is a church built in the year 
1300. So you can see that it was 
a very interesting place, besides 
the people being so nice. All 
the people were nice to its down 
there. 

The streets and highways are 
all so narrow, and they never 
run straight. 

This is about all the news that 
1 can think of now. So long, 

Jim and Ross Blencowe. 



HOPE 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Micks, Mr. 
Elwin and Misss Violet Micks 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
E. Gibson. 

Mrs. M. TaiLsley has returned 
to her home after visiting rela- 
tives in Newmarket. 

Master Lowell Pegg had the 
misfortune to fall off {he fence 
at school and break his wrist A 
speedy recovery Ls hoped for. 

The Hope Hobby Club joined 
the Women's Institute on Wed- 
nesday at the home of Mrs. J. L. 
Smith, Queensville. A splendid 
meeting is reported. 

Mrs. Win. Church has returned 
from Graven hurst to her daugh- 
ter's, Mrs. Glen Micks. 

Mrs. Norman Routley and chil- 
dren from Gravenhurst have 
been holidaying at her sistor's, 
Mrs. Glen Micks. 

The church services will be 
held as usual on Sunday. Church 
9.45. ' Sunday school 10.45. 
Everyone Is welcome at both 
services. 



Man — The bank has returned 
that cheek. 

Wife — Isn't that splendid. 
What shall we buy with Jt this 
time? — Life Aetnaizer. 



Mess Cook — Did you say you 
wanted those eggs turned over? 

Hard-bitten Gob— Yeah, to the 
Museum of Natural History. — 
Virginia Mountaineer. 



Temperature at the lighted 
end of a cigarette has been mea- 
sured by sensitive instruments- 
it turns out to be 1,375 degrees 
Fahrenheit. 



JUDGMENT RESERV- 
ED ON LIQUOR 
CHARGE 






(Continued from Page 1, Col. 7) 
i This case was remanded to 
October 8th for judgment. 

Clarence Scdore of Keswick, 
pleaded guilty to a charge of 
failing to register motor vehicle 
and not guilty to a charge ot 
careless driving. 

4, On Sunday, September 15th f 
at 2 a.m., in company with Con- 
stable Rye, I was at the | approach 
to the Richmond booth at Jer- 
sey," testified Constable Carl 
Morton. "The accused was across 
the road at Cameron's booth. 
This spot is well lighted and I 
had a clear view. I -observed a 
1927 Chevrolet parked on the 
west side of the highway. Clar- 
ence Scdore got in the car, also 
Ross Curtiss and two ladies. One 
of the ladies sat between Scdore 
and CurtLss and the other on 
Curtiss 1 lap. We intended to fol- 
low this car. Scdore backed out 
and started to drive south. He 
just went a few feet when he 
crashed into a car driven by 
Clark Grieve of Agincourt, who 
was on his own side of the road 
going north. Sedore lost control 
of the car and sideswiped Grieve's 
car, badly damaging it. Sedore 
had been drinking." i 

"I was just going north to the 
Cottage, had crossed the bridge 
and Sedore came right over, tak- 
ing the front fender and running 
board oil. and damaging the 
door," stated Clark Grieve. "1 was 
on my right hand side of the 
road." I 

l on-stable Rye corroborated 

Constable Morton's evidence, but 

stated that the accident took 
place on the north side of tin: 
bridge. ' _ I 

"I started on my own side of 
the road and saw ibis car com- 
ing/* said accused. "His lights 
were so bright 1 eoulclu't see 
where 1 was going. It was rain- 
ing and these two girls asked us 
for a ride home, otherwise 1 
wouldn't have taken theni." 

This case was adjourned a 
week in order for accused to 
bring another witness in. 

A charge of assault i against 
Mrs. Lucy Carlisle of the Town- 
ship of Whitchurch, was! dismis- 
sed. The 'evidence in this case 
was heard two weeks ago. This 
week Jean Cruickshank ] of Oak 
Ridges, came forward and gave 
a voluntary statement. 

"Mrs. Rich was not hit at all," 
she slated, ''The evidence 1 gave 
two weeks ago was not true. Sirs. 
Rich told me to say t h a 1 Mrs. 
Carlisle hit her. I did' it to save 
her. Mrs. Rich rubbed her shoul- 
der to make the marks. Its been 
worrying me ever since. Mrs. 
Carlisle just pointed her linger 
at Mrs. Rieh. 1 went down yester- 
day and told Mrs. Carlisle what 
1 was doing." | 

"1 ean tell you why Jean 
changed her story," said Mrs. 
Rich. "She got mad at me. a week 
ago Saturday night because my 
husband and I. wouldn't allow her 
to go around with a married 
man. Her mother is dead' and 1 
tried to look after her. I told her 
the Children's Aid would get 
after her if she didn't watch her 
step." I 

"So you have been trying to 
look after her?" asked the Crown. 

"Yes," replied Mrs. Rich. 

"Have you been giving her li- 
quor?" 

"No." 

"Did 



At i Wr 



t ^ - ■ 



-m. * > 



..•- ^ 



.1 






^C-KA-AL- 




'►** 





„Xi 







£ess than*l a iveek 

P No finer Ure is made today thaa the 
new Grip-Safe, Silent Tread Ada*. Un- 
surpassed for safe, non-ikid miliagi. 
Fully guaranteed by the world'* leading 
oi^ company and by us. Every type, for 
passenecr cars, trucks, and buses. Re- 
place those old tires now and take thru 
months to pay. Lowest prices . . . easiest 
credit . . . quickest service. 




Allowance On 
Old Tires 




ACKROYD'S IMPERIAL 

SERVICE STATION 

2 Huron St. Phone 44S 



{ 



* %lo44tesU Beauty *JJte Jio+ne J 



CHOICE 




make her take li- 



o your 



you 
quor" 

"No." 

"Do you give liquor 
little, boy?" 

"No, ts'.oy all had liquor that | 
afternoon." i 

"I am not satisfied in this case 
that an assault did take ylaee," 
ruled His Worship. "I am going 
to dismiss the charge." 

T. II. Mitchell of ltitigwood, 
charged by Constable Ferguson 
with attempting to pass, was 
fined $5 and costs. 

The oflicer testified that accus- 
ed was passing a truck just be- 
fore he reached the brow of a 
hill and he had to apply his 
brakes and pull over to the 
shoulder of the road to avoid 
being hit. There is a solid white 
line down the centre of the road. 

"1 was called to the side of the 
road by this courteous young 
man, and I think my trouble was 
that I was too slow in pulling in," 
admitted accused. "1 never pass 
cars on a hill. I really passed on 
the level." 

C. Gary MeKenna of Toronto, 
pleaded guilty to a charge of 
careless driving and was! filled $5 
and costs. ( 

"On August I7th, at 3.45 p.m., 
in the Township of East Gwillim- 
bury, I observed a car driven by 
MeKenna," testified Constable 
Ferguson. "I followed lit for a 
mile at 60 miles an hour, cutting 
in and out of traffic on several 
occasions and going on the 
shoulder of the road. When I 
stopped him he gave an explana- 
tion that his wife was seriously 
ill up north. He had been drink- 
ing and I wouldn't let Kim go 
any farther until he had some 
coffee. 1 phoned and found out 
that his explanation was correct. 
1 was satisfied that he was alright 
and let him go on. His nerves 
were in bad condition." 

"I had a drink before I got th« 
phone call about my wife," ad- 
mitted accused. j 

Henry Woodley of Toronto, 
charged with failing to remain 
at the scene of an accident, driv- 
ing while intoxicated, and dan- 
gerous driving, was remanded 
until next week. Bail was set at 
$500. I 

Walter Nesbitt of Aurora, was 
rananded until next [week on 
charges of careless driving and 
dangerous driving. 

Charged with speeding by Con- 
stable McCallum, Wallington 
Trading Co., Toronto, paid $8 and 
costs, Robt. A. Hollenbeck of 
Toronto, $8 and costs. I 

Ruth Kawlins of | Toronto, 
charged with speeding by Con- 
stable Mount, was fined $8 and 
costs. • | 

A. E, Depalma of; Toronto, 
charged with speeding by Con- 
stable Sloss, was fined $12 and 
costs, 













hi:tti:k quality 
walkl;k 

OVERALLS 



$2.25 



' ^ 




a 



$2. 5 o 



TUB FAMOUS WALKER 
WORK PANTS 



BLUE 



•> •> 



W.' 



Agent for • 

CHESTER CLEANERS 




V 



- 



■ 



^ 




LIFF BNSL 





l'UONE 21)0 



MEN'S & BOYS* STOKE ; 

OPPOSITE POST OFFICE 



\ 



{ 





COAL and WOOD 



Si 



ELECTRIC HOT PLATES AND HEATERS 

Combination Screen and Storm Doors 

— ■ 

ROLL ROOFING 
Plastic Roof Cement, Liquid Roof Coating 

FIX THAT ROOF NOW! 






Stove Linings and Repairs for all makes 

of stoves. 



AT 



MA 



We Deliver 







HARDWAIt 




Phone 28 



Main St. 




¥i 



. DIRECT AND EFFICIENT 
- DAILY SERVICE 

. , . between 

Toronto - Newmarket - Sutton 






Phone Numbers: 

SUTTON 
NEWMARKET 
TORONTO • 






RA. 



200 

378 

8900 



DAY AND 
NIGHT 

Hours 

$ AJtf. 

6 P.M. 










'■ 



-f '■"*. 



• 



EIGHT 



THE EXFRESS-OERALD, NB W^f ARKET, ONT„ THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1940 1940 



I - 




ZOTIZ 



ADVERTISE YOUR WANTS HERE 
Small Ad. Rate— Fifteen words, 25c for one Insertion; two 
insertions 40c; three insertions 50c; lc per word addi- 
tional. Charged ads. 10c extra, - 



O 



FOR SALE 



FOR SALE— Sisman's better 
work shoes at Morrison's Men's 
Wear, Newmarket. 

~~FOR SALE— 100 acres west 
end of lot 35, 3rd of King, town- 
line west of Newmarket, two 
streams cross property, fair 
buildings, good bush. 70 acres 
workable. Apply box 19 Express- 
H erald. gw*Q 

FOR SALE— Clare Bros, pipe- 
less furnace, in good condition. 
Applv Dr. F. G. Pim, Keswick. 
Phone Roch e's Point 74. Iw40 

FOR SALE— Gladioli blooms. 
Choice spikes. Margaret Coyle, 
phone 561. W33 

FOR SALE— One building a- 
bout 20 ft. by 25 ft., 25 ft. high; 
one plank building 15 ft. by 24 
ft., in good condition; II pigs, 
eight weeks old; five pure-bred 
llolstein heifers. T.R. and blood- 
tested, eighteen months old, 
Applv E. F. Ramsay, Sharon. 

3wks39 



FOR RENT 



FOR RENT— Garage at 38 
Millard Avenue. 3w39 



FOR RENT— Six-roomed brick 
house at 19 Timothy street west, 
nil conveniences, garage, immed- 
iate possession. Apply box 2 
Express-Herald. Iwk40 

FARMS FOR RENT — Have 3 
i arms lor rent. 100 and 100, and 
170 acre places. E. A. "Boyd, Real 
Estate Agent, Newmarket. lwp. 

FOR RENT — Garage at 10 
IVArcy Street. Iwk. 



Klewspaper WeeJ^ 

By Golden Glow 



25 



FOR SALE— Hyacinth Bulbs; 
also Darwin Tulip Bulbs. L. P. 

Cane, 72 Huron Street. 2wp. 



FOR SALE or RENT— 9-room- 
ed brick house, hardwood floors, 
all modern conveniences. "Will 
rent partly furnished if desired. 
Ph one 180i 82 Prospect Ave, lwp. 

FOR SALE— 1 large range, 1 
dining-room table (extension), 1 
sewing machine (Raymond). 
40 Gorham St. 3wp38 



FARM FOR RENT— 100 acres; 
acres ploughed; house and 
barn, other buildings. Immediate 
possession. Apply Fred A. |$ows* 
w*r,; Newmarket. lwp. 



WANTED 



WANTED— Fresh eggs, pout- 
try and produce. Please mention 

prices expected. Don Walker. 
51 Runnymede, Swansea. 3wp40 



The editor tells me this is 
newspaper week! Naturally that 
makes my mind run back to the 
early days of my girlhood, for 
one of my earliest recollections 
is the weekly local papers. Yes, 
I say papers — plural, not singu- 
lar — for always so far as 1 know, 
we have had two local papers in 
our town. 

When I first heard of this 
paper it was called "The Reform- 
er," and if my memory does not 
play me false, it was run by an 
uncle of Prof. Arthur Oliver, Mr. 
Ratcliffe, a son of whom, Mr. 
Harry Ratcliffe, lives in Toronto 
at the present time. H 

How I recall this so vividly is 
because Miss Oliver and Miss 
.Marjory Ratcliffe used to sing 
duets at local concerts, and By- 
ron Oliver played the accomp- 
animent, They were gifted 
artists, as is Prof. F. Arthur 
Oliver, who is attached to the 
Toronto Conservatory of Music 
in Toronto, and were always in 
demand, and when it was a 
question of music. 



The 
was in 
perial 
corner 
with a 



Reformer's headquarters 
the west end of the Im- 
bank building, on the 
of Main and Botsford, 

door going in from the 
entryway that leads up a stair- 
way (and well we all knew it) 
(o the "dental parlour," and to 
Lawyer Widdifield's office. The 
door was on the west side, just 
before you mounted the stairs, 
but I never recall having been in 
there. 
Then Mr. Herb Binns bought 

An Old Friend 





PUBLIC NOTICE 



EAST GWILLIMBURY VOTERS' 

LIST 



Voters' List. 11)40, .Municipality of 

East Gwillimbuiy, County 

of York. 



WANTED— Girl for general 
housework. Apply box 11 Ex- 
press-Herald. lwklO 



FOR SALE — Two Cocker span- 
iel puppies. Pedigreed stock. 
Basil Watson, Valclose Kennels 
(opposite cemetery), Newmar- 
ket phone 672. 

SALE REGISTER 



Wednesday, October 9th— Auc- 
tion sale of real estate, farm 
stock and implements, the prop- 
erty of Marjorie Sheridan and 
the Public Trustee, Part Lot 32, 
Con. 4, Township of Whitchurch. 
Real estate subject to a reserve 
bid. Sale at 2 p.m. Terms, real 
estate, 10 £ cash and balance in 
thirty days. Chattels and live- 
stock cash. F. X. Smith, Auction- 
eer. Public Trustee, Osgoode Hall. 

2w. 



WANTED— Iron 

state price. Box 
Herald. 



tea kettle, 

17 Express- 

lwk40 



WANTED— Experienced maid, 
good wages. Apply Box 8, Ex- 
press-Herald. Iwk. 

HELP WANTED — Applica- 
tions wanted by Trinity United 
Chinch for a reliable nun (o take 
charge of the heating plant, to 
keep entire building clean, lawns 
and walks in good shape, and do 
minor repairs. Services to be 
available day or evening when 
needed. Apply in writing, stating 
salary expected, to L. P. Cane, 
Newmarket. Iwk. 



Notice is hereby given that I 
have complied with section eight 
of the Voters' Lists Act and that 
I have posted up in my office at 
t}ueensville on the 27th day of 
September, 1940, the list of all 
persons entitled to vote in the 
said Municipality at municipal 
elections, and that such list re- 
gains there for inspection. 

And I hereby call upon all vo- 
ters to take immediate proceed- 
ings to have any errors or omis- 
sions corrected according to law, 
the last day of appeal being the 
18th day of October, 1940. 
J. L. SMITH. 
Clerk of East Gwillimbury 

Township. 2wks. 



TENDERS 



MISCELLANEOUS 



Tuesday, October 8 — Auction 
Sale of farm stock, implements, 
hay, grain, etc., the property be- 
longing to Gcocge King, Lot 19, 
in the rear of Con. 4, East Gwil- 
limbury, Z\\ miles east of 
Queensville. No reserve as owner 
is giving up farming. Sale at 12 
o'clock, D.S.T. Terms cash. F. N. 
Smith, Auctioneer. Richard Mount 
Clerk. lw. 

Why not subscribe to The 
Express-Herald — it costs but 4c 
a week. 



EXTERMINATORS 

BEDBUGS, Cockroaches exter- 
minated utterly; with out danger, 
vacating or publicity; rooms im- 
mediately usable; moderate cost; 
iron-clad guarantee. Satisfied 
customers our success. Write or 
telephone evenings at our ex- 
pense. Hudson 8948. Goodwill 



Tenders will be received to 
furnish foundation, move house, 
and set on above foundation. The 
lowest or any tender not neces- 
sarily accepted. Tenders close 
October 7th at 5.30 p.m. For fur- 
ther particulars phone 519, A. V. 
Higginson, Newmarket. Tenders 
io be addressed to A. V. Higgin- 
son. Box 333, Newmarket. 



Notice to Creditors 



A 1 1 persons having claims 
against the estate of Flora Craw- 
products, 127 Belsize Dr., Tor- « ford, late of the Township of 



onto. 



NOTICE 

Cars washed 50c; simonized 
$2.50 and S3. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. Phone 205. 

DOG OWNfcKS 
Dogs boarded by day, week or 
month. Also clipping, washing. 
Basil Watson, Valclose Kennels, 
(opposite cemetery), Newmarket 
Phone G72. Iwp27 



North Gwillimbury, in the County 
of York, Spinster, who died on 
the 28th day of August, 1940, are 
required to file particulars of 
same with the Executor, Charles 
Priugle, Baldwin, Out., on or 
before the first day of Nov., 1940, 
after which date the Estate will 
be distributed without regard to 
any claim not filed. 

Dated at Sutton this 1st day of 
October, A.D. 1940. 

CROZIER & CROZIER, 

Sutton West, Out., 

Solicitors for the Executor. 




PROMPT 
DELIVERY 





PHONE 
32 



THUR 



FRh 



1 j* 



*._ — 



PASTRY FLOUR 
24 lb. bag 63c 

DAIIiY CREAM 

SODAS 
2 lb. box- 25c 

CROSSE & BLACKWKI.LAS 

KETCHUP 



.i roe 



boil I 



ANDY CLARKE 









SAVE 

LABOR 



SAVE 

TIME 



SAVE 

HEALTH 



SAVE 

CLOTHES 



AND 



SAVE 

MONEY 






* 




I 



heard each Sunday morning at 
10 a.m. in "Neighbourly News/' 
gathered from the weekly press. 
These broadcasts are presented 
in co-operation with the Canad- 
ian Weekly Newspaper Associa- 
tion. > 

it and carried on in the same 
premises. It was Sir, Binns who 
changed the name to the Express- 
Herald, and he kept the paper 
up to a high standard until he 
in his turn, sold out to carry on 
in the same line down in Mon- 
treal, until, his death a few years 

a?o- > - . 

Then Mr. J- D. McKay bought 
it and moved it over to Main 
street, or I think it was Mr. 
McKay. That was during my 
school days >and we take every- 
thing for "ranted in those happy 
carefree . days! He was part of 
Main Street ,and we accepted 
him as such! He had been the 
science master at high school, but 
evidently preferred journalism, 
and 1 understand he made a 
great success of his paper. In 
r.;ct, 1 believe it was under him 
that the two local papers be- 
came partisan — one Liberal, aiid 
the other Conservative. I do not 
mean that the .Era had not al- 
ways been Liberal — indeed it 
always had, but 1 do not think 
the other paper was extreme for 
the other side, till then, when 
Mr. McKay came out strong for) 
Colonel Lennox. 

Extreme party politics seems 
to be a thing of the past, so far 
as our two local weeklies arc 
concerned — and we have what 
Mr.- Andy Clark calls "Neighbor- 
ly news." We all listen to him 
every Sunday morning at 10 
o'clock over CBL, and arc as 
pleased as a little puppy-dog with 
a nosegay tied to its tail if he 
mentions either our Express- 
Herald or our Era, or maybe both 
in his broadcast. If by some 
queer chance he should read this 
he may think I don't know much 
about my subject — and Til have 
to confess I do not. 

It is as I said before, we just 
take certain things for granted,, 
and never stop to consider their 
origin. But the weekly papers 
have always been a part of my 
life, since I can remember. Why, 
before I went to school, I can re- 
member going with other girls 
to the Era office on Thursdays, 
around four o'clock, to get the 
paper, fresh off the press, so the 
homefolk shouldn't have to wait 
till it came through the mail that 
evening, or next morning, if the 
postmaster hadn't time* to put 
them in the boxes. 

And that recalls Mr. Erastus 
Jackson, who founded the Era, 
father of the late Mr. L. C», Jack- 
son, who served the town so 
faithfully for a great many 
years, and from whom the pres- 
ent otynei*, Mr. Andrew Hebb, 
took over. 1 have heard it said 
that Mr. Erastus Jackson began 
his paper in that building at the 
north end, across from the resi- 
dence of the late Miss Josephine 
Sykes, on 



OLD YORK 

CEREAL 
;c pkg. . 

Fittest Grade 

CREAMERY BUTTER 

28c 

FREE! 



LARGE EGGS 

30c | 

Fi. :-!ili- MilK-'t 

ROLLED OATS 

5 lbs. 



No. 



PURE 
5 P.iil 



^fc 



HONEY 
Ench 



',Vl*^ .-.-•** '" 



DRY GOODS 



Large 



70 



ftette 
BLANKETS 
8-1 Pair $259 



.. 



Pyi- 



j* 



Dessert Dish and 



pkgs. MINUTE TAPIOCA 

^~. SUN-ERA 

PUFFED WHEAT 

* m 

18 oz. bag | 5c 

Grade A 

PULLET EGGS 
Dozen 24c 

DURHAM 

CORN STARCH 
pound pkg. | Qc 

FREE! 

Kxtra larue 10c Cake 



PALMOLIVE SOAP 

with large pkg. 



SUPER SUDS 



21c 



ALADDIN 4-ply 

WOOL 

ounce ball 

1 ! 

FRILLED CURTAINS 

llotxu Red and Gic-vn trim, 
and all Ivory 

Pair SI 29 

Heavy FLANNELETTE 
yard wide per yd. 23c 

Fall weight 

BLOOMERS 

medium ar.u Uirgc- sizes 

35c 

WINDOW BLINDS 

Hood ivilk-rs 

Eacb 69c 



TO-DAY! 



SHOE DEPT. 

I 

MEN- -Buy your heavy 5-eyelet 

LACED RUBBERS 

Early Season Price 



P; 



l 



air 



SI 49 




me 



no doubt! 
"Neighborly News*' well de- 
scribes our weekly papers, and 
for all people pretend they are 
not interested in what others are 
doing, they took for items in our 
local papers, j look for the little 
articles about • church activities, 
and lodges and societies of one 
kind or another. Look to see 
who is engaged, or horn, or mar- 
ried — yes/ and who has been 
called away by death from our 
midst, and are disappointed if 
there is liot st little write-up of 
the life of the deceased in the 
same isssue, or in the next week. 

The town council is a subject 
of never-failing interest, as wc 
all know, | but just now the chief 
interest lies in our military camp 
and the complete transformation 
of our dear old fair grounds. 

The new — the fair grounds — 
and the old time North Vnrk 
Agricultural Fair! In the .old 
days when we used to have thvee 
days of ii. How eagerly every- 
one watched for the local pari-Vrs 
to see the prize winners, watched 
for dates of other fall fairs. Any- 
one who likes to recall old times 
can do so by reading a few it*; jus 
culled from the files "Fifty YoV-s 
Ago," "Twenty-live Years A||» f " 
"Thirty Years Ago," "Th ,ee 
Hundred and Sixty-live I)j ys 
Ago." Old-timers certainly s{an 
that column for familiar nanus. 

Both the Era and the F\*pre|>s- 
ilerald have changed hands sev- 
eral times since their inception, 
and they grow more interesting 
year by year. Can't you jtist 
fancy our soldier boys overseas 
devouring them — reading every 
the southwest corner (last word on every page? It! 'Is 



STRONG AS 
vfcM*E $T PART 




rilOXK 14 



UG STORE 

.MAIN ST. NEWMARKET 



GYRATOR 
MODEL 




On Both Gyrator 
and Vacuum Cup 

Models 







Of Main and Ontario Streets, In 
the early, early days of our town, 
but my first recollection of the 
Era office is the spot where II 
now stands, and as I said before, 
going there on a Thursday after- 
noon to get the paper, limp and 
warm off the press. 

Mr. Erastus Jackson, who ran 
the office at the front, used to 
take us in to watch them print- 
ing the paper, and it had a fear- 
ful fascination for me; the clatter 
and the noise nearly deafened 
you, and it always seemed half 
dark there. (I suppose it was 
getting dusk about four o'clock), 
and there we stood, a frightened, 
fascinated line of little folks 
holding each other's hands, 
waiting for our papers. Mr. 
Jackson would go over to the 
huge monster that waved and 
threshed its arms back and forth, 
taking the paper off the rollers, 
where the late Mr. George Muir 
stood calmly removing them, and 
passing them back to another 
man who folded them. They all , 
smiled reassuringly at us, but we 
were too terrified to go near it. 

It was in the same way we 
used to love to stand in the door 
of the blacksmith shops, Mr. 
Manning's, Mrs. Fierhcller\s and 
Mr. Dolan's, and watch them at 
work, but we never dared ven- 
ture past the open door. But 
queer to relate, I loved the smell 
of printer's ink, and I do yet! 



r 



)t 



(he next best thing to gctti.tg 
letters from your home folk! V }s, 
I know, for I've done the sai ie 
thing — read every word, a id 
gone back and read it all again! 
Our local papers mean such a lit 
to us. We realize Just how mu |h 
they do mean in our lives wh'-jn 
we are a way,, even if, as I w 
only on holidays. 

I remember hearing tfic ole 
ones in the family discuss cdt'i- 
tri billions sent in by someone 
who called himself 'Old Know 
All," and one who signed hiii- 
self 'The Owl," both writers }fa 
the Era years ago, and many, a 
good laugh they used to raije, 
but I haven't the slightest Idj a 
who they were, nor what th 
wrote about, but children rec; 
things that used to amuse the 
families, you know. 

The editorials are eagerly re. 
by everybody — and we all lo< 
for the local news, shivered ov 
the many accidents, read wi 
pleasure, and ofter amusemei 
the soldiers' letters, as we iHJs 
their life, reading between tl;p 
lines. We simply can't imagine 
life without our town weeklies; 
the daily Toronto paper of coursft 
is a part of our daily life, but ft 
hasn't the same kind of endeaji- 
ing hold our local papers hav):. 
|, 

The Express-Herald sponsored 




-V * 



V 

T 

rr 



h 

r 



NOW'STHE TIME TO SAVE 
UP TO 20% ON FEED COST ! 

The Ful-O-Pep plan of feeding with 1-3 whole v;\u 
and 1-31 scratch grains, and 1-3 Ful-O-Pep Egg Mash, 
containing concentrated spring range, mav savevou 
as much as 20</ on feeding for eggs!" * * ■■.-, 

LOOI^ AT THIS PEAK EGG PRICE CHART FOR THE ' 

LAST 4 YEARS* 

Vlf\R DATE PRICE 

1936 — 4th Weok of November — 4Sc per dozen 

1937 — 2nd Week of November — 45c per dozen 
1038 — 4th Week of November — j 46c per dozen 
1939 — 2nd Week of November — 45c per dozen 

'Reprinted from Dominion Department of 
Agriculture Bulletin. Aug. 16th, 1940 

THIS YEAR MAKE SURE YOU GET TOP PRICES, BETTER 

EGGS AND BIGGER PROFITS EARLIER AND STEADIER 

.1 ALL SEASON LONG BY FEEDING ..•[ 

Ful ~o -Pep Egg Mash 



the Soldiers' Comforts Fund 
which the boys overseas apprt" 
That was the part that fascinated date so much.